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  • 1.
    Davidsson, Paul
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Langheinrich, MarcUniversità della Svizzera italiana, Lugano, Switzerland.Linde, PerMalmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).Mayer, SimonUniversity of St. Gallen, Switzerland.Casado-Mansilla, DiegoUniversity of Deusto, Spain.Spikol, DanielMalmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).Kraemer, Frank AlexanderNorwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.Russo, Nancy LMalmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    IoT '20 Companion: 10th International Conference on the Internet of Things Companion2020Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Eriksson, Jeanette
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Russo, Nancy L
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Beyond 'Happy Apps': Using the Internet of Things to Support Emotional Health2016In: HealthyIoT 2016: Internet of Things Technologies for HealthCare, Springer, 2016, p. 95-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions and physical health are strongly related. A first step towards emotional well-being is to monitor, understand and reflect upon one’s feelings and emotions. A number of personal emotion-tracking applications are available today. In this paper we describe an examination of these applications which indicates that many of the applications do not provide sufficient support for monitoring a full spectrum of emotional data or for analyzing or using the data that is provided. To design applications that better support emotional well-being, the full capabilities of the Internet of Things should be utilized. The paper concludes with a description of how Internet of Things technologies can enable the development of systems that can more accurately capture emotional data and support personal learning in the area of emotional health.

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  • 3.
    Eriksson, Jeanette
    et al.
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Russo, Nancy L
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Marin, Javier
    Using the Internet of Things to Support Emotional Health2018In: EAI Endorsed Transactions on Ambient Systems, ISSN 2032-927X, Vol. 17, no 18, article id e1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A first step towards emotional well-being is to monitor, understand and reflect upon one’s feelings and emotions. A number of personal emotion-tracking applications are available today. In this paper we describe an examination of these applications which indicates that many of the applications do not provide sufficient support for monitoring a full spectrum of emotional data or for analysing or using the data that is provided. To design applications that better support emotional well-being, the full capabilities of the Internet of Things should be utilized. The paper concludes with a description of how Internet of Things technologies can enable the development of systems that can more accurately capture emotional data and support personal learning in the area of emotional health.

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  • 4.
    Gkouskos, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Russo, Nancy L
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Work Space versus Work Place: The Context Aware Internet of Things2016In: Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on the Changing Nature of Work: The Impact of Digital Innovation on Work, Center for Work Science, Yonsei University , 2016, article id 33Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ubiquitous computing environments enable workers to easily transition between work and non-work activities regardless of location. While this blurring of boundaries can be viewed as having a negative impact on work-life balance through the intrusion of work activities on home, family and leisure time (Clark, 2000; Davis, 2000), a positive aspect has also been found wherein technology, particularly the smartphone, enables workers to have more control of their schedules and to remain connected to family and friends during work time (Wajcman, et al., 2008). While technology has made this duality possible, we have not yet fully taken advantage of the potential of technology to facilitate the integration of these activities. “Currently the design of the ubiquitous computing environments for home and work are each dedicated to specific realms and often fail to take into consideration the requirements to integrate activities across these two life spaces” (Cousins & Varshney, 2009, p. 123). To better support workers in managing their transitions between work and non-work activities we suggest that context aware computing environments utilizing the Internet of Things may offer a viable solution.

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  • 5.
    Kock, Elina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Sarwari, Yamma
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Russo, Nancy
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Johnsson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). AI Research AB, Sweden.
    Identifying cheating behaviour with machine learning2021In: 33rd Workshop of the Swedish Artificial Intelligence Society, SAIS 2021, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated machine learning based cheating behaviour detection in physical activity-based smart-phone games. Sensor data were acquired from the accelerometer/gyroscope of an iPhone 7 during activities such as jumping, squatting, stomping, and their cheating counterparts. Selected attributes providing the most information gain were used together with a sequential model yielding promising results in detecting fake activities. Even better results were achieved by employing a random forest classifier. The results suggest that machine learning is a strong candidate for detecting cheating behaviours in physical activity-based smartphone games.

  • 6.
    Nikolić, Predrag K.
    et al.
    School of Creativity and Art, ShanghaiTech University, 393 Huaxia Middle Road, Pudong, Shanghai, 201210, China.
    Russo, Nancy L
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Crossing Sensory Boundaries with Creative Productions2020In: Science and Technologies for Smart Cities: 5th EAI International Summit, SmartCity360, Braga, Portugal, December 4-6, 2019, Proceedings / [ed] Henrique Santos; Gabriela Viale Pereira; Matthias Budde; Sérgio F. Lopes; Predrag Nikolic, Springer, 2020, p. 420-427Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We seek to investigate possibilities of extending the emotional and cognitive experience of using products or services through the cross-modality of vision with other senses (synesthesia). Through multi-sensory, interactive environments, consumers become more engaged in the use of a product or service and may, in fact, participate as co-creators of their own experiences. To achieve the highest level of spontaneity and provoke human activation to enable us to study this, we suggest an experimental context based on interactive technologies, aesthetics and design. For this purpose, we use an artistic environment in the form of an interactive installation. Two examples of such experimental interactive art installations, Art Machine: Mindcatcher and Re-Digital, are described in this paper.

  • 7.
    Russo, Nancy L
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science (DV). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    A 'Values' Framework for Designing Internet of Things Applications2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet of Things phenomena is reflected in the increase in the types of devices that can be joined to form computing ecosystems, the growth of the amount and variety of data collected and processed, and the power and reach of applications that can be created on these platforms. While these new applications provide potentially valuable new capabilities to individuals, organizations, and society, they also entail significant risks. This paper presents the VALUES framework to identify potential impacts that should be addressed when designing Internet of Things (IoT) applications. For each of the six areas, questions and issues that should be considered are discussed.

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  • 8.
    Russo, Nancy L
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science (DV). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    The Quantified Workplace: How the Internet of Things will Impact Work in the Future2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the workplace, IOT technologies were initially used in a manner analogous to their use in smart homes, controlling lighting, heating and cooling and monitoring energy usage. Location-based sensors, including RFID, are used to track the movements of employees, and can interact with the lighting, heating and cooling controls. Traditional electronic performance monitoring data (computer use, audio and video monitoring) can be used in conjunction with other data captured by IOT devices. IOT technologies are being tested for use in training (McGowan, 2015), injury prevention (Kortuem et al., 2010), promoting cohesion (Kirkham et al., 2013), space utilization and employee interactions (Mathur et al., 2015a) and security and surveillance (Miorandi et al., 2012). The consumerization of workplace technology (Harris et al., 2012), wherein employees bring their personal smart phones and health monitors into the workplace, has made it very easy to monitor employee's locations and activities. Already in 2011, over 40% of the devices used to access business applications were the users’ personally owned devices (Gens, et al., 2011). The driver of this trend is the workers themselves, possibly because increased accessibility gives workers a sense of autonomy and flexibility that outweighs the downside of increased work demands outside of work hours (Cavazotte et al., 2014). In some organizations such as BP and Autodesk, fitness tracking devices are provided to employees as part of the corporate wellness program (Nield, 2014). These programs focus on helping people to prevent illnesses or improve health through their behavior, and may also monitor stress levels to manage mental health (Mirarchi et al., 2015). “The potential economic benefits to an organization such as reduced absenteeism, increased productivity, increased stress tolerance and improved decision-making, as well as the physical and mental health benefits for employees, means that there is a strong business case for using the workplace as a vehicle for health promotion efforts of this kind” (Kries & Brodeker, 2004, as cited in McEachan, et al., 2011, p.1) While the use of IOT technologies in the workplace may appear benign, concerns have been raised regarding the potential for abuse. Having one's location and personal interactions and communications tracked by a Quantified Workplace system may be considered a breach of both work-environment privacy and solitude privacy as defined by Ball et al. (2012). Monitoring and routinization of work processes may have a negative impact on employee work life (Carter et al., 2011). “At a minimum, we can speak of declining welfare for workers and the associated regime of total mobilisation and surveillance corrode workers’ health and safety, creating anxiety, burnout and overwork” (Moore & Robinson, 2015, p. 8). The accessibility of data from multiple sources, such as GPS, email, social media and personal devices, allows employers to combine data on behavior at work with other information, search for patterns, and draw conclusions which reflect information that the employee chose not to share her employer (Holtgrewe, 2014).

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  • 9.
    Russo, Nancy L
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Eriksson, Jeanette
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Designing Consumer-Focused Health Improvement Systems2016In: Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Information Systems Management, Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited, 2016, p. 317-321Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumers today can track health-related data via many different types of wearable devices and sensors. Health improvement systems which integrate data from personal devices and sensors with intelligent behavior modification applications can support the initiation and maintenance of behavior changes that are necessary to achieve health-related goals. The COMBI (Computerized Behavior Intervention) model and the application based on this model (eMate) demonstrate the integration of theories of behavior change in a framework on which to build an intelligent behavior modification system (Klein et al, 2014). The application, eMate, validated in several health-related settings, provides a functioning example of a consumer-focused health improvement system. Recent research highlights the importance of customizing behavior modification systems to support different user characteristics and changes over time. In this paper we present an extension of the COMBI model as an Internet of Things ecosystem which explicitly incorporates multiple types of personalization, autonomous data collection by tracking devices and sensors, and integration of actors from the user's social networks as well as healthcare professionals. Related to this extended model, the following guidelines for the design and development of consumer-focused health improvement systems are presented: (1) Personalization is essential and users should be viewed as co-designers of their personalized health improvement systems. (2) Personal monitoring devices and sensors can measure performance on relevant metrics autonomously and this data can be compared to established norms, based on user characteristics, to determine appropriate feedback. (3) The health behavior modification application must be dynamic and adapt over time to changes in the user's context and performance. (4) The system should facilitate interaction with healthcare providers and the user's social network.

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  • 10.
    Russo, Nancy L
    et al.
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Eriksson, Jeanette
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    The Internet of Things and People in Healthcare2018In: Internet of Things A to Z: Technologies and Applications / [ed] Qusay F. Hassan, John Wiley & Sons, 2018, p. 447-473Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The connection of intelligent devices and agents via the Internet of Things (IoT) provides a foundation for smart healthcare systems to monitor the status of patients, their activities, and their environments and to provide services that can improve health. These smart health ecosystems connect patients, caregivers, and medical professionals with each other and with data captured by sensors and other devices. Healthcare applications using this data can store and track relevant metrics, provide alerts when metrics are outside expected ranges, and provide feedback and recommendations to assist in the management of a wide variety of health issues including weight management, stroke rehabilitation, and glucose monitoring. This chapter provides an overview of different types of IoT-based patient-focused healthcare applications providing these types of services. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the major challenges related to healthcare technology using the Internet of Things and the future potential of these applications.

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  • 11.
    Russo, Nancy L
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Eriksson, Jeanette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Christensen, Jonas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Target Framework for Sustainable Welfare Technology Deployment in Eldercare2021In: UKAIS 2021 Conference Proceedings / [ed] Savvas Papagiannidis, Gelareh Roushan, and Guy Fitzgerald, Oxford, UK, 2021, p. 507-516Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on existing research and experiences regarding the use of supportive and assistive technology -- called welfare technology -- in elderly care, we have developed a framework to represent a holistic view of the complex tangle of factors contributing to the sustainable integration of these technologies into the elder care context. The framework is described here for the purpose of initiating a conversation regarding the framework with interested researchers. At the same time discussions are also being conducted with managers, caregivers, and other stakeholders involved in welfare technology deployment in eldercare in Sweden. Our ultimate goal with the framework is to provide general guidelines that municipalities and care organizations can use to improve the quality of life for elderly citizens through the successful selection, rollout and use of welfare technology that meets the needs not only of the elderly citizens needing support but also of the care providers and organizations. 

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  • 12.
    Russo, Nancy L
    et al.
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Eriksson, Jeanette
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Harden Mugelli, Sue
    Marin, Javier
    Small Steps: Improving Healthcare with Local Innovation2018In: Proceedings of the UK Academy for Information Systems (UKAIS) 23rd Annual Conference, Association for Information Systems, 2018, article id 29Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating technological innovations into healthcare systems has proven to be challenging. It is possible, however, to make small but significant improvements to healthcare through technologies that are not connected to the massive electronic health records systems. This paper describes one such system, Walk the Ward, which was developed for a medical ward in a large regional hospital. Walk the Ward is a quiz-type game played by hospitalized patients to provide entertainment, social interaction and, most importantly, exercise, which promotes healing. Educational information is also provided in the game. Evaluations of the game have shown that patients found it enjoyable and useful, and it facilitated social interactions. Hospital staff also found the game beneficial because it both helped patients and did not increase staff workloads. While the game is currently used in only one location, the basic structure can easily be expanded to multiple settings at a relatively low cost.

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  • 13.
    Russo, Nancy L
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Hermodsson, Klas
    Senior Software Development Engineer, Amazon, Vancouver, Canada .
    Olsson, Carl Magnus
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Personalising Applications to Influence Health-Related Behaviour: An Exploration of Differences in Motivation2017In: 22nd UK Academy for Information Systems International Conference: Ubiquitous Information Systems: Surviving & thriving in a connected society, UK Academy for Information Systems , 2017, article id 31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To support health-related behaviour changes, consumers may use technologies such as smartphones, smartbands, sensors and other devices connected to the Internet of Things. Research has shown that personalising the interaction, including the interface, data, and feedback, can result in more effective outcomes in terms of the desired changes in behaviour. This paper reports on a pilot study that tested a smartphone step challenge application that was personalised based on the user’s motivational style using the Behavioural Inhibition System/Behavioural Approach System (BIS/BAS) scales of Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory. The results indicated that participation in the step challenge did change the behaviour of the participants. For half the days of the challenge, the application delivered pep talks tailored to the two motivational styles and to the participant’s behaviour (taking more or fewer steps than on the previous day). While the study found that participants with different motivational styles responded differently to the motivational cues (pep talks), their responses did not appear to be influenced by the personalisation of the pep talks.

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  • 14.
    Dorthé, Lotti (Curator)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Olsson, Annsofie (Curator)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Spikol, Daniel (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Spalazzese, Romina (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Linde, Per (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Leckner, Sara (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Russo, Nancy (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Eriksson, Jeanette (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Persson, Jan (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Holmberg, Johan (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Olsson, Carl Magnus (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Brandström, Maria (Designer)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Tosting, Åsa (Designer)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Egevad, Per (Lightning designer)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Svensson, Anneli (Contributor)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Topgaard, Richard (Contributor)
    Malmö University, Joint University Administration and Services. Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Forskarnas galleri #5: People have the power: IOTAP on exhibit2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All around us sensors collect data, which is analyzed to figure out how to save energy, how much insulin to inject, where the closest rental bike is located, how many people are still inside a building that is on fire… This fast-spreading technology is called the Internet of Things, or IoT for short. People have the power, or do we really? How much do we value our privacy? What internet connected gadgets will help us lead a healthy, sustainable life – and what gadgets will only increase our stress level? When does use become abuse? This exhibition explores how IoT affects people, society and industry. You are welcome to try out IoT through demos and hands-on experiences based on research projects at Malmö University. Research projects in the exhibition: Emergent Configuration for IoT Systems (ECOS+), Smart energy management and security (SEMS), Fair Data, Walk the ward, Dynamic Intelligent Sensor-Intensive Systems (DISS), PELARS project and Busrunner are presented in the "IOTAP-lab"

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