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  • 301.
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Urban anagram: A bio-political reflection on cinema and city life2011In: Urban Cinematics: Understanding Urban Phenomena Through The Moving Image / [ed] Adong Lu, Francois Penz, Intellect Ltd., 2011, p. 221-238Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In relation to the city, the cinema may be regarded as a revelation. Cinema brings to light what used to be contained in adumbration. Cinema holds an almost uncanny ability to deliver exhaustive representations of composite urbanity. Cinema unmasks metropolitan monumentality. Yet, as a medium with the ability not only to capture motion but to mobilize, film also appears as a life-bringing force, exposing but also igniting what has shown to be the dormant potentials of the urban web. If before, as Walter Benjamin expressed it, "[o]ur taverns and our metropolitan streets, our offices and furnished rooms, our railroad stations and our factories appeared to have locked us up hopelessly", the filmic medium changed all this, releasing us from incarceration, "so that now, in the midst of its far-flung ruins and debris, we calmly and adventurously go travelling." What comes through in this quote is the bio-political aspect of cinematic urbanism and the mutual dependency between film and city life. In a situation where power is no longer absolute but continuously exercised through mass-mediation, and where the distance between monitoring and mobilizing has diminished, the inter-mediality between film and urbanity has gained both in importance and in ambiguity. While cinema may transgress the representative limits of the urban order, revealing to each and every one of us a more performative than contemplative potential, it does at the same time propose new regimes, offering an adventurous, yet calm and controlled ride through life. The paper will address such life-governing aspects of cinematic urbanism and especially what could be described as its double agenda of revelation and mobilization, addressed from within the filmic medium as such through different forms of self-referentiality. On the one hand side, this referentiality has been supplemented with claims to greater authenticity and more far-reaching representativity as concerns real life. On the other hand side, it has evoked what could be seen as an anagrammatic actualization of conditioning forces, playfully recombining the basic components of both filmic and urban life. As an urban anagram, cinema presents a performative capability capricious enough as to challenge what has become the increasingly powerful bio-political aggregate of life, knowledge and subjectivity.

  • 302.
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Urbanism In-Yer-Face: Spatial Polemic, Filmic Intervention and the Rhetorical Turn in Design Thinking2009In: Communicating (by) Design / [ed] Johan Verbeke, Adam Jakimowicz, Sint Lucas Hogeschool voor Wetenschap & Kunst, Bruxelles , 2009, p. 171-182Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Not untouched by a wider philosophical discourse, the design professions have over the last decades gone through what is often referred to as a “linguistic turn” (Rorty, 1967). A move away from foundationalist assumptions about ‘reality’ towards a recognition of the generative importance of signs and symbols, the turn has also involved what used to be spatial margins and borderlands. Not only has it brought into focus the everyday landscape of consumerism or suburban housing, but furthermore the more general spatial polemics of contemporary urbanity. Discussing three filmic interventions into urban discourse, the paper aims to bring out the rhetorical aspect of the turn, as it moves from signs to polemical agency. Actualizing a more agonizing, ‘in-yer-face’ communication, the paper also draws attention to the rhetorical and political implications of the turn, as a “thinking of the new disorder” (Rancière 2006:88).

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  • 303.
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Whose goodness?: ethics and aesthetics in a landscape of dissensus2012In: JoLA - Journal of Landscape Architecture, ISSN 1862-6033, E-ISSN 2164-604X, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is there a logical relationship between ethics and aesthetics? Or perhaps even a natural link between practical reasoning, ‘common sense’ and the sphere of sensuous judgment? Propelled by an increasing environmental engagement and landscape awareness, these and similar philosophical questions again incur interest, motivating commentators to talk about ‘an ethical turn’. However, it is a ‘turn’ that gives rise to supplementary questions concerning the role of aesthetics and the conditions for creativity, contestation and change. Revisiting earlier ethico-aesthetic turns and twists, from modernist anti-aesthetics to contemporary neo- and onto-aesthetics, the essay aims to historicize the relationship between ethics and aesthetics, including the effect on landscape in these polemics. Ultimately, the ethico-aesthetic conjuncture constitutes the structural paradox of a ‘modernity’, which simultaneously expands horizontally and elevates vertically, consensually interlocking assumptions of commonality, subjectivity and reality. The critical alternative, it is argued, is to consider the aesthetic as a political site, where the distribution of the sensuous is a dissensual matter of (landscape) concern.

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  • 304.
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hill, Kristina
    Moran, Pepa
    Zahonero, Anna
    Bargmann, Julie
    Stadlbauer, Christina
    Taipale, Ulla
    Goula, Maria
    Transformative Parks2016In: Paisea, ISSN 1887-2557, no 032, p. 2-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a collaborative work focused on the critical question of whether new types of contemporary public parks can emerge from designers’ engagement with dynamic processes. Rather than giving prominence to the exclusive use of stable patterns of landform and vegetation that largely have characterized past parks, we are interested in the lessons learned from practices trying to conflate theories of aesthetic experience with ecosystem dynamics in order to influence urban trends and climate change. Our compilation of texts highlights questions and recognizes scenarios of conflict and opportunity. We describe places and sites where a temporal dimension accentuates or dramatizes socio-material sensitivities, and where a dynamic condition generates more or less informal commons and wildlands, or in other words, emergent parks taking into consideration the limits of human control.

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  • 305.
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lapcevic, Milica
    Blind Points of Transition2010In: Roma Europa Fake Factory - La reinvenzione del reale attraverso pratiche critiche di remix, mash up, ricontestualizzazione, reenactment / [ed] Cary Hendrickson, Salvatore Iaconesi, Oriana Persico, Luca Simeone, Fake Press , 2010, p. 68-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BLIND POINTS OF TRANSITION is an ongoing location based dialogue including two European artists, Maria Hellström Reimer and Milica Lapčević, both in different ways somewhat peripherally located. Initiated in April 2010, the transitional project takes as its starting point two mundane public parks, one of which is situated in Malmö, Sweden, on the shores of the Öresund; and the other in Belgrade, Serbia, on the banks of the Sava and Danube Rivers. While the location in Sweden forms part of a meticulously designed upmarket waterfront development called the Western Harbour, the first phases of which were laid out only ten years ago in connection with a large housing expo, the Serbian location constitutes the recreational part of the similarly planned but modernist Novi Beograd or New Belgrade; a post‐World War II project with buildings organised in blocks and large empty areas in between. And while the Swedish waterfront, despite the presence of a trendily twisted Calatrava tower, remains quite desolate most of the year, the Serbian location, with its entirely dishevelled atmosphere and rich greenery presents a more popular and populated space. The dialogue started with concurrent and inter‐locational field observations in Malmö and Belgrade on April 17, 2010. The close on‐site notations have since then been followed up by intertextual interventions or re‐visits, where the sites have been subjected to a dialogic reinterrogation of the objective of challenging gaps in time and space.

  • 306.
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lapcevic, Milica
    Simeone, Luca
    Blind and Fake: Exploring the Geography of the Expanded Book2011In: Proceedings of the Nordes’11: The 4th Nordic Design Research Conference MAKING DESIGN MATTER!, School of Art and Design, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland , 2011, p. 68-76Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It seems like we are now rapidly leaving the galaxy of printed matter. As screen-based media is making its entry into our everyday lives, it is pushing aside an object – the book - that has structured our forms of being together for almost six hundred years. This shift is not absolute but successive, and it raises a lot of questions. What kind of mediating practices are developing beyond printed media? And how do these practices structure and organize common spaces and publicities? Even though today, we are far into the electronic age, in a way we are still suspended in between modern individualized life and new, more floating societal formations. Therefore, rather than presupposing the disappearance of the book, this paper approaches the idea of the book as an expanded and inter-medial “boundary object” (Star and Griesemer 1989). In this respect, the point of departure is the expanded book project Roma Europa Fake Factory (REFF) (Henderson et. al. 2010) – a platform for global discussion and exchange concerning the management and governance of new public spheres in the electronic age. Playing out the visual authority of the printed text against the flickering of the net through the use of inter-mediating QR codes (Quick Response Codes) and fiducial markers, the project constituted a critical and artefactual intervention, remixing and mashing up the forcible means of the printed word with the intermediary potentials of electronic circuits. In the paper, we discuss the project through one of the contributions – Blind Points of Transition – a combined text- and video-based dialogue; on the one hand an exploration of the book and the net as different locations, and on the other hand a tentative mapping of the intermediary territory between two geographically separate places. Focusing on the transition of text through different media, the paper critically examines the spatial expansion and modifications of the book as it enters electronic circuits, thus proposing a ‘blind and fake’, or in other words a questioning form of boundary modification; dislocating the critical focus from visuality to agency and from permanent property to intermediary production.

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  • 307.
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    McCormick, Kes
    Nilsson, Elisabet M.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Arsenault, Nicholas
    Advancing Sustainable Urban Transformation through Living Labs: Looking to the Öresund Region2012In: IST2012 Navigating Theories and Challenging Realities: Track F: The Role of the Cities and Regions in Transitions, 2012, p. 19-37Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Öresund Region, which encompasses a population of 3.5 million across Southern Sweden and Eastern Denmark, aims to be a regional ”powerhouse” in Europe for sustainability, innovation and clean-tech. It can therefore provide a ”laboratory” by which to experiment, implement, examine and evaluate the progress of (local) transition governance and infrastructural investments. The Urban Transition Öresund project (2011-2014) is a cross-border cooperation between Swedish and Danish partners (including academic institutions, local governments, regional authorities, and clean-tech businesses) in the Öresund Region to evaluate and improve collaborative efforts to promote sustainable urban transformation. The working approach is the co-exploration of case studies – encompassing existing and planned buildings and districts in the Öresund Region – from which essential lessons are being extracted and subsequently tested on further projects in order to obtain general lessons. Importantly, the case studies from the Öresund Region are being supplemented by research on international experiences with a particular focus on new forms of collaboration, specifically the format of Living Labs, which can be simply described as a concept to integrate research and innovation processes within a public-private-people partnership. This paper presents a discussion of how the concept of Living Labs can support (local) transition governance towards sustainable urban transformation in the Öresund Region and beyond.

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  • 308.
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nilsson, Elisabet M.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    McCormick, Kes
    Toftager Larsen, Majken
    Mapping Collaborative Methods and Tools for Promoting Urban Transitions in the Øresund Region2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is produced within the Urban Transition Øresund (UT) project (2011–2014), and it is part of the subtask Collaborative Methods and Tools for Urban Transitions (UT CoMeT). The goal of the UT project is to promote sustainable growth and advance sustainable urban transformation in the Øresund region by gathering municipalities, universities and businesses in cross-border cooperation. The subtask UT CoMeT has a special focus on tools and methods for working that allow and promote greater collaboration between various actors in a transition process towards sustainability.The initial phase of the UT CoMeT activity consists of mapping existing experiences of forms of collaboration and cross-boundary working formats in urban transition processes. This includes examples of methods and tools utilised within the Øresund region, but also beyond, on international areas, focusing on Europe. The mapping process takes its point of departure in results from earlier reports, and it was completed in two steps: (I) mapping of methods and tools currently used by the UT project partners in the Øresund region; and (II) mapping of international cases and examples in Europe.

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  • 309.
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wilson, Robin
    Green, Nigel
    Land Use Poetics2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How do we conceive of a cultural landscape already stratified by diverse and conflicting practices of cultivation? How do we relate to an everyday environment already thoroughly planned and permeated by information? Broad yet pertinent, these questions constituted the point of departure for Land Use Poetics, an arts-based and inter-disciplinary project, addressing issues of spatial documentation and projection. Structured around two intense workshops or field operations in two different North European everyday locations, the Malmö-Lund area in Southeast Sweden and the Isle of Thanet in Kent, England, it brought together a diverse group of researchers, architects and artists with the common objective to explore and challenge spatial practices, technologies and imaginaries from an arts-based point of view. The result is a collection of combined visual and textual essays and reports, in different ways actualizing the everyday drama of land use and the poetics resulting from the attempts to map it out. Maria Hellström Reimer is a visual artist and landscape architecture scholar based in Sweden; Nigel Green and Robin Wilson are…. The volume also presents contributions by Melissa Appleton and Rosy Head, Kerstin Ergenzinger, Rona Lee, Gunnar Sandin, Staffan Schmidt, Meike Schalk and Apolonija Sustercic.

  • 310.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Antropologen som författare2012In: Norsk Antropologisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0802-7285, E-ISSN 1504-2898, no 01, p. 111-113Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 311.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Argentinatrilogin2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Argentinatrilogin består av romanerna Cosmos & Aska (2000), Santiago - Historien om Gerardo K (2007) och Misiones (2014), med efterord av Thomas Hylland Eriksen. Argentina-trilogien, som har tyngdepunkt i Malmö og Rio de la Plata, skildrer en bestemt tidsånd og stemning fra tiden like før og like etter århundreskiftet. Det er en betydelig prestasjon, som savner sidestykke i svensk samtidslitteratur ved både å utfordre romanens grenser og beskrive et lite stykke svensk samtid som ikke har vært utforsket litterært tidligere.

  • 312.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Bengaluru Boogie: outlines for an ethnographic fiction2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2003 I visited Bangalore for the first time, as a reporter, making the Indian IT capital a symbol of the emerging economic powerhouse. The reportage, written on commission for a journal, was never published. Ten years later I revisited Bangalore (Bengaluru) as part of the Memories of Modernity project, and I tried to approach the city from a different angle, both thematically and methodologically, juxtaposing my first journalistic impressions to some form of literary understanding. My tentative discussion on ethnography and fiction will take as its starting-point my previous “artistic research” on South Africa and Argentina, in which I have investigated the same material by both ethnographic and literary means. I am especially interested in the relation between the two practices as related yet radically different means of exploring a near or distant past of traumatic violence

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  • 313.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Bengaluru Boogie: Outlines for an Ethnographic Fiction2015In: Memory on Trial: Media, Citizenship and Social Justice / [ed] Oscar Hemer, Anders Hög Hansen, Thomas Tufte, LIT Verlag, 2015, p. 127-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 314.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Between the Horror Show and the Wall of Silence Reflections on fiction and truth in the transition processes of South Africa and Argentina2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    South Africa and Argentina are both extraordinarily rich in cultural production and moreover share a common experience of transition from a traumatic near past; in South Africa the system of racial segregation known as Apartheid and the culmination of violence in the ”interregnum years”; in Argentina the latest military dictatorship and its ”dirty war” on the militant left, which took the character of extermination. The concept of transition has different connotations in the two cases, primarily due to the diametrically opposed political experiences. The demise of the apartheid state was conceived as the victory of the liberation struggle, whereas Argentina’s return to democracy was in a way the result of a double defeat; the annihilation of the revolutionary guerrillas was followed by the humiliation for their vanquishers in the disastrous war against Great Britain over the Falkland/Malvinas islands. The inventory of the cultural production of the transition distinguishes between reactive and proactive expressions with regard to the disputed near past. The first category applies to most of the books and films that were produced in the aftermath of the truth commissions. Like the contemporary media coverage of the Argentinean Conadep and the South African TRC, many of the early narrations had a sensationalist tinge and contributed to el show del horror, as it was called in Argentina. In South Africa, the horrors were to be played down for the reconciliatory purpose, whereas Argentina soon saw the emergence and prevalence of what could be regarded as another form of reactive response; the dissociation from “the failed utopias”, through irony or mockery. The reactive expressions basically reproduce the fictions that are circulating in the society. The disputed past is signaled by common markers that tend to turn into clichés; in Argentina the Mother come Grandmother of Plaza de Mayo, the adopted orphan come adolescent in search of his/her disappeared parents, and, as counterpart, the distinguished gentleman next-door with a shady past as torturer and murderer; in South Africa the disillusioned former freedom fighter come drug addict and petty criminals vs. the incompetent affirmative action beneficiary or the noveau riche black businessman in his conspicuous BMW. Generally speaking, these narratives are mirroring the transition in a way that may be interesting from an ethnographic point of view, but neither as art nor as social critique. The proactive strategy, by contrast, implies an interrogation of society and history by means of fiction (or documentary forms with fictional elements). Both South Africa and Argentina abound with examples of such interrogations that arguably have played a proactive role in the transition process, displaying public lies and self-deceptions, deconstructing prevailing myths rather than forging new identities.

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  • 315.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    ComDev in the Margins2015In: Glocal Times, E-ISSN 1654-7985, no 23/23, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 316.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Fiction and truth in transition: writing the present past in South Africa and Argentina2012Book (Other academic)
  • 317.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Fiction's Truth and Memories of Modernity2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Memories of Modernity in South Africa connote two parallel tendencies in literature and other forms of mediated fiction – probably in the arts in general. On the one hand an attempt to link back to an idealized pre-apartheid past. A past often depicted and interpreted as an early form of modernity which is brutally interrupted. The second tendency, closely connected to the first, is the attempt to come to grips with the alleged parenthesis of apartheid: the investigation of the recent past with its first momentum coinciding with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The urge for reconciliation seems to overshadow the quest for truth. The Christian redemption theme, combined with the fictional structure of the very proceedings, has served almost as a matrix for artistic and literary expression in the transitional period.

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  • 318.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Fiction's Truth and Social Change. Preliminary outlines for an investigation of fiction as a research method and a means of communication for social change2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As indicated by Appadurai (1996) and Ashcroft (2001), fiction has a privileged position in relation to journalism and other writing practices when it comes to promoting social action and change. Dramatized fictions, not least, in the form of live theatre, film or broadcast soap operas, are potentially very powerful communication tools. Literature played a key-role in building the imagined communities of both colonial empires and nation-states, in Europe as well as in the newly independent former colonies of Africa, Asia and the Americas. Today, not only literature but also other forms of mediated fiction may serve as important means of deconstructing the same mythologies and, possibly, foster the building of new transnational communities. My focus in this paper is on literary fiction as a transgressive means of investigation on the one hand and as a vehicle for cultural identification and social empowerment on the other. I will argue that these two aspects are intrinsically connected, and that the second aim should be subordinated to the first. Keywords are Truth, Transgression and Interpolation.

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  • 319.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Författaren som forskare - tautologi eller självmotsägelse?2010In: Forskning och kritik: granskning och recension av konstnärlig forskning / [ed] Torbjörn Lind, Vetenskapsrådet , 2010, p. 101-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    My research project ‘The Truth of Fiction’ (Fiktionens sanning) poses a simple, vast question: What can fiction tell us about the world that journalism and academic prose cannot? I tackle it by exploring two specific cases, South Africa and Argentina, and the relationship between literary fiction and society’s dramatic, traumatic transformation in these two countries over the past two or three decades. One premise of mine has been to adopt, in my investigation, the author’s rather than the literary researcher’s stance. But what does it mean in practical terms? Can an author research his own occupation? Literature is itself, after all, a form of knowledge, but there are ample grounds for the assumption that authors themselves are the people least suited to analyse the literary aspects of their own works. Attempting, in praxis, to answer the question of what artistic research on literature is all about confronts me with the dilemma of finding a single form that may, in some sense, be described as matching the content of the investigation. This dilemma is presumably unresolved. The answer is a paradox — tautology and self-contradiction alike — and the form an impossibility. My preliminary solution is necessarily a compromise: a kind of academic journalistic essay, personal and subjective but with no element of fiction and fulfilling all the requirements of academic exactitude. My fundamental lesson from the ongoing knowledge process is that writing is the foremost method. I write my way through a field resembling Borge’s garden of forking paths, in which every reference leads to another and not always back to the main path. Where I ultimately end up, I know only when the writing is finished. So far, my bid to carry out artistic research has been reminiscent of my novel projects: they too have extended over several years and changed their guise in the course of the process. But the conclusions from this both banal and revolutionary insight remain to be drawn when I am done. And someone else, perhaps, should then draw them.

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  • 320.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Global histories through the lens of fiction2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature has historically played an important role as witness-bearer to the incidents of mass violence that formed an intrinsic part of modernity in the 20th century - especially when other forms of documentation have been scarce or missing altogether. But today, when the media and new information and communication technologies give us immediate access to almost all dramatic events in the world, there is less incitement for literature to assume that role. More than just supplementing authentic testimonies, literary fantasy can however also be an important corrective, as demonstrated by the two cases of Argentina during the military dictatorship (1976-82) and South Africa during Apartheid (Hemer 2012a). The transition processes were in both countries supported by systematic investigations of the state violence, in Argentina the CONADEP (1983-84), in South Africa the TRC (1995-98), arguably the two to date most influential Truth Commissions, with a crucial impact on cultural production. Many, if not most, of the books and films that were produced in the aftermath of the truth commissions served a redemptive purpose, in the name of national reconciliation (South Africa), or in order to absolve the general public from complicity (Argentina). Rather than opening up for discussion, the mainstream cultural production sealed the new, official history. Yet literature – more than any other medium or art form - did also play a proactive role in the transition process, displaying public lies and self-deceptions, and deconstructing prevailing myths rather than forging new identities. The most effective literary approaches to the present past were, in the Argentinean case, in fact the opposite of witness literature, working the void of experience and often deploying the curious tense of the future past. In parallel with my interrogation of ‘fiction’ and ‘truth’ from a writer’s perspective, which in the end brought me to the cross-roads of Literature and Anthropology and resulted in a dissertation in Social Anthropology (Ibid.), I have worked on the same material in a hybrid literary form (Hemer 2012b), and lately by purely fictional means, in the concluding part of a novel trilogy, set in a near future (Misiones, forthcoming). With my experimental ethnographic research as a starting-point, I intend to discuss its relation to my more recent literary research, as two related yet radically different means of exploring global modernity.

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  • 321.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Islands in Distress: Making Sense of the Malvinas/Falklands War2017In: The Global South Atlantic / [ed] Joseph Slaughter, Kerry Bystrom, Fordham University Press, 2017, p. 144-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The short 1982 war between Argentina and Great Britain over the Malvinas/Falklands had far-going consequences for both countries. In Argentina, the disastrous defeat became the decisive blow to six years of military dictatorship. In Great Britain, the resounding victory was conceived as a personal triumph for the contested Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. This chapter interrogates the similarities of the symbolic significations attached to the islands (and the conflict), with mirroring myths of national renewal and adjoining crusade or romance-quest rescue scenarios, and argues that these have been more thoroughly scrutinised in Argentina than in the UK. Approaching the 35th anniversary of the war, the conditions on the islands and the South Atlantic regional context are resoundingly different, but the conflict remains unresolved.

  • 322.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Literary Truth in Transition2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A transition does not necessarily imply a move from a closed society to an open one, but the transition period itself is usually a period of opening, and it is therefore especially interesting from the perspective of literary and cultural production, since the dialectic between culture and society comes in the open. Literature has, perhaps more than other forms of expression, an ability of looking back and looking forward simultaneously, reinterpreting the past and forecasting the future. Rewriting modernity, or history – even writing history for the first time, exploring material that has been left untouched, waiting to be narrated. In South Africa, literature – and the arts in general – have played a proactive role in the transition process of the ‘90s, mainly endorsing the new democratic government, but also taking a critical stand, deconstructing prevailing myths, rather than forging new identities. In Argentina, the role of literature has until now been reactive, at best. There are several reasons for this difference, some of which have to do with dissimilar historical contexts, others with diverse literary traditions. But the basic explanation is political. In South Africa, the former “terrorists” are now the ruling party. In Argentina the armed struggle of the ‘60s and ‘70s ended in total defeat. It is easier to stretch out a hand of forgiveness from a position of power, and in the conviction that this position was obtained through the struggle. In Argentina a quite common leftist view would be that the (class) struggle continues, and there has been little self-examination among surviving representatives of the guerrilla groups. The idea that the aged mothers and grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo – now in their eighties – or the children and grandchildren of the disappeared, who have often been politically radicalized from their infancy, would extend a hand of forgiveness to the torturers and murderers, who for the most part have never been convicted for their deeds, is almost unthinkable.

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  • 323.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Memories of a Modernity to be: On truth and reconciliation in transitional South Africa2007In: Glocal Times, no 8Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Truth and reconciliation are decisive factors in contemporary South African culture. 'Memories of modernity' connote two parallel tendencies in literature and other forms of mediated fiction. Firstly, a yearning to link back to an idealized pre-apartheid past – often depicted and interpreted as an embryonic modernity which is brutally interrupted. Secondly, the attempt to come to grips with this alleged parenthesis: the investigation of the recent past by experimental means.

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  • 324.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Memories of a Modernity-to-be: Some reflections on South Africa's unresolved dilemma2008In: CFE Conference Papers Series;3 / [ed] Johanna Lindbladh, Institute for Educational Sciences, Lund University, Sweden, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As indicated by Appadurai (1996) and Ashcroft (2001), fiction has a privileged position in relation to journalism and other writing practices when it comes to promoting social action and change. Dramatized fictions, not least, in the form of live theatre, film or broadcast soap operas, are potentially very powerful communication tools. My focus in this paper is on literary fiction as a transgressive means of investigation on the one hand and as a vehicle for cultural identification and social empowerment on the other. I will argue that these two aspects are intrinsically connected, and that the second aim should be subordinated to the first. I will specifically discuss South Africa in the transitional period from 1991 to the present as my case, with emphasis on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and its impact on culture and public debate.

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  • 325.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Memories of the future past: on literary and ethnographic means to explore global modernity2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature has historically played an important role as witness-bearer to the incidents of mass violence that formed an intrinsic part of modernity in the 20th century - especially when other forms of documentation have been scarce or missing altogether. But today, when the media and new information and communication technologies give us immediate access to almost all dramatic events in the world, there is less incitement for literature to assume that role. More than just supplementing authentic testimonies, literary fantasy can however also be an important corrective, as demonstrated by the two cases of Argentina during the military dictatorship (1976-82) and South Africa during Apartheid (Hemer 2012a). The transition processes were in both countries supported by systematic investigations of the state violence, in Argentina the CONADEP (1983-84), in South Africa the TRC (1995-98), arguably the two to date most influential Truth Commissions, with a crucial impact on cultural production. Many, if not most, of the books and films that were produced in the aftermath of the truth commissions served a redemptive purpose, in the name of national reconciliation (South Africa), or in order to absolve the general public from complicity (Argentina). Rather than opening up for discussion, the mainstream cultural production sealed the new, official history. Yet literature – more than any other medium or art form - did also play a proactive role in the transition process, displaying public lies and self-deceptions, and deconstructing prevailing myths rather than forging new identities. The most effective literary approaches to the present past were, in the Argentinean case, in fact the opposite of witness literature, working the void of experience and often deploying the curious tense of the future past. In parallel with my interrogation of ‘fiction’ and ‘truth’ from a writer’s perspective, which in the end brought me to the cross-roads of Literature and Anthropology and resulted in a dissertation in Social Anthropology (Ibid.), I have worked on the same material in a hybrid literary form (Hemer 2012b), and lately by purely fictional means, in the concluding part of a novel trilogy, set in a near future (Misiones, forthcoming). With my experimental ethnographic research as a starting-point, I intend to discuss its relation to my more recent literary research, as two related yet radically different means of exploring global modernity. This discussion aims at being a platform for a possible transdisciplinary intervention within the current Memories of Modernity project, and it will include a workshop on imagining the future pas

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  • 326.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Memories of Violence: Literature and transitional justice in Argentina2015In: The Performance of Memory As Transitional Justice / [ed] Elisabeth S Bird, Fraser Ottanelli, Intersentia, 2015, p. 181-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature has historically played an important role as witness-bearer to massacres and incidents of mass violence, especially when other forms of documentation have been missing. But today, when the media and new information and communication technologies give us immediate access to almost all dramatic events in the world, there is less incitement for literature to assume that role. More than just supplementing authentic testimonies, fi ction can add an important dimension to the interrogation and understanding of the horror, as demonstrated by the case of Argentina in the processing of the experience of the military dictatorship (1976–82). Whereas the testimonial narratives were a prime source of knowledge about the crimes of the Dictatorship, and served a crucial purpose as evidence in the judicial process, these testimonies are not more reliable than other sources when it comes to occurrences that preceded the Dictatorship or that were not related to the repression. Memory recurs to simplifi ed narrative forms that tend to replace analysis. In order to understand, the imagination has to distance itself from the subjective memory and become refl ective. Th erefore, literary fi ction may, paradoxically, present the most accurate images of the traumatic recent past and of its fabric of ideas and experiences Th e maturity of memory (and ‘postmemory’) is also a signifi cant factor. Unlike news reports, witness testimonies, and other documents, the literary text may sometimes reveal its historical/ethnographic value only in retrospect. It appears as prophetic, as forecasting the future. Yet, it oft en requires a long ‘incubation time’. Th e literary interpretation of historical events and social processes may need a distance in time of 30 or 40 years.

  • 327.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Memories of Violence: Truths of victory and defeat in South Africa and Argentina2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    South Africa and Argentina share the common experience of dealing with a traumatic near-past; in South Africa, the system of racial segregation and suppression known as apartheid and the violent so-called interregnum years; in Latin America, the military dictatorships and the so-called dirty war on the militant left, which in Argentina took on the character of systematic extermination. The transition processes were in both countries supported by systematic investigations of the state violence, in Argentina the CONADEP (1983-84), in South Africa the TRC (1995-98), arguably the two to date most influential Truth Commissions, with a crucial impact on cultural production. The fundamental disparities between the two cases are primarily due to the diametrically opposed outcomes of the political militancy. The demise of the apartheid state was conceived as the victory of the liberation struggle, whereas Argentina’s return to democracy was, in a way, the result of a double defeat; the annihilation of the guerrillas in the dirty war and the subsequent humiliation for their vanquishers in the Malvinas (Falklands) disaster. The paper, based on the author’s extensive research of fiction’s role in the transition processes (Writing Transition : Fiction and Truth in South Africa and Argentina), specifically explores how the differing views on revolutionary violence have changed over time, from the 1980s to today, as reflected in literature and film, and how the notions of victory and defeat have determined the conditions for reconciliation.

  • 328.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Memory for Development: Amnesia, xenophobia and participatory communication in a South African context2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Memory work, understood as the making public of memory, has not been a priority for Communication for Development, in spite of the fact that ‘conflict resolution’ has lately become one of the most important areas of ComDev practice. The mediation of social and political conflict is largely about the mediation of public memory – mediation understood as both literal peace broking and what Roger Silverstone (2008) defines as ‘actively creating a symbolic and cultural space in which meanings are created and communicated beyond the constraints of the face to face’. The prevailing conception of development implies a notion of progress, but this very idea is refuted by the dual impossibility of both continued economic growth and its reversal, ‘degrowth’ (Eriksen, in Hansen, Hemer and Tufte, 2015). If structural amnesia is a distinct feature of global modernity, then memory work may become not only a resourceful and future-posing activity but the very processor of social transformation. The paper forms part of a pre-study for a larger research project which attempts to develop a meta-theory of Communication for Development. Such meta-theory ought to accomplish two things: (1) conceptualise the history and field of ComDev research; (2) contextualise ComDev in the social sciences and humanities. The purpose of (1) is to integrate ComDev as a research field in its own right. The purpose of (2) is to define and refine the theoretical context of ComDev, with regard to specific concepts like agency, memory, justice, hope and social change—themes discussed during the four Ørecomm Festivals (2010-2014)—and thereby also systematise its connections with related research fields. The subtheme of Memory has specific relevance for participatory communication by exploring memory work as ‘communication for reconciliation’, looking at different cultural interventions’ role in conflict or post-conflict processes of mediation, with special regard to the concepts of postmemory and transitional justice. This paper will have a focus on South Africa and the possible correlation between the “Truth and Reconciliation” process afer apartheid and the current outbursts of xenophobic violence against migrants from other South African countries.

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  • 329.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Misiones2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    ÅRET ÄR 2018, ett lågskaligt världskrig pågår med epicentrum i Centralasien, den interkontinentala flygtrafiken har upphört och flyktingar och lycksökare färdas återigen sjövägen från den gamla till den nya världen och från norra till södra halvklotet. Medan Europa sjunkit allt djupare i sin självbespeglande söndring så har Argentina brutit sin onda cirkel och ser ut att äntligen förverkliga sin enorma potential. Cosmos och Aska, alias Ernst och Cenice, återförenas i Buenos Aires och ger sig ut på en resa för att finna sin försvunna dotter Elena. Till Argentina och närmare bestämt svenskbyn Oberá i provinsen Misiones, kommer också romanens berättare, på spåret av en fantastisk hemlighet. Med karakteristisk förening av lätt ironi och blodigt allvar knyter Oscar Hemer i Misiones samman de tematiska trådarna i sin Argentinatrilogi (Cosmos & Aska, 2000; Santiago, 2007).

  • 330.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    "One Must Speak, One Cannot Speak": Fiction, memory and genre hybridity2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decades have seen a proliferation of truth commissions, in Latin America, Eastern Europe and South Africa, whose Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) is arguably the most ambitious to date. The post-modern philosophical angst about the pursuit of truth thus paradoxically coincides with a renewed political confidence in the same process as the panacea to break away from authoritarian and violent pasts. In South Africa, the typical mixed-genre literature of the post-apartheid transition (Hirson, Krog, Ndebele, Wicomb) mirrors the inter-disciplinary complexity of the TRC itself. Moreover it seems to provide a form in which to deal with the horrific past and take possession of history, in accordance with Lyotard’s suggestion that the liminal experiences of our time demand new genres adequate to their unspeakability. South Africa’s disputed reconciliation process stands in stark contrast to Argentina, whose latest and most murderous military regime (1976-82) remains largely unrevealed. It is only in the last years that writers have begun to look its holocaust in the face (Feijóo, Kohan, Pauls, Saccomanno), often through the experience of the children of the disappeared (Alcoba, Bruzzone). By a comparative reading of recent novels from the two countries, this paper will discuss the relation between truth and fiction, and the (potential) role of literature both as a means of truth-seeking and as a vehicle for advocacy that goes beyond merely memorial reconstruction. References: Herwitz, Daniel (2003) Race and Reconciliation. Essays from the New South Africa. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Lyotard, Jean-François & Thébaud, Jean-Loup (1979) Au juste: conversations. Paris: Bourgois. Martyniuk, Claudio (2004) ESMA. Fenomenología de la desaparición. Buenos Aires: Prometeo. Sanders, Mark (2007). Ambiguities of witnessing: law and literature in the time of a truth commission. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press Wilson, Richard A. (2001) The politics of truth and reconciliation in South Africa : Legitimizing the post-apartheid state. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

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  • 331.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    "One Must Speak, One Cannot Speak": Fiction, memory and genre hybridity in transitional South Africa and Argentina2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decades have seen a proliferation of truth commissions, in Latin America, Eastern Europe and South Africa, whose Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) is arguably the most ambitious to date. The post-modern philosophical angst about the pursuit of truth thus paradoxically coincides with a renewed political confidence in the same process as the panacea to break away from authoritarian and violent pasts. In South Africa, the typical mixed-genre literature of the post-apartheid transition (Coetzee, Krog, Ndebele, Wicomb) mirrors the inter-disciplinary complexity of the TRC itself. Moreover it seems to provide a form in which to deal with the horrific past and take possession of history, in accordance with Jean-François Lyotard’s suggestion that the liminal experiences of our time demand new genres adequate to their unspeakability. South Africa’s disputed reconciliation process stands in stark contrast to Argentina, whose latest and most murderous military regime (1976-82) remains largely unrevealed. It is only in the last years that fiction writers have begun to look its holocaust in the face (Feijóo, Kohan, Pauls, Saccomanno), often through the experience of the children of the disappeared (Alcoba, Bruzzone). By a comparative reading of recent novels from the two countries, I will discuss the relation between truth and fiction, and the (potential) role of literature both as a means of truth-seeking and as a vehicle for advocacy that goes beyond merely memorial reconstruction.

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  • 332.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Proactive participation in the interrogation of society and history: reflections on fiction and truth in the transition processes of South Africa and Argentina2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    South Africa and Argentina are both extraordinarily rich in cultural production and moreover share a common experience of transition from a traumatic near past; in South Africa the system of racial segregation known as Apartheid and the culmination of violence in the ”interregnum years”; in Argentina the latest military dictatorship and its ”dirty war” on the militant left, which took the character of extermination. The concept of transition has different connotations in the two cases, primarily due to the diametrically opposed political experiences. The demise of the apartheid state was conceived as the victory of the liberation struggle, whereas Argentina’s return to democracy was in a way the result of a double defeat; the annihilation of the revolutionary guerrillas was followed by the humiliation for their vanquishers in the disastrous war against Great Britain over the Falkland/Malvinas islands. The inventory of the cultural production of the transition distinguishes between reactive and proactive expressions with regard to the disputed near past. The first category applies to most of the books and films that were produced in the aftermath of the truth commissions. Like the contemporary media coverage of the Argentinean Conadep and the South African TRC, many of the early narrations had a sensationalist tinge and contributed to el show del horror, as it was called in Argentina. In South Africa, the horrors were to be played down for the reconciliatory purpose, whereas Argentina soon saw the emergence and prevalence of what could be regarded as another form of reactive response; the dissociation from “the failed utopias”, through irony or mockery. The reactive expressions basically reproduce the fictions that are circulating in the society. The disputed past is signaled by common markers that tend to turn into clichés; in Argentina the Mother come Grandmother of Plaza de Mayo, the adopted orphan come adolescent in search of his/her disappeared parents, and, as counterpart, the distinguished gentleman next-door with a shady past as torturer and murderer; in South Africa the disillusioned former freedom fighter come drug addict and petty criminals vs. the incompetent affirmative action beneficiary or the noveau riche black businessman in his conspicuous BMW. Generally speaking, these narratives are mirroring the transition in a way that may be interesting from an ethnographic point of view, but neither as art nor as social critique. The proactive strategy, by contrast, implies an interrogation of society and history by means of fiction (or documentary forms with fictional elements). Both South Africa and Argentina abound with examples of such interrogations that arguably have played a proactive role in the transition process, displaying public lies and self-deceptions, deconstructing prevailing myths rather than forging new identities.

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  • 333.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Re-Inventing History. A reading of South African novels of the transition2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    History is the great forger of national identity, but literature also played a key-role in its construction, in Europe as well as in the newly independent former colonies of Africa, Asia and the Americas. Many post-colonial writers actively participated in the nation-building process, providing epics for identification and contributing to a national imaginary. In most of Africa, the national projects have failed and given room for disillusion, which may also be artistically productive. But neither happened in South Africa, where national modernization was frustrated in an embryonic stage by the imposition of Apartheid. During the transition process, and especially in the last decade, South African writers have reexamined history in the pursuit of neglected and suppressed configurations. The marginal, yet critical role of literature in the transition seems to be that of deconstructing prevailing myths, rather than the forging of new identities. This paper discusses the presence of history and the near past in recent novels by five South African witers (Zakes Mda, Marlene van Niekerk, Zoë Wicomb, Aziz Hassim and Ronnie Govender), and takes a special interest in the disclosed legacy of creolization.

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  • 334.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Round-table Discussion Led by Thomas Hylland Eriksen: The Flattening of the Public Sphere and the Loss of Respect for Knowledge2014In: Reclaiming the Public Sphere: Communication, power and social change / [ed] Tina Askanius, Liv Stubbe Östergaard, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, p. 154-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Panel discussion on "The Public Intellectual" with Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Ingrid Elam and Carsten Jensen, at the Örecomm Festival 2012

  • 335.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Sanningen mot strömmen2012In: Praktik & Teori, ISSN 1104-6570, no 1, p. 39-49Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 336.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The Writer as Anthropologist2016In: The Anthropologist as Writer: Genres and Contexts in the Twenty-First Century / [ed] Helena Wulff, Berghahn Books, 2016, p. 172-187Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 337.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Till kontaminationens lov / Bengaluru Boogie2017In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 26, no 2/2017, p. 11-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Praise of Contamination/ Bengaluru Boogie I am currently engaging with the relation between literary and academic writing. Drawing from my experience as a literary writer and academic I interrogate how these writing practices may info each other, and whether or not they can be merged. The "ethnographic fiction" Bengaluru Boogie is part of an ongoing open-ended interrogation of the discourse(s) of purity and impurity

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  • 338.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Writing and Methodology: Literary Texts as Ethnographic Datra and Creative Writing as a Means oif Investigation2016In: Methodological Reflections on Rersearching Communication and Social Change / [ed] Norbert Wildermuth, Teke Ngomba, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 161-182Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter will discuss the relation between writing and ethnography from two radically different perspectives. Firstly, writing as method. In academic research, the writing process is often regarded as merely a means of conveying results, and ”good writing” is even met with suspicion. Drawing from my own experience of both literary, journalistic and academic writing I will discuss the interrelations between these three writing practices, with specific focus on creative forms of academic writing and even the deployment of fictional elements in ethnographic research. Examples will be taken from the extensive discussion on the relation between Literature and Anthropology after Anthropology’s “literary turn” in the 1980s, which has implications for many other disciplines, not least Media and Communication studies. I will argue that writing itself constitutes a methodology that is under-researched in the context of Communication for Development. The second part of the chapter will ”turn the tables” and look at literary texts (books, films or other formats) as ethnographic data. Again, primarily founding my argument on my research in South Africa and Argentina, I will claim that literature may hold key information about processes of development and social change that cannot be assessed by other means. I will specifically focus on the notion of the conceptual repertoire (Appadurai) and fiction’s role in the production of collective memory and self-understanding.

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  • 339.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Writing from an imagined diaspora2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rather than blurring the boundraries, cross-border writing makes them more transparent. The presentation discusses two interrelated projects: a dissertation in a literary form, and a novel trilogy written from an imagined diaspora, as if the author were an Argentinean exile in Sweden. Writing across borders is usually associated with the literal experience of exile: Writing in or from a diaspora, addressing the "host" culture, or the imagined "homeland" (which is often a temporal rather than spatial category). But borders can just as well be boundaries between genres, or disciplines, in which case exile and diaspora still appear as apposite metaphors. I am engaged with all these forms of transgression and my reflections upon their interrelations are based on two recently concluded writing projects: • An artistic research project investigating the role of fiction in the transition processes of South Africa and Argentina, and • A novel trilogy with strong thematic connections to the Argentinean case study. Whereas the first project in the end resulted in an academic dissertation, although in a literary form, the second project was informed by the academic research in a way that paradoxically emphasized its fictionality. Rather than blurring the borders, the transgressive efforts made them more transparent. In recent writing I attempt to merge academic and literary approaches in a cross-genre that I tentatively call ethnographic fictions. The Argentina Trilogy is written from an imagined diaspora, as if I were an Argentinean exile in Sweden, addressing experiences that obviously resonate more with an Argentinean audience than a Swedish one. Yet unless the trilogy is translated to Spanish, these potential connections will never occur. Language is the principal barrier that I am constantly and increasingly confronted with, and translation is crucial to all forms of transgressive writing.

  • 340.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Writing Transition: Fiction and Truth in South Africa and Argentina2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis is the result of a four-year research project, which takes its point of departure in a simple, vast question: What can fiction tell us about the world that journalism and science cannot? The truth of fiction – if there is one – must obviously entail something other than factual truth. But how can it be assessed? This dilemma is tackled by exploring two specific cases, South Africa and Argentina, and the relationship between literary fiction and society’s dramatic transformation in the two countries over the past three decades. South Africa and Argentina are both extraordinarily rich in literary production and moreover share a common experience of transition from a traumatic near past; in South Africa the system of racial segregation known as apartheid and the culmination of violence in the ”interregnum years”; in Argentina the latest military dictatorship and its ”dirty war” on the militant left, which took the character of extermination. The concept of transition has different connotations in the two cases, primarily due to the diametrically opposed outcomes of the political militancy. The demise of the apartheid state was conceived as the victory of the liberation struggle, whereas Argentina’s return to democracy was in a way the result of a double defeat; the annihilation of the revolutionary guerrillas, followed by the humiliation for their vanquishers in the disastrous campaign to reconquer Malvinas (the Falklands) from Great Britain. Given the dissimilar historical contexts and diverging cultural traditions, the experiential correspondences between the two countries become the more striking. Literature has been a crucial means for differing attempts at looking the horrific past in the face and taking possession of history and memory. Both South Africa and Argentina abound with examples of interrogations of the present and the near past by means of fiction (or documentary forms with fictional elements) that arguably have played a proactive role in the transition process, by displaying public lies and self-deceptions, deconstructing prevailing myths rather than forging new identities. One of the premises for the investigation has been to adopt the perspective of the author, rather than that of the academic researcher. Fifteen writers are interviewed extensively; more than “informants”, they are participants in a collaborative venture. But what does the writer’s perspective imply? Attempting, in praxis, to answer the question of fiction’s truth confronts the author with the dilemma of finding a single form that may, in some sense, be congenial with the content of the investigation. The solution to this presumably impossible dilemma is an experimental compromise: a basically discursive text that borders on both journalism and literature, incorporating reportage, essay and memoir.

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  • 341.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Äventyraren vid världens ände2003Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En essä om Etiopienresenärerna Richard Burton, Arthur Rimbaud och Wilfred Thesiger

  • 342.
    Hemer, Oscar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Örecomm Global Launch Panel: New Challenges in Communicatin for Development2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of communication for development is experiencing dynamic times, both in the theoretical debates and not least in practice. However, there is a certain inertia in the theoretical perspecrives used, and critical reflection upon how we conceive the field is not formulated. New development challenges are posing fundamental questions to the field and this panel suggests a critical assessment of these cjallenges as well as of the teheories applied to develop the field in this context. The panel addresses issues at three levels: Firsly, at the level of development theory, where Jan Nederveen Pieterse uses the 'rise of Asia' to rethink development thinking ("the return of the development state"). Secondly, at the level of development cooperation, where Karin Wilkins deconstructs the field to demonstrate how power relations remain at the core of nunderstanding communication for development practice. Finally, Thomas Tufte and Rafael Obregón review a particular and very successful communication strategy within the field: education-entertainment (EE). They suggest a broader theoretical framework which reflects the development challenges EE often is used to address.

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  • 343.
    Hemer, Oscar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Forsare, Malena
    Kulturjournalistikens gränser2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under de senaste decennierna har gränserna som tidigare definierat kulturjournalistik i svenk press blivit allt mindre tydliga. Nyhetsjournalistiska värderingar har kommit att prägla kulturbevakningen, samtidigt som den subjektiva opinionsjournalistiken spritt sig till tidningarnas helgbilagor och även till den traditionella nyhetsbevakningen. Från kulturjournalistiskt håll har de uppluckrade gränserna ofta upplevts som ett hot, sällan som en möjlighet. Kulturjournalistikens gränser är ett försök till positionbestämning av en genre som sägs ha befunnit sig i kris åtminstone de senaste tjugo åren. Åtta författare, med olika kulturjournalistisk bakgrund, reflekterar kring kulturjournalistiken, inte bara utifrån hur den ser ut idag, utan lika mycket utifrån vad den skulle kunna vara.

  • 344.
    Hemer, Oscar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hög Hansen, AndersMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).Tufte, Thomas
    Memory on Trial: Media, Citizenship and Social Justice2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book approaches the memory sharing of groups, communities and societies as inevitable struggles over the interpretation of, and authority over, particular stories. Coming to terms with the past in memory work, alone or with others, is always unsteady ground and the activation of memory will always relay imaginations of futures we want to shape and inhabit. The contributors all explore in different ways how citizens can actualize a public and how citizens and groups struggle with their pasts and presents - and other group’s understandings - in their work for futures they dream of, or envision. This implies an engagement with the notion of social justice, which in turn entails trial and revision of ideas and procedures of how to share the world. But to share also requires some kind of common ground and distributed power. The anthology thus engages with a range of cases that bring views and voices back in public, demanding justice, recognition, sometimes literally triggering new trials. Some of the memory work is done strategically, in the context of communication for development and social change interventions where NGOs, community-based organizations, governments or UN agencies pursue not just voice and views, but also very material demands for social justice and social change.

  • 345.
    Hemer, Oscar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Persson, Hans-ÅkeDepartment of Communication, Business Information Technologies, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    In the Aftermath of Gezi: From social movement to social change?2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the light of the last two years’ dramatic development in Turkey, the aftermath of the popular protests that started at Gezi Park in Istanbul in the summer of 2013 seems to be fading. What was celebrated as a sign of democratic maturity in a modern, prospective EU member state now may rather appear as an almost futile attempt to articulate visions of a pluralist political sphere in an increasingly repressive society. This introductory chapter argues, however, that Gezi was a liminal moment whose long-term implications remain to be revealed. In the prism of perspectives on Gezi that are presented in the anthology, this chapter dwells particularly on one reference point, which in the aftermath has attained renewed significance: the Öcalan crisis of 1998, which in an unexpected way were to impact both the Kurdish question and the relations between Turkey and the EU.

  • 346.
    Hemer, Oscar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Tufte, Thomas
    Afterword: Addressing the Challenge of The Present Continuous2014In: Reclaiming the Public Sphere: Communication, power and social change / [ed] Tina Askanius, Liv Stubbe Östergaard, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, p. 225-231Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Afterword to the anthology "Reclaiming the Public Sphere", based on contributions to the Örecomm Festival 2012 on the same theme.

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  • 347.
    Hemer, Oscar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Tufte, Thomas
    ComDev in the mediatized world2012In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 33, no Special issue, p. 229-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As we are writing, in late 2011, we are in the beginning of a historical revolution that may or may not turn out to be even more far-reaching than the one unleashed in 1989. A common denominator in this resurging revolution is the mobilizing power of the so-called social media. Even if labels such as the Twitter or Facebook revolution are rightfully refuted, the on-going Arab Spring is a clear-cut example of a new and unprecedented communication power, which is largely out of the authorities’ control. While the crucial role of media and communication in processes of social change and development at last becomes evident, it is however not associated with the field of communication for development and social change, not even by the development agencies themselves. While ComDev historically has been about developing prescriptive recipes of communication for some development, it is high time we refocus our attention to the deliberative, non-institutional change processes that are emerging from a citizens’ profound and often desperate reaction to this global Now.

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  • 348.
    Hemer, Oscar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Tufte, Thomas
    Communication for development in the mediatized world2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As we are writing, in late 2011, we are in the beginning of a historical revolution that may or may not turn out to be even more far-reaching than the one unleashed in 1989. A common denominator in this resurging revolution is the mobilizing power of the so-called social media. Even if labels such as the Twitter or Facebook revolution are rightfully refuted, the on-going Arab Spring is a clear-cut example of a new and unprecedented communication power, which is largely out of the authorities’ control. While the crucial role of media and communication in processes of social change and development at last becomes evident, it is however not associated with the field of communication for development and social change, not even by the development agencies themselves. Mediatization, like Globalization before it, challenges the traditional conception of development communication. What are the causal relations between media development, agency and social change? And how do we study these dynamics? The challenge for ComDev scholars and practitioners, at this moment, is to take a step back and reflect, to analyze and understand, rather than to impose development strategies. While ComDev historically has been about developing prescriptive recipes of communication for some development, it is high time we refocus our attention to the deliberative, non-institutional change processes that are emerging from a citizens’ profound and often desperate reaction to this global Now. And there is more than ever a need for cross- or inter-disciplinarity.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 349.
    Hemer, Oscar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Tufte, Thomas
    Introduction: Why Voice and Matter Matter2016In: Voice matter: communication, development and the cultural return / [ed] Oscar Hemer, Thomas Tufte, Nordicom, 2016, p. 11-21Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter introduces the overall aim with the anthology Voice & Matter, offering historical and disciplinary context for a better understanding of where communication for development is heading, as an interdisciplinary field of theory and practice. Firstly, we outline the altogether bumpy, contradictory and complex pathway leading to the present, which we, in section two, tentatively describe as a new momentum. The new forms of social mobilisation that took the world by surprise in 2011, most decisively in the so-called Arab spring but also elsewhere on the globe, sparked a disciplinary reorientation and subsequently a deepening and broadening of ComDev’s theoretical base. Section 3 offers a retrospective analysis of world development and outlines some of the ‘epistemologies from the south’ which increasingly inform contemporary development debates, while section 4 unpacks the features of what we call the ethnographic turn . Finally, we argue that ComDev has thrived not only in the constitutive tension between theory and practice but by remaining at the margins. Conclusively, we outline how the chapters of this book in each their way substantiate dimensions of the new momentum and its continuing articulation and redefinition of Communication for Development.

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  • 350.
    Hemer, Oscar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Tufte, Thomas
    Media and Glocal Change. Rethinking Communication for Development2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction The Challenge of the Glocal Oscar Hemer and Thomas Tufte I Globalization, Media and Culture Chapter 1 How can the Global be Local? Islam, the West and the globalisation of identity politics Thomas Hylland Eriksen Chapter 2 New Complexities of Transnational Media Cultures Kevin Robins and Asu Aksoy Chapter 3 Writing the World Oscar Hemer Communication and Social Change Chapter 4 Five Key Ideas: Coincidences and Challenges in Development Communication Silvio Waisbord Chapter 5 Participatory Communication – The New Paradigm? Jan Servaes & Patchanee Malikhao Chapter 6 Communication for Social Change Struggles for Visibility and Voice, Culture and Diversity Thomas Tufte Methodology Chapter 7 The Diffusion and Participatory Models: a comparative analysis Nancy Morris Chapter 8 Communication for Empowerment The practice of participatory communication in development Maria Celeste Cadiz Chapter 9 Entertainment-Education in Development Communication Between Marketing Behaviours and Empowering People Thomas Tufte II Mapping the Field Chapter 10 Media, Democracy and the Public Sphere James Deane Chapter 11 From NWICO to Global Governance of the Information Society Ulla Carlsson Chapter 12 Media Policy, Peace and State Reconstruction Tim Allen and Nicole Stremlau Chapter 13 Participatory and Cultural Challenges for Research and Practice in Health Communication Rafael Obregon and Mario Mosquera Chapter 14 Communication for Sustainable Development: applications and challenges Paolo Mefalopolos Chapter 15 Out of Focus: Gender Visibilities in Development Karin Gwinn Wilkins Chapter 16 The Information Society: Visions and Realities in Developing Countries Madanmohan Rao Chapter 17 Assessing ICT in development: a critical perspective Manne Granqvist Chapter 18 ‘We were nobody. We were nothing’: art, communications & ‘memories of underdevelopment’ Sarat Maharaj and Gilane Tawadros III Case Studies Chapter 19 Miners’ radio stations A unique communication experience from Bolivia Alfonzo Gumucio Dagron Chapter 20 The Citizen, Media and Social Change in Namibia Ullamaija Kivikuru Chapter 21 Missed Opportunities in Post-War Bosnia Kemal Kurspahic Chapter 22 Radio in Afghanistan: Socially Useful Communications in Wartime Gordon Adam Chapter 23 From the Sandinista Revolution to Telenovelas: The Case of Puntos de Encuentro Clemencia Rodriguez Chapter 24 Si Mchezo Magazine Community media making a difference Minou Fuglesang Chapter 25 Young Voices Travel Far: A case study of Scenarios from Africa Kate Winskell & Daniel Enger Chapter 26 Communication functions in an evolving context of rural development Ricardo Ramirez Chapter 27 Bridging Digital Divides: Lessons Learned from the Information Technology Initiatives of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh. Arvind Singhal, Peer Svenkerud, Prashant Malaviya, Everett M. Rogers and Vijay Krishna Chapter 28 Theatre for Development in Africa Chris Kamlongera Notes on the authors References

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