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  • 1. Palmer, Henrietta
    et al.
    Righard, Erica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Björling, Nils
    Jernsand, Eva Maria
    Kraff, Helena
    Omondi, Lilian
    Clustering and assemblage building2020In: Comparative Urban Research from Theory to Practice: Co-Production for Sustainability / [ed] David Simon, Henrietta Palmer, Jan Riise, Bristol: Policy Press, 2020, p. 89-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Moriuchi, Emi
    Adolfsson, Caroline
    Nyström, Marcus
    Ulver, Sofia
    Comparing attitudes and preferences towards multiracial advertisement in Sweden and the US: Exploration through eye-tracking2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on the results of a pilot study which examines and compares how multiracial and multiethnic advertisement is looked at and perceived in Sweden and the US. Research involving eye-tracking is growing in several disciplines but still underexplored in the Social Sciences. Eye trackers enable recording of eye movements both in a natural and isolated/experimental context. Combining eye-tracking data and other types of traditional data such as interviews or surveys has a great potential to analyze and challenge the data bias, such as social desirability needs and race of interviewer effect. Even though we did not find any statistically significant results due to the limited sample size, the results points to interesting trends and tendencies which need to be addressed in further studies. We did not find any statistically significant differences in the preference in monocultural advertisements among Swedish and American students. However higher prior interracial exposure had some significance in a higher preference in multicultural advertisement.

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  • 3. Orhan, Akinalp
    How to Save a Disappearing Nation?: Discourses on How to Address the Consequences of Climate Change Induced Migration and Examples from Kiribati2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Migration induced by the impacts of climate change is a complex phenomenon that consists of various concepts. It also consists of various perspectives about the cause and the effects of such migration. Regardless of these debates, however, some atoll island nations are under a threat of disappearance due the impacts of climate change, especially the rising sea levels. Migration remains the only option for these island nations. Consequently, there are numerous perspectives on how to address the arising problems due to such migration. By utilizing argumentative discourse analysis, this thesis identifies three dominant discourses that address these consequences of climate change induced migration and explores how the island nation of Kiribati, although seemingly follows the lead of these dominant discourses, manages to shape and transform the discourses for the best interest of the Island Nation.

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  • 4.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Psychol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Korol, Liliia
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Is love politically blind?: The role that the romantic partner plays for young adults' socio-political interest2020In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the political interest of young adults who over two years moved in or out of a romantic relationship or had a romantic partner at both ages. The sample comprised young adults in Sweden (n = 1335; M-age = 22.75, SD = 3.01). Among those who entered a romantic relationship, the partners seemed to adjust to each other's political interest, but when separations occurred, the influence of the former partner vanished. Attending to similarities and dissimilarities in both partners' levels of political interest, we hypothesized that in relations where both partners had high political interest, their political discussions would occur frequently, and they were likely to reinforce each other's search for information about society more than in other romantic relationships. This hypothesis was confirmed. We also examined if partners with different political interest had lower partner commitments and later become singles more often than couples with similar political interests. We found few differences. Overall, both variable- and person-oriented analyses showed that romantic partners can both thwart and increase the political interest of young adults. Apparently, young adults' romantic partners play a significant role for their political interest.

  • 5.
    Zdravkovic, Slobodan
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Carlzén, Katarina
    Länsstyrelsen Skåne.
    Grahn, Mathias
    Malmö Stad.
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Kartläggning av hälsa, levnadsvanor, sociala relationer, arbetsmarknad och boendemiljö bland arabisktalande nyanlända inom etableringen: Delrapport från MILSA 2.02020Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Forced migration is a trying and difficult experience to endure. Several supplementary challenges in relation to the establishment process await almost immediately after arrival. The process of establishing into a new society is often a long and challenging process. Both learning the language and understanding the society are the first immediate barriers for entering the Swedish labour market, as well as the authorization of diplomas and qualifications. A common challenge is also finding stable and adequate housing. A prerequisite for being able to take on these challenges is the health capital/status of recently arrived migrants (RAM). Health approached in a wide-ranging manner includes all factors that are in one way or another affecting the life of a human being. In order to enhance the establishment and inclusion of RAM it is important to have the fundamental understanding of the situation that this group are facing in relation to their health, as well as different health related risk factors.

    Aim

    The aim of the survey was to evaluate health and health related factors for RAM adults included in the establishment process in the southern region of Sweden, Skåne.

    Material and methods

    All recently arrived Arabic speaking individuals that currently participated in civic- and health communication through Partnership Scania were invited to participate in the study. The period of data collection was between May 2018 and March 2019. The questionnaire was initially developed in Swedish and translated into Arabic. It contains questions addressing different diseases, care needs, migration specific questions, housing, social relations, violence, living habits and sexual health among other things. The questionnaire was distributed in a paper format in civic and health communication classes through civic and health communicators. In total, 315 questionnaires were received resulting in an approximate response rate of 25,3%.11

    Conclusion

    The study found that a large percentage of RAM reported being either overweight or obese, with many of them considering that they gained weight since their flight to Sweden. Almost one in ten RAM participants reported their health status as bad or very bad. A third of participants reported their health as fairly good. Almost half of the respondents experienced an improvement in self-reported health status after receiving the residence permit, but almost one fifth experienced a change for the worse. Almost half the participants had been in a need for health care during the last three months from the date of answering the questionnaire without seeking care. Furthermore, almost a third of the RAM was at risk for their mental ill-health. A higher proportion of men as compared to women reported being at risk for their mental ill-health. More than half of the respondents were not physically active or were active less than 30 minutes per week. The majority of the respondents reported distrust for humans beings. A considerable proportion were lacking social networks in relation to finding jobs. Half of the respondents were missing any contact with employers and a third experienced difficulties having their qualification validated.

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  • 6.
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlzén, Katarina
    Länsstyrelsen Skåne.
    Grahn, Mathias
    Malmö Stad.
    Zdravkovic, Slobodan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Kartläggning av nyligen nyanländas hälsa, levnadsvanor, sociala relationer, arbetsmarknad och boendemiljö efter etableringen.: Delrapport från MILSA 2.02020Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It is often a long and time-consuming process for migrants i.e. refugees to establish themselves into a new society. This includes adapting to the new society within which they find themselves, learning the local language as well as trying to access the labour market. To facilitate this, in 2010 Sweden adopted a mandatory 24 months structured and individually based public support system for to facilitate migrants establishment in the country (once a residence permit has been granted). This research questions how well the group of newly arrived migrants i.e. refugees from Syria and Iraq is equipped to take on the challenges that await them after the mandatory period of establishment has ended. For example, has their situation improved? How is their physical and mental health status? How do they consider the establishment period? Are they employed or what are their thoughts on the possibility of becoming so? This understanding is crucial in order to ensure that there is a solid empirical foundation upon which to base an assessment of, and were necessary adapt, the establishment procedure in Sweden.

    Aim

    The aim of the survey has been to map health and health related factors among adult newly arrived migrants from Iraq and Syria in Skåne that received the public support for their establishment. In addition to this the research sought to determine if this support has contributed to increased participation in society as well as increased access to the labour market.

    Material and methods

    The survey was conducted using a broad questionnaire in Arabic which focused on different health related questions, care needs, living conditions, social relations, violence , migration specific questions, employment, participation in society as well as questions related to sexual health. The selection of respondents is based on a random sample containing 10 000 individuals living in Skåne who were born in Iraq and Syria. The research looked at those who had received a residence permit between 01.09.2012 and 31.08.2016. The age of the respondents was between 20 and 64 years when receiving the residence permit. The survey was conducted during the autumn of 2018. The questionnaire was sent out to the respondents as a paper questionnaire with the possibility to answer the13questionnaire online. In total, 3208 questionnaires were received resulting in a response rate of 33%.

    Conclusion

    The survey found the following. The time period for receiving residence permit was usually within one year of arrival. A good level of Swedish language proficiently was only reported by a few respondents. The self-reported health status is in line with the rest of the population in the region. In addition, the participants recognised that the maintenance of their health was largely their responsibility, and was important. There were also some reports of unmet health needs as well as unmet dental care needs. Health related living conditions, such as smoking and physical inactivity, is more common amongst this group than the rest of the population. Lack of trust for different institutions is a challenge as it is more prevalent amongst this group than the general population. However, in contrast to this, there were high level of trust reported with regard to child health care centres. Almost all participants reported that they participated in the public support for establishment, including civic and health communication. The majority reported that the activities included in the establishment programme as being relevant. However, the observed challenges were not being sensitive to the various situations of the participants, quality as well as that, the activities overlap. Loss of social network as well as language barriers are considered by many as an obstacle for entering the labour market. Access to the Swedish labour market was reportedly a significant ongoing challenge for the participants.

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  • 7.
    Andrén, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    MIM Academic Record 20192020Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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  • 8.
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Zdravkovic, Slobodan
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Nyanlända flyktingars upplevelse av hälsa under etableringen i Sverige: Delrapport från MILSA 2.02020Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundMigration in general is a factor that could lead to increased stress-levels among migrants, which is often caused by different circumstances that have occurred before the migration. After their arrival in a host country, a period of uncertainty occurs for asylum seekers. This results from waiting for their asylum claim to be assessed. Prolonged waiting for permission to stay correlate negatively in relation with mental health. In Sweden, all newly arrived migrants are invited to participate in an establishment process, which means individually developed support for the newly arrived persons to settle and begin to integrate. However, a foundation for being able to actively participate in the establishment process is a good health as well as stable and safe housing. A special vulnerable group among the newly arrived are families with children. This results from challenges that this group face with health and secure and stable housing in contrast to other newly arrived persons that are without a partner and children. Further on, newly arrived women are also a vulnerable group to consider. Therefore, there is a great need to illuminate the newly arrived families and especially women, and how they consider their health as well as their situation during their establishment process.

    Aim

    The aim was to shed light on the newly arrived families experience of health, with a focus on female newly arrived migrants health during their establishment.

    Material and methods

    The present report consists of two qualitative research studies that employed interviews. The interviews were carried out using semi-structured guides and consisted of several questions and themes. 26 interviews were carried out in total. 15 of these focused on families and 11 focused on the situation for newly arrived women. In the first study the data was analyzed by the method by Attride-Stirling and thematic network and in the second study with Burnard`s method for content analysis. Authorized translators were used. All interviews were conducted within the county of Scania.

    Conclusion

    Newly arrived families within the establishment process are fighting the asylum application as well as being challenged to find stable housing for their families. The children enjoyed school and the parents were driven by a determination to learn the Swedish language as well as being able to enter the Swedish labor market, although the later was considered to be a challenge for them. Some of the parents were suffering from stress due to having family12members left in home countries. Further to this the participants highlighted challenges with regard to integration in to Swedish society. When we do consider the situation of the newly arrived women, they were also seeing that family reunification is of importance and crucial for their mental well-being. The women in the present study, were eager to learn the language and to enter the labor market.In conclusion, it is of great importance to be sensitive to determinants of health such as unemployment, participation, the social life in Sweden as well as safe housing conditions with looking at certain vulnerable groups experiences of the establishment process in Sweden.

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  • 9.
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Zdravkovic, Slobodan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Sjögren Forss, Katarina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    The Association Between Self-perceived Health and Sleep-Quality and Anxiety Among Newly Arrived Refugees in Sweden: A Quantitative Study.2020In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, ISSN 1557-1912, E-ISSN 1557-1920, Vol. 22, p. 82-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research findings suggest that insomnia could be related to decreased health status and that it could also be affected by traumatic life experiences, such as war. Good health is important for newly arrived refugees for an effective integration process. The aim of the present study is, therefore, to investigate the association between self-perceived health and sleep quality among newly arrived refugees in Sweden. The results are based on 681 migrants who participated in a survey between 2015 and 2016. There was a significant odds ratio (OR) after adjustment for confounders for newly arrived refugees that were experiencing bad self-perceived health to also experience bad sleep: OR 8.07 (4.34-15.00). Furthermore, the OR remained significant but lower after adjustments for confounders for newly arrived refugees that had bad self-perceived health to be suffering from anxiety during sleep, with OR 3.83 (2.11-6.94).

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  • 10.
    DeBono, Daniela
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    The Libya-Italy migration corridor2020In: Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development / [ed] Tania Bastia and Ron Skeldon, Oxon: Routledge, 2020, 1st, p. 462-467Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Suter, Brigitte
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Cangia, Flavia
    Time and family on the move: 'Accompanying partners' in geographical mobility2020In: Time & Society, ISSN 0961-463X, E-ISSN 1461-7463, article id 0961463X19897431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under conditions of global economy, geographical mobility becomes an important aspect of the working lives for a wider range of professionals. At times, these people move with their families. The relocation to a new country can entail changes for the whole family, in particular for the partner, who can experience a more pronounced alteration of work-family relations. Especially for dual career couples, with both partners employed before migration, the change in the experience of time can be very profound for the accompanying partner who can move from being a full-time professional to being a full-time homemaker. Based on two studies conducted respectively in China and Switzerland with mobile families, we explore how accompanying partners experience and practice time in the context of migration with the family. We discuss how, while time for the contracted partner can still be structured by work, a more ambivalent mixture of personal desire, family relations, cultural values and social expectations seem to affect the subjective experience of time for the accompanying partner.

  • 12.
    Emilsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Irastorza, Nahikari
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    30 Percent Lower Income: A Follow-up of the Swedish 2008 Labour Migration Reform2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2008, Sweden introduced a non-selective labour migration policy without labour market tests and human capital considerations. This article studies the effects of the policy change on the size, composition and labour market outcomes. Using longitudinal register data, we find that the 2008 liberalizations of the Swedish labour migration policy increased the number of labour migrants from non-EU countries. Post-reform labour migrant cohorts have on average lower level of human capital, and the lower level of human capital translates into worse labour market outcomes. One year after migration, post-reform cohorts have a higher skills-mismatch and about 30 percent lower income. Migration controls against abuse introduced in 2011 and 2012 improved the labour market outcomes somewhat.

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  • 13.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Sato, Yuna
    Beyond being either-or: Identification of multiracial and multiethnic Japanese youth2019In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the number of multiracial and multiethnic Japanese who are socially recognised and identified as haafu (mixed) has increased due to a rise in intermarriages, the identities and experiences of mixed persons in Japan are seldom critically analysed. Based on interviews with 29 multiracial and multiethnic individuals residing in Japan, this article explores not only how multiracial and multiethnic Japanese identify themselves but also how they feel they are identified by others in society. The analysis shows that multiracial and multiethnic persons self-identify in a way that goes beyond either-or categories and the binary notions of Japanese/foreigner. It also reveals how both multiracial and multiethnic persons face a gap between self-identity and ascribed identity and that they negotiate this gap in various ways. However, the gap and the negotiation process that multiracial persons face differ to those of multiethnic persons. Multiracial persons whose mixedness is phenotypically visible experience more constraints in their ethnic options and have more difficulty in passing as Japanese, whereas multiethnic persons whose mixedness is invisible can pass as Japanese more easily but face constraints in their ethnic option to be identified as mixed and in claiming their multiethnic background.

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  • 14.
    Strange, Michael
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Oliveira Martins, Bruno
    Claiming parity between unequal partners: how African counterparts are framed in the externalisation of EU migration governance2019In: Global Affairs, ISSN 2334-0460, E-ISSN 2334-0479, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 235-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The externalisation of European Union migration governance disproportionately impacts states based on the African continent. Much of the analytical focus amongst existing research has been on the agency of the EU and its Member-states, identifying the asymmetric and postcolonial character of these policies, as well as highlighting that the imposition of European interests on African states risks undermining their own political stability. Yet, there is significant effort spent by actors on both sides of the Mediterranean on making African counterparts visible as an equal partner – an endeavour seen not just rhetorically within speeches, but also in the set-up of key institutional fora and their membership. The article approaches the framing processes involved to trace the legitimating basis of EU-Africa relations and the externalisation of EU migration policy to African states, highlighting how African political actors are positioned as participating in what is an EU-led process.

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  • 15.
    Emilsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Adolfsson, Caroline
    Dreaming of Sweden as a Space of Well-Being: Lifestyle Migration Among Young Latvians and Romanians2019In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 201-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on 41 semi-structured interviews with young Latvians and Romanians in Malmö, Sweden, this article explores why Europeans from new European Union (EU) member states want to move to, and stay in, Sweden despite economic difficulties and underemployment. Six main factors for explaining mobility patterns are highlighted: free university education, romantic relationships, cosmopolitan lifestyle, presence of English language, idealisation of Sweden and work–life balance. We read these factors as ideas and aspirations of well-being in the ‘imagined space’ of Sweden. The findings illustrate that many young migrants do not chose to move to Sweden for short-term economic opportunities, but rather to experience a different lifestyle. In most cases, these expectations are met, although over time.

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  • 16.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Governing vulnerabilised migrant childhoods through children’s rights2019In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 337-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses four different contexts in Sweden where children’s rights have been mobilised to govern vulnerabilised migrant childhoods. The concept of ‘vulnerabilisation’ is suggested to capture the political processes creating the conditions for defining and attributing vulnerability. To enable children’s rights to be a productive tool for challenging the repressive governing of migrant families and children, the article argues for the need of a problematisation and contextualisation of both the children’s rights paradigm and the vulnerabilisation of migrant childhoods.

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  • 17.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    How do mixed Swedes identify themselves2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A global trend has shown an increase in intimate partnerships across nationality, race, ethnicity, and religion, and this is also the case in Sweden. As a result, the children of these unions (i.e. multiethnic and multiracial persons) are undeniably part of contemporary society. This study is one of the first studies in Sweden that solely focuses on the multiracial and multiethnic population. Based on 21 qualitative interviews, this article explores how mixed Swedes identify themselves and how they experience that they are identified by others using Brubaker’s (2016) conceptualization. The analysis shows that, contrary to the flexibility in how mixed Swedes identify themselves, mixed Swedes experience that people in society categorize them in a fixed idea of ‘either-or’ – either Swedish or not Swedish. The idea of being Swedish is strongly connected to the idea of being white; therefore, many mixed Swedes with a non-white phenotype experience that their identification as Swedish is not validated. However, some interviewees reject the idea of Swedish as solely being ‘white’ and are actively redrawing what it means to be Swedish through emphasizing nationality and cultural belonging.

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  • 18.
    Povrzanovic Frykman, Maja
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Guribye, Eugene
    Hidle, Knut
    Mozetic, Katarina
    How does place matter to highly skilled migrants? Work/non-work experiences of international physicians in Norway and Sweden2019In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article tackles the question of how place matters to migrant physicians in the regions of Agder in Norway and Skåne in Sweden by exploring how place-specific conditions affect their experiences in the work, private, family and social domains of life. For this purpose, the article uses thematic analysis of the narrative material gathered through 25 semi-structured interviews. The lens of work/non-work domains, combined with a practice-oriented approach to place, highlights the complexity of lived experiences as they evolve in a particular context. Three main findings are identified: the non-homogenous significance of place across life domains, the vital role of transborder connections and obligations that affect individual and family resources for work/non-work negotiations in the place of settlement and the limits to the skill-based privileges in the place of settlement, which are notable in the domain of work but not replicated in non-work domains.

  • 19.
    Wærp, Eline
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Humanitarian Borderwork?: An Analysis of Frontex’s Discourses and Practices2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of ’humanitarian borderwork’ (Pallister-Wilkins 2017) entered the social sciences the last couple of years, in the wake of the 2015 migration crisis to the EU. With roots in the ’humanitarian border enforcement’ discourse (Williams 2016) that developed in the US post-9/11, the concept suggests that the goals of ‘migrant safety’ (i.e. human security) and ‘border control’ (i.e. state security) are mutually attainable. This ‘humanitarian-security’ (Andersson 2017, De Lauri 2018) or ‘safety/security’ (Williams 2016) nexus casts increased border control as not the cause of, but the remedy to, migrants’ vulnerability and death. ‘Humanitarian borderwork’ further implies a convergence between two seemingly distinct concepts: ‘humanitarianism’ and ‘borderwork’ (Walters 2011). Whereas ‘humanitarianism’ has traditionally been associated with a concern for humanity, human rights, alleviation of suffering, and the principle of ‘do no harm’; ‘borderwork’ has been preoccupied with exclusion, control, security and monitoring/surveillance (Pallister-Wilkins 2015b). And whereas humanitarian action has traditionally been carried out by depoliticized, independent actors (notably NGOs) with the sole purpose of providing humanitarian assistance (Redfield and Bornstein 2011); humanitarianism is now increasingly being delivered by (supranational) state-actors, such as the EU’s Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) – which claims to be just as preoccupied with saving lives as protecting the EU’s external borders. This begs the questions: are ‘humanitarianism’ and ‘borderwork’ compatible concepts? And if so, in the case of the EU, how humanitarian is Frontex’s borderwork? Informed by a literature review of the genealogy of the concepts of ‘humanitarianism’ and ‘humanitarian borderwork’, the paper problematizes the latter and seeks to answer those questions by analyzing and comparing Frontex’s humanitarian discourses and practices to the understanding of humanitarianism within anthropology – a field that has studied it extensively. The paper thus provides part of the literature review and theoretical- and conceptual framework for the dissertation, to be complemented with more empirics at a later stage. Arguing that while Frontex’s ‘humanitarian borderwork’ fails to meet the criteria in the traditional understanding of humanitarianism, it does succeed in situating itself within the ‘new humanitarianism’ (Nascimento 2015) that emerged after the end of the Cold War – where state actors play a larger role, and militarization and securitization of borders increasingly shape humanitarian action.

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  • 20.
    Emilsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Mozetič, Katarina
    Intra-EU youth mobility, human capital and career outcomes: the case of young high-skilled Latvians and Romanians in Sweden2019In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the relationship between human capital and career outcomes using the case of highly skilled young Latvians and Romanians in Sweden. As a non-English-speaking country with regulated labour markets, the Swedish case provides a contrast to previous studies on EU10 to EU15 mobility that usually focus on English-speaking receiving countries with less regulated labour markets. Thirty-eight semi-structured interviews are analysed from a life-course perspective to map the education and career trajectories before and after their mobility. Three career trajectories are found: match, re-skilling, and de-skilling. Most young migrants tend to prioritize general, rather than country specific, human capital investments, which negatively affects their career outcomes. The results highlight the importance of individual human capital investment choices as well as structural opportunities in receiving countries for understanding the relationship between human capital and career outcomes for young EU-migrants.

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  • 21. Lulle, Aija
    et al.
    Janta, Hania
    Emilsson, Henrik
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Introduction to the Special Issue: European youth migration: human capital outcomes, skills and competences2019In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human capital has been long an exceedingly important concept in migration research. Over time there have been attempts to provide more nuanced, and less economistic interpretations of human capital. Based on outputs from the EU Horizon 2020 project YMOBILITY (2015–2018) and two additional papers, this Special Issue seeks to advance this agenda further by addressing the complexities of the mobility of human capital. Migration problematises human capital assumptions due to challenges in transferring human capital across national borders. In this introductory paper we propose rethinking the human capital of migrants in a three-fold way. Firstly, we question the interpretation of skills and competences beyond the conventional divide of ‘higher-skilled’ and ‘lower-skilled’ through the concept of a ‘knowledgeable migrant’. Secondly, we probe deeper into an understanding of the transferability of skills in relation to ‘location’, exploring the possibilities and constraints to the transfer of human capital in different spatial contexts. Thirdly, we theorise human capital in terms of new temporalities of migration and the role these play in skill acquisition. We illustrate our novel theoretical thinking with selected empirical data, both quantitative and qualitative, on youth mobility in Europe.

  • 22.
    Håkansson, Peter Gladoic
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Zdravkovic, Slobodan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Kvantitativa studier bland nyanlända ungdomar och ensamkommande: Tillvägagångssätt och utmaningar2019In: MILSA Working Paper Series, no 2019:1Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns ett flertal tillfällen då det är svårt att hitta respondenter via traditionella register eller insamlingsmetoder. Att undersöka nyanlända ungdomars hälsa är ett sådant tillfälle. Projektet MILSA 2.0 är en forskningsbaserad stöd- och utvecklingsplattform och ett av projektets mål har varit att utveckla metoder för att samla in kunskap om nyanländas hälsa. I delprojektet MILSA 2.3 undersöks barn och ungdomars hälsosituation framförallt med fokus på social kapital, riskbeteenden och framtidstro. Den metod som utvecklades i projektet byggde på att samla in enkätsvar via skolorna i Skånes kommuner. Metoden förutsatte ett nära samarbete med kontaktpersoner i kommunerna. Enkäterna var översatta av MILSA-projektet till arabiska, dari och pashto, men även en version på svenska erbjöds respondenterna. Trots vissa brister utifrån ett traditionellt obundet slumpmässigt urval (OSU), menar vi att urvalet kan svara på frågor som vi inte annars hade kunnat få svar på. Vi bör naturligtvis vara medvetna om de brister som finns i urvalet, men samtidigt kan det bidra till ny kunskap om en grupp där det finns väldigt begränsat med data. För framtida studier av liknande grupper bör mer resurser avsättas för ett närmare samarbete med kommunerna och studien måste tydligare förankras med skolor och kommuner utifrån den metod som ska användas.

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  • 23.
    Righard, Erica
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Emilsson, Henrik
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Öberg, Klara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Language Education for Asylum Seekers and Refugees in Sweden: Provision and Governance2019Report (Other academic)
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  • 24.
    Suter, Brigitte
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Migration as Adventure: Swedish corporate families’ experience of liminality in Shanghai2019In: Journal of Transient Migration, ISSN 2397-7140, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 45-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The post-reform era in China has seen a steady increase in foreign migrants to the country. Swedish intra-corporate families are ambivalent about the move to China, as this causes the family dynamic to shift from a dual-career model to that of a single-career model. Although structural conditions are important in the decision to migrate, the more subjective part of the motivation to engage in mobility is the main focus of this article. Many assert that wanting to ‘have an adventure’ was a decisive aspect of the decision to migrate. By disentangling this ultimately relational concept, the article analyses the construction of difference in the way China is both imagined and experienced. The article contributes by providing insight into the family dynamics and decision-making involved in taking on an international assignment.

  • 25.
    Andrén, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    MIM Academic Record 20182019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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  • 26.
    DeBono, Daniela
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Narrating the Humanitarian Border: Moral Deliberations of Territorial Borderworkers at the EU’s Mediterranean Border2019In: Journal of Mediterranean Studies, ISSN 1016-3476, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 55-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union’s external border regime in the Mediterranean is the classic ‘humanitarian border’. It is presented and performed as a humanitarian and caring enterprise, but conceals strong elements of exclusionary border control. Important actors in its daily social construction are territorial borderworkers who are tasked with the implementation of the laws and policies underpinning the humanitarian border. Their narratives are passionate and articulated using emotive language and expressions denoting an intensity of personal feelings, while the moral framing of the issues indicates a moral discomfort. Drawing on multi-sited and long-term ethnographic fieldwork in Lampedusa and Sicily, situated on the external Mediterranean border of the European Union, this article explores the key themes and form of the personal narratives of territorial borderworkers who discuss border processes and deliberate their own roles within it. Their narratives reveal insights about their worldview, and add empirical depth to our understanding of the humanitarian border and the enterprise of constructing it.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-11-07 00:00
  • 27.
    Hansen, Christina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    New Collectives and Alliances: A Study of Activism in Möllevången, Malmö2019In: Creating the City: Identity, Memory and Participation, Malmö University Publications in Urban Studies, Malmö University , 2019, p. 329-342Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 28.
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Zdravkovic, Slobodan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Newly arrived refugee parents in sweden and their experience of the resettlement process: A qualitative study2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The Swedish public support system for integration and establishment of newly arrived refugees includes an individualized introduction plan, containing language, civic and health information classes. As the plan requires active involvement, the simultaneous establishment of childcare and school start for children risks creating additional challenges and frustrations. The aim of the study was to explore the experience of adjustment among newly arrived refuge parents in the resettlement process, so as to understand how this risk may be mitigated. Methods: A qualitative study conducted with 24 Syrian refugee parents participating in the resettlement process and having received asylum status. Results: Parents experienced stress due to long waiting times for residence permits and the struggle to find stable housing. The parents established themselves by enrolling in language studies and looking for employment. They also faced challenges adjusting socially since they were mainly meeting people from their own country and therefore felt excluded from the Swedish society. Conclusions: The parents describe the experiences of having escaped from a war-torn country and arrived in new surroundings as mainly challenging for their current situation. Feelings of uncertainty arise as families struggle with daily life while waiting for residence permits, finding stable housing, learning a language and adjusting to new social circumstances. Having this in mind, we conclude that this group of refugees is exposed to health risks in the near future and as such is in need of additional support.

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  • 29.
    Sjögren Forss, Katarina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Persson, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Nursing students' experiences of caring for ethnically and culturally diverse patients: A scoping review2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 37, p. 97-104Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about nursing students' experiences of caring for patients from diverse cultures, which is an important factor in educational settings when it comes to understanding whether the teaching strategies applied are successful. Thus, the aim of this study was to conduct a scoping review of the literature, thereby synthesising existing studies to explore nursing students' experiences of caring for patients with different cultural backgrounds from theirs. A systematic article search was done in PubMed, CINAHL and ERIC. A total of 996 studies were found in the searches and finally seven studies met the inclusion criteria and were included. The analysis of the seven included studies was interpreted to represent two overarching themes, namely the challenge of communication and non-mutual language and the challenge of culture and culturally influenced behaviour, representing nursing students' experiences of caring for patients with a different cultural background from theirs. A major challenge for nursing educators appears to be creating pedagogical interventions that cultivate a humble, solicitous and caring curiosity among students, such that they do not perceive only challenges in caring for culturally diverse patients.

  • 30. Mäkelä, Fanny
    et al.
    Povrzanovic Frykman, Maja
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Mäkelä, Fanny
    "Only volunteers"? Personal motivations and political ambiguities within Refugees Welcome to Malmö civil initiative2019In: Refugee Protection and Civil Society in Europe / [ed] Margit Feischmidt, Ludger Pries, Céline Cantat, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 291-318Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 7 September and 12 November 2015, approximately 800 volunteers met up to 1000 refugees a day under the banner of Refugees Welcome to Malmö, at Malmö Central train station as the first point of the asylum seekers’ arrival in Sweden. Based on in-depth interviews, this chapter analyzes the volunteers’ motivations, experiences and ambiguities, against the background of a specific historical, organizational and local context in which this grassroots initiative emerged. Special attention is paid to the volunteers’ perceptions of their work and to collaborations and conflicts with other actors in the field. The analysis of the volunteers’ positions toward the politicization of a civil initiative points to the need for city context-sensitive research on the changing constellations of actors who provide support to refugees.

  • 31. Gegner, Harald
    et al.
    Righard, Erica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Denvall, Verner
    Otydlighetens betydelse: de regionala utvecklingsledarna och evidensbaserad praktik inom den sociala barn- och ungdomsvården2019In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 153-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The significance of ambiguity – Evidence-based practice in social service with children and youth. Evidence-based practice (EBP) has gained a central position as a model of knowledge for social work in the public sector. In the Swedish Government Report about knowledge-based social work from 2008, EBP is described as a useful way of structuring the social services on a scientific basis (SOU 2008:18). Following on this, and in order to establish EBP in social work practice, between 2009 and 2016, there were annual agreements between the government and the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions (SALAR). As defined by the annual agreements, a national network of Regional Development Leaders (regionala utvecklingsledare) was given the task of producing regional plans of action for the establishment of EBP in the municipalities. The article examines how the Regional Development Leaders in the so-called Children and Youth Investment (Barn- och ungasatsningen) interpret and implement EBP as a model in public social work. The study is based on interviews with 22 out of the 37 Regional Development Leaders that were part of the Children and Youth Investment in 2016. Ernesto Laclau’s theory of empty signifier serves as an analytical tool. The analysis shows that the ambiguity surrounding EBP creates discretion for the Regional Development Leaders. This discretion allows them to use EBP as a ”signifier without a signified”; a model that they can fill with different meanings depending on purpose and context. In that perspective, EBP appears as a floating term and can be characterized as an empty signifier. One of the main results stresses the fact that the Regional Development Leaders describe EBP as a model of governance rather than a model of knowledge. Despite its ambiguity, EBP fills a significant function for the development of knowledge-based social work practices in the public sector.

  • 32. Carlzén, Katarina
    et al.
    Witmer, Hope
    Zdravkovic, Slobodan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Partnership Skåne: establishing a model for health diplomacy at subnational level2019In: Health diplomacy: spotlight on refugees and migrants / [ed] Santino Severoni, Monika Kosinska, Palmira Immordino, Michaela Told, Mihály Kökény, WHO regional office for europe , 2019, p. 172-183Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 33.
    DeBono, Daniela
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Plastic hospitality: The empty signifier at the EU’s Mediterranean border2019In: Migration Studies, ISSN 2049-5838, E-ISSN 2049-5846, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 340-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hospitality and hospitality-laden language feature highly among people working in or around structures of first reception in Italy and Malta, two countries at the European Union’s (EU) external border. This is peculiar because hospitality rarely features at first reception, which forms part of the state’s border system. Characteristically, security issues are prioritized, and the first reception system is managed by the member state’s security agents, in collaboration with EU and international security agents. In practice, first reception refers to the processes of identification, registration, and classification that irregular migrants go through after having crossed the border without authorization and, often, without identification. Drawing on long-term and multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork in Italy and Malta, this article examines some of the uses of hospitality language by a spectrum of territorial borderworkers operating with state, non-state, security, humanitarian, and activist entities in the two countries that are the object of this study. Discourse analysis yields interesting insights into how the use of the hospitality paradigm and hospitality terminology in first reception is less about hospitality practices and more about power. It proposes that the hospitality paradigm be conceptualized as a Laclauian empty signifier, and therefore, as a locus of power.

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  • 34. Wittrock, Jon
    Politiska begrepp. Carl Schmitt som samtida politisk tänkare: mångkultur, migration, ordning och undantag2019Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This text presents, interprets and further develops key concepts that are used by Carl Schmitt and apply them to contemporary Swedish debates about multiculturalism and migration. Schmitt’s theory of the political is interpreted in terms of two dimensions, one that is about distinctions between friends and enemies and one that focuses, rather, on constant processes of politicisation and depoliticisation, which different actors try to structure into friend/enemy distinctions for their own purposes. In this struggle about which friend/enemy distinctions are to be established, norms, narratives, symbols and rituals become crucial political tools, which means that we cannot understand contemporary Swedish politics in a simplistic way as unambiguously secular – rather, there are elements which we may call sacred, as well as elements which may be considered marginalised and taboo. Ultimately, we may thus pose the question as to what a consistently secular order would actually entail – a question which opens up for a deeper reflection on alternative socio-political orders.

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  • 35.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Hellström, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Pro-and antimigrant mobilizations in polarized Sweden2019In: The refugee reception crisis in anti-immigrant times: Polarization of the public opinion, local mobilizations and reception practices in Europe; / [ed] Andrea Rea, Martin Martiniello, Alessandro Mazzola, Bart Meuleman, ULB Press , 2019, p. 75-94Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes current changes in migration flows and politics in Sweden, before presenting and discussing the reactions to these changes in civil society – the mobilization of both pro- and anti-migration sentiments – which reflect the polarized sentiments towards immigration in Swedish society.First, this report conveys information about migration flows to Sweden before, during and after the refugee reception crisis of 2015. In 2016 in particular, Sweden had a major intake of asylum seekers, which prompted new legislative measures to manage this. Second, we emphasize transformations in the party-political landscape before, during and after the refugee reception crisis of 2015. In this period there was also a rhetorical shift in mainstream politics, heralding an emphasis on security in order to protect the Swedish model. The mainstream-right bloc was also split in two. Third, we study the actions and reactions in response to these changes in civil society. The everyday experiences of problems with integration stand in contrast with international norms of solidarity. We conclude that the crisis enabled a window of opportunity for the mobilization of both pro- and anti-migration sentiments in civil society.

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  • 36.
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Zdravkovic, Slobodan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Refugee women`s experince of the resettlement process: a qualitative study2019In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 19, article id 147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Resettlement can be particularly challenging for women as having a lower socioeconomic status and language barriers, may impede women’s access to education, employment opportunities, health-care services, as well as the cultural, social, material and resilience factors that facilitate adjustment and adaption. Thus, the aim of this study is to further explore the perception of refugee women in Sweden concerning their situation during active participation in the resettlement process in the country. Methods: Qualitative interview study with 11 recently arrived refugee women who had received their residence permits and were enrolled in the resettlement process. The interviews were conducted in Swedish with the support of an authorized Arabic translator present by telephone. Results: Refugee women suffered from being separated from their loved ones and felt compelled to achieve something of value in the host country. All experienced both physical and mental anguish. Conclusions: Stakeholders in societies that receive refugee women should stress the importance of finding opportunities for and fast entrance into employment in the host countries. This would be beneficial for the integration and well-being of refugee women after migration. Keywords: Migration, resettlement, qualitative research, women

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  • 37.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Shinozaki, Kyoko
    Researching across differences: Unsettling methodological discussions from a minority’s perspectives2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Just as we inhabit multiple positions and identities in our everyday life, when conducting fieldwork and analysis, we also both consciously and unconsciously draw on different positions as researchers. Simultaneously, through field interactions, we, too, are positioned by research participants. Some of these positions and identities can be flexible and fluid while other positions such as ‘race’ or gender can be imposed and rigid. There are ample methodological discussions interrogating the question of insider-outsider positions. One of the conclusions in this body of literature highlights the importance of reflexivity and awareness of positionality. This line of literature, moreover, focuses on the fluidity of social positions by emphasising the transgressing of hierarchies between the interviewees and the interviewed. However still, methodological discussions tend either reinforce the insider-outsider binary thinking, and not to further than reflexivity. Our key claim is that it is precisely because reflections written from the perspective of researchers belonging to a minority group of different kinds are still scarce to date. Thus, there is an urgent need to critically engage with a ‘traditional’ gaze as a researcher. In this article, we take a step to unsettle the taken-for-granted mode of knowledge production by reflecting both upon our own experiences of conducting research across various social differences in Austria, Germany, Japan, and Sweden.

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  • 38.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Sacrificing parents on the altar of children's rights: Intergenerational struggles and rights in deportability2019In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 32, article id 100529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    State actors arguing for the rights of undocumented children often attempt to strengthen children's deservingness by portraying their parents as bad parents who put their children at risk. Through ethnographic observations in Malmö, Sweden and Birmingham, UK, this article shows how such demonization of the parents by the state is not reflected in the everyday life experiences of undocumented families themselves. While the state views the parents as putting their children at risk by ‘hiding’ them, the parents view the state as putting their children at risk by trying to deport them. The article discusses how parents act as ‘humanitarian agents’ responsible for caring for the children when state support to the deserving, rights-bearing child is limited by the notion of the deportable migrant child. These parental practices of unrecognized emotional labour are analysed as mother- work. The interdependent character of family life in deportability is highlighted through how children take on parental responsibilities as well and how stress and knowledge about their irregular situation is shared across generations. To conclude, the article argues that if one neglects the intergenerational context of undocumented children's rights, one risks marginalising the human rights of both children as well as adults.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-07-19 00:00
  • 39.
    Lill, Linda
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Helene, Jacobson Pettersson
    Teaching ethnicity in social work education: teachers’ experiences in Sweden2019In: Social Work Education, ISSN 0261-5479, E-ISSN 1470-1227, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 34-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The shifting demographics that come with migration and globalization have changed the settings for social work education in Sweden. To promote sustainability in a diverse society, strategies for inclusion and equality are essential in the development of core competencies in social work. One essential question is how social work education has responded to the demographic changes. The study aims to contribute with knowledge about how ethnicity is conceptualized in Sweden and to describe the impact the subject has on teaching forms and strategies. More specifically, the study investigates university teachers’ expressions of their teaching practices about the concept and addresses the faculty members’ narratives about the teaching situations. The study concludes that the lack of a coherent academic context for teaching ethnicity leads to the development of individual approaches by the teachers and a personalization of the issue of ethnicity in social work education. This creates a limitation on how structural elements come into play in relation to ethnicity, and in turn, leads to a shortage of a critical analysis of the construction of social problems where ethnicity plays a fundamental role. These circumstances precede theoretical perspectives on social problems related to ethnicity, migration, transnational relations, globalization, and racism.

  • 40.
    Povrzanovic Frykman, Maja
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Mozetic, Katarina
    The importance of friends: social life challenges for foreign physicians in Southern Sweden2019In: Community, Work and Family, ISSN 1366-8803, E-ISSN 1469-3615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article connects the fields of work/non-work research with the research on social integration of migrants. It is based on in-depth interviews with foreign physicians in the south of Sweden which explored their work/non-work experiences and their subjective perceptions of managing work, family, social and private domains of life. Based on individual reflections of social life as experienced in the workplace, in the locations of everyday life and transnationally, the analysis does not pursue the existence and composition of social networks but focuses on non-instrumental aspects of social life and explores their significance for high-skilled migrants’ own sense of integration. The findings suggest that migrants who are privileged in terms of education and employment still face extensive challenges in the social domain of life, especially with regard to close friendships. The findings furthermore suggest that social integration is a process that is influenced by place, time and individual life trajectories and therefore cannot be truthfully accounted for by looking at the numbers and ethnic composition of a migrant’s social relations. It is the quality of relations – notably friendships – that matters most.

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  • 41.
    Tawat, Mahama
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    The Tip of the Iceberg: Prop. 1975:26 and its Freedom of Choice Goal in Sweden’s Multiculturalism Policy2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the expansive literature on Swedish multiculturalism policy, the Freedom of Choice Goal (FCG) of the Bill, Prop. 1975:26, Guidelines for an Immigrant and Minority Policy is often presented as its founding document. But this belies the fact that the Goal was beset by a controversy about its multicultural scope in the years that followed its adoption in 1975 that was never really settled. This article revisits the question and shows that the Goal indeed represented a multicultural vision. However, it was just the tip of an iceberg formed by socioeconomic integration policies. Earlier and more consistent multicultural policy provisions were present most notably in the state cultural policy. The article draws evidence from multiple sources including comparison with Norway.

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  • 42.
    Povrzanovic Frykman, Maja
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Transnational Dwelling and Objects of Connection: An Ethnological Contribution to Critical Studies of Migration2019In: Journal of European Ethnology and Cultural Analysis (JEECA), ISSN 2511-2473, no Special Issue 1, p. 28-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article argues that empirical attention should be given to migrants’ personal engagements with the materiality of transnational dwelling, notably to ob- jects of everyday use. Such objects carried, sent and received across national borders facilitate familiar material practices that, in their turn, help the migrants to feel at home in different locations. At the same time, they lend a sense of connection between migrants, those who stayed behind and homes located in different countries. Positioned at the intersection between ethnology, migration research and studies of material culture, the article draws on Levitt and Glick Schiller’s analytical distinction between the ways of being and the ways of belonging, Bourdieu’s notion of habitus, and Hage’s discussion of hexis. It suggests that ethnographic research on mundane objects in the context of transnational dwelling can destabilize the ways migrants are thought of in terms of difference and, thereby, contribute to critical studies of migration.

  • 43.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Irastorza, Nahikari
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Rodríguez-García, Dan
    Understanding Mixed Experiences: Towards a Conceptual Framework of Mixedness2019In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue brings together nine articles on the experiences of multiracial and multiethnic individuals from nine different countries across the globe – the United Kingdom, Sweden, Ireland, Spain, Canada, the United States, Japan, Singapore and Israel. The articles in this volume address the diverse experiences of the identification, socialising and mainstreaming of multiethnic and multiracial individuals in different national contexts. The collection consists of both qualitative and quantitative research from various disciplines in the social sciences and thus contributes to an interdisciplinary understanding and a multi-method approach to this reality. Through a cross-country analysis of the results provided by each paper, this Introduction proposes a conceptual framework for better understanding the realities of mixedness globally.

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  • 44. Wallengren, Simon
    et al.
    Wigerfelt, Anders
    Wigerfelt, Berit
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Mellgren, Caroline
    Visibility and vulnerability: A mixed methodology approach to studying Roma individuals’ victimization experiences2019In: International Review of Victimology, ISSN 0269-7580, E-ISSN 2047-9433, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines the prevalence and impact of victimization among a sample of Roma individuals in Malmö and Gothenburg (Sweden). The aim of the study was to examine the link between visibility and victimization, and whether the Roma community employs behavioural strategies to reduce visibility, and, finally, to analyse how such strategies affect the group. The study design combines survey data (n1⁄4610) with interviews (n1⁄430). The findings suggest that visibility is an important risk factor for victimization and that the study participants’ attempt to conceal their ethnicity affects them negatively both at an individual and a community level. The discussion concludes by presenting a number of policy implications.

  • 45.
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Slobodan, Zdravkovic
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    A qualitative study of refugee families’ experiences of the escape and travel from Syria to Sweden2018In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 11, no 594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Research shows that, depending on the route of travel during the escape, the journey presents the refugees with different health risks. Traumatic events during flight may have long-lasting physical and psychological effects on the refugee children. Therefore, it is important to illuminate the experiences that refugee families arriving in Sweden have endured during their flight. A qualitative study was conducted through interviews with fifteen recently arrived Syrian refugee families. Results: The parents described different reasons as to why they as families had to escape the war. Some families had lost jobs and loved ones in the war and did not want their children to die as well. They mentioned that the journeys varied between 10 and 40 days and were usually filled with struggles and threats. The escape to Sweden was expressed as an emotionally trying journey. Many parents talked about the fear and terror the children felt. Traumatic events during the escape, such as separation from family, death of family members, sexual violence, kidnapping or extortion may have long-lasting physical and psychological effects on the refugee children and their families. Therefore, health care workers meeting and caring for these families after arrival must pay close attention to that.

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  • 46.
    Zdravkovic, Slobodan
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Håkansson, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Westerling, Ragnar
    A support platform for migration and health (MILSA 2.0), Sweden2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 472-472Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Solid health is a prerequisite for successful inclusion and participation in support systems for recently arrived migrants’ (RAM) i.e. refugees. The society support system may vary depending on the age of RAM but is equally important for an effective start of the establishing process. Understanding health needs of RAM in different phases of establishing is essential as such knowledge is central for the supporting system. Methods: MILSA 2.0 consists of five studies targeting various health aspects. The focus is depicted into an early phase of establishment as well as following the period after the mandatory process. The platform addresses health issues of families with children as well as various health aspects of Arabic speaking adult RAM soon after arrival to Sweden. Also, it focuses on RAM adolescents in relation to risk behavior, social capital and confidence as well as on health issues in adult RAM after the formal establishment process. The platform also illuminates an extended support system of civic and health communication both in time as well as lecturing environment primarily targeting social capital, coherence and self-efficacy. Results: MILSA 2.0 addresses different phases of an establishing process in Sweden. Several health and health related factors are addressed such as self-rated health, social capital, trust, physical activity, sexual and reproductive health and living conditions. The extended civic and health communication addresses increased program hours as well as new program environments such as libraries, museums, and workplaces. Conclusions: These five studies reveals health related knowledge in different aspects of the establishing process as well as it develops several questionnaires and reveals methodological aspects. The platform focuses on both adolescent and adult RAM during and after the mandatory public support system including both the recipients of the support as well as the supporting actors. Key messages: - MILSA 2.0 develops questionnaires and determines health related concerns both during and after the mandatory establishing process. - MILSA 2.0 evaluates the effect of a policy change regarding standard procedures of civic and health communication.

  • 47. Lundberg, Anna
    et al.
    Gruber, Sabine
    Righard, Erica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Brandväggar och det sociala arbetets professionsetik2018In: Manifest: för ett socialt arbete i tiden / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt, Philip Lalander, Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 291-302Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Choosing Mixed Methods in Examining Attitudes Toward Interracial Marriages in Sweden2018In: SAGE Research Methods: Cases, Sage Publications, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study will present how I used mixed methods in my PhD dissertation project which investigated the majority society's attitudes toward interracial dating, marriage, and childbearing in Sweden. I will explain why I chose mixed methods and describe the mixed-methods model called follow-up explanations model of explanatory design procedures. I will also explain how the model was applied to investigate the attitudes. I address the four steps of follow-up explanations model, together with the results from my study on attitudes toward interracial relationships.

  • 49.
    Righard, Erica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Conceptualising Social Work Through the Lens of Transnationalism: Challenges and Ways Ahead2018In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 245-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional social work was established and expanded in a historical moment marked by intense nation-building; it was organized along and in parallel with other welfare state services which functioned to strengthen the nation-state. Today social work is at practice in a society marked by intensified globalisation; social needs and social problems that social workers are confronted with in their professional practice are sometimes transnational in their dynamics and cannot adequately be understood when limited to a local or national context. Drawing on insights from the transnational perspective, this article identifies challenges and ways ahead in the development of social work practice and theory with relevance for the globalised society. It argues that the transnational perspective can contribute to the dissolving of binaries between both ‘here’ and ‘there’, and ‘us’ and ‘them’ in social work, and pave the way for approaching social problems from a relational viewpoint beyond ‘given’ territorial and ethnocultural lenses.

  • 50.
    Emilsson, Henrik
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Continuity or Change? The refugee crisis and the end of Swedish exceptionalism2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the policy-making literature, external shocks are one of the most important pre-requisites for major policy changes. This article investigates how the refugee crisis affected Swedish political parties’ asylum and family migration policy preferences. The results indicate that the refugee crisis contributed to the breaking up of a long-established policy paradigm of openness and equal rights previously shared by most parties in parliament. A more fragmented party system has emerged where a new paradigm of controlling numbers has also found strong support outside the anti-immigration party the Sweden Democrats.

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