Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Druker, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Sundmark, BjörnMalmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).Warnqvist, ÅsaSvenska barnboksinstitutet.Österlund, MariaÅbo Akademi University.
    Silence and Silencing in Children’s Literature2021Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Druker, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Warnqvist, Åsa
    Swedish Institute for Children’s Books.
    Österlund, Mia
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Introduction: Silence and Silencing in Children’s Literature2020In: Barnboken, ISSN 0347-772X, E-ISSN 2000-4389, Vol. 43Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 3.
    Ivakko, Sirkka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Läsarengagemang, bildtolkning och identifikation: Barns brev till tidskriften Jultomten2022In: Barnboken, ISSN 0347-772X, E-ISSN 2000-4389, E-ISSN 0347-772X, Vol. 45, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines a selection of children’s letters sent to the editor of the Swedish annual Christmas publication Jultomten (Father Christmas) during three years at the turn of the century 1900. The aim is to show how children responded to the editor’s invitation to write letters to the journal, how the children commented on some of the images, and how their appreciation and involvement were articulated in terms of reader engagement, interpretation, and identification. For this purpose, the letters were analyzed with the help of visual literacy theories and methods, which focus on primary school children’s picture (and picturebook) reception. The results show that the children’s response to the chosen images varies according to their level of involvement and degree of visual literacy competence.

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    Breven till Jultomten
  • 4. Kelen, Christopher (Kit)
    Dizdarević, Merima (Translator)
    Snö: och andra dikter2011Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Kelen, Christopher Kit
    et al.
    University of Macau, Macao.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Where Children Rule: An Introduction2017In: Child Autonomy and Child Governance in Children's Literature: Where Children Rule / [ed] Christopher Kelen, Björn Sundmark, Routledge, 2017, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In children’s literature childhood is frequently represented as a state of being – as an imaginary ‘state’ even. There are numerous key texts of and about childhood in which we can see forms of child governance in action or in contention. Narnia is just one of these childhood nations, a fairyland closed to adults, a place where children rule. Children’s texts like these play with the idea of child autonomy. This critical anthology explores a range of texts in which children are, in various ways, empowered. We discuss whether childhood itself may be thought of as a nationality, and what that may imply.

  • 6. Kelen, Christopher
    et al.
    Sundmark, BjörnMalmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Child Autonomy and Child Governance in Children's Literature: Where Children Rule2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores representations of child autonomy and self-governance in children’s literature.The idea of child rule and child realms is central to children’s literature, and childhood is frequently represented as a state of being, with children seen as aliens in need of passports to Adultland (and vice versa). In a sense all children’s literature depends on the idea that children are different, separate, and in command of their own imaginative spaces and places. Although the idea of child rule is a persistent theme in discussions of children’s literature (or about children and childhood) the metaphor itself has never been properly unpacked with critical reference to examples from those many texts that are contingent on the authority and/or power of children. Child governance and autonomy can be seen as natural or perverse; it can be displayed as a threat or as a promise. Accordingly, the "child rule"-motif can be seen in Robinsonades and horror films, in philosophical treatises and in series fiction. The representations of self-ruling children are manifold and ambivalent, and range from the idyllic to the nightmarish. Contributors to this volume visit a range of texts in which children are, in various ways, empowered, discussing whether childhood itself may be thought of as a nationality, and what that may imply. This collection shows how representations of child governance have been used for different ideological, aesthetic, and pedagogical reasons, and will appeal to scholars of children’s literature, childhood studies, and cultural studies.

  • 7. Kelen, Kit
    et al.
    Sundmark, BjörnMalmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    The nation in children's literature: nations of childhood2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores the meaning of nation or nationalism in children’s literature and how it constructs and represents different national experiences. The contributors discuss diverse aspects of children’s literature and film from interdisciplinary and multicultural approaches, ranging from the short story and novel to science fiction and fantasy from a range of locations including Canada, Australia, Taiwan, Norway, America, Italy, Great Britain, Iceland, Africa, Japan, South Korea, India, Sweden and Greece. The emergence of modern nation-states can be seen as coinciding with the historical rise of children’s literature, while stateless or diasporic nations have frequently formulated their national consciousness and experience through children’s literature, both instructing children as future citizens and highlighting how ideas of childhood inform the discourses of nation and citizenship. Because nation and childhood are so intimately connected, it is crucial for critics and scholars to shed light on how children’s literatures have constructed and represented historically different national experiences. At the same time, given the massive political and demographic changes in the world since the nineteenth century and the formation of nation states, it is also crucial to evaluate how the national has been challenged by changing national languages through globalization, international commerce, and the rise of English. This book discusses how the idea of childhood pervades the rhetoric of nation and citizenship, and how children and childhood are represented across the globe through literature and film.

  • 8.
    Kérchy, Anna
    et al.
    University of Széged.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Introduction2020In: Translating and Transmediating Children’s Literature / [ed] Anna Kérchy; Björn Sundmark, Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 1-25Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction discusses and theorizes the two key concepts that frame and inform the book, transmediation and translation, and how these interconnected and related concepts can be specifically applied to the study of children’s literature. In the following, the division of the chapters into five sections, and the rationale behind this structure, are discussed. It is claimed that each of the sections shed light on vital aspects of translating and transmediating children’s literature. The section headings are: “Inter-/Intra-Cultural Transformations,” “Image-textual Interactions,” “Metapictorial Potentialities,” “Digital Media Transitions,” and “Intergenerational Transmissions.” Finally, the individual chapters are outlined and summarized. 

  • 9.
    Kérchy, Anna
    et al.
    University of Széged.
    Sundmark, BjörnMalmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Translating and Transmediating Children’s Literature2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From Struwwelpeter to Peter Rabbit, from Alice to Bilbo—this collection of essays shows how the classics of children’s literature have been transformed across languages, genres, and diverse media forms. This book argues that translation regularly involves transmediation—the telling of a story across media and vice versa—and that transmediation is a specific form of translation. Beyond the classic examples, the book also takes the reader on a worldwide tour, and examines, among other things, the role of Soviet science fiction in North Korea, the ethical uses of Lego Star Wars in a Brazilian context, and the history of Latin translation in children’s literature. Bringing together scholars from more than a dozen countries and language backgrounds, these cross-disciplinary essays focus on regularly overlooked transmediation practices and terminology, such as book cover art, trans-sensory storytelling, écart, enfreakment, foreignizing domestication, and intra-cultural transformation.

  • 10.
    Persson, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Examinationsregleringen eller "Går det ens att undervisa i litteraturvetenskap längre"?2020In: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, E-ISSN 2001-094X, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 11.
    Persson, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Litteraturhistorieundervisningens möjligheter och utmaningar i en globaliserad värld2022In: Didaktiska perspektiv på språk och litteratur i en globaliserad värld / [ed] Pia Nygård Larsson; Cecilia Olsson Jers; Magnus Persson, Lund: Svenska med didaktisk inriktning , 2022, p. 215-229Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna essä har ett blygsamt syfte – vi vill introducera och kort pröva några resonemang om problemområdet litteraturhistoriedidaktik i en globaliserad värld – och resonera om varför och hur ska vi läsa och undervisa om klassiker och äldre litteratur i en tid präglad av kulturell heterogenitet. I samband med detta gör vi en jämförelse mellan de nuvarande ämnesplanerna för engelska och svenska i gymnasieskolan, centrala styrdokument som våra blivande lärare måste förhålla sig till. Vad säger egentligen styrdokumenten om litteratur? Vilket utrymme ges litteraturhistoria? Finns här några globala och interkulturella perspektiv, och i så fall vilka? Vi kommer även att göra några korta nedslag i egna undervisningserfarenheter. De teoretiska utgångspunkterna är litteraturdidaktiska och kulturanalytiska. 

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  • 12.
    Sauro, Shannon
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Critically Examining the Use of Blog-Based Fan Fiction in the Advanced Language Classroom2019In: ReCALL, ISSN 0958-3440, E-ISSN 1474-0109, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 40-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper critically examines the integration of online fanfiction practices into an advanced university English language classroom. The fanfiction project, The Blogging Hobbit, was carried out as part of a course in the teacher education program at a Swedish university for students who were specializing in teaching English at the secondary school level. Participants were 122 students who completed the course in 2013 and 2014. In both classes, students were organized into groups of three to six to write collaborative blog-based role-play fanfiction of a missing moment from JRR Tolkien’s fantasy novel The Hobbit. The 31 resulting pieces of collaborative fanfiction, the online formats they were published in, the 122 reflective essays produced by the two classes, and interviews with a focal group of participants were used to explore how technology and learners’ experience with this technology may have mediated the resulting stories. In addition, the classroom fanfiction texts were compared with comparable online writing published in the fanfiction site Archive of Our Own (Ao3) to identify thematic and stylistic differences. The results showed that students’ lack of familiarity with publishing in blogs often posed a challenge that some groups were able to overcome or exploit to facilitate or enhance the readability of their completed stories. Compared to online fanfiction, the classroom fanfiction was less innovative with respect to focal characters yet more collective in its focus, with stories being told from multiple characters’ perspectives.

  • 13.
    Sauro, Shannon
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Report from Middle-Earth: fan fiction tasks in the EFL classroom2016In: ELT Journal, ISSN 0951-0893, E-ISSN 1477-4526, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 414-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study builds upon work in task-based language teaching and literary studies to explore the use of fan fiction as a pedagogical tool in a technology-enhanced university foreign language class. A task-based fan fiction project, The Blogging Hobbit, modelled on blog-based role-play storytelling found in online media fandoms, was carried out in a first-year university course for undergraduate learners of English who were also training to become secondary school English teachers in Sweden. Students were organized into groups, in which each member was responsible for voicing a single character from Tolkien’s novel The Hobbit in a blog-based collaborative role-play of a missing moment from the story. Findings revealed that carefully sequenced collaborative fan fiction could facilitate analysis of a literary text, learners’ use of creative writing techniques, and language development, particularly at the level of lexis.

  • 14.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    A Murder of Crows: Using Igor Oleynnikov’s Illustrations in a Creative Writing Class2019Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 15.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    A Murder of Crows: Using Picturebook Sequencing in Language Education2019In: Anglofiles : Journal of English Teaching, ISSN 1395-881X, no 193, p. 86-90Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the teaching module described in this article a collaborative creative writing module in ESL is described and discussed. Specifically, the articles explores how sets of wordless pictures were interpreted, sequenced, read, discussed, and given literary form by two cohorts of students in Sweden, one in upper secondary education (ESL), the other one in tertiary education (teacher students). The underlying assumption is that literature is a suitable training ground for the language learner. It presents well-defined chunks of memor¬able language that can be approached, analyzed, and processed in different ways. Moreover, although literature can be characterized by its language content, it is also an aesthetic object, and a carrier of cultural content.

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  • 16.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    "A Serious Game": Mapping Moominland2014In: The Lion and the unicorn, ISSN 0147-2593, E-ISSN 1080-6563, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 162-181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    A Wonder Books for Boys and Girls2006In: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 4, Smad-Zwer / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, p. 196-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 18.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Alexander, Sue2006In: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 1, Aamu-Duan / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, p. 44-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 19.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Alf Pröysen2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    År 1967 rådde Pröysenmania i Sverige. Teskedsgumman hade firat triumfer i både radio och TV, med adventskalendrar i båda medierna. Gumman blev idol och TV-kändis – en av de första – och Pröysens sago-böcker sålde som smör. På hösten skrevs det oroligt i tidningar som Röster i Radio TV och Vecko¬revyn om den nya advents¬kalendern: skulle den kunna leva upp till Teskedsgummans nivå? I det läget började Veckorevyn ge ut nya sagor med ”hela landets oförglömliga teskeds¬gumma i TV”. Den första publicerades 2 oktober 1968, den sista gavs ut 1 april 1969; inalles blev det 26 sagor av Alf Pröysen. Ulf Peder Olrog stod som tidigare för översättningarna, och Björn Berg bidrog med illustrationer. Några av sagorna känns igen från adventskalendern (Lucia, Julen, Julgröten, Filipin). Pröysen har i de här fallen omarbetat TV-manus och gett texterna den skriftliga sagans form. Andra gånger är sagorna helt nyskrivna. Sjutton av dem gavs senare ut i Teskedsgumman flyger och far (1972). Det är i det sammanhanget värt att notera att trots att antalet sagor är lika stort som i de första fyra böckerna tillsammans (26 stycken) så har Veckorevyns sagor inte uppmärksammats i någon större utsträck¬ning tidigare. I den här artikeln blir därför en viktig uppgift att just presentera materialet, och i viss mån jämföra det med den tidigare utgivningen. Vidare syftar artikeln till att utveckla några remedierings- och rekontextualiseringsperspektiv med avseende på Teskedsgumman. Vad händer med sagan och läsarens förväntan och upplevelse av sagan när den går från TV (manus) till veckotidningstext till bok? Slutligen analyseras just Veckorevyn som mediemiljö för sagorna. 1968-1969 var Veckorevyn en tidning som drog åt olika håll: kändisskriverier, noveller, mode, kulturreportage och barn- och familjeartiklar tävlade om innehållet. Teskedsgumman blir en del i den dragkampen.

  • 20.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Alice’s Apprenticeship as Storyteller2015In: IBBY Breakout Sessions A&B, United States Board of Books for Young People , 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The presenter poses the argument that the Alice books by Lewis Carroll can be seen as Alice’s apprenticeship as a storyteller. By extension, it provides a model of how language play and narratives always work towards recruiting listeners, readers and spectators to become re-tellers and story-makers themselves. Alice recites and listens to verses and songs, she makes sense of what she experiences during her adventures, she engages in verbal dueling and wordplay, and she learns to accept and invite the fantastic without losing herself. At the close of Alice in Wonderland she even recounts her dream-story to her sister, in turn making the sister recall fragments of the story. Thus, we see already in the frame story the invitation to readers/listeners/critics to perpetuate Alice’s adventures ad infinitum, a process, which in the end leads to Alice “escaping her narration” and turning her into an example of “written folklore.”

  • 21.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Allingham, William2006In: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 1, Aamu-Duan / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, p. 51-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 22.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Anders Ljungstedt and the Swedish East India Company2015In: Macau Studies, ISSN 0872-8526, no 80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is concerned with the Swedish East India Company and with Sir Anders Ljungstedt (1759-1835), a pioneer historian of Macau of Swedish extraction. It sums up the main points of Ljungstedt’s life and work. The article also places his achievement into the context of previous Swedish explorers, traders and scientists to China, paying special attention to the “Letters from China,” a collection that has hitherto not been known outside Sweden.

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  • 23.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Andrew Lang and the Colour Fairy Books2005Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 24.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Astrid Lindgren an Being Swedish2005Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 25.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Astrid Lindgren and Being Swedish2005Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 26.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Att bli människa: barn, sedlighet och kön i Amanda Kerfstedts, Helena Nybloms och Mathilda Mallings författarskap 1880–19102011In: Barnboken, ISSN 0347-772X, E-ISSN 2000-4389, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 69-72Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 27.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Barnlitteratur och rädsla: Om konsten att skrämma barn2020In: Finsk tidskrift : kultur, ekonomi, politik, ISSN 0015-248X, E-ISSN 2670-2541, no 3-4, p. 71-83Article in journal (Refereed)
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    Skrämma barn
  • 28.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Becoming Human: Children, Morality and Gender in the Works of Amanda Kerfstedt, Helena Nyblom and Mathilda Malling 1880-19102012In: International Research in Children's LiteratureArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Beyond the Canon of Fantasy Illustration: Tove Jansson’s 1962 Illustrations of The Hobbit2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Beyond the Canon of Fantasy Illustration: Tove Jansson's 1962 Illustrations of The Hobbit J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit (1937) and The Lord of the Rings (1954) were instrumental in establishing fantasy as publishing genre. At the outset, however, there were no established models or conventions for how (or even if) fantasy should be illustrated, and Tolkien’s own writings on the aesthetics of fantasy, as well as his own illustrations, came to serve both as inspiration but have also led to a visual orthodoxy and process of canonization on how Middle Earth and its inhabitants should be portrayed. In this paper it is argued that it is only by looking at the early translations and transmediations of Tolkien’s work that we can get a glimpse of alternative ways in which his work can be (and was) interpreted. It is also shown that today there is a new openness to unorthodox ways of visualizing fantasy, and a growing acceptance of the pioneer illustrators of the 1960’s. The paper focuses in particular the expressive and non-realistic artistry of work of Tove Jansson for the 1962 Swedish edition of The Hobbit. Ultimately, the article makes a plea for a reassessment of Jansson’s Hobbit-illustrations on the basis of the visual diversity evident in much present day fantasy.

  • 30.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Bilderbokens berättelser2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bilderbokens berättelser I Alice i underlandet frågar sig Alice uttråkad vad man ska göra med en bok utan ”bilder och samtal”. I den här presentationen vänder jag på frågan: vad ska man göra med böcker som har både bilder och ord. Bilderboken är ju barnets första möte med bild och skrift. Barnet ska förstå vad som händer i en bild, vad orden gör och hur berättande blir till. Det är en av de största utmaningarna vi ställs inför i våra liv, och ett helt avgörande steg i läs¬utvecklingen. All senare läsning och förmåga att ta till oss berättelser bygger på att vi tar det steget. Två frågor hamnar därmed i fokus: hur berättar bilderböcker? Och vad måste barnet klara av för att ta dem till sig?

  • 31.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Bilderbokens berättelser2014In: Berättande i förskolan / [ed] Barbro Bruce, Bim Riddersporre, Natur & Kultur , 2014, p. 114-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Bokhyllan: Zizek om Mankell2003In: Sydsvenskan, ISSN 1652-814X, no 2003-12-03Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 33.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Bookbird: An Overview2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bookbird 60 years Drawing on my experience as chief editor of Bookbird 2014-2018, the article provides a brief history of the journal’s 60 years in circulation, from its 1958 inception at The International Youth Library and (Munich) at the behest of Jella Lepman. It is argued that already from the start Bookbird served the idea of “the republic childhood” and that international children’s books could and should serve the greater cause of peace-building between peoples and nations. The article highlights the unique character of Bookbird as a publication that caters to academics as well as librarians, publishers, authors and illustrators. Through the mother organization, the International Board of Books for Young People (IBBY), Bookbird has an advantageous position internationally, with branches and correspondents in more than a hundred countries. This geographical spread and varied readership is also reflected in the contents, which are made up of not only peer-reviewed articles, but of more reader-friendly interviews, reports on reading campaigns, letters. Finally, the journal’s emphasis on visuals and design is commented on. This too, is a feature that distinguishes it from other academic publications in the field of children’s literature.

  • 34.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Bravemole, Superman and Avatar: Children’s 9/11-Fictions2010Other (Other academic)
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    "Docent" lecture
  • 35.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Broar, böcker, barn2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det här föredraget handlar om broar och barnböcker. Men jag tänker inte tala så mycket om böcker som broar eller om litteraturundervisning som bro för förhöjd literacy och större mångkulturell kompetens, eller broar som något annat alls än just broar, åtminstone inte till att börja med. Jag ska tala om broar. Och jag tänker till att börja med göra det på fiktionens premisser och villigt underkasta mig en ”suspension of disbelief”, där Bifrost alltjämt går mellan människans värld och gudarnas och Gandalf faller från bron vid Khazad-Düm, där Tooticki blickar ner på Mumintrollet från broräcket och Jess bygger en bro till Terabithia. Paperet ger exempel på hur broar används i företrädesvis barn- och ungdomstexter. Där äger bilolyckor, fall, självmord och strider rum. Bron är vägen till det fullständigt annorlunda: döden, livet, fantasins världar – en annan verklighet. Till sist: boken är förstås också en bro; den öppnar en portal till en annan verklighet. Som läsare följer vi orden dit de leder, över ordspannet, från första till sista sidans brofästen, och tas till en annan verklighet. Men som broböckerna visar är det inte riskfritt; broar är farliga – liksom böcker.

  • 36.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    ’But the Story Itself Is Intact’ (or is it?): The Case of the English Translations of The Wonderful Adventures of Nils2009In: Nordic Lights: Translation in the Nordic Countries / [ed] Brett Epstein, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2009, p. 167-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the foreword to the first English translation of The Further Adventures of Nils (orig. 1907, transl. 1911) Velma Swanston Howard acknowledges that “some of the purely geographical matter in the Swedish original … has been eliminated” and that “with the author’s approval, cuts have been made where the descriptive matter was merely of local interest”. She concludes with the words: “But the story itself is intact”. Now, one can certainly sympathize somewhat with the translator and a presumptive international audience and feel that they should be spared some of the geo-trivia of the original. However, the first book, The Wonderful Adventures of Nils (1906, transl 1907), had not been subjected to the same kind of topographic cleansing, and it had still been a resounding success internationally. So, why the change of editorial practice? Even more troublesome: despite Howard’s protestations it is clear that what has been eliminated is not just “geographical matter”, but key scenes of great importance to the overall story, some of which have never been translated into English. In my paper I will focus on two of the most interesting elisions: the death and burial of Little Mats, and the pivotal actions in the Uppsala chapter. The latter episode does exist in an English version, but one based on an abridged and simplified version (1962/1989); the Little Mts-episode has never been translated as far as I know. I will discuss how Howard argues and negotiates the issues at stake with Lagerlöf in the light of their correspondence, material that has hitherto remained unexamined in the Royal Library collection in Stockholm.

  • 37.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Canon Constitution in Children's Literature. Ed. Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer and Anja Müller2018In: International Research in Children's Literature (IRCL), ISSN 1755-6198, E-ISSN 1755-6201, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 99-102Article, book review (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 38.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Card, Orson Scott2006In: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 1, Aamu-Duan / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, p. 255-255Chapter in book (Other academic)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 39.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Carroll Studies2016In: Barnboken, ISSN 0347-772X, E-ISSN 2000-4389, Vol. 39Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Review Essay/Samlingsrecension Anna Kérchy. Alice in Transmedia Wonderland. Jefferson: McFarland, 2016. (258 s.) Sissy Helff och Nadia Butt (Red.). ’Tantalizing Alice’: Approaches, Concepts and Case-studies in Adaptations of a Classic. Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2016. (220 s.) Virginie Iché. L’esthétique du jeu dans les Alice de Lewis Carroll. Paris: L’Harmattan, 2015. (254 s.)

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  • 40.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Carson, Kit2006In: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 1, Aamu-Duan / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, p. 370-370Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 41.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Causley, Charles2006In: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 1, Aamu-Duan / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, p. 268-269Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 42.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    (Child)Reign of Terror: Dangerous Child Régimes2017In: Child Autonomy and Child Governance in Children's Literature: Where Children Rule / [ed] Christopher Kelen, Björn Sundmark, Routledge, 2017, p. 96-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the corner stones of the social order is the asymmetrical power relationship between the adult and the child. The details may differ but essentially power and responsibility should be the prerogative of the adult, whereas dependence and obedience should necessarily be the lot of the child. If these fundamentals are altered or challenged, the social order itself is threatened. In this chapter Stephen King’s short story “Children of the Corn” (1977), and some of the film adaptations of that story are analyzed; moreover, the fairy tale (and film adaptations of) “Hansel and Gretel” are scrutinized; finally, I the focus will be on Charlie Higson’s “The Enemy”-series (2009-2015). The contention is that these are fictions that address intergenerational anxieties and point to changing roles for adults and children.

  • 43.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Children's Covid-19 Literature2020In: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 84-85Article in journal (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 44.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Children’s Fiction about 9/11: Ethnic, Heroic and National Identities2010In: International Research in Children's Literature (IRCL), ISSN 1755-6198, E-ISSN 1755-6201, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 222-223Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Children’s Literature2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    extended abstract uploaded

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  • 46.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Children's Literature Studies: A Research Handbook2012In: International Research in Children's Literature (IRCL), ISSN 1755-6198, E-ISSN 1755-6201, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 229-231Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Church, A. J2006In: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 1, Aamu-Duan / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, p. 303-303Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 48.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Church, Richard2006In: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 1, Aamu-Duan / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, p. 303-304Chapter in book (Other academic)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 49.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Citizenship and Children’s Identity in The Adventures of Nils and Scouting for Boys2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    One of the problems facing present-day liberal and multicultural society is how to negotiate identity and nation through education. If national belonging becomes exclusive and territorial, it will alienate those who feel (or are told) that they are not fully qualified citizens. On the other hand, if citizenship is inclusive but meaningless, society is still at risk. Little prevents it from disintegrating into subcultures and interest groups based on ethnicity and religion. Indeed, both assertive exclusion and watered-down inclusion are problematic, for in each scenario identity-formation and citizenship is disconnected from the greater good of the community. Inclusive and meaningful education is one key. In my paper I will appraise two widely different educational approaches to these issues, both of which have been in and out of fashion for a hundred years. I refer to those seminal works of citizenship and children’s identity: The Adventures of Nils (1906-7) by Selma Lagerlöf and Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship Through Woodcraft (1908) by Robert Baden Powell. The two texts are characteristic of their time and their respective national and cultural contexts – British Empire and Swedish nation – and there is admittedly a lot of ideological and pedagogical lumber between the pages. For instance, the way in which male gender by default equals “human” is of course striking. Nils is a boy, yet unproblematically used as an Everyman representing all children. And Baden-Powell’s handbook is apparently directed at boys only. However, despite these flaws, a critical reading, where I shall make use of recent theories on citizenship and nation, shows that these works still have something say in the educational debate of the 21st century and the questions raised about identity and inclusion.

  • 50.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Citizenship and Children’s Identity in The Wonderful Adventures of Nils and Scouting for Boys2009In: Children's Literature in Education, ISSN 0045-6713, E-ISSN 1573-1693, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 109-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Wonderful Adventures of Nils (1906–1907) by Selma Lagerlöf and Scouting for Boys (1908) by Robert Baden-Powell are characteristic of their time and their respective national and cultural contexts—the Swedish nation state of the early twentieth century and the British Empire. Taking its cue from recent theories on citizenship and education, the article discusses ways in which these two classic children’s books relate to citizenship, nation and education. Ultimately, both books point to ways in which education—in and out of school—can be used to promote individual growth and a peaceful and durable society for world citizens.

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