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  • 101.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Female heroes in myths and fairy tales2007Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Female Heroes in Myths and Fairy Tales Myths and fairy tales express, among other things, what it means to be an ideal woman and man. Both genres have gone through various permutations over time, and fullfilled different cultural needs. This is certainly the case with female heroism in myths and fairy tales, which is the subject of my presentation. Although the mythic hero has “a thousand faces,” to borrow Joseph Campbell’s phrase, the feminine is doubly featureless in the index to Campbell’s classic work of comparative religion - not heroic, not present. In Campbell mythic heroism is a male reserve. By contrast, the canonical western fairy tales has been described as an essentially feminine genre: women protagonists predominate, feminine (circular) plot structure is the rule, implied female narrators are conventional (“Old Wives Tales”, “Mother Goose”) etc. But feminine heroism is passive and suffering, hardly ever the active heroism that is the stuff of myth and legend. This does not mean that there are no such tales - stories like Kate Crackernuts and Molly Whuppie present another picture. But editors, anthologists and folklorists - mostly men - have consistently and successfully favoured the Cinderellas over the Whuppies. Today we see a resuscitation female heroes through the rediscovery of “forgotten” fairy tales, non-western fairy tales and myths, and through popular, multimodal retellings. Does this bring the case of female heroism in myths and fairy tales to a happy end after a century or so in Bluebeard’s secret chamber? I think not. One needs to address what kinds of heroism is sought after in different historically and culturally determined societies (pre-industrial to post-industrial), to what extent these qualities are gendered, and, finally, how these notions are given narrative expression today. Björn Sundmark

  • 102.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Female heroes in myths and fairy tales2007Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 103.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Flowery Frankfurters: The Nonsense of Hans Alfredson2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Flowery Frankfurters: The Nonsense of Hans Alfredson For decades Hans Alfredson (1931-) “humoured” us Swedes, by making Sweden a slightly better and more fun place to be. He still does, through his books, songs, his audio and film recordings, and the legacy he has left behind. I would say, most Swedish comedian and humorous writers are indebted to his work. And through his work he also re-shaped and expanded the Swedish audience’s form and genre expectations. His contribution is both extensive and varied too, and can be hard to grasp. In this presentation I will provide a brief overview, and then focus on one aspect of his humorous oeuvre.

  • 104.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Flyktens Europa: bok om krigsårens flykt bort ger en bild av dagens flykt hit2013Inngår i: Sydsvenska dagbladet, ISSN 1652-814X, nr 20131029, s. B5-B5Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
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  • 105.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Frilans i Underlandet: det våras för Alice: som ingen lyckas göra till sin2010Inngår i: Sydsvenska dagbladet, ISSN 1652-814X, nr 23 marsArtikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
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  • 106.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Graphic Novels in Theory and Educational Practice: The Legend of Sally Jones2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The Legend of Sally Jones When discussing the nature of the graphic novel in relation picturebooks and/or comic books, critics tend to focus on the visual content. Picturebook scholars refer to picturebook codes and make use of the concept of the iconotext (Hallberg; Nikolajeva & Scott), in which the relationship between verbal and visual text on single pages or spreads is explored. In practice, if not in theory, such iconotext analyses often overlook the dynamic interplay between pictures. Research into comics (or the bande dessinée, to use the more solidly critical French term), on the other hand, is more concerned with the idea of seriality, that is, the spatial organization of panels and strips, as well as the arrangement and repetition of visual motifs over and across pages. What is regularly missed in research into comic books, however, is the verbal aspect of the narrative, and how it relates to the visual representation. But in any case, and through association with the picturebook and the comic book genres, the “graphic novel” is caught up in a discourse of the visual, whether “iconic” or “serial.” Obviously, “graphic,” refers to the visual domain, but as I see it, and just as importantly, it is also a novel. The reason why this matters is that it takes somewhat different skills to read a graphic novel than a picturebook, or a comic book. It is in this context that it becomes interesting to consider Legenden om Sally Jones [“The Legend of Sally Jones” – not translated into English] by Jakob Wegelius. The Swedish publication was in 2008, and it won the most prestigious children’s book prize in Sweden that year, the August Prize. The sequel, Mördarens apa [“The Murderer’s Ape” – not translated into English] was also awarded the August Prize (2014), and also received the Nordic Council Prize in the same year. In this presentation I will focus on the qualities and properties that make The Legend of Sally Jones a (graphic) novel. Methodologically I seek inspiration in Ian Watt’s historical and critical account of the genre in his seminal The Rise of the Novel (1957). The underlying educational assumption I make is that by engaging with graphic novel, children (the novel is aimed at 10-12 year olds) are not only given the tools to handle complex visual-verbal narratives, but also serve as an introduction to the rich tradition of novel writing in prose. Björn Sundmark

  • 107.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Gubbig smygtittare?: nej, texterna på LitteraLund har lika mycket att ge som Söderberg2008Inngår i: Sydsvenska dagbladet, ISSN 1652-814X, nr 20081023Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
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  • 108.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Guerriers égarés: Les Vikings dans la littérature de jeunesse: La littérature suédoise pour la jeunesse, 1985-20102012Inngår i: DESHIMA, revue d'histoire globale des pays du Nord, ISSN 1957-5173, nr 6, s. 163-180Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 109.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    ”H. P. Lovecraft: Ett långsamt verkande gift”2000Inngår i: Sydsvenska dagbladet, ISSN 1652-814X, nr 20000926Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    Del 4 i artikelserie om kultböcker

    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 110.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Hans Christian Andersen Award Nominees 20182017Inngår i: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 55, nr 4, s. 1-3Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 111.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    ”Hasta la vista, baby!” eller: Communication in English2001Inngår i: Praktik och teori, ISSN 1104-6570, nr 2, s. 75-81Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 112.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Herre jävlar! Vad klockan är mycket! Vi kommer för sent till nonsenslitteraturen!2016Annet (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
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  • 113.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Hoban, Lilian2006Inngår i: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 2, Dubo-Lowr / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, s. 238-238Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
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  • 114.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Hockey Fictions and Canadian Identity2006Inngår i: Literary Environments: Canada and the Old World / [ed] Britta Olinder, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2006, s. 119-130Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 115.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Hockeyböcker och kanadensisk identitet2007Inngår i: SVIF Årsbok;2007 / [ed] Johan R Norberg, Svenska idrottshistoriska föreningen , 2007, s. 59-73Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 116.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Holiday, Henry2006Inngår i: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 2, Dubo-Lowr / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, s. 247-248Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
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  • 117.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Humorous and subversive maps in children's literature2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Humorous and subversive maps in children’s books Maps – whether in books for children or adults – fulfill the same basic functions (Sundmark 2014b, Sundmark 2015): they produce a fictional space for the reader, and/or they reference the main events of the storyline and index the places in which these occur, and/or (finally) they are part of the fictional universe itself, as with R. L. Stevenson’s map of Treasure Island. But even if there is no fundamental way in which fictional maps in books for adults differ from those found in children’s books, I would argue that there is one category (at least) of maps in children’s books that are less common in adult literature – the humorous and parodic. Such playful and subversive maps are in fact found much more frequently in children’s fiction than in other kinds of literature. Characteristically, these are maps where the referential function is downplayed, and where the fictional space is less that of a “realistically” portrayed fantasy world (Ekman), than a mirror-image of the play-world of the child. One could also see such maps as toys in themselves, prompting and inviting the child to play and have fun. Typically, some of these maps replicate a child’s world; it is the nursery or the back yard garden with its toys, as in Milne’s and Shephard’s “Hundred Acre Wood,” or in Barbro Lindgren and Eva Eriksson’s “Barnhans’s land”. Others represent a miniature toy- or animal-land (Geronimo Stilton). Moreover, the map conventions themselves can be exaggerated and subverted to create a spirit of boisterousness and humorous recklessness as in Cressida Cowell’s books about the Viking boy Hiccup. Finally, there are also humorous maps that are integral to the absurd and nonsensical fictional worlds they portray: Walter Moers’s map of Zamonia (Captain Bluebear’s 13½ Lives) is one example. Thus, the chapter is an attempt to chart the humorous and subversive uses of maps in children’s books, and argues that this is a defining trait of maps in books for children (rather than for adults).

  • 118.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Hundred Merry Tales, A2006Inngår i: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 2, Dubo-Lowr / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, s. 269-270Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
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  • 119.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Hur vi än vänder oss har vi ändan bak: third space har kanske inte lösningarna på allt2002Inngår i: Sydsvenska dagbladet, ISSN 1652-814X, nr 2002-12-03Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
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  • 120.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    I am endlessly enchanted by this world: an interview with Cornelia Funke2016Inngår i: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 54, nr 2, s. 68-71Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 121.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    In the hope white people will like them: Andrew Lang and the colonization of fairyland2007Inngår i: Expectations and experiences: children, childhood and children's literature / [ed] Clare Bradford, Valerie Coghlan, Pied Piper Publishing, 2007, s. 111-121Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The Victorians embraced different theories of oral culture and its relationship to children’s literature and childhood. Most early folklorists and authors fail to see any connection at all between oral culture and children’s literature. This is evident in, for instance, W. B. Yeats’ fairy tale anthology Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry (1888), a collection that has a decidedly adult perspective and is more concerned with legends and the supernatural than with childhood and nursery tales. However, already in Andrew Lang’s Blue Fairy Book (1889) we find a radically different approach. In it Lang establishes principles that have become normative: the intended child audience, the eminence of the wonder tale, the international approach, as well as uniformity of language and style. This may seem unproblematic, but in my paper I will show that Lang’s fairy tale project is part of a colonial discourse that effectively leads to the appropriation of oral culture and the colonisation of Fairyland. Lang’s now generally accepted premise was that the same fairy tales have evolved all over the globe and have gone through the same kind of transitions into myth and literature (and sometimes back again). More problematically, he also shared the colonial and social Darwinist belief that cultures go through developmental phases that correspond to those of biological evolution and individual maturation. Bluntly, these assumptions lead up to the idea that an adult savage is on the same level, culturally, as a white English boy, and that adult folklore can pass as nursery entertainment after proper editing. It will be one of the focal points of this paper to look at the nature of this editing process. Finally, Lang’s view of oral culture and how it relates to (civilised) childhood and Victorian children’s literature is, in my opinion, not just of antiquarian interest. The model is still with us today, although we profess different ideas about oral culture, childhood and children’s literature.

  • 122.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    In Vikings’ Wake: The Viking Motif in Children’s Literature2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    A mythologized past is essential in the construction of national identity. In order for the modern state to become a national community, tradition has to be “invented” and the nation has to be “imagined.” Fuelled by Romantic and patriotic ideas of the folk, the Viking age was, for instance, reconceptualized in Sweden following the traumatic loss of Finland in 1805. Leading poets like Esaias Tegnér and Erik Gustaf Geijer founded Viking societies and wrote poems on Viking themes, which soon entered the Swedish canon, and painters fabricated the image of the marauding, mead-drinking Vikings, complete with horn-crested helmets and other historically nonsensical attributes. Children’s literature was deeply implicated in this collective imagining of the nation too, and Viking themes and topics were established in Swedish children’s literature and culture, not least in school readers. If the educational uses of the Viking period were manifold, there are actually few Viking novels to speak of in the first half of twentieth century. One can speculate as to why there was so relatively little children’s fictional writing about Vikings when they were apparently important in schools. My hypothesis is that it was precisely the association of Vikings with patriotic history teaching that made them less appealing to employ in fictional, non-didactic works. This situation prevailed until after the demise of the Viking school histories in the 1960s. The Viking age played an important in the other Scandinavian countries as well, but in this article the focus will be on the Swedish material. Instead, points of comparison will be established with how the Viking motif has been used in children’s literature in the English-speaking world: first as a foe against whom the nation must rally (Henty), later as and formidable but admirable foreigner (Ballantyne), then as a potent forefather (Linklater, Treece). In the most recent transformation, contemporary international representations of Vikings in children’s literature eventually have come to replace those that are nationally or regionally determined. I argue that the heterogeneous uses of the Viking motif, especially in the late international adaptations of Vikings in picture books, comics and film ultimately lead to a reductive stance. Thus, in a book (and film) like How to Tame a Dragon by Cressida Cowell we have come to a point where “Viking” has truly become a floating signifier: a helmet with horns – attachable to almost any tribe of muscular, bearded and bold men.

  • 123.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Introduktion2012Inngår i: Barnboken, ISSN 0347-772X, E-ISSN 2000-4389, Vol. 35Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion till temanummer om skuld i barnböcker

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  • 124.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Irish Mythology2006Inngår i: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 2, Dubo-Lowr / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, s. 299-300Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
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  • 125.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Ivanhoe and the Translation of English Children’s Books into Swedish in the Nineteenth Century2011Inngår i: Literature, geography, translation: studies in world writing / [ed] Cecilia Alvstad, Stefan Helgesson, David Watson, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011, s. 120-131Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 126. Sundmark, Björn
    ”Jag och alla”: Social hållbarhet i nordisk barnlitteratur2022Inngår i: På tværs af Norden 3: Social holdbarhed i nordisk børneog ungdomslitteratur / [ed] Maria Österlund; Maria Lassén-Seger; Sofie Hermansen Eriksdatter, Copenhagen: Nordisk ministerråd , 2022, s. 26-31Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 127.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Joy och önskeburken: Joy är ingen ny Pippi2008Inngår i: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, nr 20080114Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 128.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Kapitalismen som anhalt på vägen mot vänsterns utopia2002Inngår i: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, nr 8 januari, s. 7-8Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
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  • 129.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Kartor är hemskt spännande: om Tove Janssons kartor2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is concerned with the map-iconotexts of the Moomin-books by Tove Jansson. A methodology is developed, focusing To begin with the focus is on the verbal, pictorial and cartographic elements, and the ways in which these aspects interact and overlap in these books. In a second move, tThe maps are then analyzed with regard to their functions: being part of the plot, helping the reader keep track of plot and setting, and stimulating the reader’s imagination to produce an imaginative space. It is shown that the Moomin maps are rich and complex texts with a great deal of overlap, formally and functionally. It can also be conceded that the Moomin maps invite the reader to engage imaginatively with Moominworld, to play Moomintroll’s “serious game” of map reading. Finally, it is hoped that the two-step methodology worked out in the article can be fruitfully applied more generally on maps in children’s literature.

  • 130.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Kherdian, David2006Inngår i: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 2, Dubo-Lowr / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, s. 359-360Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
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  • 131.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Konstnären som skriver på natten2002Inngår i: Sydsvenskan, ISSN 1652-814X, nr 20020709Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Intervju med Douglas Coupland.

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  • 132.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Kritiken blir grönare2004Inngår i: Sydsvenska dagbladet, ISSN 1652-814X, nr 20040806Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
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  • 133.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Lagerlöf’s Legacy: A Hundred Years of Writing the Nation2008Inngår i: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 46, nr No 3, s. 14-21Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    How can it be that an early 20th-century classic Swedish children’s text deals with such up-to-the-minute 21st-century concerns as the importance of preventing ecological disaster? Björn Sundmark’s brilliant and inspiring reading of The Wonderful Adventures of Nils in light of the work of Peter Kemp on citizenship of the world also looks at new interpretations of this classic book and identifies its true heir not in Sweden but in Denmark

  • 134.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Language is about becoming in the world: interview with David Almond2016Inngår i: Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature, ISSN 0006-7377, E-ISSN 1918-6983, Vol. 54, nr 2, s. 64-67Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 135.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Lena Kåreland: Skönlitteratur för barn unga: Termer, genrer, analyser2015Inngår i: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, E-ISSN 2001-094X, Vol. 45, nr 4, s. 83-86Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    recension

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 136.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Lennart Hellsing: A Study in Nonsense2019Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation sheds light on the nonsense techniques used in Lennart Hellsing’s Sjörövarbok (1965) (“The Pirate Book”). In the paper, it is argued, furthermore, that Hellsing's nonsense writing is congenial with his role in Swedish children’s literature in the latter half of the 20th C as both a critic and a carrier of tradition. Theoretically and methodologically the study draws on the critical apparatus developed by mainly Wim Tigges. It is shown that Sjörövarbok is a prime example of nonsense literature, particularly in the use of repetition (names, verbs) and simultaneity of meaning.

  • 137.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Lewis, Naomi2006Inngår i: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 4, Smad-Zwer, [Index] / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, s. 437-437Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 138.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Lewitt, Jan2006Inngår i: The Oxford encyclopedia of children's literature. Vol. 2, Dubo-Lowr / [ed] Jack Zipes, Oxford University Press, 2006, s. 437-437Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 139.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Lilis bok2008Inngår i: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, nr 2008-03-08Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 140.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Lyckan att vara neurotisk2000Inngår i: Sydsvenska dagbladet, ISSN 1652-814XArtikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    ”Douglas Couplands Generation X”. Del 2 i artikelserie om kultböcker.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 141.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Mapping Middle Earth: A Tolkienian Legacy2017Inngår i: Maps and Mapping in Children's Literature: Cityscapes, landscapes, and seascapes / [ed] Bettina Kümmerling Meibauer, Nina Goga, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, s. 221-238Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, J. R. R. Tolkien’s fantasy maps in The Hobbit (1937) and The Lord of the Rings (1954–55) are assessed and analyzed. The analysis shows that the five maps – two in The Hobbit and three in The Lord of the Rings – are less uniform than one would assume. It is also clear that the maps in The Hobbit represent a more child-oriented aesthetics than in the latter work. A few examples are then given of how Tolkien’s maps have influenced subsequent writers of fantasy. Finally, it is demonstrated how the Tolkienian fantasy map is transformed when it is moved from the printed page to the screen.

  • 142.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    “Maps are essential and urgent!” Of Maps and Map-making in Children’s Books2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Maps have always fascinated me. It could be the maps in historical atlases (which I frequently embellished by colouring them), the maps in fantasy books (which I used to pore over for hours), or the maps I made myself of imagined lands and imagined stories. If Alice wondered “what is the use of a book without pictures or conversations?” I could have countered, “and what is the use of a book without a map?” In this presentation I will talk about what maps can offer readers in terms of world creation, suspension of disbelief, and making sense (or not) of the imagined. I also discuss how the use of maps have developed over the years, from seminal adventure and travel stories like Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels and Stevenson’s Treasure Island, over the fantasy maps of Tolkien and LeGuin, to the present, where maps come in all shapes and designs and can be found in all genres of writing. Maps are not only useful and wonderful to readers, however; they are indispensable to writers as well. Many authors (some mentioned above) have actively used maps in the construction and creation of their narrative universe. But teachers too can use the creative writing potential of maps with their students. Instead of starting with plot, theme or character – the conventional approach – maps allow writers to focus on setting. I have successfully employed this approach in several creative writing classes. In the presentation I will describe this approach, and then turn the presentation into a map-making and storytelling workshop with the participants.

  • 143.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Maps in Children’s Books: From Playworld and Childhood Geography to Comic Fantasy and Picturebook Art2019Inngår i: Filoteknos, ISSN 2082-9310, Vol. 9, s. 123-137Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is concerned with maps in children’s books. It is noted that maps are more common in children’s books than in books for adults, and that maps are common across different children’s literature genres. They are, moreover, directed at both preliterate children and adolescents. In the article, the argument is made that there seems to be a greater readiness in children’s literature to combine verbal and visual elements. After all, the child’s experience of picturebooks and illustrated books, make the inclusion of maps quite unobtrusive and natural, whereas in a book for adults, a map is a distinctive generic marker (fantasy or travel book). The article goes on to specifically analyze how humorous and playful maps are used in children’s books – a mode of mapping largely missing in adult literature. A number of examples are marshalled and analyzed. It is shown that some maps produce comedy in the low-mimetic mode, others may be highly abstract but at the same time aesthetically pleasing. Some maps also clearly make use of parody and satire in their use of maps. And while fantasy maps for adults tend to promote verisimilitude and suspension of disbelief, fantasy maps in children’s books are often intentionally incredible and unrealistic.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 144.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Maps of Fantasy: From Middle Earth to Game of Thrones2015Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 145.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Maria Ulfgard, Nils Holgersson tur & retur: Barnens brev till Selma Lagerlöf2023Inngår i: Barnboken, ISSN 0347-772X, E-ISSN 2000-4389, Vol. 46Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 146.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Med ordet som vapen: boken Poeter mot krig2003Inngår i: Sydsvenska dagbladet, ISSN 1652-814X, nr 20030630Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 147.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Militärhandbok blev fredens rättesnöre2008Inngår i: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, nr 24 juni, s. 8-9Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 148.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Kultur-språk-medier (KSM).
    Min systers dotter har många pappor: Wahldén ger röst åt livsöden2011Inngår i: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, nr 20110920Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 149.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    Moomin and the Sea: Tove Jansson as Comic Strip Artist2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Tove Jansson’s Moomin comic strip introduced the Moomintrolls to an international audience as well reaching new readers in Finland and Sweden (Tolvanen). The Moomin comic strip remains a remarkable achievement, and one which is key to opening up Jansson’s magical “Moominverse.” But while the Moomin books have received ample critical consideration, the comic strip has with few exceptions been overlooked. This paper attempts to redress the situation somewhat by analyzing Moomin and the Sea (1957) with the help of comic book theory and the idea of comics as “sequential art” (Eisner, Groensteen, Miller). The analysis aims to bring out salient features of the narrative, focusing in turn of the individual panel, the daily strip, episodes and recurring motifs. A second aim is to bring the interpretation of Moomin at Sea into relief by comparing some of its motifs with those of the illustrated prose book Moominpapa at Sea.

  • 150.
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för kultur, språk och medier (KSM).
    “Muminalism”: Tove Jansson and the Art of the Miniature2018Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
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