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  • 51. Behschnitt, Wolfgang
    et al.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    "Multicultural Literatures" in a Comparative Perspective2013In: Literature, Language, and Multiculturalism in Scandinavia and the Low Countries / [ed] Wolfgang Behschnitt, Sarah De Mul, Liesbeth Minnaard, Rodopi, 2013, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers some theoretical and methodological reflections on comparative approaches to multicultural literature.

  • 52.
    Bellanca, Raffaella
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Diffusion of innovations: reforestation in Haiti2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Development discourse emerged from the implicit assumption that the technological achievements and societal organizations of western civilization represent successes of humankind in inhabiting the planet, and should therefore be promoted among other cultures. The ecological threats of this time suggest the contrary, forcing us to reconsider the positiveness of over exploitations of natural resources and to recognize the paradox of the economical growth model. A new urgent meaning for development is that of rediscussing what characterizes an ideal society and enabling the transformation toward sustainability and justice. Among the many challenges that the planet is facing deforestation well represents the reach of the problems since it affects humans at several levels: from the smallest scale of family economy with the products they can directly offer; to the national size through the effect they have on the environmental conditions of countries; and to the global level for the influence over the planet’s climate. In this era of tremendous transformations, demanding the reduction of consumptions for developed countries and appropriate planning of future consumption for developing ones, communication plays a central role. Exchange of information without preferential directions and between different levels (global-local, local-local) is at the base of this process. This study analyses the communication dynamics of a reforestation campaign in Haiti operated by the NGO AMURT. Assuming that the idea of planting trees rather then cutting them can be seen as an innovation, I adopted as a theoretical framework the findings of “Diffusion of Innovation” research. In particular I used the field work to critically assess some of the diffusion model’s findings, especially concerning the characterization of early adopters which I perceived as pro-innovation biased. An analysis of the NGO communication strategy according to diffusion of innovation parameters revealed several positive points, such as the use of homophile change agents, the adaptation of messages to the audience and the characterization of the meaning of the innovation from a receiver’s perspective. Nevertheless, the most important reasons for the success of the program rather seemed to sit in the NGO approach: the relationship of trust, the stability of its presence in the area and the intimate contact and cooperation with the local social structures.

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  • 53. Belli, Luca
    et al.
    Schwartz, Molly
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Louzada, Luiza
    Selling your soul while negotiating the conditions: from notice and consent to data control by design2017In: Health and Technology, ISSN 2190-7188, E-ISSN 2190-7196, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 453-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article claims that the Notice and Consent (N&C) approach is not efficient to protect the privacy of personal data. On the contrary, N&C could be seen as a license to freely exploit the individual's personal data. For this reason, legislators and regulators around the world have been advocating for different and more efficient safeguards, notably through the implementation of the Privacy by Design (PbD) concept, which is predicated on the assumption that privacy cannot be assured solely by compliance with regulatory frameworks. In this sense, PbD affirms that privacy should become a key concern for developers and organisations alike, thus permeating new products and services as well as the organisational modi operandi. Through this paper, we aim at uncovering evidences of the inefficiency of the N&C approach, as well as the possibility to further enhance PbD, in order to provide the individual with increased control on her personal data. The paper aims at shifting the focus of the discussion from "take it or leave it" contracts to concrete solutions aimed at empowering individuals. As such, we are putting forth the Data Control by Design (DCD) concept, which we see as an essential complement to N&C and PbD approaches advocated by data-protection regulators. The technical mechanisms that would enable DCD are currently available (for example, User Managed Access (UMA) v1.0.1 Core Protocol). We, therefore, argue that data protection frameworks should foster the adoption of DCD mechanisms in conjunction with PbD approaches, and privacy protections should be designed in a way that allows every individual to utilise interoperable DCD tools to efficiently manage the privacy of her personal data. After having scrutinised the N&C, PbD and DCD approaches we discuss the specificities of health and genetic data, and the role of DCD in this context, stressing that the sensitivity of genetic and health data requires special scrutiny from regulators and developers alike. In conclusion, we argue that concrete solutions allowing for DCD already exist and that policy makers should join efforts together with other stakeholders to foster the concrete adoption of the DCD approach.

  • 54.
    Bergstrand, Hans
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Brink, Thor
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Communicating Relatedness2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report is an evaluation of if it is good or bad to use a metaphor in order to display the results of an academic search engine in a web interface. In order to evaluate this we are describing our work with developing two different web interfaces for an academic search engine by the name Silverfish. This project has been a co-operation between Indian Institute of Information Technol- ogy in Bangalore, India and Malmˆ University K3, Sweden. To start our report we describe how we see our context we are to work within. We define our stakeholders as being academics worldwide and also define that we are working within a web 2.0 context. To strengthen our choices regarding the design process of the two different interfaces as well as in order to give more validity to our discussion surrounding metaphors we continue with presenting different studies and facts that give more weight to the above mentioned parts. To make it possible to create the interfaces we have made use of several methods. We give a short definition of how these methods are to be used and later describe in the design process how we have made use of them. To describe how we have made use of the methods as well as to describe how we have developed our prototypes we continue our report with describing the design process, regarding which deci- sions we have made and why we have made them. To summarize our report we come to a con- clusion regarding our thesis question; communicating related key phrases through web interface metaphors; good or bad? Regarding our question we have found that the orientational metaphor we are using does not work as it is supposed to. We believe that further studies are required in order to get a deeper un- derstanding of how the user understands the orientational metaphor we are using. This informa- tion could help us come to an understanding of how we could make better use of our orienta- tional metaphor, or help us find out of a metaphor that would be better to use than our orienta- tional metaphor.

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  • 55.
    Bergöö, Martin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    IDR "Interaktionsdesignad rädsla"2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay focuses on the possibilities and problems that come with having teleportation mixed with horror and fear and not having monsters in fear games. How it is to play a horror game without enemies and just being able as an Interactiondesigner to relay on the psychological feeling within the player, if the feeling is more than enough if the player him self get to fantasies and let their deepest fright feelings take over. Is there no difference if there are monsters/enemies or not. Is fright and fear already there before you encountering the enemies? These questions are answered as the paper also presents a game in the shape of a course that has been paralleled worked with. The world with the complete and finished game have bin done in the Hammer editor which the game HalfLife2 (VU games/Valve Software, 2004) is built on. The finished game is a result of several user tests from the prototype game and user questionnaires. Fear games are mainly built on humans’ psychological feelings, the imaginations and how one feel. Through strong usage and building upon these main factors to create fear I have worked from that perspective and investigated how I by best possible means, should do to create fear to fright players by not using enemies as main frightening objects. Focus has been on the narrative of both visual and auditive narration. I have also given an account of the advantage and disadvantages with working with the tool I have chosen, how it has affected my work and my result. The Result turned out to be even better than I had in mind and a positive attitude towards my game from all the test persons. They thought it was a good example that a horror game is not bound to have monsters in order to fright the player. I got a loot of good feedback, response and ideas of what I could improve and what was already good. Some wanted more light effects on the first part and others less sound in the last part. By listening to the test persons I started to create and shape the final version of the game. Everyone became scared and felt more or less frightened through all four parts of the game. I also got positive feedback on my theory from the test persons, that teleportation mixed with horror and fear is something that they could consider using more in games and that this was a good start in the right direction.

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  • 56. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    Brandt, Eva
    Ehn, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Halse, Joachim
    Democratic design experiments: between parliament and laboratory2015In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 11, no 3-4, p. 152-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than four decades, participatory design has provided exemplars and concepts for understanding the democratic potential of design participation. Despite important impacts on design methodology, participatory design has, however, been stuck in a marginal position as it has wrestled with what has been performed and accomplished in participatory practices. In this article, we discuss how participatory design may be reinvigorated as a design research programme for democratic design experiments in the light of the decentring of human-centredness and the foregrounding of collaborative representational practices offered by the ANT tradition in the tension between a parliament of things and a laboratory of circulating references.

  • 57. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    De Michelis, Giorgio
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jacucci, Giulio
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wagner, Ina
    Design Things2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Design Things offers an innovative view of design thinking and design practice, envisioning ways to combine creative design with a participatory approach encompassing aesthetic and democratic practices and values. The authors of Design Things look at design practice as a mode of inquiry that involves people, space, artifacts, materials, and aesthetic experience, following the process of transformation from a design concept to a thing. Design Things, which grew out of the Atelier (Architecture and Technology for Inspirational Living) ...

  • 58. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    De Michelis, Giorgio
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jacucci, Giulio
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wagner, Ina
    What is the object of design?2012In: Proceeding: CHI EA '12 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA , 2012, p. 21-30Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we reflect upon design at a conceptual level, discussing how creativity can be coupled with participation and experience, dialoguing with philosophers and social theorists, and looking for the experiential grounds of our understanding of the very nature of design. Three words:'drawing','thing'and'together', are at the center of our discourse. We propose a view of design as accessing, aligning, and navigating among the'constituents' of the object of design. People interact with the object of design through its constituents. The ...

  • 59. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    Hellström, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design Spaces2005Book (Other academic)
  • 60. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    Löwgren, JonasMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).Malmborg, Lone
    (Re)Searching the Digital Bauhaus2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 61. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    Malmborg, Lone
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Messeter, Joern
    Lee, Yanki
    Gumbo, Sibukele
    What Can Design Laboratories Do?2013In: Human-Computer Interaction: INTERACT 2013, PT IV / [ed] Kotze, P Marsden, G Lindgaard, G Wesson, J Winckler, M, Springer, 2013, p. 775-775Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Collaborative Design and Grassroots Journalism: Public Controversies and Controversial Publics2014In: Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy / [ed] Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard, MIT Press, 2014, p. 227-255Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 63.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Open-ended participatory design as prototypical practice2008In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 85-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues in favour of seeing co-design as an open-ended exploration where prototypical practices are explored that engender favourable conditions for ongoing negotiation of meaning. Participatory design approaches to designing for specific practices are reviewed with particular focus on how to handle constantly evolving practices, where some design researchers argue for creating open and flexible technical systems while others emphasise design as primarily concerned with questions of changing practices. By discussing an extended participatory design project in which new ways of engaging in informal learning through self-produced videos were explored in an intensive care unit, I argue first and foremost for viewing co-design as prototypical practice which is explored through an open-ended exploration of possibilities. Second, I argue that a focus on practice necessarily requires in situ explorations to see if the proposed design explorations invoke relevant prototypical practices in the midst of work. Third, I argue that a focus on practice entails viewing tools as temporary props for various settings, rather than as central features that define the settings of learning, knowing and working.

  • 64.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Socio-material mediations: learning, knowing and self-produced media within healthcare2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis discusses lessons learned and issued raised when exploring how self-produced rich media can facilitate sharing of meaning between healthcare professionals at an intensive care unit and between healthcare professionals and patients within a hand surgery clinic. Design experiments conducted at the intensive care unit focused on how healthcare professionals could collaboratively produce ‘best practice’ videos displayed on handheld devices and accessed through barcodes placed out in the unit. The making of the videos it is argued can be seen as a temporary convergence of different views when reifying ‘best practice.’ Design experiments conducted at the hand surgery clinic focused on how healthcare professional and patients collaboratively could produce, during consultations, rich media documents that are tailored to the patients’ specific needs. The rich media documents made can be seen as a temporary convergence of two distinct practices; namely that of hand surgery treatment and the practice of everyday life. Making of rich media documents in both projects resulted in developing relational spaces of informal learning, which engendered the making of rich reifications that function well in close relation to participation. To engender the making of the rich media documents demanded the establishment and hardening of a socio-technical infrastructure which can be seen as a temporary convergence between tools and practices where both the tools and practices are changed. In both cases using these videos in turn demanded that the videos, a form of local collaborative hardenings, needed to be translated anew and so to speak “defrosted.” The design consequences are that designers need to acknowledge materiality as an ongoing process which is given meaning through participation over time within and across communities of practice. Materiality and human agency in this instance are not seen as discrete elements, but rather highly intertwined. The second design consequence is that we need to acknowledge the complexity, partiality, and multiplicity of such relational spaces. Methodologically, the consequences are that it is important to consider where the designers position themselves and the artifacts in the network of relations, since different positioning will have different implications for the subsequent spaces of action.

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  • 65.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The Making of Cultural Commons: Nasty Old Film Distribution and Funding2014In: Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy / [ed] Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard, MIT Press, 2014, p. 187-225Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 66.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Birt, Arlene
    Cuartielles, David
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Davidsson, Paul
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Ginslov, Jeannette
    Gustafsson Friberger, Marie
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Hobye, Mads
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Jacobson, Bob
    Jacobsson, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Kozel, Susan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Nilsson, Elisabet M.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Peterson, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Rosenqvist, Karolina
    Topgaard, Richard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Prototyping Futures2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Prototyping Futures gives you a glimpse of what collaborating with academia might look like. Medea and its co-partners share their stories about activities happening at the research centre – projects, methods, tools, and approaches – what challenges lie ahead, and how these can be tackled. Examples of highlighted topics include: What is a living lab and how does it work? What are the visions behind the Connectivity Lab at Medea? And, how can prototyping-methods be used when sketching scenarios for sustainable futures? Other topics are: What is the role of the body when designing technology? What is collaborative media and how can this concept help us understand contemporary media practices? Prototyping Futures also discusses the open-hardware platform Arduino, and the concepts of open data and the Internet of Things, raising questions on how digital media and connected devices can contribute to more sustainable lifestyles, and a better world.

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  • 67.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Agonistic participatory design: working with marginalised social movements2012In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 8, no 2-3, p. 127-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participatory design (PD) has become increasingly engaged in public spheres and everyday life and is no longer solely concerned with the workplace. This is not only a shift from work-oriented productive activities to leisure and pleasurable engagements, but also a new milieu for production and ‘innovation’. What ‘democratic innovation’ entails is often currently defined by management and innovation research, which claims that innovation has been democratised through easy access to production tools and lead-users as the new experts driving innovation. We sketch an alternative ‘innovation’ practice more in line with the original visions of PD based on our experience of running Malmö Living Labs – an open innovation milieu where new constellations, issues and ideas evolve from bottom–up long-term collaborations among diverse stakeholders. Three cases and controversial matters of concern are discussed. The fruitfulness of the concepts ‘agonistic public spaces’ (as opposed to consensual decision-making), ‘thinging’ and ‘infrastructuring’ (as opposed to projects) are explored in relation to democracy, innovation and other future-making practices.

  • 68.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design things and design thinking: contemporary participatory design challenges2012In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 101-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design thinking has become a central issue in contemporary design discourse and rhetoric, and for good reason. With the design thinking practice of world leading design and innovation firm IDEO, and with the application of these principles to successful design education at prestigious d. school, the Institute of Design at Stanford University, and not least with the publication of Change by Design, in which IDEO chief executive Tim Brown elaborates on the firm's ideas about design thinking, ...

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  • 69.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Participatory design and “democratizing innovation”2010In: PDC '10: Proceedings of the 11th Biennial Participatory Design Conference, ACM Digital Library, 2010, p. 41-50Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Participatory design has become increasingly engaged in public spheres and everyday life and is no longer solely concerned with the workplace. This is not only a shift from work oriented productive activities to leisure and pleasurable engagements, but also a new milieu for production and innovation and entails a reorientation from “democracy at work” to “democratic innovation”. What democratic innovation entails is currently defined by management and innovation research, which claims that innovation has been democratized through easy access to production tools and lead-users as the new experts driving innovation. We sketch an alternative “democratizing innovation” practice more in line with the original visions of participatory design based on our experience of running Malmö Living Labs - an open innovation milieu where new constellations, issues and ideas evolve from bottom-up long-term collaborations amongst diverse stakeholders. Two cases and controversial matters of concern are discussed. The fruitfulness of the concepts “Things” (as opposed to objects), “infrastructuring” (as opposed to projects) and “agonistic public spaces” (as opposed to consensual decision-making) are explored in relation to participatory innovation practices and democracy.

  • 70.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ehrndal, Marie
    Rosenqvist, Karolina
    Steijn, Arthur M.
    Topgaard, Richard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wellejus, Asta
    Wendelboe Kuczynski, Eva
    Wille, Jakob I.
    How the lion learned to moonwalk and other stories on how to design for classical music experiences2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Live classical music is facing considerable challenges. How can philharmonic orchestras, organizations that are heavily rooted in the past, become more democratic and better connected to the societies they are situated in? Through collaboration across institutional borders and knowledge domains, the Designing Classical Music Experiences project had the ambition to develop new spatial and mediated audience experiences, and to reach new audiences in the Øresund Region. The vision was nothing less than to democratize classical music. One of the premises of the project was to involve musicians, designers, researchers, students, audience members – and many others – in the design- and development processes. Another premise was to enhance and extend the concert experience through visualizations and other types of visual arts. A number of conclusions related to ‘organizational challenges’, ‘audience engagement’, and ‘media and technologies’ are presented and further developed in this book. The first section of the book accounts for two perspectives on how to work with live classical music and audiences from a designer’s point of view. The second section of the book give detailed accounts of the most high-profiled case studies the project has worked with.

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  • 71.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    On the spot experiments within healthcare2004In: PDC 04: Proceedings of the eighth conference on Participatory design: Artful integration: interweaving media, materials and practices - Vol. 1, ACM Digital Library, 2004, p. 93-101Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the value of On the Spot Experiments with self-produced content and the use of technology within healthcare. On the Spot Experiments are experiments conducted in the setting of on going clinical work and patient care. We begin by relating our work to approaches within ethnography and work place studies which link ethnography and design. Thereafter we describe how we have carried out On the Spot Experiments in two projects where we have explored the possibilities of self-produced learning material. The first project described is within an intensive care unit setting where the staff and designers explored the making of self-produced videos on different procedures and their use in handheld computers. The second project described focuses on patient learning at a hand surgery clinic where we explored the possibilities of individualised video training instructions. In both cases the On the Spot Experiments have shown fruitful results in different aspects of clinical work and how the use of content and technology might affect this work. A key factor has been exploring what relevant content could be. We conclude by outlining some qualities and limits of doing On the Spot Experiment

  • 72. Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Høg Hansen, Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    City Symphony Malmö. The spatial politics of non-institutional memory2016In: Journal of Media Practice, ISSN 1468-2753, E-ISSN 2040-0926, Vol. 17, no 2-3, p. 138-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    City Symphony Malmö was a collaborative documentary that engaged citizens of Malmö in recording short film sequences. The Symphony’ video material was also performed at the art and performance centre Inkonst where electronic musicians improvised to VJ’s digital and analogue live mixing of the material. A remediation of the performance was streamed live on the Internet with live footage from the performance. All clips were released under the creative commons licence and made available for remixing through The Pirate Bay. This article explores what it can imply to hand over the means of film production to citizens. The discussion concentrates on participatory and spatially distributed filmmaking and screening of non-institutional memories, produced in the symphony. The analysis merges influence from silent cinema and Soviet Montage, theories of public memory and place. It describes the complexities of creating non-institutional memory and archiving practices and argues that such citizen-driven and non-institutional memories may challenge official history and societal memory production, yet also reproduce typical and iconic images which reveal spatio-material hierarchies. Such complexities demonstrate the value of an analysis of participation and spatio-material dimensions of public memory as unfolded in the article.

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  • 73.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Høg Hansen, Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Mediating Memory: strategies of interaction in public art and memorials2011In: Journal of Arts & Communities, ISSN 1757-1936, E-ISSN 1757-1944, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The article addresses how a selection of participatory art and memorial projects have engaged with public memory and interaction. The intention has to been to explore the tension between the artists’ strategies - and the actual life span and use of the art works by its audiences. The authors interviewed the artists Esther Shalev- Gerz, Alfredo Jaar and Rafael Lozano Hemmer (during 2008 and 2009) and examined specific works. In addition, one of the literally ‘ground-breaking’ works of process art by Robert Smithson, Partially Buried Woodshed, was included in the analysis of cases that have provoked interesting social or collective memory debates and community interaction around public art.

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  • 74.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Severson, Pernilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Creative Class Struggles2014In: Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy / [ed] Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard, MIT Press, 2014, p. 173-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 75.
    Björk, Daniel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Mobil TV – En användbarhetsstudie2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Bachelor thesis in Interaction Design by Daniel Björk, spring term 2006. Malmö University, School of Arts and Communication. This bachelor thesis is a student project about mobile TV for the Swedish software technology and design company TAT – The Astonishing Tribe. The TV medium is on the move, literally. Moving out from it’s static environment in people’s homes out on the street as a non static medium, exactly what happened with the telephone for a couple of years ago. At the same time TV becomes more connected to the individual because every person that is watching mobile TV will make there own choices and buy there own mobile TV subscription. But what is mobile TV? The purpose is to investigate the bonds, possibilities and connections between regular TV and mobile phones. What new bonds will be created between mobile TV and regular TV? What types of shows can you foresee? How will mobile TV users behave and how will mobile TV be used? when? and where? Which form will the new features and functions take in the mobile world? and how will they affect other already established mobile functions? In my research I will investigates how the TV functionality can be integrated in the mobile phones of tomorrow and how mobile TV will affect or cooperate with the regular TV and how the usage of these two mediums will eventually change. The goal with this project is to develop a concept for mobile TV that will be visualized in form of a flash-simulation and that will show the interaction between the user and the mobile TV.

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  • 76. Borges, Jorge Luis
    Hemer, Oscar (Editor, Translator)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Borges I (1923-1944): Jorge Luis Borges: Samlade verk. Urval.2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den första volymen av tre som samlar Jorge Luis Borges verk på svenska. Samlingen är kronologisk och första delen omfattar åren 1922-1944. Översättningarna är gjorda av Lasse Söder­berg, Oscar Hemer, Sun Axelsson/Marina Torres, Ingegerd Wiking och Johan Laserna.

  • 77.
    Borggren, Pia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Politisk kommunikation i en föränderlig demokrati. En studie av kommunikationsvägar mellan medborgare och politiker i fem skånska kommuner2004Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Allt fler kommuner väljer att arbeta med deltagardemokratiska forum. Medborgarförslag, en ny kommunikationsväg mellan medborgare och politiker, är ett sådant Gestaltande del:Planerad kommunikation. Informationskampanjen "Vi vill veta vad du tycker!" för en fiktiv kommun (Vår kommun) som bestämt sig för att införa medborgarförslag. Kampanjen innehåller förutom en tidsplan: annons

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  • 78.
    Borgqvist, Philip
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    En ny Upplevelse - En studie i formgivande av interaktioner på webben och effektivisering av arbetsflöden2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We’re all aware that technology progresses forward with giant leaps on a daily basis. In one-way or another this affects us in our everyday life. It can affect us in the way we’re shopping, communicating, researching, planning future events or how we choose to be entertained. That the web is an increasingly stronger tool for communicating in more or less every type of business is becoming more evident for people. For the past few months I’ve been working at Adamsson Appelfeldt Advertising in designing and developing a highly interactive website for a Swedish furniture company called Ragnars. By being involved in the work process myself, I’ve tried to analyze how I, as an interaction designer, can improve it and make it work smoother for everyone involved. Maybe we can get a more distinct indication on when, where and how problems arise by letting users test the website on a regular basis. In this report you’ll follow me through the design process, how I’ve involved users in the project, and how I have evolved individually as an interaction designer. The help of using interaction design for creative solutions on the web and other areas of development online is definitely something that should be explored further.

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  • 79. Brandt, Eva
    et al.
    Eriksen, Mette Agger
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Co-design Events: Driving Innovation by a series of events (Programmatic vision)2010In: Rehearsing the Future / [ed] Joachim Halse, Eva Brandt, Brendon Clark, Thomas Binder, The Danish Design School Press , 2010, p. 70-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One powerful co-design event is worth a thousand hours of individual work! Driving innovation as a series of co-design events helps mobilize and involve all stakeholders to explore present everyday practices and to sketch new possible futures. But what makes a co-design event powerful? And why are series of events better than a sequence of deliverables and milestones in keeping innovation on track?

  • 80. Brandt, Eva
    et al.
    Eriksen, Mette Agger
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    From a blank slate or a full table?: kicking off innovation by exploring the well-known2010In: Rehearsing the Future / [ed] Joachim Halse, Eva Brandt, Brendon Clark, Thomas Binder, The Danish Design School Press , 2010, p. 74-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation never starts from a blank slate - rather many contributors bring previous experiences, current practices and personal interests to the table. By providing materials that support remembering, sharing and exploring these collaboratively in different ways, we can render them "strangely familiar" and thus fruitful for innovation processes.

  • 81.
    Brandt, Eva
    et al.
    Danmark.
    Johansson, Martin
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Avdelningen för Design och datavetenskap.
    Messeter, Jörn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design Lab: re-thinking what and how to design2005In: Design spaces / [ed] Binder, Thomas and Hellström, Maria, Helsingfors: Edita Publishing Oy , 2005, p. 34-43Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decades there has been a dramatic change in the design agenda within the field of IT design. With the increase of mobile and wireless devices and the massive expansion of Internet availability the classic object of design - is about to vanish. Even if we conceive the setting where information technology is used as a 'system', this system can hardly be seen as the outcome of a system design process. Arguably, IT design is today guided by new design agendas. Ubiquitous computing and from the user side information ecologies seem to be more appropriate labels for the emerging technology. The objects of design has correspondingly been changing from systems to devices, tools or information appliances. This radical opening of the question of what to design has led to an apparent confusion on how to design. Just as the field of information systems is about to mature with a broad and widely accepted repertoire of design approaches and methods, ranging from workflow analysis to user involvement, this battery of approaches is loosing ground in favor of more techno-centric explorations, such as Tangible Computing. In our view there seem to be a growing divide between mainly North American contributions to IT design emphasizing new information technology concepts such as ubiquitous computing, tangible interaction and augmented reality, and mainly European contributions emphasizing the role of particular information technology applications in the light of in-depth studies of the potential contexts of use.

  • 82. Brandt, Eva
    et al.
    Redström, Johan
    Eriksen, Mette Agger
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Binder, Thomas
    XLAB2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research at design schools or research conducted by people with a professional training in design or architecture is not necessarily different from research of for example art history, media studies or anthropology. Nevertheless we see new research topics and new research methodologies emerge as designers begin to employ their professional gaze within the world of research. Research-through-design, practice-based research or design-led research are all among the new labels that characterize such research that strives to bring design competences into play in design research. This book comes out o the XLAB project - one attempt to get hold of what such design research may be and how it can contribute to the production of knowledge. The XLAB project sought to capture design research and particularly the design experiment not through a theoretical or methodological approach, but through a practical exploration of the practice of design researchers. This happened through a series of three one-day workshops with researchers and research students.

  • 83.
    Brandão, Simone
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Overcoming Academic Procrastination: Exploring the Purpose of Space and Social Connections through Tangible Interaction to Impact Students’ Motivation and Embrace the Focus on Their Individual Projects2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis project investigates the procrastination problem in university students and the effects of this issue in individual work such as essays and learning activities related to academic context. As part of students’ routines, the use of digital devices is crucial for easy access to online resources, but, at the same time, this technological development has become a high distraction source while trying to accomplish academic goals. Adding to this, the study environment greatly impacts student's performance and concentration, which turned out to be an important element in this project’s development.

     

    Here, the problem of procrastination affects society physically and psychologically, with side effects that unpack researchers’ curiosity for a deeper understanding of this issue in the user-centered context and the Interaction Design field (IxD). Additionally, Tangible Interactions, Research Through Design and a brief study of Auto-ethnography complemented the process by introducing the impact that social problems and humans’ personal experiences have on design concept production.

     

    Taking into consideration space and digital distractions surrounding students as one of the reasons for the lack of academic concentration, this thesis aspires to show the benefits of studying environments such as university libraries and focus on the social aspect of studying in a group. As such, Structure-Us is the final design concept that runs through Arduino Nano as an accountability box for students. As so, the outcome is a method academic students individual work maintaining social connections as a motivational method bringing reflection on their behavior as a step to achieve personal goals. 

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  • 84.
    Brossner, Daniel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    IT-Stöd För Personer Med Psykiska Funktionshinder2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    IT-Information and communication may provide a mean of improving health among people with psychological disabilities. My project is about creating a web-solution for people with psychological disabilities. I have carried through interviews and a workshop. I have interviewed both the users and the staff that take care of them. I have engaged the users in my design process. My goal was to identify the user’s needs and to create my design with that in mind. During the workshop I let the users freely decide upon which of my design suggestions that where most interesting and useful for their needs. I decided to create a website for the users to engage and encourage social intercourse, which has been the central function in my final design. The Website consists of several functions: it shows the users’ mood and there are several options to pep each other: by sending music, pictures, text and messages. The effects of IT-communication among people with psychological disabilities should be further explored.

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  • 85.
    Carlsson, Håkan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Dtourist: Historieskapande, interaktion och planering med rörlig media på webben2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Bachelor thesis in Interaction Design by Håkan Carlsson, spring term 2007, Malmö University, School of Arts & Communication. The climate for video sharing online is somewhere in the border of becoming a place for only the big companies to distribute material with general interest, or small communities with genre-specific interest to attract a larger audience. In this article I will look at the travelindustry to see what possibilities can be implemented into communities with interest in planning and travelling. I will argue that the importance of collaboration with different media can create a bigger picture so that more people can use and discover each other’s travel videos and experiences. I have also taken a closer look at social interaction at online communities such as MySpace and YouTube. The concept Dtourist is an online travel planner so that people can share experiences and use video as a part of their planning for trips and vacations. If we are to understand what kind of experiences we are publishing we must first look at our own material and understand them fully before we expect that a larger audience can be attracted.

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  • 86.
    Casas, Roberto
    et al.
    Technical University of Catalonia, Spain.
    Cuartielles, David
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Marco, Alvaro
    University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Gracia, Hector J.
    University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Falco, Jorge L.
    University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Hidden Issues in Deploying an Indoor Location System2007In: IEEE pervasive computing, ISSN 1536-1268, E-ISSN 1558-2590, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 62-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Installing indoor location system prototypes yields practical lessons about how to design and deploy future ubiquitous technologies. The design of context-aware technologies has been on many research team agendas since Mark Weiser first described his ubiquitous computing vision. Determining the location of people and objects in indoor environments with a high degree of accuracy is a main technical obstacle to achieving this vision.

  • 87.
    Chakirov, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Klopic, Dino
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Panic - IT-stress och Design med hälsa i tanken2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay will focus on the growing stress in our society in relationship to the increasing consumption of IT-related products. Stress is in out culture a well spread illness and we have tried to find the connection between people’s bad physical condition and the large escalation of information technology. The word stress can be defined as the reaction of maladjustment between the individual’s capabilities and the outer world’s demands and needs. We asked ourselves how extensive information technology contributes to stress in our society in our day of age. Present research shows that technology which is not user-friendly and rather difficult to manage contributes in large extent on work places to long term stress. In intent to obtain a greater knowledge of how stress exists and forms all around us, we made a survey which did not contradict earlier research results in the same subject. The survey itself discusses the relationship between stress, relaxation and the everyday usage of IT-products. The survey consisted of personal interviews that were performed in a, for the persons interviewed, natural environment – the school. The answers on our questions are divided in different categories and we have drawn some conclusions about when, how and why information technology stresses individuals in common life. Before we actually began with the survey itself, we had to understand deeper what stress is and the different stress theories that exist around the subject. The concept of Flow attempts to explain how one can use positive stress to enhance his own life. Today there are IT-products everywhere around us and many of these products are developed without actually taking time to consider people’s health in relation to them. Slow Design is on the contrary a design philosophy which implicates that products should be designed with the human in mind. With help from all our information and our surveys, our gestalt product became in some degree what we had planned from the beginning. The core in our original idea was to somehow integrate stress and IT.

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  • 88.
    Ciuccarelli, Paolo
    et al.
    Polytechnic Institute of Milan, Milan, Italy.
    Lupi, Giorgia
    Polytechnic Institute of Milan, Milan, Italy.
    Simeone, Luca
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Visualizing the data city: social media as a source of knowledge for urban planning and management2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing interest across a wide range of subfields of urban studies in understanding the role played by location-based social media and the impact of the increasing availability of urban digital data from different sources. The way people experience the city is affected by a complex, dense, and reactive information landscape: the data city presents itself with an unprecedented quantity of information in the form of geo-located comments from Twitter, reviews from Pickles, and check-ins from Foursquare. This fragmented proliferation of information generated by urban inhabitants offers potential benefits both for the research community and urban decision makers, who can use the data to generate broad and analytical visions of the uses of urban space. This book explores and presents methods and tools to collect, analyze, and represent time-based geo-located social media data at the urban scale. The aim is to investigate possible perspectives for the use of these data as a source of knowledge for urban planning, de-sign, and management. We ask whether geo-located social media data can be useful in the creation of indicators of urban life as it is perceived and communicated by city users. In fact, although traditional data collection methods such as surveys, interviews, questionnaires, and, more recently, data harvesting and analysis techniques (e.g., using geographical location data from mo-bile devices) have provided interesting insights into the social life of urban spaces, nowadays, they can be complemented using geo-located social media data. On one side, the book reviews the existing literature, projects, and approaches related to data visualization and the geo-located social mining techniques used to investigate topics of urban interests. On the other side, the book presents the design experiments we conduct-ed in collaboration with urban stakeholders at various levels and in various US and European cities. These case studies document our research activity with geo-located social mining techniques and offer some insights distilled from our experience. As a conclusion, we propose recommendations for the exploitation of geo-located social media data in order to answer hitherto un-solved urban questions and—as such—to generate knowledge for urban planning and management.

  • 89.
    Clavier, Berndt
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    John Barth and Postmodernism: Spatiality, Travel, Montage2007Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    John Barth is one of the major novelists of American postmodernism. Barth’s contribution to the practice and theory of postmodernism is in this sense undisputable. However, much of the criticism dealing with his work in relationship to postmodernism is prompted by Barth’s own theories of “exhaustion” and “replenishment,” leaving his writing relatively untouched by theories of postmodernism in general. This study aims to change that. What is of particular interest here is the relationship between Barth’s aesthetic and the ideology critical work of the historical avant-gardes, which were the first to mobilize art against itself and its institutional practices and demands. This mobilization often took the form of an intentional shattering of the boundary between life and art and a subsequent critique of notions such as originality and organicity. To emphasize the idea of literature as practice (life), I focus on the notion of spatiality as it is defined and conceptualized within Marxism and Critical Theory, particularly by Fredric Jameson, Jean Baudrillard, Guy Debord, and Johannes Fabian. As many of these discussions show, spatiality is connected to human consciousness and material reproduction, generating not only the subject-object distinction, but also notions of temporality, historicity, and causality. There is, however, a paradox involved in the production of space. On the one hand, space can only be generated through systems of representation; on the other, our notion of reality requires space to be lived and authentic. The ability to produce space is therefore always connected to metaphorical skills. Yet, space exists only as social practice, as a field of authenticity. In this context, travel is seen as one of the fundamental spatial practices with which such a literalization is made. Examining Barth’s metafictional parodies in the light of these theories of space and subjectivity, I try to engage the question of ideology critique in postmodernism. My first chapter focuses on the postmodernism debate in America towards the 1990s, where I give a general historical overview of the issues discussed and elaborate connections to various theories and strategies of the historical avant-gardes. Next, I introduce the concept of spatiality, which has become the central issue defining postmodernism. Spatiality is generally seen as weakening of historicity and temporality, and by extension, of reality itself. I try to dispute this idea and relate the “spatialization of time” occurring within postmodernism to ideas of critical art. Thirdly, I explore the relationship of travel to the production of space. Here I suggest that travel above all is an acculturation of the real, a spatial practice through which reality acquires a meaningful and coherent structure. Chapter Two focuses on how these issues of spatiality, travel, and representation work their way into the fiction and essays of John Barth. The last chapter is a close reading of one of Barth’s later novels, The Last Voyage of Somebody the Sailor (1991), which aims to bring the previous discussions into proximity with one specific text. Here I argue that the montage can offer a critical model for understanding the spatiality of postmodernism, particularly its “simultaneity of the radically disparate.” My discussion ends by suggesting that such a take on postmodernism may well be perceived as a mimesis of reality, particularly a recognition of the collective nature of self and world.

  • 90.
    Clavier, Berndt
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Medborgarskap och värdegrund2011In: Vägar till medborgarskap / [ed] Pieter Bevelander, Christian Fernández, Anders Hellström, Arkiv förlag & tidskrift, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Clavier, Berndt
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The transnational imaginary: cultural space and the place of theory2004In: Transnational spaces: disciplinary perspectives / [ed] Maja Povrzanovic Frykman, Malmö University, International Migration and Ethnic Relations (IMER) , 2004, p. 46-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 92.
    Clavier, Berndt
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    'The World Is Closer Than You Think': Travel, Antarctica and the Marketing of British Airways2001In: Text and nation: essays on post-colonial cultural politics / [ed] Jopi Nyman, Andrew Blake, Faculty of Humanities, University of Joensuu, Finland , 2001, p. 29-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Clavier, Berndt
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Värdegrunden blir ett etniskt filter2012In: Mana, ISSN 1403-6886, no 4, p. 16-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Skolans värdegrund motverkar sitt syfte. Istället för att bekämpa rasismen befäster värdegrundsarbetet föreställningar om att människors handlande och tänkande kan kopplas till etnicitet. Det hävdar Berndt Clavier, lektor vid institutionen för Konst, kultur och kommunikation på Malmö Högskola.

  • 94.
    Clavier, Berndt
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Art for integration: political rationalities and technologies of governmentalisation in the city of Malmö2017In: Ett texthäfte om konst- och kultursatsningar i relation till ägande och styrning / [ed] Maryam Fanni, Elof Hellström, Sarah Kim, MDGH , 2017, p. 23-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities increasingly use artistic and cultural activities to promote active citizenship and social cohesion. We suggest that city-sponsored cultural and artistic practices in Sweden are finding a new discursive context in migration. In this article, we look at two artistic and cultural institutions in Malmö, Sweden: Arena 305 and Drömmarnas hus. We develop a typology of governmentalisation based on the work of Nicholas Rose and Peter Miller, which allows us to describe the governing activity of Arena 305 and Drömmarnas hus. What becomes visible is the discrepancy between the moral form of the political rationalities and the technologies of government: even though institutions may harbour ideals and principles of inclusion, they are perfectly capable of sustaining activities that brighten the very boundaries they set out to challenge.

  • 95.
    Clavier, Berndt
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Art for integration: political rationalities and technologies of governmentalisation in the city of Malmö2014In: Multiculturalism and the Arts in European Cities / [ed] Marco Martiniello, Routledge, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book discusses the tension, or even the contradiction, between ethno-cultural segregation and ethno-cultural mixing in the field of the arts. It focuses on the local artistic sphere in the multicultural EU cities of Amsterdam, Antwerp, Brussels, Cologne, Malmö and Vienna. The chapters show a variety of local experiences by exploring in each city discourses, policies and practices in the local artistic field and by addressing one or more of the following questions: How do cities construct diversity discourses and policies? How do migrants and subsequent generations mobilise in the local artistic scene? What type of collective identities and ethnicities are publicly expressed and constructed in the arts? Are immigrant and ethnic artists and productions supported by official cultural institutions? Are local cultural policies becoming multicultural? How do migrant and ethnic artist mobilise in order to change cultural policies? The contributors combine top-down and bottom-up perspectives from a variety of large, mid-size and small European cities to make sense of the links between migrants and ethnic groups and artistic change at the local level. They examine how the city as an artistic space is changed by minority artistic expression and also how local cultural institutions change minority artistic expressions. The chapter authors are drawn from broad variety of disciplines, including anthropology, cultural studies, political science, sociology, urban studies and planning, offering the reader a broad variety of perspectives and insights into this area. This book was originally published as a special issue of Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power.

  • 96.
    Clavier, Berndt
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Art for integration: political rationalities and technologies of governmentalisation in the city of Malmö2014In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 10-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities increasingly use artistic and cultural activities to promote active citizenship and social cohesion. We suggest that city-sponsored cultural and artistic practices in Sweden are finding a new discursive context in migration. In this article, we look at two artistic and cultural institutions in Malmö, Sweden: Arena 305 and Drömmarnas hus. We develop a typology of governmentalisation based on the work of Nicholas Rose and Peter Miller, which allows us to describe the governing activity of Arena 305 and Drömmarnas hus. What becomes visible is the discrepancy between the moral form of the political rationalities and the technologies of government: even though institutions may harbour ideals and principles of inclusion, they are perfectly capable of sustaining activities that brighten the very boundaries they set out to challenge.

  • 97.
    Cuartielles, David
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Arduino SA.
    Delivery number D2.2: Report on Thinking Appliance Manual2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document summarizes the way how the SandS hardware ecosystem can be deployed inside an appliance and programmed to connect to the internet and, by extension, to the SandS infrastructure.

    This deliverable builds on top of D2.1 that was dedicated to describing the SandS hardware. In this case, we focus in the ways the different elements can be configured and reprogrammed. It also describes the tools created specifically for the project in order to reprogram the appliances.

    Together with this deliverable, we provide a series of documents that look in more detail into the different parts of the system. The following documents are referred to throughout the deliverable:

    • D2-2_Getting-Starter-Guide_SandS_motherboard.pdf: explains how to configure the drivers and how to upload Arduino code to the SandS motherboard
    • D2-2_Getting-Started-Guide_SandS_I2C_configuration_tool.pdf: explains how to connect a series of modules to a SandS motherboard and configure them from a command line interface
    • D2-2_Getting-Started-Guide_SandS_cross_compiler.pdf: explains how to create an SDK to compile code that can be uploaded to the Linux part of the SandS motherboard
    • D2-2_Built_In_Oven_Remote_Extension_Protocol.pdf: specifies the communication over serial port towards Gorenje's HomeChef oven. This serves as an example of how to get the SandS motherboard to talk to devices that offer a serial port connection
  • 98.
    Cuartielles, David
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    How Deep Is Your Love?: On Open-Source Hardware2014In: Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy / [ed] Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard, MIT Press, 2014, p. 153-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 99.
    Cuartielles, David
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Resign desearch: The Darwinian evolution of contemporary thought species2004In: Design [x] research: Essays on interaction design as knowledge / [ed] Pelle Ehn; Jonas Löwgren, Malmö University, School of Arts and Communication , 2004, p. 21-36Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    From its origin as a craft, passing through the market reappropriation of the term during the 80’s, to the moment when many disciplines have adopted it as a generic creative strategy, design has taken many forms and has incurred a series of ideological transformations. In an attempt of making sense within the already established structures in the fields of science and academic practices, some authors suggest the creation of the area of design research through the methodology of systematic inquiry.

    This text (first) analyzes the evolution of design as presented by different design practitioners, design philosophers, and design theorists. After studying the etymological definitions for both Design and Research according to two contemporary scholars, I will depict my understanding of the contemporary academic design scene through a historical overview, thus taking an evolutionary approach to the concept of Design Research.

    The text ultimately concludes by counterattacking the position of systematic inquiry applied to design research by starting from the original statement of design: to provide with solutions, making use of the argument of the western-centered background of the scientific knowledge, and presenting cases that I have faced in my everyday design practice as part of a design collective.

    With Resign Desearch I try to address that Gestalt is a big part of design, a part that contains an ideological discourse that is as hard to leave out of design practice as it is to find it in scientific knowledge. This contextualization politicizes design research to the point of making it partial. As a matter of fact, it isn’t until the postmodern era that design found a way of coping with the market. Therefore I believe that there is room for creating a research discipline with a different character—more contextualized—than any of the other scientific disciplines.

    The interesting evolutional characteristic of design resides in the fact that the different forms it has taken since its origins are coexistent nowadays. The use of the term »Darwinian evolution« in the subtitle to this paper is therefore intentionally ironic. It tries to address that despite all the controversy around the different kinds of work within design (commercial, research, educational, social, etc.) there is room for all of them.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 100.
    Cuartielles, David
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Arduino SA.
    Katterfeldt, E.
    Dabisias, G.
    Berner, A.
    Delivery number 4.2: Report on Final STEM Learning Kit with Integrated Learning Analytics for Trials2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This deliverable is an overall status report on the technical development and kit design made within the PELARS project prior to launching a series of trials with students within three different learning scenarios.

    The document presents a series of tools: hardware, software and crafting materials that will both enable the students perform a series of tasks, but also get real time feedback about the state of their projects. The feedback will also be sent to the teachers to inform them about potential issues faced by the students, allowing them take actions there where it is most needed.

    The tools here presented have been developed for the project based on the research made mainly as part of workpackages WP2 and WP4, but also on the technical descriptions of WP5.

    When it comes to the technical development, it advanced faster than anticipated, thanks to a relocation of human resources, what allowed the project to be presented at Ars Electronica in September 2015 and fulfill some of the partners’ plans for trials with students to start in late October 2015. At the time of writing 4 different series of boards have been produced adding up to more than 700 circuits of 13 different types that will be put in the hands of students during the different trials.

    The electronic development platform is now called TALKOO kits (formerly known as PELARS kits) that together with the PELARS crafting materials and the PELARS visualization tool will be at the core of the trials to be performed with groups of university students in interaction design and engineering, as well as high school students in different countries. PELARS has an extensive trial plan that is described in WP7’s deliverables and that builds on the results of this deliverable D4.2.

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