Malmö University Publications
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  • Public defence: 2024-05-23 13:00 NI:C0E11, Malmö
    Boothby, Hugo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Careful Convivial Listening: Making Sound Work Apparent as Political Action2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Focusing on the creation and performance of sound work this doctoral thesis considers the value of listening as a site of political action. The meaning of sound work is dual; connoting both an artifact that is created and performed, a work of art, and the processes of creating sound, the work of listening. Listening is integral to the creation and performance of sound work and is defined in this thesis as an aesthetic relation generated in the in-between of hearing subject, sound and sound technology. Drawing on the philosophy of Hannah Arendt I recognize a distinction between the objective world building of work, and the transformative potential of political action. Listening and the relational qualities that listening affords are integral to the processes through which sound work can transform to become apparent as political action. In my doctoral research I consider a diversity of sound work including popular music, sound art, podcasting and contemporary experimental music. Applying an experimental media research methodology, I interrogate sound work’s potential to be made apparent as political action using a repertoire of methods drawn from ethnography, artistic research and participatory design. In this research I find that sound work’s potential to become apparent as political action is informed by both the quality of attention tendered by hearing subjects and the material affordances of sound and sound technology. Being attentive to the agencies of both human subjects and non-human objects I posit that an orientation towards careful convivial listening in the creation and performance of sound work can succeed in making political action apparent. Reflecting on the contribution that this research makes within the field of media and communication studies I recognise that sound work, careful convivial listening and experimental media exist as tools that can be applied in future research to build new knowledge and instigate transformative change.

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    Figure 5 – Audio Content - s01 ep03 Teaching Home – Samordningsnummer – 05m 43s
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    Figure 8 – Audio Content – Music for Universities full length version 47m 35s
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    Figure 10 – Audio Content – Listening with Elephant Ears recording Element Studios Gothenburg 05-10-2021 06m 58s
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    Figure 16 – Audio Content – Music for Universities short extract included with article 03m 27s
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    FIGURE 1 - Audio Content Paper IV - Listening with Elephant Ears 06m 58s Additional vocal performance by Zofia Åsenlöf Recorded live at Lund Contemporary Music Festival October 2021
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    FIGURE 2 - Audio Content Paper IV - Found Sound Journey 0m 30s
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    FIGURE 3 - Audio Content Paper IV - Listening with Elephant Ears - 01m 23s Extract from isolated Zoom recording from workshop 3
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    FIGURE 4 - Audio Content Paper IV - Pre-recorded tape content mixed by Gusten Aldenklint 06m 52s
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    FIGURE 5 - Audio Content Paper IV - Listening with Elephant Ears 06m 58s Additional vocal performance by Zofia Åsenlöf recording by Linus Andersson
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  • Public defence: 2024-05-23 13:15 OR:D138, Malmö
    Sebelius, Sofia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Idrottsläraryrkets strävan efter mål och status2024Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish school system has undergone a significant change and development during the last 180 years. The Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) has made its own development journey, from training gymnastics directors with a particular focus on floor gymnastics and fencing, to becoming a university education with its foundation in sports science.

    Despite the significant changes in the school's governance and the development of PETE, the same development does not seem to have taken place for the professional practice of Physical Education (PE) teachers. The PE teachers seem to have difficulties formulating what the knowledge objective of the PE subject is. There also seem to be difficulties in formulating how learning in the PE subject should take place. A certain reproduction of traditional values takes place, and the PE teaching profession is described and experienced as marginalised. 

    Based on this, the dissertation's aim is to create an understanding of the PE teachers’ pursuit of purpose and status and what that pursuit entails. To achieve this aim, two studies have been conducted. Based on the perspective that PE teachers function as street-level bureaucrats, the first study aims to understand what governs their professional practice and how they manage it. The aim of the second study is to understand which continuities exist in the language used about the PE teaching profession and what it means for the professional claims of the PE teaching profession.

    By analysing the language within and about the PE teacher profession, the dissertation creates an understanding of PE teachers' pursuit of purpose and status and what that pursuit entails. The thesis shows that PE teachers in their professional practice are Problem Solvers, Comfort Creators and Organisers. It further identifies continuities in the language about the PE teacher profession gathered within the themes of Strength, Liveliness and Status. Finally, the dissertation describes how the PE teacher profession uses social closure in its professional claim.

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  • Public defence: 2024-05-24 10:15 NI:C0E11, Malmö
    Wærp, Eline
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    The Age of Frontex: Banal Securitization and its Normalization in EUropean External(ized) Border Control2024Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation examines how migration has become securitized in what I term the field of EUropean external(ized) border control and how this securitization has become increasingly normalized. It does so by focusing on the role of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency’s (Frontex) risk analysis reports in constructing migration as a security threat. Although framed as an apolitical and objective overview of the situation at the external(ized) border, I conceptualize these reports as constituting a particular form of knowledge with securitized ontological and epistemological assumptions, which preclude alternative framings of irregularized migration. By drawing on critical discourse analysis, I interrogate how this border knowledge securitizes migration in both banal and explicit ways, normalizes crises, and portrays border control as humanitarian. Interviews with civil society actors, border guards, Frontex, and European Commission officials were conducted to analyze how they resist or reproduce this securitization, which is taken as indicative of its normalization. The dissertation aims to question the taken-for-grantedness of treating unwanted migration as a security issue in this field and draws attention to its harmful effects for refugees and migrants who try to cross increasingly inaccessible borders.

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  • Public defence: 2024-06-05 10:15 Niagara, hörsal C (NI:C0E11), Malmö
    Holeksa, Julie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Varying drug policies and unequal access to harm reduction: Experiences, mobility, and risk management of people who use drugs2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has a history of a restrictive drug policy, with a national policy focus on achieving a “drug free society.” This has led to a relatively slow development of “harm reduction” services, those services which aim to reduce risk and vulnerability for people who use drugs (PWUD), without requiring drug abstention. The harm reduction services which do exist are inequitably distributed across the country. In this context, this project aims to explore the attitudes of social work professionals (SWP) towards harm reduction, and the experiences of Swedish PWUD. The data consist of a survey of SWP (208 responses), interviews with PWUD in an area of limited harm reduction (11), and interviews with PWUD who had travelled to Denmark, a country with a less restrictive drug policy approach (17). 

    Article I utilizes survey data to explore the perspectives of Swedish SWP regarding the philosophy of harm reduction and specific harm reduction initiatives. The study reveals a generally positive attitude towards harm reduction, albeit with significant geographical variances. There were low levels of support concerning the adoption of newer harm reduction strategies. Less positive attitudes and negativity regarding new interventions were significantly associated with SWP in areas with lesser exposure to harm reduction practices. 

    Article II examines how PWUD in a small urban center handle the absence of local harm reduction services. The participants’ experiences are interpreted using the theoretical concept of “risk environment” which highlights how various environmental factors interact to produce risk of drug-related harm. Strategies ranged from traveling to external needle exchange programs, relying on unofficial secondary distribution, to risk behaviours such as stealing, reusing, or sharing injection equipment. Many were homeless, articulating a continuous struggle to find temporary shelter. They injected drugs in unsafe places, such as public toilets, increasing risk of overdose or infection. They also expressed 10 feeling stigmatized and excluded from society which compounded their stress, risk of disease transmission and overdose, and poor overall wellbeing. 

    Article III explores the motivations behind the mobility of PWUD from Sweden to Denmark. The “risk environment” framework was used to contextualize decision-making and risks, based on the physical, social, policy, and economic environments. The study identifies harm reduction service availability, stigma, social networks, the drug scene, and policing practices, as key drivers for relocation. Despite the perceived benefits of moving, such as improved access to harm reduction services, participants also reported exposure to new risks, including violence, potential exclusion from a range of services, and exposure to new drugs. 

    Article IV analyzes the reflections of PWUD on their experiences in Sweden and Denmark in the context of each nation’s drug policy. The analysis explored experiences of stigma and coupled these to concepts of identity and social exclusion. In daily interactions, participants felt ignored and dehumanized in Sweden’s zero-tolerance environment, whereas in Denmark, a country with a harm reduction approach, they felt visible and valued as individuals. This, combined with more developed services and a less punitive policing approach, led participants to feel included in society in Denmark. Contrasts between experiences in the two countries were also echoed in participants’ interactions with the healthcare system, relating to feeling controlled in Sweden, or being given autonomy and trust over their care in Denmark. 

    Collectively, this thesis highlights the interplay between drug policies, care formats, policing practices, social interactions, the attitudes of SWP, and the lived experiences of PWUD. While overall positive, the attitudes towards care goals and interventions differ between different areas, among professionals who provide care to PWUD. PWUDs’ movement to and experiences in different settings can be used to offer an insight into their own policy preferences. The project demonstrates the role of constructions, and resulting drug policy, in how they influence PWUDs’ experiences of stigma and exclusion, and their risk environments. 

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  • Public defence: 2024-06-05 13:15 NI:B0E15, Malmö
    Söderberg, Rebecka
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Displacing Diversity: How Social Mix Interventions are Legitimised, Experienced and Resisted in a Danish Neighbourhood2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis explores residents’ experiences of and resistance to social mix interventions, as well as how these interventions are legitimised in policies. This is studied through an ethnographic approach to policies combined with ethnographic fieldwork in a neighbourhood targeted by social mix interventions. In its empirical scope, the thesis is limited to a Scandinavian context, highlighting the perspectives of residents in a Danish neighbourhood targeted by the so-called ghetto legislation and comparing Danish and Swedish policies. 

    The first article of this compilation thesis explores problematisations of urban diversity in Danish and Swedish urban and integration policies. It highlights processes of ‘selfing/othering’, showing how Danish policies construct the figure of ’the non-Western’ and myths of national sameness based on assumptions about cultural homogeneity, while Swedish policies construct the figure of ‘the unproductive’ based on assumptions about sameness as productiveness. The second article explores residents’ experiences of ongoing interventions for social mix. The analysis shows how residents live in conditions of evictability and how they are subjected to the discursive, material, and psychological violence of un-homing, i.e., residents are deprived of their home on multiple scales, even before relocation. The third article highlights how residents engage in various forms of resistance against displacement and commodification. The analysis emphasises how residents’ resistance is both individual and collective, material and discursive, discreet and confrontational. In addition, it shows how residents’ resistance is productive and ambiguous, producing new discourses, (dis)alliances, and places.

    Researching experiences of social mix interventions while they occur, this thesis adds new aspects to previous research, which is mainly concerned with whether social mix policies ‘work’. The analysis shows how social mix interventions have immediate, wide-reaching and unintended consequences, and highlights mundane and productive dimensions of processes of resistance.

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