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Publications (10 of 58) Show all publications
Petersson, B. (2023). Citizens and the state in authoritarian regimes: comparing China and Russia [Review]. Eurasian geography and economics, 64(5), 661-663
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Citizens and the state in authoritarian regimes: comparing China and Russia
2023 (English)In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 661-663Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-46745 (URN)10.1080/15387216.2021.1993294 (DOI)000708752900001 ()
Available from: 2021-11-09 Created: 2021-11-09 Last updated: 2023-10-18Bibliographically approved
Blackburn, M., Hutcheson, D. S., Petersson, B. & Tsumarova, E. (2023). Covid-19 and the Russian Regional Response: Blame Diffusion and Attitudes to Pandemic Governance. Canadian Journal of European and Russian Studies, 16(1), 29-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Covid-19 and the Russian Regional Response: Blame Diffusion and Attitudes to Pandemic Governance
2023 (English)In: Canadian Journal of European and Russian Studies, ISSN 2562-8429, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 29-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As was the case with other federal states, Russia’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic was decentralized and devolved responsibility toregional governors. Contrary to the common highly centralized governance in Russia, this approach is thought to have helped insulate the government from criticism. Using local research and analysis based on a national representative survey carried out at the height of the pandemic during the summer of 2021, the article charts the public response to the pandemic across Russia. It examines the regionalization of the response, with an in-depth focus on two of the Russian cities with the highest infection rates but differing responses to the pandemic: St. Petersburg and Petrozavodsk. There are two main findings: at one level, the diffusion of responsibility meant little distinction was made between the different levels of government by the population; at another level, approval of the pandemic measures was tied strongly to trust levels in central and regional government.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ottawa: Centre for European Studies at Carleton University, 2023
Keywords
Russia; Covid-19; Regional politics
National Category
Public Administration Studies Political Science
Research subject
Global politics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-63995 (URN)10.22215/cjers.v16i1.3955 (DOI)
Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2023-12-22Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. (2023). En europeisk tragedie: Hvordan Vesten og Russland ble fiender – og kan finne sammen igjen [Review]. Nordisk Östforum, 37, 65-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>En europeisk tragedie: Hvordan Vesten og Russland ble fiender – og kan finne sammen igjen
2023 (Swedish)In: Nordisk Östforum, ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 37, p. 65-67Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2023
Keywords
Ryssland, Ukraina, krig, Väst
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Global politics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-63999 (URN)10.23865/noros.v37.5645 (DOI)
Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2024-05-23Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. (2023). Felslut och önsketänkanden: Om Rysslandsforskarna, Putin och utvecklingen fram till kriget. Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, 125(1), 25-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Felslut och önsketänkanden: Om Rysslandsforskarna, Putin och utvecklingen fram till kriget
2023 (Swedish)In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, Vol. 125, no 1, p. 25-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fallacies and wishful thinking: on Russia studies, Putin, and the lead-up to the warWhen President Putin over the years repeatedly raged and ranted about how Russia had been deceived by the West over NATO’s eastward expansion, how Ukraine’s rightful president allegedly had been illegally overthrown in a coup instigated by the West, and how these actions had the hidden purpose of bringing destruction and devastation to Russia, few were inclined to believe that he was not just repeat-ing a mantra, but actually believed in what he said and prescribed a program of action. This essay provides a background to the steady growth of the authoritar-ian essence of the Putin regime and its growing ambitions beyond Russia’s borders and discusses what academic area studies specialists in the West and other Russia pundits generally should have been able to foresee about Russia’s aggressiveness and its upcoming assault on Ukraine. Perhaps the current situation could have been avoided, had there been a greater inclination to bring together the clues that were there and take preventive action to meet the danger

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Fahlbeckska stiftelsen, 2023
Keywords
Ryssland; Rysslandsforskning; kriget mot Ukraina
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Global politics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-63997 (URN)
Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2024-05-23Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. (2023). Squaring the circle: Legitimizing the Putin regime after February 24, 2022 (1ed.). In: Taras, Raymond (Ed.), Exploring Russia’s Exceptionalism in International Politics: (pp. 53-65). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Squaring the circle: Legitimizing the Putin regime after February 24, 2022
2023 (English)In: Exploring Russia’s Exceptionalism in International Politics / [ed] Taras, Raymond, London: Routledge, 2023, 1, p. 53-65Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Vladimir Putin’s power position has long been sustained by the successful communication of major political myths and his acclaimed role in them. This chapter discusses such myths to assess whether they are still useful for the regime as tools of legitimation after Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, launched on February 24, 2022, and Russia’s lack of success on the battlefield thereafter. I introduce the distinction between overarching master myths and more supplementary myths, arguing that the master myths about Russia’s pre-determined great power status, Russia as a phoenix rising from the rubbles of another Time of Troubles, and Russia as a bulwark against the evil West retain their relevance and are ruthlessly exploited by the regime. Several supplementary myths have most likely had their credibility reduced. However, unless the master myths are affected, the regime is not likely to face a major loss of legitimacy among the population at large.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2023 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Contemporary Russia and Eastern Europe Series, ISSN 2835-592X, E-ISSN 2835-5911
Keywords
Russia, Putin, Ukraine, war, legitimation, master myths, supplementary myths
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Global politics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-64000 (URN)2-s2.0-85180043643 (Scopus ID)9781032610153 (ISBN)9781003462521 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-12-01 Created: 2023-12-01 Last updated: 2024-05-23Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. (2023). The politics of bad governance in contemporary Russia: by Vladimir Gel’man, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, University of Michigan Press, 2022 [Review]. Eurasian geography and economics, 1-3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The politics of bad governance in contemporary Russia: by Vladimir Gel’man, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, University of Michigan Press, 2022
2023 (English)In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, p. 1-3Article, book review (Other academic) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-58722 (URN)10.1080/15387216.2023.2181199 (DOI)000936168400001 ()
Available from: 2023-03-22 Created: 2023-03-22 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
Blackburn, M. & Petersson, B. (2022). Parade, plebiscite, pandemic: Legitimation efforts in Putin’s fourth term. Post-Soviet Affairs, 38(4), 293-311
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parade, plebiscite, pandemic: Legitimation efforts in Putin’s fourth term
2022 (English)In: Post-Soviet Affairs, ISSN 1060-586X, E-ISSN 1938-2855, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 293-311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Putin’s fourth term as president (2018–2024) has involved new challenges for Russia’s hybrid regime. COVID-19 hit the Kremlin at a sensitive time, when the old institutional forces had been demounted and new arrangements, including extensive constitutional changes, had yet to become cemented. There is an emerging gulf between state rhetoric, PR events, and patriotic performances, on the one hand, and economic chaos, social disorder and dysfunctional state capacity, on the other, which is likely to reduce system legitimacy and cause increased reliance on repressive methods. This article examines Kremlin legitimation efforts across Beetham’s three dimensions: rules, beliefs, and actions. We argue that the regime’s legitimation efforts in 2020–21 have failed to reverse emerging cleavages in public opinion since 2018. Increased reliance on repression and manipulation in this period, combined with the contrast between regime promises and observable realities on the ground, speak not of strength, but of the Kremlin’s increased weakness and embattlement

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
political legitimacy, authoritarian legitimation, Putin, COVID-19
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Global politics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-49128 (URN)10.1080/1060586x.2021.2020575 (DOI)000736029100001 ()2-s2.0-85121878335 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-04 Created: 2022-01-04 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. (2021). From high hopes to mundane reality: Swedish perspectives on post-Communist Europe 30 years on. In: Ostap Kushnir; Oleksandr Pankieiev (Ed.), Meandering in Transition: Thirty years of reform and identity in post-communist Europe (pp. 229-248). Lanham: Lexington Books
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From high hopes to mundane reality: Swedish perspectives on post-Communist Europe 30 years on
2021 (English)In: Meandering in Transition: Thirty years of reform and identity in post-communist Europe / [ed] Ostap Kushnir; Oleksandr Pankieiev, Lanham: Lexington Books, 2021, p. 229-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The objective of this chapter is to provide a Swedish perspective on the 30th anniversary of the fall of Communism in eastern Europe. The most evident contrast when comparing Sweden in 1990 and 2020, was that the country was now a committed, even if also somewhat disillusioned, member of the European Union. Little remained of the so-called policy of neutrality that had been so cherished during the times of the Cold War. The euphoria of the early 1990s, those brief years when everything seemed possible, was clearly gone. The years when Sweden had been a relentless champion promoting enlargements of the European Union as the standard recipe for ensuring peace and democracy in Europe had come and then waned considerably. The European Partnership had largely brought disappointing results. Whereas optimism about general developments used to be almost unbridled in official Sweden by the end of the Cold War, disillusionment seemed to reign ever since the mid-2010s, when moves toward illiberal democracy, populism and Russian violations of international law defined much of the order of the day in Europe. Grey and somber realities characterized for the most part the everyday, and it was left to the Swedish government to deal with this in its practical policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lanham: Lexington Books, 2021
Keywords
Sweden, post-communism, Eastern Europe, Russia, development, identity, perceptions
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Global politics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-45244 (URN)978-1-7936-5074-0 (ISBN)978-1-7936-5075-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-08-26 Created: 2021-08-26 Last updated: 2023-02-26Bibliographically approved
Berglund, C., Gotfredsen, K. B., Hudson, J. & Petersson, B. (Eds.). (2021). Language and Society in the Caucasus: Understanding the Past, Navigating the Present. Lund: Universus Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Language and Society in the Caucasus: Understanding the Past, Navigating the Present
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2021 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This book brings together a strong and international team of linguists, historians, and social and political scientists renowned for their expertise on North and South Caucasus. Their contributions paint a compelling picture of the region’s contested past and highlight some of the enduring challenges still confronting it. Taken together, the ten chapters of the book enhance our understanding of the region’s ancient languages, shed light on historical events of crucial significance, and uncover mechanisms behind political conflict and cooperation in the tinderbox that is the Caucasus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Universus Press, 2021. p. 248
Keywords
Caucasus, Languages, Societies
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Global politics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-42311 (URN)978-91-87439-67-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-05-25 Created: 2021-05-25 Last updated: 2023-07-04Bibliographically approved
Petersson, B. (2021). Review: Navalny: Putin's Nemesis, Russia's Future? by Dollbaum, Jan Matti, Lallouet, Morvan, Noble, Ben [Review]. Slavonic and East European Review, 99(4), 794-795
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Review: Navalny: Putin's Nemesis, Russia's Future? by Dollbaum, Jan Matti, Lallouet, Morvan, Noble, Ben
2021 (English)In: Slavonic and East European Review, ISSN 0037-6795, E-ISSN 2222-4327, Vol. 99, no 4, p. 794-795Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Modern Humanities Research Association, 2021
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-47854 (URN)10.1353/see.2021.0095 (DOI)000726757300034 ()
Available from: 2021-12-16 Created: 2021-12-16 Last updated: 2023-10-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
Legitimacy, Urban Planning and Sustainability in Russia and Sweden (LUPSRUSS); Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS)Legitimacy, urban planning and sustainability in Russia and Scandinavia (LUPSRUSS-2)Authoritarian Policy Transfer in Post-Soviet States [21-PR2-0020_OS]; Södertörn University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7289-6318

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