Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Petersson, Charlotte C
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Den sårbara gemenskapen: kvinnojourer under covid-19-pandemin2021In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, Vol. 58, no 1-2, p. 33-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When the Covid-19 pandemic reached Sweden, women’s shelters mobilized quickly because they knew what a lockdown of public life could mean for women and children who are living with threats and violence in their homes. In a short time, recommendations by the authorities to work at home, maintain social distancing, and avoid travelling resulted in decreased possibilities for mobility. This made it particularly difficult for abused and controlled women to make contacts with the authorities and women’s shelters. The purpose of this article is to understand how the relationship between abused women and the community can be understood in times of pandemic . This is done by applying a theoretical model of ”the immunitary life”, to understand the relation between the individual and the community. The study consists of telephone interviews conducted in the spring of 2020 with staff at five different women’s shelters. A central result in the study is that abused women, during the pandemic, are at risk of being deprived of opportunities to create the relationships with the community that women’s shelters otherwise enables.

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  • 2.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Petersson, Charlotte C
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Social Work and Lost Contacts with Clients during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Experiences of Shared Trauma from Three Different Civil Society Organisations2023In: Social Work During COVID-19: Glocal Perspectives and Implications for the Future of Social Work / [ed] Timo Harrikari, Joseph Mooney, Malathi Adusumalli, Paula McFadden, Tuomas Leppiaho, Routledge, 2023, p. 158-170Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, social workers at battered women's shelters and night shelters and church deacons in Sweden warned that they were at risk of losing contact with their clients. Thus, even though Sweden was never subject to a lockdown in 2020 or 2021, many of the signals from the social workers indicated that their lost clients were at risk of increased ill health, mental illness, and violence due to the situation produced by the pandemic. The aim of this chapter is to develop a theoretical and empirical understanding of this vulnerable position that was imposed on these client groups by the COVID-19 pandemic. These developments also created fear and worry among the social workers themselves, when it became clear to them that they were at risk of losing contact with their clients. Therefore, the concept of shared trauma is used to focus on the way in which care workers are exposed to similar impacts of collective traumatic events as their clients. From the start of the project in March 2020, a total of 25 different civil society organisations have been followed through short telephone interviews. The method is inspired by rapid ethnographies.

  • 3.
    Nordgren, Camilla
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Egard, Hanna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Germundsson, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Runge, Ida
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Petersson, Charlotte C
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Krantz, Oskar
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Lingärde, Svante
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Norstedt, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Svensson Chowdhury, Matilda
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Flink, Madeleine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Runesson, Ingrid
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Efterfrågas rätt kunskap och kompetens2021In: Socionomen, ISSN 0283-1929, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Petersson, Charlotte C
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Developing Gender and Culture Sensitive Conversations with Sexually Abused Men by Blending Ethnography and Psychotherapy2020In: kritisk etnografi: Swedish Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 2003-1173, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Child sexual abuse can have long-term impact on the survivors’ emotional, physical, and psychological wellbeing. Male survivors of sexual abuse are less likely to disclose and report their experience compared to females because of aspects related to male gender socialisation. Feelings of shame, guilt or confusion about sexual or masculine identity silence sexually abused men. They report difficulties in both seeking and receiving formal support services tailored to their specific needs. This article presents collaborative work performed by an anthropologist and a psychotherapist during therapy of adult men with a history of sexual abuse. By using certain tools of ethnography in narrative therapy, we developed culture- and gender-sensitive conversations with sexually abused male clients from diverse backgrounds. A case study is provided to demonstrate how we worked with the various stages and practices of ethnography and narrative therapy, focusing on how sexually abused men were invited to unpack the discourses of masculinity that influenced their ways of understanding themselves and their traumatic past. The article offers an example of how anthropological knowledge and methods can be applied in contexts of clinical social work and demonstrates the way that postmodernist and constructive therapies combined with the tools of ethnography can generate constructive conversations about gender for sexually abused men

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  • 5.
    Petersson, Charlotte C
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Fatherhood Following the Experience of Child Sexual Abuse2019In: Midwifery Today, Vol. 130, no Spring, p. 28-29Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Petersson, Charlotte C
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Våldsutsatta kvinnor med samsjuklighet: Individanpassat socialt arbete utifrån ett intersektionellt perspektiv2024In: Funktionsförmåga, funktionshinder och socialt arbete / [ed] Hanna Egard, Ingrid Runesson, Matilda Svensson Chowdhury, Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2024, p. 99-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Petersson, Charlotte C
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Social Work Responses to Domestic Violence During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Experiences and Perspectives of Professionals at Women’s Shelters in Sweden2022In: Clinical social work journal, ISSN 0091-1674, E-ISSN 1573-3343, Vol. 50, p. 135-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how social work professionals at women’s shelters in Sweden experience, understand, and are responding to domestic violence under the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. A qualitative longitudinal research design was employed, and multiple semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 professionals at women’s shelters over a period of one year. The results are presented in three overall themes; (a) professional challenges due to increased needs, (b) professionals’ adjustments to new circumstances, and (c) professionals’ attributions regarding client barriers to help seeking. The results show diverse and changing experiences among the professionals as the pandemic progressed. Clients and professionals have shared the same collective trauma associated with the pandemic, which has affected the professionals’ understanding of and response to domestic violence. The professionals understand both clients and themselves as being more vulnerable and susceptible to risk under these new circumstances. Social work adjustments focused on maintaining contact, reducing risk and prioritizing safety, which had both positive and negative consequences for both clients and professionals. The study concludes that the professionals coped with the uncertainty they experienced during the pandemic by relying on both their previous knowledge and work experience of domestic violence and their experience of sharing trauma with clients.

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  • 8.
    Petersson, Charlotte C
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Plantin, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Breaking with Norms of Masculinity: Men Making Sense of Their Experience of Sexual Assault2019In: Clinical social work journal, ISSN 0091-1674, E-ISSN 1573-3343, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 372-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the sexual assault of males has received growing attention both in the research literature and among the public. Much of the research has focused on documenting prevalence rates or the psychological consequences of male sexual assault. However, this article aims to understand how men, as gendered, embodied and affective subjects, make sense of their experiences of sexual assault. In-depth interviews with ten adult males who have experienced sexual assault have been analyzed using a phenomenological approach in order to learn more about their lived and gendered experience. Four themes emerged from the analysis: (a) conflicting feelings and difficult conceptualizations, (b) re-experiencing vulnerability, (c) emotional responses and resistance, and (d) disclosure and creativity. The findings suggest that the ways in which men navigate norms of masculinity shape the way they understand, process and articulate their lived experience of sexual assault. As a way of coping with the experience and of healing from a past that is still present, the study participants perform an alternative masculine identity.

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  • 9.
    Petersson, Charlotte C.
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), People, Places and Prevention.
    Plantin, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), People, Places and Prevention.
    Overcoming Challenges of Intimacy: Male Child Sexual Abuse Survivors’ Experiences of Achieving Healthy Romantic Relationships in Sweden2023In: Journal of family Violence, ISSN 0885-7482, E-ISSN 1573-2851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Studies on sexual health following male child sexual abuse (CSA) have identified the negative effects of such experienceson body functioning, but little is known about male CSA survivors’ ability to create emotional and physical closenessin romantic relationships. The purpose of this article is to explore how male CSA survivors perceive, experience and developintimacy in romantic relationships, including both the challenges they face and the positive changes that enable them to growand achieve healthy relationships.

    Method: The study has employed a qualitative research approach and is based on in-depth interviews conducted among adultmale CSA survivors residing in Sweden. Participants were recruited through civil society organizations and an ad in a dailynewspaper. Using reflexive thematic analysis, the results are presented in relation to two themes: (a) challenges of intimacy;and (b) building trust and close relationships.

    Results: The results show that participants desired couple relationships that included both sexual and emotional intimacy.The challenges of intimacy were related to compromised sexual identity, sexual dysfunctions and compulsions, emotionaldysregulation, and body shame. Efforts to achieve intimacy were facilitated by disclosing abuse experiences, developingemotional bonds or awareness, embracing sensitivity, and having an empathetic and supportive partner.

    Conclusions: Reconstructions of abuse histories were both challenged and facilitated by the accessibility of various and shiftingideas about masculinities that co-exist in Sweden, which were important sources for meaning making and assisted themen in developing positive valuations of themselves as men.

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  • 10.
    Dorthé, Lotti (Curator)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Olsson, Annsofie (Curator)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Johnsdotter, Sara (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Larsson, Camilla (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Charlotta (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Ouis, Pernilla (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Holmström, Charlotta (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Petersson, Charlotte C (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Carlström, Charlotta (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Brandström, Maria (Designer)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Tosting, Åsa (Designer)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Svensson, Anneli (Designer)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Landin, Kajsa (Filmmaker)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Egevad, Per (Lightning designer)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Wogensen, Lotta (Project director)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Forskarnas galleri #2: 6 om sex2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core of the exhibition is a presentation of six researchers, linked to the Center for Sexology and Sexual Studies, presenting their respective fields of research. The exhibition also consists of a timeline with stops in Swedish sexuality history, a curiosity cabinet and a collection of literature. The visitors can leave comments or ask questions to the researchers in a mailbox. The questions and the answers are then projected on the wall for everyone to see. Two public talks are held and filmed; “Sex and Power” and “Theme Erotic Literature”. The art project "Kiss" (an interpretation of the song of Songs) by the priest and artist Kent Wisti and the author Maria Küchen can also be seen in the exhibition.

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