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  • 1.
    Larsson, Glenn
    et al.
    Univ Borås, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Ctr Prehosp Res, SE-50190 Borås, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Prehosp Emergency Care, Gothenburg, Sweden.;PICTA, Prehosp Innovat Arena, Lindholmen Sci Pk, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Eldh, Jana
    Univ Borås, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Ctr Prehosp Res, SE-50190 Borås, Sweden..
    Hagman, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    Univ Borås, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Ctr Prehosp Res, SE-50190 Borås, Sweden..
    The non-conveyance of trauma patients in Swedish emergency medical services: a retrospective observational study of the trauma population not transported to an emergency department2024In: BMC Emergency Medicine, E-ISSN 1471-227X, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionDue to a systemic modification in Swedish emergency medical services (EMS) staffing in recent years, the nature of the Swedish EMS has changed. Transport to an emergency department (ED) is no longer the only option. Referrals and non-conveyance form a growing part of EMS assignments. Trauma is one of the most common causes of death and accounts for 17% of Swedish EMS assignments. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics and clinical outcomes of non-conveyed trauma patients who were assessed, treated and triaged by the EMS to gain a better understanding of, and to optimise, transport and treatment decisions.MethodsThe study had a descriptive, retrospective and epidemiologic design and was conducted by reviewing EMS and hospital records for 837 non-conveyed trauma patients in the southwest of Sweden in 2019.ResultsThree in four non-conveyed trauma patients did not seek further medical care within 72 h following EMS assessment. The patients who were admitted to hospital later were often older, had suffered a fall and had a medical history. Half of all the incidents occurred in a domestic environment, and head trauma was the major complaint. Less than 1% of the studied patients died.ConclusionMost of the non-conveyed trauma patients did not seek further medical care after being discharged at the scene. Falling was the most common trauma event, and for the older population, this meant a higher risk of hospital admission. The reasons for falls should therefore be investigated thoroughly prior to non-conveyance decisions. Future studies should focus on the reasons for non-conveyance and measure the morbidity and invalidity outcomes rather than mortality.

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  • 2.
    Rosvall, Annica
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Toth, Ervin
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Gastroenterol, Lund, Sweden..
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Malmö, Sweden..
    Annersten Gershater, Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Development and content validity testing of a colonoscopy-specific patient-reported experience measure: the Patient Experience Colonoscopy Scale (PECS)2024In: Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes, ISSN 2509-8020, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIn endoscopic care, favourable patient experiences before, during and after a colonoscopy are essential for the patient's willingness to repeat the procedure. To ensure that significant experiences are measured, patients should be involved in creating the measurement instruments. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a colonoscopy-specific PREM by (1) operationalising patient experiences before, during and after a colonoscopy procedure and (2) evaluating its content validity.MethodsThe colonoscopy-specific PREM was developed in two stages: (1) operationalisation with item generation and (2) content validity testing. A previously developed conceptual model, based on a systematic literature review that illustrates patients' (n = 245) experiences of undergoing a colonoscopy, formed the theoretical basis. To assess the degree to which the PREM reflected patients' experiences before, during and after a colonoscopy procedure, content validity was tested-through face validity with healthcare professionals (n = 4) and cognitive interviews with patients (n = 14) having experienced a colonoscopy. Content validity index (CVI) was calculated to investigate the relevance of the items.ResultsThe Patient Experience Colonoscopy Scale (PECS) is a colonoscopy-specific PREM consisting of five different constructs: health motivation, discomfort, information, a caring relationship and understanding. Each construct was defined and generated into a pool of items (n = 77). After face-validity assessment with healthcare professionals, a draft 52-item version of the PECS was ready for content validity testing by the patients. During cognitive interviews the patients contributed valuable insights that led to rewording and removal of items. Results from the CVI suggest that the PECS and its content are relevant (I-CVI range 0.5-1, S-CVI/Ave = 0.86). The final PECS consists of 30 items representing a colonoscopy-specific PREM.ConclusionThe PECS is a new 30-item PREM instrument designed for adult elective colonoscopy patients after they have undergone the procedure. Each item in the PECS derives from a conceptual model based on a systematic literature review. Patients and healthcare professionals were involved in developing the PECS, which measures colonoscopy-specific patient experiences before, during and after the procedure. The content validity testing positively contributed to the development of the PECS. Psychometric properties need to be evaluated further.

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  • 3.
    Annersten Gershater, Magdalena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Brenner, Josefin
    Department of Health and Social Care, Home Care Kungsparken, Malmö Municipality, Västra Kanalgatan 4, Malmö 211 41, Sweden.
    Nordberg, Malin
    3 Department of Health and Social Care, Malmö Municipality, Villa Vikhem, Vikhems bygata 100, Staffanstorp 245 46, Sweden.
    Hommel, Ami
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Nurse assistants' perception of caring for older persons who are dying in their own home: An interview study.2024In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: As the proportion of older persons in society increases, there is a growing trend towards providing end-of-life care in their homes. Palliative care is a complex and knowledge-demanding form of care, and nurse assistants are those who work closest to the older person at the end-of-life in their own homes. However, nurse assistants sometimes have low educational and insufficient levels of knowledge in palliative care, which can affect the quality of care they provide. Moreover, nurse assistants' experiences are relatively unexplored in this context. The purpose of the study was to illuminate nurse assistants' experiences in caring for dying older persons at home.

    METHOD: An empirical, qualitative interview study was conducted with 14 nurse assistants with experience of palliative care in homecare. The material was analyzed using thematic content analysis.

    RESULTS: From the nurse assistant's experiences, one main theme emerged: doing everything possible for the dying older person despite challenges. Moreover, three sub-themes emerged: making a difference at a crucial time, death awakens emotions, and balancing personal and professional relationships. The nurse assistants' saw their role primarily as relieving symptoms but also focusing on next of kin. The following are described as essential parts of their role: carrying out practical nursing tasks, focusing on the physical environment, working alone and seeking help from colleagues due to a physical distance to the other members of the multidisciplinary team. The nurse assistants experienced a lack of support as there was no structured guidance or debriefing available in difficult emotional situations. Furthermore, they disclosed that they were left alone to deal with their feelings.

    CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that nurse assistants strive to provide comprehensive care for dying older persons despite facing obstacles from their working conditions and work organization. They lack supervision and education in palliative care, but they rely on their experience-based knowledge to a large extent and provide care according to the four cornerstones of palliative care.

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  • 4.
    Sjöberg, Emma
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wangel, Anne-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ambulance personnel's experiences of, and lessons learned from, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest missions during the COVID-19 pandemic: An interview study2024In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During COVID-19, an increased incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests was seen, resulting in decreased outcomes. In addition, altered attitudes to performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation among first responders were reported. The aim of this study was to explore ambulance personnel's experiences of, and lessons learned from, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest missions during the COVID-19 pandemic, in a Swedish context. Nine Swedish ambulance personnel were interviewed, and the data were analysed using thematic content analysis. The analysis illuminated professional, personal and relational consequences as well as lessons learned reported by the informants. The COREQ guideline was used to report the important aspects of the study. The ambulance personnel experienced several challenges, mainly due to the personal protective equipment. To enhance patient safety, they strived to remain resilient despite the challenges. The informants also expressed positive aspects of their experiences, such as having acquired increased competence through working under these circumstances. To strive for resilience and competence became the overarching theme. The experiences and the lessons learned described in the study, could contribute to helping ambulance organisations initiate new routines and/or improve existing ones, as well as developing a protective equipment that does not obstruct any aspect of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest mission.

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  • 5.
    Cirovic, Stefan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Non-invasive biomedical analysis: recent advances, challenges, and future perspectives2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-invasive healthcare technologies are increasingly pivotal in research anddevelopment due to their affordability and the convenience they offer to bothhealthcare recipients and providers. Alongside traditional non-invasive methodssuch as ultrasound imaging, a variety of innovative non-invasive devices havebeen developed. These include cardiovascular diagnostic systems, bioimpedancebasedscales, and various types of analyzers. These analyzers, which can be fluidlessor fluid-based, are capable of measuring not just physical parameters of thebody but also key biomarkers like glucose and lactate. This comprehensive andtransdisciplinary thesis encompasses three distinct yet interconnected segments:1) Advanced ultrasound imaging (Papers I and II): The first explored vortexformation time in female athletes and the second detailed investigations of thesuperficial venous systems of apparently healthy volunteers.2) Validation and application of commercially available fluid-less bloodanalyzers (Papers IV-VI). These papers focus on non-invasive blood glucosemonitoring (Paper IV) and the general use of non-invasive healthcaretechnologies among female participants from socioeconomicallydisadvantaged areas (Papers V and VI).3) Design and testing of novel, fluid-based sensors, and biosensors (Papers II andIII): Paper II delves into biosensing of viruses, and paper III deals withcontinuous ex vivo glucose sensing in human blood using an enzymatic sensorin a vein replica.Each of these segments contribute to the broader understanding and advancementof non-invasive healthcare technologies, highlighting the significant role suchtechnologies play in modern healthcare research. The thesis's transdisciplinaryapproach, spanning from advanced imaging techniques to the development ofnovel biosensors, exemplifies the dynamic and evolving nature of medicaltechnology research.

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  • 6.
    Axnäs, Nina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Utredningsbara misshandelsbrott?: En studie av polisens förutsättningar och förmåga att utreda och klara upp misshandelsbrott2024Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The police are involved in almost all phases of a criminal investigation, starting with the crime itself and ending in court. The clearance rate is a core issue. If this rate is low or decreases, perpetrators will not be prosecuted and sentenced, and the police will be criticized. If this is to be rectified it is necessary to understand why it happens (causes).The aim of this study has been to investigate the prerequisites for the investigation of assault crimes and the police's ability to solve these crimes. The objective has been to produce knowledge for a follow-up model that can provide a more multifaceted picture of the police investigation results, beyond just reported preliminary investigation protocols (FUP).The data consist of 384 police reports regarding assaults that were assessed to be non-serious. In line with the aim of the study, the study employs a Swedish equivalent of the Evidence-Based Investigative Tool (EBIT) (McFadzien et al., 2020; Sherman, 2018).Rational decision theory (March, 1994) has been applied, along with theories focused on the way street bureaucracies manage and prioritize among an incessant influx of cases (Lipsky, 2010) and on various mechanisms that influence the approaches employed (Brodkin, 2011a; Jönsson, 2021). As a measure of the prerequisites for police investigations, a number of basic variables have been employed to reflect whether there is an identified victim, who then cooperates with the investigation, and an identifiable perpetrator. Other basic variables reflect whether there are witnesses, or surveillance cameras that may have captured the incident. As a measure of the police's investigative ability, the study employs variables focused on whether victims and witnesses have been interrogated and whether the police have checked/obtained footage from surveillance cameras.The results show that the conditions for investigating assault are not optimal. Only one third of cases meet all the specified requirements. In about 75 percent of these cases, the police had carried out the investigative measures that were possible. In the remaining investigations, the victims had not been interviewed, the police had not questioned witnesses, or they had not checked and retrieve surveillance footage. To some extent this might be explained by the fact that the reported crime was minor, that the case included information about a counter allegation, the crime would be difficult to prove, or a claim of self-defense difficult to disprove.

    The study’s results are in several respects neither unexpected nor remarkable. According to the Swedish Police’s national investigative strategy, high priority must be given to cases of domestic violence and only crimes that are expected to lead to prosecution should be investigated. However, there were also some surprising findings: The police succeeded in confirming or disproving assault in 29 percent of all reported non-serious assault crimes. Solving reported crimes is not always equivalent to prosecuting.

    Finally, the results indicate that a tool for predicting clearance could be utilized to reduce the workload of Principal Investigators. However, this would require more extensive investigative measures to be undertaken at the time the crime report is initially registered. The results show that the documentation on which decisions are based is in many cases insufficient for an assessment of whether or not a prosecution is likely, since it lacks information on the presence or absence of witnesses or surveillance cameras, and whether these substantiate the crime.

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  • 7.
    Wangel, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Persson, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Duerlund, Sara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Fhager, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Mårdhed, Emma
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjögran, Lotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjöström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Glantz, Andreas
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    The Region Skåne Committee on Psychiatry, Habilitation and Technical Aids, Lund, Sweden;Department of Clinical Sciences Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The Core Elements of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing: Time, Honest Engagement, Therapeutic Relations, Professional Nursing and Lifetime-Perspective2024In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, p. 1-10Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Defining psychiatric and mental health nursing has been a challenge for decades, and it is still difficult to find a comprehensive definition. We have identified a possibility to clarify psychiatric and mental health nursing based on humanistic philosophy in a general psychiatric care context. The aim was therefore to identify and synthesize the theoretical frameworks from which psychiatric and mental health nursing models are developed. We systematically collected and evaluated articles based on Grounded Theory (GT) methodology regarding psychiatric or mental health nursing. The PRISMA statement for systematic reviews was used and the formal process of synthesis, as a three-step process of identifying first -, second - and third-order themes following the examples of Howell Major and Savin-Baden. The synthesis resulted in a model describing five core elements of psychiatric and mental health nursing: 'professional nursing', 'therapeutic relationships' and 'honest engagement', with time as the all-encompassing theme, including the patients' 'lifetime perspective'. Psychiatric and mental health nursing is a caring support towards recovery, where the patient's lifetime perspective must be in focus during the caring process with a relationship built on an honest engagement. Time is therefore essential for psychiatric and mental health nursing.

  • 8.
    Al Musawi, Ahmed
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Hellström, Lina
    Department of Medicine and Optometry, eHealth Institute, Linnaeus University, Kalmar; Pharmaceutical Department, Region Kalmar County, Kalmar.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University.
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Cheng, Yuanji
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Materials Science and Applied Mathematics (MTM).
    Eriksson, Tommy
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Intervention for a correct medication list and medication use in older adults: a non-randomised feasibility study among inpatients and residents during care transitions2024In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Medication discrepancies in care transitions and medication non-adherence are problematic. Few interventions consider the entire process, from the hospital to the patient’s medication use at home.

    Aim In preparation for randomised controlled trials (RCTs), this study aimed (1) to investigate the feasibility of recruitment and retention of patients and data collection to reduce medication discrepancies at discharge and improve medication adherence and (2) to explore the outcomes of the interventions.

    Method Participants were recruited from a hospital and a residential area. Hospital patients participated in a pharmacist-led intervention to establish a correct medication list upon discharge and a follow-up interview two weeks post-discharge. All participants received a person-centred adherence intervention for three to six months. Discrepancies in the medication lists, the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ-S), and the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-5) were assessed.

    Results Of 87 asked to participate, 35 were included, and 12 completed the study. Identifying discrepancies, discussing discrepancies with physicians, and performing follow-up interviews were possible. Conducting the adherence intervention was also possible using individual health plans for medication use. Among the seven hospital patients, 24 discrepancies were found. Discharging physicians agreed that all discrepancies were errors, but only ten were corrected in the discharge information. Ten participants decreased their total BMQ-S concern scores, and seven increased their total MARS-5 scores.

    Conclusion Based on this study, conducting the two RCTs separately may increase the inclusion rate. Data collection was feasible. Both interventions were feasible in many aspects but need to be optimised in upcoming RCTs.

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  • 9.
    Stenberg, Marie
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Supporting each other towards independence: A narrativeanalysis of first‐year nursing students' collaborative process2024In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, article id e12627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration for nursing is a core competence and therefore educational interventions are essentials for collaborative skills. To identify such interventions, we carried out a study to understand nursing students' collaborative process. A narrative inquiry method was used to explore the collaborative process of first-year undergraduate nursing students. The analysis was conducted on field notes from 70 h of observation of 87 nursing students' collaboration during skills lab activities. It also included transcriptions of four focus group discussions with 11 students. The results are presented as a sequential process of (1) navigating in unfamiliar territory, (2) navigating together to cope, and (3) navigating together towards independency and the future nursing profession. We identified a transition from teacher-led assistance and guidance to student interdependency and reciprocal learning, ending with student-led assistance supporting independency. In line with Vygotsky's theory of zone of proximal development, different scaffolding interventions are needed depending on where the students are in the collaborative process. 

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  • 10.
    Mikaelsson Midlöv, Elina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Health, Faculty of Engineering Blekinge Institute of Technology Karlskrona Sweden.
    Lindberg, Terese
    Department of Health, Faculty of Engineering Blekinge Institute of Technology Karlskrona Sweden.
    Skär, Lisa
    Faculty of Health Science Kristianstad University Kristianstad Sweden.
    Relative's suggestions for improvements in support from health professionals before and after a patient's death in general palliative care at home: A qualitative register study2024In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The efforts of relatives in providing palliative care (PC) at home are important. Relatives take great responsibility, face many challenges and are at increased risk of poor physical and mental health. Support for these relatives is important, but they often do not receive the support they need. When PC is provided at home, the support for relatives before and after a patient's death must be improved. This study aimed to describe relatives' suggestions to improve the support from health professionals (HPs) before and after a patient's death in general PC at home.

    Methods: This study had a qualitative descriptive design based on the data from open-ended questions in a survey collected from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. The respondents were adult relatives involved in general PC at home across Sweden. The textual data were analysed using thematic analysis.

    Results: The analysis identified four themes: (1) seeking increased access to HPs, (2) needing enhanced information, (3) desiring improved communication and (4) requesting individual support.

    Conclusions: It is important to understand and address how the support to relatives may be improved to reduce the unmet needs of relatives. The findings of this study offer some concrete suggestions for improvement on ways to support relatives. Further research should focus on tailored support interventions so that HPs can provide optimal support for relatives before and after a patient's death when PC is provided at home.

  • 11.
    Lampridou, Smaragda
    et al.
    Vascular Surgery Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery & Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Saghdaoui, Layla Bolton
    Vascular Surgery Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery & Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Bicknell, Colin
    Vascular Surgery Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery & Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, 214 28 Malmö, Sweden.
    Lear, Rachael
    NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre, Institute of Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Health Related Quality of Life Following Intervention for Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm: a Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis2024In: Annals of Vascular Surgery, ISSN 0890-5096, E-ISSN 1615-5947, Vol. 101, p. 105-119, article id S0890-5096(23)00860-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) pose significant risks of morbidity and mortality. Considering the evolving techniques for TAAA intervention and the growing interest in quality of life (QoL) outcomes for decision-making, we aimed to evaluate the impact of patient and perioperative characteristics on short-, medium-, and long-term post-operative QoL in TAAA repair patients.

    METHODS: A systematic search was conducted in CINAHL, APA PsycINFO, EMBASE, Medline and Cochrane to identify primary research studies evaluating QoL post TAAA surgery, published in English or Swedish between 01 January 2012 and 26 September 2022. A narrative synthesis was reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. The quality of evidence was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme and Joanna Briggs Institute checklists.

    RESULTS: Eight studies of low or moderate quality with 455 patients were included. Preoperative QoL in TAAA patients was lower compared to the general population. While there is an initial short-term improvement in post-operative QoL, patients fail to reach baseline levels even after seven years, with physical activity and functioning domains being particularly affected. Experiencing post-operative complications, including paraplegia and cardiovascular events, negatively impacts post-operative QoL. Patients with uncomplicated postoperative status had improved QoL. Prolonged hospital stay negatively affects physical functioning.

    CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with TAAA are likely to have lower baseline QoL compared to the general population. Following TAAA repair, post-operative QoL may remain lower than baseline levels, persisting over the long-term. Comorbidities, post-operative complications, and hospitalisation duration appear to exert adverse effects on post-operative QoL.

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  • 12.
    Ekdahl, Susanne
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Nyckeln Competence Center, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Department of Health and Caring Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Need of support for significant others to persons with borderline personality disorder: A Swedish focus groupstudy2024In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 240-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Being a significant other (SO) to a person with borderline personalitydisorder (BPD) affect their health. High incidence of substance use disorder, posttraumaticstress disorder, stress, fear, anxiety, depression, family burden and griefare common. Some specific therapies for BPD, have included support to SOs, howeverresources are scarce and to participate in the support it assumes that the personwith BPD is included in these therapies. Although the SO support has been shown tobe helpful, they all have a similar structure, and only a small exclusive group of SOshave access to the support.

    Aim: The aim was to describe experiences and need of support for significant othersto persons with borderline personality disorder from the perspective of themselvesand of health care workers.

    Methods: Data was collected via two focus groups. One with five SOs to personswith BPD, one with five health care workers. Two interview sessions in each groupwere conducted and data were analysed with qualitative content analysis. The studywas approved by the research ethics committee of Lund (2016–1026).

    Results: The results revealed four themes; not being seen by health care professionalscreates hopelessness, being seen by healthcare professionals creates trust, experienceof support - helpful or shameful and the step from loosely structured supportto a structured support group. Both groups expressed a need for further support as acomplement to already existing support.

    Conclusions: The need of support is extensive. The results suggest a professionalcoordinator intended for SOs and peer support groups not linked to a particular psychiatrictreatment yet offering support in a structured way. Further studies examiningthese complements to existing support, is therefore recommended.

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  • 13.
    Rönnebjerg, L
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kankaanranta, H
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland; Tampere University Respiratory Research Group, Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Ekerljung, L
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Health-related quality of life, anxiety, depression, beliefs of medication, and self-efficacy in individuals with severe asthma - a population-based study2024In: Journal of Asthma, ISSN 0277-0903, E-ISSN 1532-4303, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 148-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Individuals with severe asthma often report poor Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and more research is essential to increase understanding of how they may be helped to improve HRQoL. The main aim of the current paper is to evaluate HRQoL, and possible factors influencing HRQoL, in individuals with severe asthma. The aim is also to explore associations among anxiety, depression, beliefs of medication, self-efficacy, and HRQoL among individuals with severe and other asthma as well as those with no asthma.

    METHODS: = 902) were recruited from West Sweden Asthma Study, a population-based study, which includes both questionnaire surveys and clinical examinations.

    RESULTS: Individuals with severe asthma had worse physical HRQoL (measured with SF-8) than those with other and no asthma (median 48.4, 51.9, and 54.3, respectively). They also had worse mental HRQoL (median 46.7) and reported higher anxiety and depression scores (measured using HADS, median 5.0 and 3.5, respectively) compared to no asthma (median 4.0 and 2.0, respectively). HRQoL was particularly affected among women with severe asthma. Individuals with severe asthma believed that their asthma medication was more necessary than those with other asthma, but they reported more concern for the medication. Asthma control and packyears predicted physical HRQoL and anxiety predicted mental HRQoL among individuals with severe asthma.

    CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to improve asthma control and to reduce anxiety may improve HRQoL in individuals with severe asthma. Especially, women with severe asthma seem to need support to improve their HRQoL. Reducing concerns with asthma medication is most likely essential as high concerns may lead to poor adherence, which in turn may negatively affect asthma control and HRQoL.

  • 14.
    Peterson, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
    Keehn, Mary Therese
    Office of the Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
    Hasnain, Memoona
    Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
    Gruss, Valerie
    College of Nursing, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Exploring differences in and factors influencing self-efficacy for competence in interprofessional collaborative practice among health professions students2024In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The value of health care delivered via effective interprofessional teams has created an imperative for interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaborative practice (ICP). To inform IPE strategies, we investigated differences in perceived self-efficacy (SE) for competence in ICP among health professions students. Study data was collected between 2015-2019 from students from 13 different programs (N=3,496) before an annual institutional interprofessional program. Students completed the IPECC-SET, a validated instrument evaluating perceived SE for competence in ICP, and rated their 1) amount of previous contact with, and 2) perceived understanding of the role of different health professions.  Student groups were compared using parametric statistics. Regression analyses explored factors influencing SE for competence in ICP. Findings revealed significant differences in perceived SE for competence in ICP between programs (p<.05). Specifically, health information management/health informatics, dental, medicine, and nursing students expressed relatively higher SE, whereas physical and occupational therapy students expressed relatively lower SE. Perceived understanding of the role of health care professions (p<.01) and gender (p<.01) contributed significantly to predict perceived SE for competence in ICP, while amount of previous contact with other health professions did not (p=.42).  Findings highlight the value of IPE designed with consideration of specific learner needs.

  • 15.
    Gard, Helena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Enskär, Karin
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala Universitet.
    Ingvarsdotter, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Isma, Gabriella E
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Exploring young people's experiences of race, gender and socioeconomic status in relation to everyday challenges: A focus group study2024In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 228-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reports indicate a decrease in youth mental health in Sweden but at the same time research suggests that what is interpreted as mental ill-health could be considered everyday challenges by young people themselves. The distribution of mental health and illness among young people is uneven based on inequities related to factors such as race, gender and socioeconomic status. Sweden in particular is a country with large socioeconomic inequities in youth mental health and in school results, compared to other European countries. The aim of this study was to explore young people's experiences of the role of race, gender and socioeconomic status in relation to everyday challenges. Sixty-five young people aged 13–15 years old were recruited by student health services and participated in focus group discussions at schools in the southernmost part of Sweden. Data were analysed by secondary analysis with deductive qualitative content analysis using Ecosocial theory of disease distribution as theoretical framework. The analysis resulted in one main theme; Navigating inequities to gain and keep social status, with three underlying themes; Guided by social norms, Negative impact in everyday life and Importance of family influence. Participants were aware and critical of norms and expectations related to race, gender and socioeconomic status. Experiences of prejudice and unfairness was both own lived experiences by the participants as well as observed through friends and classmates. Young people spontaneously identify everyday challenges related to race, gender and socioeconomic status, even when not asked directly about these issues. Conforming to sexist, racist and classist, expectations is a way to lose and gain status in a school setting. Many of the inequities discussed related to socioeconomic status and the direct consequences of having or not having money. Young people's everyday experience of inequities is important to consider in youth mental health promotion aiming to tackle health inequities. Further research is needed on those experiences and how this affects mental health.

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  • 16.
    Bramhagen, Ann-Cathrine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Lundström, Mats
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Teachers' and nurses' perspective regarding sex education in primary school and influencing factors2024In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 115-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex education can be described as an important part of health education in school and one way of strengthening health education could be a collaboration between different professionals in the school team. The aim of this study was to describe teachers' and school nurses' experiences and perspectives with regard to sex education among students aged 11-12 years and to explore potential influencing factors. We employed a qualitative design, and the teachers and school nurses were interviewed individually. A thematic analysis was conducted on the interviews and the results showed that the classroom was considered to be the teacher's arena. Tradition and attitudes between professionals could be obstacles that affect collaboration between teachers and nurses and the study showed that there remains much to be done before collaboration at the same level between the groups can be established.

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  • 17.
    Stenzelius, K.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Urol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Wangel, Anne-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Urinary tract symptoms and bother among middle-aged women with long lasting type 1 diabetes2023In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 58, p. 11-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå Univ, Sect Sustainable Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, OLIN Unit, Umeå, Sweden..
    Nwaru, Bright I.
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Wallenberg Ctr Mol & Translat Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Umeå Univ, Div Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, OLIN unit, Umeå, Sweden..
    Vanfleteren, Lowie
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Resp Med & Allergol, COPD Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Hedman, Linnea
    Piirila, Paivi
    Univ Cent Hosp, Unit Clin Physiol, HUS Med Diagnost Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland..
    Jalasto, Juuso
    Univ Cent Hosp, Unit Clin Physiol, HUS Med Diagnost Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland..
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, HUNT Res Ctr, NTNU, Levanger, Norway..
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Seinajoki Cent Hosp, Dept Resp Med, Seinajoki, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Tampere, Finland..
    Radinger, Madeleine
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ronmark, Eva
    Umeå Univ, Sect Sustainable Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, OLIN Unit, Umeå, Sweden..
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå Univ, Div Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, OLIN unit, Umeå, Sweden..
    The extent and characterization of underdiagnosis and misclassification of COPD in Sweden2023In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 62, no Suppl. 67, article id OA3167Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Murray, Bridget
    et al.
    RCSI Univ Med & Hlth Sci, Sch Nursing & Midwifery, Dublin, Ireland..
    Smith, Sheree
    Univ Western Sydney, Sch Nursing & Midwifery, Sydney, Australia..
    Roberts, Nicola
    Edinburgh Napier Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Care, Edinburgh, Scotland..
    Padilha, Miguel Jose
    Escola Super Enfermagem Porto ESEP, Nursing Sch Porto, CINTESIS RISE, Porto, Portugal..
    Sajnic, Andreja
    Univ Hosp Ctr, Dept Resp Dis Jordanovac, Zagreb, Croatia..
    Narsavage, Georgia
    West Virginia Univ, Sch Nursing, Morgantown, WV USA..
    Christensen, Helle Marie
    Univ Southern Denmark, Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Resp Med, Odense, Denmark.;Univ Southern Denmark, Dept Clin Res, Odense, Denmark..
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carme, Hernandez
    Hosp Clin Barcelona Univ Barcelona, August Pi & Sunyer Biomed Res Inst IDIBAPS, Med & Nursing Direct, CIBERES Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain..
    Poot, Betty
    Victoria Univ Wellington, Sch Nursing Midwifery & Hlth Practice, Wellington, New Zealand..
    Kelly, Carol
    Edge Hill Univ, Cardioresp Res Ctr, Ormskirk, England..
    Existing respiratory nursing curriculum, frameworks, and other documentation relevant to respiratory nursing education: A Scoping Review2023In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 62, no Suppl. 67, article id OA3173Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Sajnic, Andreja
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Ctr, Dept Resp Dis Jordanovac, Zagreb, Croatia..
    Narsavage, Georgia
    West Virginia Univ, Sch Nursing, Morgantown, WV USA..
    Murphie, Phyllis
    Natl Ctr Sustainable Delivery, Modernising Patient Pathways Programme, Glasgow, Scotland..
    Hernandez, Carme
    Univ Barcelona, August Pi & Sunyer Biomed Res Inst IDIBAPS, Med & Nursing Direct, Hosp Clin Barcelona, Barcelonaupon Tyne, Spain..
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Padilha, Jose Miguel
    CINTESIS Tech4edusim, Nursing Sch Porto, Porto, Portugal..
    Rezelj, Mariana Paula
    Clin Pulm Dis Golnik, Golnik, Slovenia..
    Stonham, Carol
    Minchinhampton Surg, Stroud, England..
    Heslop-Marshall, Karen
    Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Resp Med, Royal Victoria Infirm Hosp, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    International Coalition of Respiratory Nurses supports global initiative in raising awareness of Asthma and COPD in low- and middle-income countries2023In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 62, no Suppl. 67, article id OA3174Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Hylén, Mia
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Health Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;Department of Intensive and Perioperative Care, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Striberger, Rebecka
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sjögran, Lotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Samuelsson, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Pediatrics, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    A cross-sectional study of career paths for Swedish registered nurses with a doctoral degree: When aspirations and possibilities collide2023In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 43, no 3-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Registered nurses with a doctoral degree are important for the quality of care, nursing education, and nursing research. Still, postgraduate career paths are criticized for being too vague. To enable career path development, mapping of the current situation appears fundamental. The objective was therefore to chart the current professional positions and work conditions and to explore the future career aspirations of registered nurses with a doctoral degree in Sweden. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted including 118 participants, all nurses with a doctoral degree earned between 2016 and 2022. This study is reported in accordance with STROBE. The participants reported a significant change from hospital-based positions before doctoral studies, towards university-based positions after graduation. This is clearly in contrast to their expressed aspiration to hold a shared position, remaining in contact with the clinical context. In conclusion, a national collaboration is needed and wanted regarding career opportunities for registered nurses with a doctoral degree in Sweden. Furthermore, career paths within nursing science need to be established within the clinical context.

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  • 22.
    Hellstrand Tang, Ulla
    et al.
    Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg; Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy,University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Centre of Empirical Research in Information Systems, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Sundberg, Leif
    Gothenburg Diabetes Association, Gothenburg.
    Annersten Gershater, Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Zügner, Roland
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy,University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Patients’ Expectations of Evidence-Based Service at the Pharmacy Regarding Information on Self-Care of the Feet for Persons with Diabetes at Risk of Developing Foot Ulcers – A Cross-Sectional Observational Study in Sweden2023In: Patient Preference and Adherence, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 17, p. 3557-3576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Self-care of the feet is one of the cornerstones in the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). Often, individuals with diabetes seek help at the pharmacy, but it is still unclear whether the service meets their expectations and needs. The aims were to explore patients' expectations of support from the pharmacy regarding self-care of their feet and explore how patients with diabetes felt that they managed the self-care of their feet.

    Patients and methods: The included participants (n = 17), aged 70 ± 9 years, answered surveys regarding their expectations of support from the pharmacy related to self-care of the feet and how they felt that they managed the self-care of their feet. By using software, MyFoot Diabetes, they assessed their risk of developing DFU (ranging from 1 = no risk to 4 = DFU). In addition, a healthcare professional assessed the risk grade.

    Results: Sixteen patients had not received any information from the pharmacy regarding how to take care of their feet. Several suggestions for ways the pharmacy could help patients with diabetes to take care of their feet were registered. They included having the necessary skills and competence, giving advice regarding self-care, giving information regarding the products they market and have for sale and giving advice on ointments/creams. The participants gave several examples of how they self-managed their feet: by wearing shoes indoors and outdoors, wearing socks and compression stockings as often as possible, being physically active, inspecting their feet, being aware of the fact that their feet have no problems, washing, moisturising their feet, cutting their nails and finally seeking help to prevent DFU.

    Conclusion: The participants thought that they should receive competent information from the personnel at the pharmacy to improve the self-care of their feet, eg, being given information about which ointments/creams to use.

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  • 23.
    Fritzell, Kaisa
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Hereditary Cancer Clinic, Theme Cancer, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Berith
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Woudstra, Anke
    Team Advies en Onderzoek, Municipal Health Service (GGD) Kennemerland, Haarlem, the Netherlands.
    Forsberg, Anna
    Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sventelius, Marika
    Regional Cancer Centre, Stockholm, Gotland, Sweden.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jervaeus, Anna
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Making the BEST decision-the BESTa project development, implementation and evaluation of a digital Decision Aid in Swedish cancer screening programmes- a description of a research project2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 12, article id e0294332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sweden has a long tradition of organized national population-based screening programmes. Participation rates differ between programmes and regions, being relatively high in some groups, but lower in others. To ensure an equity perspective on screening, it is desirable that individuals make an informed decision based on knowledge rather than ignorance, misconceptions, or fear. Decision Aids (DAs) are set to deliver information about different healthcare options and help individuals to visualize the values associated with each available option. DAs are not intended to guide individuals to choose one option over another. The advantage of an individual Decision Aid (iDA) is that individuals gain knowledge about cancer and screening by accessing one webpage with the possibility to communicate with health professionals and thereafter make their decision regarding participation. The objective is therefore to develop, implement and evaluate a digital iDA for individuals invited to cancer screening in Sweden.

    METHODS: This study encompasses a process-, implementation-, and outcome evaluation. Multiple methods will be applied including focus group discussions, individual interviews and the usage of the think aloud technique and self-reported questionnaire data. The project is based on The International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) framework and the proposed model development process for DAs. Individuals aged 23-74, including women (the cervical-, breast- and CRC screening module) and men (the CRC screening module), will be included in the developmental process. Efforts will be made to recruit participants with self-reported physical and mental limitations, individuals without a permanent residence and ethnic minorities.

    DISCUSSION: To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first attempt aimed at developing an iDA for use in the Swedish context. The iDA is intended to facilitate shared decision making about participation in screening. Furthermore, the iDA is expected to increase knowledge and raise awareness about cancer and cancer screening.

    PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Lay people are involved throughout the whole development and implementation process of the digital DA.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT05512260.

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  • 24.
    Kottorp, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Killian, Catherine
    Occupational Therapy Program, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL..
    Duke, Kathryn
    Occupational Therapy Programs, West Coast University, Center for Graduate Studies, Los Angeles, CA..
    Leggett, Caniece
    Franciscan Health, Olympia Fields, IL.; Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago..
    Drasga, Ruxandra
    Community First Medical Center, Chicago, IL.; Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago..
    Preissner, Katharine
    Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago..
    The Revised American Occupational Therapy Association Fieldwork Performance Evaluations: Evaluation of Internal Structure, Response Processes, and Precision—Part 22023In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 77, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: There is an evidence-based need to assess the validity and reliability/precision of the revised American Occupational Therapy Association’s Fieldwork Performance Evaluation (FWPE) items for the occupational therapy student (OTS) and the occupational therapy assistant student (OTAS).

    Objective: To evaluate evidence of validity in relation to response processes, internal structure, and precision of the FWPEs.

    Design: Cross-sectional study design.

    Setting: OTS and OTAS fieldwork practice settings, United States.

    Participants: Two hundred sixty-seven fieldwork educators participated in total, providing 228 OTS evaluations and 39 OTAS evaluations.

    Outcomes and Measures: A Rasch model was used to evaluate aspects of validity and precision.

    Results: The rating scales provided evidence of the tools’ overall validity. Thirty-two of 37 items on the FWPE for the OTS, and 27 of 31 items on the FWPE for the OTAS demonstrated acceptable fit, but the evidence of unidimensionality in the subscales and in the total scales was not fully supported. The total/reduced FWPE scales were able to separate students into at least four distinct groups of fieldwork performance. The relationships between the current and revised FWPEs indicate that the new scales measure different but related constructs of student fieldwork performance, compared with the current version.

    Conclusions and Relevance: The findings support that the revised FWPEs for the OTS and OTAS demonstrate preliminary evidence of internal structure, response processes, and precision, supporting evidence-based practice in fieldwork evaluations.

    What This Article Adds: This article highlights evidence demonstrating the validity and precision of the revised American Occupational Therapy Association’s Fieldwork Performance Evaluation items and supports academic and fieldwork settings for occupational therapy students and occupational therapy assistant students.

  • 25.
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Norberg, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Växa tryggt: Slutrapport från Malmö universitets forskargrupp2023Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Under åren 2019–2022 genomfördes en satsning på ett utökat hembesöks-program för förstagångsföräldrar inom barnhälsovården i Skåne. Satsningen hade namnet Växa tryggt och baserades på erfarenheter av ett liknande program i Rinkeby. I Växa tryggt erbjöds förstagångsföräldrar sammanlagt sex hembesök under barnets första 15 månader. Besöken genomfördes i ett sam-arbete mellan barnmorskor, barnhälsovårdssjuksköterskor, föräldrastödjare och tandsköterskor/tandhygienister.En tvärvetenskaplig forskargrupp från Malmö universitet har på uppdrag av Region Skåne forskat om Växa tryggts genomförande och effekter. Forsk-ningen har inkluderat intervjuer och enkäter riktade till deltagande familjer, de professioner som genomförde hembesöken, verksamhetschefer och politiska beslutsfattare.I denna rapport redovisas forskargruppens övergripande resultat. Resultaten visar genomgående att både professioner och deltagande familjer var mycket nöjda med de utökade hembesöken. För professionerna, främst familjestöd-jaren och tandsköterskan/tandhygienisten, har Växa tryggt inneburit möj-ligheter att tidigt komma i kontakt med barnfamiljer i upptagningsområdet. Utöver stöd och support i enskilda frågor har professionerna även kunnat informera om ytterligare stöd som barnhälsovården, socialtjänsten och tand-vården kan erbjuda. För familjerna har de utökade hembesöken varit ett stöd i den intiala osäkerhet som ofta präglar ett nyblivet föräldraskap. Samtidigt har Växa tryggt främjat möjligheten att bygga tillitsfulla relationer med välfärds-professioner som utifrån sina skilda kompetenser är experter på barn- och familjeliv. Hemmet har i det föreliggande projektet visat sig vara en bra arena för att kunna individanpassa råd och stöd. Ytterligare en positiv effekt av Växa tryggt har varit att fera professioner samverkat i hembesöken och därmed kunnat komplettera och stärka varandra i dialoger med familjerna.

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  • 26.
    Hellström, Lisa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Sjöman, Madeleine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Enskär, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Conceptualizing adolescents’ everyday stressors using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) classification system2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research indicates that there is uncertainty among children as well as among adults of where to draw the line between everyday stressors and mental health problems that could indicate a need for a common terminology and language regarding mental health (Wickström & Lindholm, 2020; Hellström & Beckman, 2021). The increased prevalence rates of self-reported mental health problems such as bad mood, difficulty sleeping, headaches or stomachache among youth shows a worrying trend in Sweden as well as internationally (Hagquist et al., 2019; Potrebny et al., 2017). At the same time, mild symptoms of mental health problems can be relatively common and be an expression of everyday challenges (Hellström & Beckman, 2021; Wickström & Lindholm, 2020). This contradictory trend is confirmed in the largescale cross-national survey Health Behavior in School-Aged Children, showing reports of very good health and quality of life among young people in Sweden as well as an increase in self-reported mental health problems (Public Health Agency of Sweden, 2018).

    Adolescence is a period that involve many changes in different areas such as increasing academic demands and academic competition, a decrease in teacher-student relationship closeness or school safety, rearrangement of relationships with parents and peers including an increase in social comparison, identity issues, as well as thoughts about the future (Bremberg, 2015; Brown, 2009; Tetzner et al., 2017). In addition, the increased emphasis on high-stakes testing, assessment and grading due to recent school reforms in Sweden have shown potentially negative effects on Swedish pupil’s health (Högberg et al., 2021). There is a need to identify what causes stress in the everyday life of adolescents as they could potentially develop into mental health problems (ref). Studies show that when adolescents and young adults put it into their own words, the most pronounced everyday stressors include academic failures, relationship problems, negative self-evaluations through social comparisons, and other performance-oriented tasks (Gustafsson et al., 2010; Hellström & Beckman, 2021).

    To be able to design interventions to decrease mental health problems and increase mental wellbeing for youth a common language is needed. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides a conceptual framework and terminology for describing health and functioning in everyday life and can serve as a common framework for developing comparable concepts (WHO, 2001). According to ICF, participation is defined as involvement in life situations promoting health and wellbeing (WHO, 2001). The ICF defines components of health included as domains described from the perspectives of the body, the individual and society. Developing a common language will make it easier to interact, discuss and plan health interventions based on young people’s perceptions (Adolfsson et al., 2018; Augustine et al., 2021; Klang Ibragimova et al., 2011; WHO, 2007). The current study investigates how youth explain stressors in their everyday life that could be conceptualized as everyday challenges and possibly symptoms of mental health problems.  Hence, the aim of this study is to conceptualize adolescents’ experiences of everyday stressors, using the ICF as an analytic tool.MethodThis study is a part of a wider project aiming to test and evaluate an intervention to enhance mental wellbeing among school students using an experience-based co-design. The sample includes 65 adolescents (45 girls and 20 boys) in grades 7–9 at seven schools in southern Sweden. Data collection took place during the autumn of 2020. The youth were identified through a purposive sampling procedure, by a gatekeeper assigned by the principal at each school, with the intention of obtaining a wide distribution of experiences to gain transferability of the results. At each school, eight to twelve participants were included. The participants were told to discuss perceived everyday stressors in pairs/smaller groups and documented words from the discussion on post-it notes. The documented words constitute the empirical data in this study. A data analysis with both manifest and latent elements, inspired by a deductive reasoning approach has been adopted. We have aimed to stay close to the text, describe what the adolescents actually say and describe the visible and obvious in the text. To make the manifest linking processes systematic and consistent, the process of coding the documented words/concepts to ICF codes (e.g., “Handling stress and other psychological demands”, “Global psychological functions” and “Emotional functions”) followed established linking rules based on the ICF (Cieza et al., 2005). To ensure that the latent interpretation could lean on a multidisciplinary background knowledge about child functioning, all three authors with different professional backgrounds conducted individual coding (Fayed et al., 2012). In cases were the authors’ linking processes resulted in different ICF codes, a latent procedure with interpretation of the underlying meaning of the content on the post-it notes were conducted by two of the authors (LH and MS). The meaning of the content on each post-it note were thoroughly discussed until consensus was achieved. 39 number of linkages were discussed jointly by the two researchers in relation to the coding scheme. When consensus was obtained, the exact agreement was 94 percentage inter-coder agreement on the 2nd ICF-level. The study was approved by the Swedish Ethical Review Authority (reg.no. 2019-06430 / 2020-04-07).Expected OutcomesThe findings raise awareness about the concept of everyday stressors among adolescents. The aspects of everyday life that adolescents find challenging and stressful can be conceptualized and guide conversations with and about young people and guide supportive actions. The adolescence in this study expressed high psychological demands in combination with a lack of support, mainly from parents, and a lack of resources, mainly time restraints as great challenges. These demands can most often be related to performing well in school or in social contexts. Demands and their effect on wellbeing are essential aspects in the lives of young people when it comes to everyday stressors that needs to be considered in everyday conversations. For parents, school personnel or other adults this could mean talking to adolescents and young people about overwhelming demands and help them sort out what demands they can influence and what demands are hard for them to tackle alone. Here, the relation between demand and control may be a useful theoretical framework and efforts to strengthen a sense of coherence could be a useful coping strategy providing adolescents and young people with a greater sense of control. In addition to demands, how they are perceived by others and how they compare to others are other sources of stress among the adolescents. Social comparisons can function as tools for self-evaluation and self-enhancement in young people’s identity development. However, when these comparisons become stressful and potentially harmful, parents, school personnel or other adults can talk to young people about alternative strategies for identity development. Based on the results in this study in combination with previous research showing a lack of knowledge surrounding mental health, examples of relevant theoretical frameworks to enhance adults’ and young people’s mental health literacy could be demand/control model, sense of coherence and social comparison theory.References 

    Adolfsson, M., Sjöman, M., & Björck-Åkesson, E. (2018). ICF-CY as a framework for understanding child engagement in preschool. Frontiers in Education, 3, 36. Cieza, A., Geyh, S., Chatterji, S., Kostanjsek, N., Ustun, B., & Stucki, G. (2005). ICF linking rules: an update based on lessons learned. J rehabil med, 37(4), 212-218. Fayed, N., Cieza, A., & Bickenbach, J. (2012). Illustrating child-specific linking issues using the Child Health Questionnaire. American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 91(13), S189-S198. Gustafsson, J.-E., Allodi Westling, M., Alin Åkerman, B., Eriksson, C., Eriksson, L., Fischbein, S., Granlund, M., Gustafsson, P., Ljungdahl, S., & Ogden, T. (2010). School, learning and mental health: A systematic review. Stockholm: Kungl. Vetenskapsakademien. Hagquist, C., Due, P., Torsheim, T., & Välimaa, R. (2019). Cross-country comparisons of trends in adolescent psychosomatic symptoms–a Rasch analysis of HBSC data from four Nordic countries. Health and quality of life outcomes, 17(1), 1-13. Hellström, L., & Beckman, L. (2021). Life Challenges and Barriers to Help Seeking: Adolescents’ and Young Adults’ Voices of Mental Health. International journal of environmental research and public health, 18(24), 13101. Högberg, B., Lindgren, J., Johansson, K., Strandh, M., & Petersen, S. (2021). Consequences of school grading systems on adolescent health: evidence from a Swedish school reform. Journal of education policy, 36(1), 84-106. Klang Ibragimova, N., Pless, M., Adolfsson, M., Granlund, M., & Björck-Åkesson, E. (2011). Using content analysis to link texts on assessment and intervention to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-version for Children and Youth (ICF-CY). Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 43(8), 728-733. Potrebny, T., Wiium, N., & Lundegård, M. M.-I. (2017). Temporal trends in adolescents’ self-reported psychosomatic health complaints from 1980-2016: A systematic review and meta-analysis. PLOS one, 12(11), e0188374. Public Health Agency of Sweden, (2018). Skolbarns hälsovanor i Sverige 2017/18 [The Public Health Agency. Health Behaviour in School-aged Children, Swedish report 2017/18]. Tetzner, J., Becker, M., & Maaz, K. (2017). Development in multiple areas of life in adolescence: Interrelations between academic achievement, perceived peer acceptance, and self-esteem. International journal of behavioral development, 41(6), 704-713. WHO. (2001). International Classification of Functioning, DIsability and Health. W. H. Organization. WHO. (2007). International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY). W. H. Organization. Wickström, A., & Lindholm, S. K. (2020). Young people’s perspectives on the symptoms asked for in the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children survey. Childhood, 27(4), 450-467.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Ewa K.
    et al.
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Dallora, Ana Luiza
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Marcinowicz, Ludmila
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland.
    Stjernberg, Louise
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Swedish Red Cross University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Björling, Gunilla
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden;Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;Faculty of Nursing, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Tanzania.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden;School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Bohman, Doris
    Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden;Optentia Research Unit, Vanderbijlpark Campus, North-West University, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa.
    Self-Reported eHealth literacy among nursing students in Sweden and Poland: The eNursEd cross-sectional multicentre study2023In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 29, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to provide an understanding of nursing students’ self-reported eHealth literacy in Sweden and Poland. This cross-sectional multicentre study collected data via a questionnaire in three universities in Sweden and Poland. Descriptive statistics, the Spearman’s Rank Correlation Coefficient, Mann–Whitney U, and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used to analyse different data types. Age (in the Polish sample), semester, perceived computer or laptop skills, and frequency of health-related Internet searches were associated with eHealth literacy. No gender differences were evidenced in regard to the eHealth literacy. Regarding attitudes about eHealth, students generally agreed on the importance of eHealth and technical aspects of their education. The importance of integrating eHealth literacy skills in the curricula and the need to encourage the improvement of these skills for both students and personnel are highlighted, as is the importance of identifying students with lacking computer skills.

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  • 28.
    Ljungbeck, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Municipal Healthcare in Hässleholm, Management of Care and Welfare, Malmö.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjögren Forss, Katarina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Swedish stakeholders' views of the preparatory workneeded before introducing the nurse practitioner role inmunicipal healthcare–A focus group study2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The nurse practitioner role has become important globally in handlingthe growing healthcare needs of older adults with chronic diseases. Nevertheless,research shows that introducing the role is a complex process, and more studies areneeded to prepare for its introduction into different healthcare contexts, such as municipalhealthcare.Aim: The aim is to investigate what Swedish stakeholders identify as the preparatorywork needed before introducing the nurse practitioner role into municipalhealthcare.Methods: Data were collected through four focus group interviews conducted virtuallyon the TEAMS digital platform, with three to six participants in each groupand 18 participants total. The transcribed interviews were analysed using a six-stepthematic approach: familiarisation with the data, coding the data, generating initialthemes, reviewing themes, defining and naming the themes and producing thereport.Findings: The findings are divided into two main themes, each with two sub-themes.In the first, clarifying why the nurse practitioner role is needed, participants stressedthe importance of having a clear intention for introducing the role. The second, ensurea national framework to bolster the introduction at the local level, demonstratesthe need for collaboration among national actors to clarify the role's mandate andauthority before its introduction.Conclusions: Adding the nurse practitioner role to municipal healthcare can helpincrease the supply of nursing competence and the quality of patient care, but preparationfor introducing the role requires extensive work. The development of thenurse practitioner role requires decision-makers and leaders to take primary responsibilityfor its introduction. This study can support countries in the early phase ofdeveloping the nurse practitioner role by identifying both best practices and pitfalls.

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  • 29.
    Lerdal, Anners
    et al.
    Research Department, Lovisenberg Diaconal Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Gay, Caryl
    Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Bonsaksen, Tore
    Department of Health and Nursing, Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway; Department of Health, Faculty of Health Studies, VID Specialized University, Stavanger, Norway.
    Ekeberg, Øivind
    Psychosomatic and CL Psychiatry, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Grimholt, Trine
    Department of Health, Faculty of Health Studies, VID Specialized University, Oslo, Norway; Department of Acute Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Heir, Trond
    Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Lee, Kathryn A
    Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Skogstad, Laila
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health and Care Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Schou-Bredal, Inger
    Department of Public Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Validation of a short version of the Lee fatigue scale in adults living in Norway: a cross-sectional population survey2023In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 2132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Due to the nature of fatigue, a brief reliable measure of fatigue severity is needed. Thus, the aim of our study was to evaluate a short version of the Lee Fatigue Scale (LFS) in the Norwegian general population.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional survey consists of a representative sample from the Norwegian population drawn by The National Population Register in Norway. The study is part of a larger study (NORPOP) aimed at collecting normative data from several questionnaires focused on health in adults living in Norway. Registered citizens between 18 and 94 years of age were randomly selected stratified by age, sex and geographic region. Of the 4971 respondents eligible for the study, 1792 (36%) responded to the survey. In addition to age and sex, we collected responses on a 5-item version of the LFS measuring current fatige severity. The psychometric properties focusing on internal structure and precision of the LFS items were analyzed by a Rasch rating scale model.

    RESULTS: Complete LFS scores for analyses were available for 1767 adults. Women had higher LFS-scores than men, and adults < 55 years old had higher scores than older respondents. Our analysis of the LFS showed that the average category on each item advanced monotonically. Two of the five items demonstrated misfit, while the three other items demonstrated goodness-of-fit to the model and uni-dimensionality. Items #1 and #4 (tired and fatigue respectively) showed differential item functioning (DIF) by sex, but no items showed DIFs in relation to age. The separation index of the LFS 3-item scale showed that the sample could be separated into three different groups according to the respondents' fatigue levels. The LFS-3 raw scores correlated strongly with the Rasch measure from the three items. The core dimensions in these individual items were very similarly expressed in the Norwegian language version and this may be a threat to the cultural-related or language validity of a short version of the LFS using these particular items.

    CONCLUSIONS: The study provides validation of a short LFS 3-item version for estimating fatigue in the general population.

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  • 30.
    Stentagg, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Hlth, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Lindberg, Terese
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Hlth, Karlskrona, Sweden.;Blekinge Inst technol, Dept Hlth, SE-37179 Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Sexuality is not age-related: an interview study2023In: Sexual and Relationship Therapy, ISSN 1468-1994, E-ISSN 1468-1749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased knowledge of how sexuality is expressed in older persons may create opportunities for healthcare professionals to perform care according to a person-centered approach. To describe older people's experiences of sexuality concerning aging, a qualitative study was conducted. Eight persons aged 60 and above were interviewed, and the obtained data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings revealed that the participants were certain of being sexually active as they got older. Awareness of what old age can bring regarding illness and increased medication intake was clear, alongside the importance of discussing sexuality with friends or a partner. Age was not seen as an obstacle to continuously being sexually active, and new ways to maintain intimacy and sexuality were identified. According to our results sexuality in older people is about well-being and intimate relationships. Creating opportunities for a trusting, caring relationship can strengthen older people's sexual health. Healthcare professionals must, therefore, make possibilities for trustful relationships to support and discuss sexuality with older people. In this study, eight persons aged 60 and above were interviewed about their experiences of sexuality concerning aging. They described sexuality in terms of well-being and intimate relationships and spoke about the need for support and discussions about sexuality in meetings with healthcare personnel.

  • 31.
    Ramji, Rathi
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Awad, Eman
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Cirovic, Stefan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Health and quality of life among women after participation in a CBPR-informed physical activity intervention: with a pandemic perspective.2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 17972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of culturally and contextually oriented interventions promoting physical activity (PA) has led to increased physical inactivity among women living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Sweden. In this study one such intervention informed by community-based participatory research (CBPR) has been evaluated among 34 women from a disadvantaged neighbourhood before and during COVID-19. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL), behavioural and biomedical outcomes were assessed directly prior and post-intervention, followed by evaluations at 6-months and 18-months follow-up during COVID-19. The results revealed that HRQOL, particularly psychological, social, and environmental health significantly increased post-intervention compared to prior to intervention but reversed back at 6-months follow-up. Perceived health satisfaction and environmental health increased at 18-months follow-up during COVID-19. Participation in PA improved post-intervention and at 6-months follow-up. Everyday activities and fruit and vegetable intake continued to increase through all timepoints. Systolic blood pressure significantly decreased post-intervention and 6-months follow-up; blood flow rate increased significantly at all timepoints. Overall, the findings underscores the potential effectiveness of CBPR approaches in promoting and sustaining healthy lifestyles, even during acute situations such as the COVID-19. It may even serve as a future model for promoting health and addressing health disparities in similar groups.

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  • 32.
    Svensson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Pediat Heart Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden.; Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Pediat, Lund, Sweden..
    Liuba, Petru
    Skane Univ Hosp, Pediat Heart Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Pediat, Lund, Sweden..
    Wennick, Anne
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Berghammer, Malin
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Dept Paediat, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ West, Dept Hlth Sci, Trollhättan, Sweden..
    "I Dread the Heart Surgery but it Keeps My Child Alive"-Experiences of Parents of Children with Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Anomalies during the Assessment for Cardiac Reoperation2023In: Congenital Heart Disease, ISSN 1747-079X, E-ISSN 1747-0803, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 349-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parents of children with complex right ventricular outflow tract ( RVOT) anomalies are confronted with their child's need for heart surgery early in life and repeated reoperations later on. Preoperative assessment needs to be performed whenever an indication for reoperation is suspected. The aim was to illuminate the experiences of parents of children diagnosed with RVOT anomalies, in particular, how they experience their child's heart disease and everyday life during the assessment and after the decision on whether to perform a reoperation. Method: Individual interviews (n = 27) were conducted with nine parents on three occasions between 2014 and 2016 and analyzed using reflexive thematic analysis. Results: The analysis resulted in the following five main coexisting themes: The heart surgery keeps my child alive illuminates parents' experiences during and after the assessment and emphasizes that heart surgery, although dreaded, is central for their child's survival; Everyday struggles illuminates the different struggles parents had to face to ensure that their child would be in the best possible condition; the remaining three themes, Unconditional love, Trust in life, and Togetherness, illuminate the ways in which the parents gained inner strength and confidence in their everyday lives. Conclusion: Although the parents were grateful for the assessment and had learned to navigate among the fears it aroused, they experienced several distressing situations during the assessment process that should be addressed. By inviting both the parents and their child to participate in the child's care, individualized support can take into account the needs of both parents and child.

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  • 33.
    Samuelsson, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Malmö, Sweden..
    Wennick, Anne
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Lydrup, Marie-Louise
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Surg & Gastroenterol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Surg & Gastroenterol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Translation, cultural adaptation, and psychometric testing of the supportive care needs survey for partners and caregivers for swedish family members of persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer2023In: Journal of patient-reported outcomes, E-ISSN 2509-8020, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosis globally and is increasing in both incidence and prevalence. Despite evidence showing that family members of persons diagnosed with cancer have supportive care needs, no validated questionnaire measuring the needs of family members of persons diagnosed with CRC exists in Swedish. Thus, the objective of the present study was to translate, culturally adapt, and evaluate the psychometric properties the Supportive Care Needs Survey - Partners and Caregivers 45.

    Methods: The translation and cultural adaptation followed a systematic yet iterative process. Firstly, the questionnaire was translated using a forward-backward approach. Secondly, face and content validity and comprehensibility were evaluated by two expert panels of colorectal cancer specialist nurses and family members, respectively. Lastly, the psychometric properties, validity, and reliability of the translated questionnaire were evaluated among 45 Swedish family members of persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

    Results: The face, content, and construct validity of the translated questionnaire were evaluated as satisfying. Moreover, psychometric evaluations showed high data quality and satisfactory internal consistency. However, the results also revealed unsolved issues regarding relevance, targeting, and internal consistency, as well as a probable scaling failure.

    Conclusion: The translated and adapted questionnaire can be used to identify family members unmet needs of support throughout the colorectal cancer trajectory. The questionnaire showed promising validity and reliability in the target population. However, it needs to be further evaluated in a larger sample, preferably involving factor analysis and stability over time.

    Plain language summary: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnose globally. At times of cancer, also the health and wellbeing of the surrounding family members is negatively affected. As a result, family members of persons diagnosed with cancer report that they too need support. Still, no validated questionnaire that enable measurement of family members needs of support throughout the colorectal cancer trajectory existed in Swedish. Thus, the present study undertook the process of translation of a questionnaire from English to Swedish. Thereto, evaluated it among Swedish family members of persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer. The evaluation showed a successful translation and the translated questionnaire appeared reliable and useful for measuring the family members´ needs of support throughout the colorectal cancer trajectory. However, it requires further evaluation.

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  • 34.
    Mangrio, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Hjortsjö, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Meeting families in various social situations: Reflections from healthcare staff working with an extended home-visiting program in Sweden2023In: Discover Health Systems, E-ISSN 2731-7501, Vol. 2, p. 1-6, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives 

    Health inequalities exist among children in Sweden, and one effort that the Swedish government has focused on to promote health among small children and their parents is an extended home-visiting program during the child’s first 15 months. This study aimed to illuminate healthcare professionals’ experiences of meeting parents in different social situations during the home visits within Grow safely. 

    Methods

    The chosen method was qualitative, and 13 interviews were carried out with healthcare, social, and dental professionals working with the extended home-visiting program within the child healthcare in the south of Sweden. 

    Results

    The results revealed that the parents raised differing needs in the meetings with the healthcare professionals in the program. The needs included advice on children with special needs, support with problematic breastfeeding, and more psychosocial support. The professionals met different groups of parents, such as young parents or newly arrived migrant parents, that in different ways needed the team to reach out to them. The professionals also met families who came from better-off areas and who were not initially considered to really need the program. As the program progressed, these parents could see that diverse, unpredictable needs could be met by the intervention. For example, the program provided access to and advice from social workers, which in turn created contacts that lasted longer than the program itself.

    Conclusions

    The professionals encountered various family situations and needs within the extended home-visiting program. This highlights the need for a close collaboration between child healthcare nurses and social workers, in order to be able to support the families and work towards the aim of reaching equal health among all children in Sweden. 

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  • 35.
    Sjögran, Lotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Våldsutsatthet hos män i psykiatrisk vård2023In: Psyche : psykiatrisk vårdtidskrift, ISSN 0283-3468, no 3, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här artikeln sammanfattar doktoranden och specialistsjuksköterskan Lotta Sjögran en vetenskaplig studie som publicerades våren 2023. Resultatet av studien visar att våldserfarenhet är vanlig bland män som söker allmänpsykiatrisk vård eller beroendevård.

  • 36.
    Slates, Sarah
    et al.
    Seton Hill University.
    Cook-Sather, Alison
    Bryn Mawr College, USA.
    Aghakhani, Sima
    University of Toronto.
    Al-Humuzi, Ali
    McMaster University.
    Alonso, Dulce
    The University of Texas at Austin.
    Borgström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Boyle, Fiona
    University of Cumbria.
    Cachia, Chris
    Toronto Metropolitan University.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Cole, Jonathan
    Queen's University Belfast.
    Dennehy, Tadhg
    University College Cork.
    Väfors Fritz, Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Gadzirayi, Marlene
    University of Sussex.
    Goff, Loretta
    University College Cork.
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Han, Yang
    Wenzhou-Kean University.
    Hellman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Holder, Kal
    Purdue University.
    Hou, Sixun
    Wenzhou-Kean University.
    Hughes, Julie
    University of Wolverhampton.
    Jennings, Jimmy
    University of Wolverhampton.
    Jegliska, Wiki
    University of Warwick.
    Kaur, Amrita
    Wenzhou-Kean University.
    Kehan, Lu
    Wenzhou-Kean University.
    Kelly, Andrew
    Edith Cowan University.
    Lee, Carrie
    Blackpool and The Fylde College.
    Leonard, Constance
    United States Air Force Academy.
    Lewitzky, Rachael
    George Brown College.
    Majeed, Asia
    University of Toronto.
    Marquart, Matthea
    Columbia University.
    Marsden, Joshua
    Queen's University Belfast.
    Marshall, Lia
    Columbia University.
    Matu, Florina
    U.S. Air Force Academy.
    Molefe, Tsholo
    University of Sussex.
    Mori, Yoko
    University of Otago.
    Morrell-Scott, Nicola
    Liverpool John Moores University.
    Mullenger, Elizabeth
    Oxford Brookes University.
    Obregon, Monica
    University of Texas.
    Pearce, Matt
    University of Wolverhampton.
    Pike, Claire
    Anglia Ruskin University.
    Pol, Hurshal
    Purdue University.
    Riva, Elena
    University of Warwick.
    Sands, Caitlin
    Queen's University Belfast.
    Sinanan, Rachel
    Deakin University.
    Smart, Kelsey
    Purdue University.
    Smeltzer, Sandra
    Western University.
    Spence, Abi
    University of Wolverhampton.
    Maggard Stephens, Teresa
    RN P.R.E.P.
    Stollenwerk, Maria Magdalena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Sum, Kiu
    Solent University.
    Van-Ess, Josephine
    University of Sussex.
    Vick, Dustin
    Air University.
    Wong, Michael
    McMaster University.
    Wright, Heather
    University of Texas.
    Wright, Jasmine
    University of Texas.
    Zou, Wei
    Wenzhou-Kean University.
    How can students-as-partners work address challenges to student, faculty, and staff mental health and well-being?2023In: International Journal for Students as Partners, E-ISSN 2560-7367, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 221-240Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 37.
    Lind, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bläckberg, Mats
    Department of Urology, Helsingborg County Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hosseini, Abofazl
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jerlström, Tomas
    Department of Urology, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ströck, Viveka
    Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stenzelius, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Health-related quality of life prior to and 1 year after radical cystectomy evaluated with FACT-G and FACT-VCI questionnaires2023In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 58, p. 76-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) before and 1 year after radical cystectomy in relation to age and gender.

    Methods: This prospective study involves 112 men and 40 women with bladder cancer treated with radical cystectomy between 2015 and 2018. HRQoL was assessed preoperatively and 1 year post-surgery through Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Scale - General (FACT-G) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Scale - Vanderbilt Cystectomy Index (FACT-VCI) questionnaires. The median age of the 152 patients was 71.5 years.

    Results: Preoperatively, emotional and functional well-being were negatively affected. Physical, emotional and functional well-being presented higher values 1 year after surgery compared to before radical cystectomy, that is, better HRQoL. Social well-being showed a reduction, especially regarding closeness to partner and support from family. Men and women were equally satisfied with their sex life before radical cystectomy, but less so 1 year after, where men were less satisfied compared to women. Additionally, one out of five patients reported that they had to limit their physical activities, were afraid of being far from a toilet and were dissatisfied with their body appearance after surgery.

    Conclusions: Recovery regarding HRQoL was ongoing 1 year after radical cystectomy. Patients recovered in three out of four dimensions of HRQoL, but social well-being was still negatively affected 1 year after treatment. Sexual function after radical cystectomy was exceedingly limited for both men and women. An individual sexual rehabilitation plan involving the couple with special intention to encourage intimacy, might not only improve sexual life but also have a positive effect on social well-being as a consequence.

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  • 38.
    Mikaelsson Midlöv, Elina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Blekinge Inst Technol, Fac Engn, Dept Hlth, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Terese
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Fac Engn, Dept Hlth, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Sterner, Therese
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Fac Engn, Dept Hlth, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Support given by health professionals before and after a patient's death to relatives involved in general palliative care at home in Sweden: Findings from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care2023In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: General palliative care (PC) is provided more at home, leading to increased involvement of relatives. Although support for relatives is a fundamental component of PC, there are deficiencies in the support provided to relatives when general PC is provided at home. This study aimed to describe the support provided by health professionals before and after a patient's death to relatives involved in general PC at home.

    Methods: A cross-sectional register study was implemented, with data from the Swedish Register of Palliative care. The sample consisted of 160 completed surveys from relatives who had been involved in general PC at home, with 160 related surveys answered by health professionals. Only the questions about support to relatives were used from the surveys.

    Results: The findings showed that although many relatives appear to receive support in general PC at home, not all relatives receive optimal support before or after a patient's death. The findings also indicated differences in whether relatives received some support before and after a patient's death depending on the type of relative. There were also differences in responses between health professionals and relatives regarding if relatives received counseling from a doctor about whether the patient was dying.

    Significance of results: There is potential for improvements regarding support for relatives, especially after a patient's death, which has been confirmed in previous studies. The differences in whether relatives received support before and after a patient's death depending on the type of relative highlight the need for future research on how to support different types of relatives before and after a patient's death when general PC is provided at home.

  • 39.
    Axén, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Blekinge Inst Technol, S-37179 Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Taube, Elin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Berglund, Johan Sanmartin
    Blekinge Inst Technol, S-37179 Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Skar, Lisa
    Blekinge Inst Technol, S-37179 Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Loneliness in Relation to Social Factors and Self-Reported Health Among Older Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study2023In: Journal of Primary Care & Community Health, ISSN 2150-1319, E-ISSN 2150-1327, Vol. 14, article id 21501319231198644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Loneliness is described as a public health problem and can be both a consequence of aging and a cause of ill health. Lonely older adults tend to have difficulties making new social connections, essential in reducing loneliness. Loneliness often varies over time, but established loneliness tends to persist. Maintaining good health is fundamental throughout the life course. Social connections change with aging, which can contribute to loneliness.

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate loneliness in relation to social factors and self-reported health among older adults.

    Method: A cross-sectional research design was used based on data from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care, Blekinge (SNAC-B), from February 2019 to April 2021. Statistical analysis consisted of descriptive and inferential analysis.

    Results: Of n = 394 participants, 31.7% (n = 125) stated loneliness. Close emotional connections were necessary for less loneliness. Loneliness was more common among those who did not live with their spouse or partner and met more rarely. Furthermore, seeing grandchildren and neighbors less often increased loneliness, and a more extensive social network decreased loneliness.

    Conclusion: This study underlined the importance of social connections and having someone to share a close, emotional connection with to reduce loneliness.

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  • 40.
    Green, Sara
    et al.
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Services, Region Skane, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wangel, Anne-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Nurses' Perceptions of Telephone Triage in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Services - an Enhanced Critical Incident Technique Study2023In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 974-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, units managed by nurses specialised in counselling and telephone triage, have been developed within the Child and Adolescent Mental Health services (CAMHS). This study has a qualitative design and illuminates the nurses' perceptions of what helps or hinders their assessments and telephone triage. The Enhanced Critical Incident Technique was utilised, eight nurses were interviewed in depth, to identify factors influencing triage. The study is the first to provide a comprehensive description of helpful and hindering factors while performing telephone triage. It illuminates telephone triage in Swedish CAMHS settings and provides insights how to enhance and implement this practice.

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  • 41.
    Bergvad, I. Buset
    et al.
    Lovisenberg Diaconal Hosp, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Lindberg, M. Falch
    Lovisenberg Diaconal Hosp, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Skou, S. Thorgaard
    Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.;Naestved Slagelse Ringsted Hosp, Slagelse, Denmark..
    Lerdal, A.
    Lovisenberg Diaconal Hosp, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway..
    Translation and validation of a norwegian version of the satisfaction measure for use in patient undergoing total joint arthroplasty2023In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, E-ISSN 1522-9653, Vol. 31, no S1, p. S186-S186Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Patient satisfaction is one of the key outcomes that should be included in research after join arthroplasty, as recommended by OMERACT (Outcomes Measurement in Rheumatology)This study aims to translate and evaluate measurement properties of the Satisfaction Measure for use in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA).

  • 42.
    Neziraj, Merita
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skane University Hospital, Skanes universitetssjukhus Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hellman, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Andersson, Magdalena
    Health and Social Care, Strategic Development, Unit of Research and Development and Competence Centre, Malmö, Sweden.
    The STAIR OF KNOWLEDGE-a codesigned intervention to prevent pressure ulcers, malnutrition, poor oral health and falls among older persons in nursing homes in Sweden: development of a complex intervention2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e072453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of a codesigned complex intervention intended to prevent the risks of pressure ulcers, malnutrition, poor oral health and falls among older persons in nursing homes.

    DESIGN: : Nursing homes in the municipality in southern Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: End users (n=16) in nursing homes (n=4) codesigned the intervention together with the research group in workshops (n=4) in March-April 2022. Additionally, stakeholders (n=17) who were considered to play an important role in developing the intervention participated throughout this process. Data were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis.

    RESULTS: Four workshops were conducted with end users (n=16) and 13 meetings with stakeholders (n=12) were held during the development process. The intervention aims to bridge the evidence-practice gap regarding the preventive care process of the risks of pressure ulcers, malnutrition, poor oral health and falls among older persons in nursing homes. The intervention is aimed at end users, lasts for 3 weeks and is divided into two parts. First, end users obtain knowledge on their own by following written instructions. Second, they meet, interact and discuss the knowledge acquired during part 1.

    CONCLUSION: The intervention is robustly developed and thoroughly described. The study highlights the extensive process that is necessary for developing tailored complex interventions. The description of the entire development process may enhance the replicability of this intervention. The intervention needs to be tested and evaluated in an upcoming feasibility study.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT05308862.

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  • 43.
    Sundblad, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Intensive Care and Perioperative Medicine, Skaane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden..
    Hommel, Ami
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Experience of Relocation to COVID-19 Intensive Care-A Qualitative Interview Study.2023In: AANA journal, ISSN 2162-5239, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 273-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spring 2020, a global SARS-Cov-2 pandemic was declared. The number of patients in need of intensive care exceeded the number of available care places at intensive care units (ICUs) and certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) were relocated to ICUs to support the care during the pandemic. The aim of this study was to illuminate the experiences of the CRNAs regarding relocation to COVID-19 intensive care. An interview study based on qualitative content analysis was conducted. The participants were CRNAs who usually work in the operating unit, however, were relocated to work in the COVID-19 ICU at a university hospital in southern Sweden during the pandemic. Four themes emerge in the results: sense of pride, competence, work environment, and nursing. The results illuminate the CRNAs' experience of relocating from their usual working environment to caring for critically ill patients in a COVID-19 ICU. The CRNAs managed the relocation well, although sometimes it was difficult. The CRNAs showed great loyalty, dedication, competence, and flexibility in their professional capacity. The time they worked in COVID-19 intensive care was a challenging period, but it gave them a well-deserved sense of pride and competence.

  • 44.
    Deprez, Julie
    et al.
    Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research (SCENTR), School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Kottner, Jan
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium;Institute of Clinical Nursing Science, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.
    Eilegård Wallin, Alexandra
    Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research (SCENTR), School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ohde, Nils
    nstitute of Clinical Nursing Science, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.
    Bååth, Carina
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Faculty of Health, Welfare and Organisation, Østfold University College - Campus Frederikstad, Fredrikstad, Norway.
    Hommel, Ami
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Hultin, Lisa
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Upsalla University, Upsalla, Sweden; Upsalla University Hospital, Upsalla, Sweden.
    Josefson, Anna
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research (SCENTR), School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    What are the prognostic factors for the development of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD): a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e073115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is irritant contact dermatitis and skin damage associated with prolonged skin contact with urine and/or faeces. Identifying prognostic factors for the development of IAD may improve management, facilitate prevention and inform future research.

    Methods and analysis: This protocol follows the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols. Prospective and retrospective observational studies or clinical trials in which prognostic factors associated with the development of IAD are described are eligible. There are no restrictions on study setting, time, language, participant characteristics or geographical regions. Reviews, editorials, commentaries, methodological articles, letters to the editor, cross-sectional and case-control studies, and case reports are excluded. MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library will be searched from inception until May 2023. Two independent reviewers will independently evaluate studies. The Quality in Prognostic Studies tool will be used to assess the risk of bias, and the Checklist for Critical Appraisal and Data Extraction for Systematic Reviews of Prediction Modelling Studies-Prognostic Factors checklist will be used for data extraction of the included studies. Separate analyses will be conducted for each identified prognostic factor, with adjusted and unadjusted estimated measures analysed separately. Evidence will be summarised with a meta-analysis when possible, and narratively otherwise. The Q and I2 statistics will be calculated in order to quantify heterogeneity. The quality of the evidence obtained will be evaluated according to the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation guidance.

    Ethics and dissemination: No ethical approval is needed since all data is already publicly accessible. The results of this work will be published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

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  • 45.
    Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Backman, Helena
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health/ the OLIN unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nwaru, Bright I
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Wallenberg Centre for Molecular and Translational Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stridsman, Caroline
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Vanfleteren, Lowie
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; COPD Center, Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health/ the OLIN unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Piirilä, Päivi
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, HUS Medical Diagnostic Center, University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland and University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Jalasto, Juuso
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, HUS Medical Diagnostic Center, University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland and University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway; Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway.
    Kankaanranta, Hannu
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Seinäjoki, Finland; Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Rådinger, Madeleine
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health/ the OLIN unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Underdiagnosis and misclassification of COPD in Sweden - A Nordic Epilung study2023In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 217, article id 107347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The prevalence of COPD tends to level off in populations with decreasing prevalence of smoking but the extent of underdiagnosis in such populations needs further investigation.

    AIM: To investigate underdiagnosis and misclassification of COPD with a focus on socio-economy, lifestyle determinants and healthcare utilization.

    METHOD: was defined according to the fixed post-bronchodilator spirometric criteria FEV1/FVC<0.70 in combination with respiratory symptoms.

    RESULTS: , the underdiagnosis was 83.6% (n = 107) of which 57.9% were men. The undiagnosed participants were younger, had higher FEV1% of predicted and less frequently a family history of bronchitis. One in four of the undiagnosed had utilized healthcare and had more frequently utilized healthcare due to a burden of respiratory symptoms than the general population without COPD. Underdiagnosis was not related to educational level. Misclassification of COPD was characterized by being a woman with low education, ever smoker, having respiratory symptoms and having a previous asthma diagnosis.

    CONCLUSION: In the high income country Sweden, the underdiagnosis of COPD was highly prevalent. Reduced underdiagnosis can contribute to risk factor modification, medical treatment and self-management strategies in early stages of the disease, which may prevent disease progression and improve the quality of life among those affected. Therefore, there is a need to increase the use of spirometry in primary care to improve the diagnostic accuracy.

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  • 46.
    Hofman, Hannelore
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Univ Ctr Nursing & Midwifery, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ghent, Belgium..
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Univ Ghent, Univ Ctr Nursing & Midwifery, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ghent, Belgium.;Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Swedish Ctr Skin & Wound Res SCENTR, Sch Hlth Sci, Örebro, Sweden..
    Duljic, Tanja
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Swedish Ctr Skin & Wound Res SCENTR, Sch Hlth Sci, Örebro, Sweden..
    Al Gilani, Samal
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Falun, Sweden..
    Johansson, Sara
    Creat Mammals, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kottner, Jan
    Univ Ghent, Univ Ctr Nursing & Midwifery, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ghent, Belgium.;Charite, Inst Clin Nursing Sci, Charite Ctr Hlth & Human Sci, Berlin, Germany..
    Kinnaer, Lise-Marie
    Univ Ghent, Univ Ctr Nursing & Midwifery, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ghent, Belgium..
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Örebro, Sweden..
    Patients' experiences with the application of medical adhesives to the skin: a qualitative systematic review protocol2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e073546Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionMedical adhesives are adhesives used in medical devices to establish and maintain contact with the body over a period of time (usually by application to the skin) and are widely used in most care settings. Application of medical adhesives to the skin can lead to skin stripping, mild or severe allergic reactions and skin irritation that may manifest as redness, itching or rash. Adhesive-related skin injury can lead to infection, delayed wound healing and an increased risk of scarring. These injuries can cause severe discomfort and pain, and can affect the patient's quality of life. A systematic review summarising patient's experiences on this topic will contribute to informing adhesive producers and policy makers, and guiding further development and improvement of available technologies. Methods and analysisThis systematic review protocol is based on the principles of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols guideline. A systematic search will be conducted in CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. In addition, manual searches will be performed, reviewing the reference lists of relevant reviews and articles included for quality assessment. Qualitative studies using various methods will be considered for inclusion. Screening of title, abstract and full text will be done by two reviewers. The methodological quality of studies under consideration will be critically assessed by two reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Tool for Qualitative Research. Data extraction will be performed independently by two reviewers using a predefined data extraction form. Meta-aggregation will be used to summarise the evidence. Ethics and disseminationNo ethical approval or consent is required because no participants will be recruited. This systematic review protocol is published in an open access journal to increase transparency of the research methods used. Results will be disseminated at national and international conferences.

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  • 47.
    Isma, Gabriella E
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Enskär, Karin
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Perceptions of health among school-aged children living in socially vulnerable areas in Sweden2023In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 11, article id 1136832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: According to the Convention on the Rights of the Child, all children have the right to health. Since good health is a decisive factor for children's future, investing in children's health is important, especially children from vulnerable areas. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of health among school-aged children from socially vulnerable areas.

    Methods: The study has an explorative mixed-method design with a participatory and inductive approach based on focus group interviews with children and youth leaders, respectively, at Multi-activity Centers in three of the vulnerable areas in Malmö Municipality, as well as results from the Multi-activity Centers' own questionnaire. The data has been analyzed with inductive and deductive content analysis.

    Results: The children and the youth leaders described health in terms of well-being, participation, and activity. Well-being included feeling good and safe, having a healthy body, and having fun by doing things together with friends and leaders. Participating in activities was described as having a feeling of involvement, being able to have an influence on the organization of the activities and participating on one's own terms.

    Discussion: The result of this study shows that participating in activities increases the child's sense of well-being.

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  • 48.
    Telborn, Lovisa
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Lasarettsgatan 48, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat Surg, Lund, Sweden..
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Malmö, Sweden..
    Graneli, Christina
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Lasarettsgatan 48, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat Surg, Lund, Sweden..
    Axelsson, Irene
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Lasarettsgatan 48, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Stenström, Pernilla
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Lasarettsgatan 48, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat Surg, Lund, Sweden..
    Diet and bowel function in children with Hirschsprung's disease: development and content validation of a patient-reported questionnaire2023In: BMC Nutrition, E-ISSN 2055-0928, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAlthough dietary adjustments are recommended frequently for bowel symptoms, evidence of diet's impact on bowel function is lacking. The aim was to develop a patient-reported outcome instrument, for children with and without Hirschsprung's disease (HD), to explore experiences of dietary effects on bowel function.MethodsChildren with and without HD and their parents participated. Questionnaire items regarding the impact of diet on bowel function originated from focus group discussions. Specific food items, reported in the literature or in focus groups to cause bowel functional effects, were listed requesting each item's effect size and effect type. Content validity was tested within two separate semistructured interviews. A pilot test was performed. Assessing comprehension, relevance and wording clarity structurally, revisions were made accordingly. Children's bowel function was assessed through the validated Rintala Bowel Function Score.ResultsA total of 13 children with and without HD, median age 7 (range 2-15) years, and 18 parents participated in the validation. Each question's relevance had been ranked highly early in the validation process but most questions needed refining for improving clarity and comprehension. Wordings regarding bowel symptoms and emotions connected to food in particular were perceived to be sensitive and complex. Specifically wording regarding some bowel symptoms (gases, pain) and parental stress emotions (guilt, ambivalence) were, consistent with participants' opinions, subjected to multiple step revisions. Following the validation process, which included two semistructure interviews with different participants and then a pilot test with a third cohort, a full track overview of changes and rewording made in all steps of the validation process was presented. The final questionnaire then comprised 13 questions assessing foods' significance for bowel function, emotions, social impact and 90 specific food items' possible effects and effect sizes on bowel function.ConclusionsThe Diet and Bowel Function questionnaire, enabling answering by children, was developed and the content validated qualitatively. This report presents insights into the whole validation process, declaring reasons for the selected question- and answering options, and their wordings. The Diet and Bowel Function questionnaire can be used as a survey questionnaire to enhance understanding of dietary effects on bowel function in children, and its results can be supportive in improving dietary-treatment programs.

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  • 49.
    Lindsjö, Cecilia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjögren Forss, Katarina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Migrant women's engagement in health-promotive activities through a women's health collaboration2023In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 11, article id 1106972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Social determinants of health impact health, and migrants are exposed to an inequitable distribution of resources that may impact their health negatively, leading to health inequality and social injustice. Migrant women are difficult to engage in health-promotional activities because of language barriers, socioeconomic circumstances, and other social determinants. Based on the framework of Paulo Freire, a community health promotion program was established in a community-academic partnership with a community-based participatory research approach.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe how a collaborative women's health initiative contributed to migrant women's engagement in health promotion activities.

    Materials and methods: This study was part of a larger program, carried out in a disadvantaged city area in Sweden. It had a qualitative design with a participatory approach, following up on actions taken to promote health. Health-promotional activities were developed in collaboration with a women's health group, facilitated by a lay health promoter. The study population was formed by 17 mainly Middle Eastern migrant women. Data was collected using the story-dialog method and the material was analyzed using thematic analysis.

    Result: Three important contributors to engagement in health promotion were identified at an early stage of the analysis process, namely, the group forming a social network, the local facilitator from the community, and the use of social places close to home. Later in the analysis process, a connection was made between these contributors and the rationale behind their importance, that is, how they motivated and supported the women and how the dialog was conducted. This therefore became the designated themes and were connected to all contributors, forming three main themes and nine sub-themes.

    Conclusion: The key implication was that the women made use of their health knowledge and put it into practice. Thus, a progression from functional health literacy to a level of critical health literacy may be said to have occurred.

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  • 50.
    Skyttberg, Niclas
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Hlth Informat Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Ethics, Solna, Sweden..
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Alenius, Lisa Smeds
    Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Med Management & Ethics, Solna, Sweden..
    Sound psychometric properties of a short new screening tool for patient safety climate: applying a Rasch model analysis2023In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: WHO recommends repeated measurement of patient safety climate in health care and to support monitoring an 11 item questionnaire on sustainable safety engagement (HSE) has been developed by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions. This study aimed to validate the psychometric properties of the HSE.

    Methods: Survey responses (n = 761) from a specialist care provider organization in Sweden was used to evaluate psychometric properties of the HSE 11-item questionnaire. A Rasch model analysis was applied in a stepwise process to evaluate evidence of validity and precision/reliability in relation to rating scale functioning, internal structure, response processes, and precision in estimates.

    Results: Rating scales met the criteria for monotonical advancement and fit. Local independence was demonstrated for all HSE items. The first latent variable explained 52.2% of the variance. The first ten items demonstrated good fit to the Rasch model and were included in the further analysis and calculation of an index measure based on the raw scores. Less than 5% of the respondents demonstrated low person goodness-of-fit. Person separation index > 2. The flooring effect was negligible and the ceiling effect 5.7%. No differential item functioning was shown regarding gender, time of employment, role within organization or employee net promotor scores. The correlation coefficient between the HSE mean value index and the Rasch-generated unidimensional measures of the HSE 10-item scale was r = .95 (p < .01).

    Conclusions: This study shows that an eleven-item questionnaire can be used to measure a common dimension of staff perceptions on patient safety. The responses can be used to calculate an index that enables benchmarking and identification of at least three different levels of patient safety climate. This study explores a single point in time, but further studies may support the use of the instrument to follow development of the patient safety climate over time by repeated measurement.

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