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  • 1.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Schütze, Carolin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Van Belle, Eva
    Brussels Institute for Social and Population Studies (BRISPO), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Nyström, Marcus
    Lund Humanities Lab, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    "We choose this CV because we choose diversity" - What do eye movements say about the choices recruiters make?2024In: Frontiers in Sociology, E-ISSN 2297-7775, Vol. 9, article id 1222850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: A large body of research has established a consensus that racial discrimination in CV screening occurs and persists. Nevertheless, we still know very little about how recruiters look at the CV and how this is connected to the discriminatory patterns. This article examines the way recruiters view and select CVs and how they reason about their CV selection choices, as a first step in unpacking the patterns of hiring discrimination. Specifically, we explore how race and ethnicity signaled through the CV matter, and how recruiters reason about the choices they make.

    METHODS: We recorded data from 40 respondents (20 pairs) who are real-life recruiters with experiences in recruitment of diverse employees in three large Swedish-based firms in the finance and retail sector in two large cities. The participating firms all value diversity, equity and inclusion in their recruitment. Their task was to individually rate 10 fictious CVs where race (signaled by face image) and ethnicity (signaled by name) were systematically manipulated, select the top three candidates, and then discuss their choices in pairs to decide on a single top candidate. We examined whether respondents' choices were associated with the parts of the CV they looked at, and how they reasoned and justified their choices through dialog.

    RESULTS: Our results show that non-White CVs were rated higher than White CVs. While we do not observe any statistically significant differences in the ratings between different racial groups, we see a statistically significant preference for Chinese over Iraqi names. There were no significant differences in time spent looking at the CV across different racial groups, but respondents looked longer at Polish names compared to Swedish names when presented next to a White face. The dialog data reveal how respondents assess different CVs by making assumptions about the candidates' job and organizational fit through limited information on the CVs, especially when the qualifications of the candidates are evaluated to be equal.

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  • 2.
    Hemmaty, Mona
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).
    The Cruel Optimism of Work Permits: Vulnerabilities and Deportability Among Rejected Asylum-Seekers and International Students Pursuing Track Changes in Sweden2024In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, ISSN 1556-2948, E-ISSN 1556-2956, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article suggests that recent transformation of the Swedish migration regime has exposed different categories of migrants working in Sweden to deportability, despite the promises that work permits offer. Firstly, I outline the policy context in which deportability works as a cohesive order (Könönen, Citation2018, p. 59). Secondly, I explore how migrants who go through track changes balance prolonging their stay on the basis of work with the risk of deportation. Here, deportability captures how having a work permit both open doors and at the same time produces vulnerabilities attached to being dependent upon individual employers in the current employer-driven system.

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  • 3.
    Lundberg, Janna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Ennerberg, Elin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).
    ‘Run three laps around the house’: A rural life of supportive love and free childhood2024In: Sociologidagarna 2024, Göteborg 13-15 mars: Övergång eller undergång, Göteborgs universitet, 2024, p. 95-95Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Finding a partner and establishing a happy family together is a project intimately connected withchoosing where to live. The sense of place is often discussed in relation to belonging and to widernarratives of nation and culture (Yuval-Davis, 2011), but it is also a way to understand everydaypractices relating to personal life (Harris et.al, 2021). As May and Nordqvist (2019: 177) argue,‘personal life says something about both us as individual people, and the social context in which welive’. In our article, we explore the personal lives of individual people in the particular social context ofrural lives. In our study we have worked with connecting theoretical perspectives of rural sociology totheory of personal lives (Smart, 2007; May and Nordqvist, 2019) by considering how conceptions oflove, childhood, and family life are understood in rural contexts in Sweden. Our interview study ofpersonal lives for individuals have been explored in a rural context. Complex personal narratives onrural lives are presented from the perspective of the ‘ordinary’. Our results present accounts on howideals of family and rural life are negotiated and how families who consider themselves happy withtheir personal lives conceptualise their choices in relation their rural home. Finding a partner andestablishing a happy family together is a project intimately connected with choosing where to live. Ourfindings show how ideals of rural living and family life is negotiated by taking account of a bricolage ofnostalgic notions of the countryside, its freedom as well as more modern conceptions of gender equalfamily practices

  • 4.
    Markstöm, Annica
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Björkhagen Turesson, Annelie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Plantin, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    A collaborative process: child participation in interventions provided by Swedish child and family welfare services2024In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The right of children to express their views on matters concerning them is a core principle of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, as defined in Article 12. However, research shows that interventions provided by Swedish child and family welfare services are planned and based on parents' perspectives even though research suggests that child participation results in welfare service provision that is better matched to the children's needs. The aim of this study is to explore how child participation is constructed in interventions provided by Swedish child and family welfare services and to study which elements are of importance to this process. The article is based on a qualitative interview study with 14 family social workers and 11 children aged 7-16 with experience of family interventions provided by the child and family welfare services. The results suggest that child participation is a collaborative process in which both the child and the FSW have an active role to play. Participation is constructed through a series of seemingly small, everyday actions in the meeting between the child and the FSW. By actively asking questions and allowing the child to practice participation and influence the process, the FSW can, together with the child, work towards increased child participation in interventions.

  • 5.
    Palm, Camilla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Navigating Conflicting Norms on Body and Sexuality: Exploring Swedish-Somali Women's and Swedish Welfare Workers' Perceptions of Female Genital Cutting2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Female genital cutting (FGC), sometimes referred to as female genital mutilation, is the subject of intense debate, exposing tensions between varying cultural values about bodies and sexuality. In Sweden, FGC is framed as a social problem designed to control female sexuality, and national efforts have long aimed to prevent it from being perpetuated. Welfare workers have a key role in interpreting and implementing FGC politics, making the welfare encounter a site where sometimes divergent cultural understandings about FGC, bodies, and sexuality converge.

    In this thesis, I explore how sexuality and sexual health are constructed in relation to FGC through welfare work and from the perspectives of different generations of Somali women in the Swedish setting of immigration. Based on individual interviews (16) and focus groups (3) with welfare workers (24) in social care, healthcare, and education, I investigate how FGC, sexuality, and sexual health, is approached in counseling and information targeting young women potentially affected by FGC. Through individual interviews (12) and focus groups (9) with Swedish-Somali women of different generations (53), I examine how women relate to and make sense of their own FGC experiences in light of changing social norms and discourse of FGC post-migration to Sweden. I discuss how concepts of FGC, body, sexuality, and sexual health are navigated and negotiated by investigating meanings ascribed to FGC by the various actors. I also consider the ways in which the understandings of these notions are changing depending on a complex interchange between individual experience, social interaction, and global discourse on FGC.

    The thesis consists of four papers. The first two papers explore the complexity of how to counsel and address FGC in welfare encounters while having a difficult dual role – working to protect future generations from the practice, while simultaneously encouraging and empowering those for whom it has already been done, without undermining body image or sense of sexual capacity. The first paper found that a key problem is the over-reliance on medical models of sexuality that tend to result in a reductionist focus on the genitals for sexual function, perhaps under-emphasizing the role of the mind, emotions, and sociocultural factors. This approach often led welfare workers to conclude that FGC inevitably negatively interferes with sexuality and sexual health. It was also primarily within a biomedical discourse that solutions and strategies to promote young women’s sexual wellbeing were sought.

    The second paper investigate how welfare workers understand and respond to health discourse about FGC, using counseling on menstrual pain as an empirical example. The study found that welfare workers navigate their various sources of knowledge, where acquired FGC-knowledge worked as a lens through which young women’s situations were understood. Medical discourse, and menstrual pain in particular, was also used as a starting point for discussing drawbacks of FGC, in order to deter young women from forwarding the practices to future generations.

    The third paper highlights how women navigate dominating discourse of FGC in their efforts to make sense of their experiences. The study found that imageries and dominant framings of FGC affect how women are perceived by others, or how they expect others to perceive them, also affecting women’s selfunderstanding. Women “talked back” to and talked through expected categorizations and elements of dominant discourse that put women with FGC in a stigmatized position. Doing this, they reinforced categorizations of the most extensive form of FGC (type III, pharaonic cutting) as stigmatized and harmful, while less extensive forms of FGC (type I-II, IV, sunna cutting) were disconnected from some of the stigma attached to FGC.

    The fourth paper examines subjective experiences and perceptions of sexuality in relation to FGC. The study found that while FGC has been seen as a means to mold a tempered female sexuality in line with cultural standards for proper gendered behavior, both gender standards and means to achieve them have changed under influence of migration and global FGC politics. The findings suggest that while premarital virginity remains as an important value, the external regulation of sexuality through FGC to protect female chastity has been replaced by increased emphasis on inner control and self-discipline. Women disqualified previous rationales for the practice by unsettling the connection of FGC to reduced sexual responsiveness. Many described sexual responsiveness as inherent and not necessarily adversely affected by FGC, although experiences varied. While most expressed positive expectations on sexual desire and pleasure, emerging was also more mixed understandings among some older and younger women. These were associated with notions of the clitoris as significant for sexual responsiveness, causing women to question their bodily and sexual adequacy. Such understandings shall be seen in light of previous cultural ideas about FGC as contributing to reduced sexual responsiveness, which is reinforced in the Swedish context which emphasizes the negative impact of FGC on sexuality.

    In conclusion, this thesis sheds light on the complex nature of FGC in a context of immigration, particularly highlighting FGC in relation to individual care and counseling in welfare encounters. In Sweden, FGC is framed as a social problem, shaping how women with FGC are perceived and understand themselves. Welfare workers predominantly address FGC from a health perspective, often adopting a genital reductionist approach. Medical discourse plays a dual role: empowering women through knowledge while also exerting control over their bodies, drawing boundaries of some bodies as normal, and others as pathological. Interviews with Somali women shed light on their interactions with FGCconstructs in the Swedish context, illustrating a complex interplay of sociocultural, individual, and global influences.

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  • 6.
    Apelmo, Elisabet
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    “They really looked, looked and looked”: Contemporary dance, disability and the circulation of emotions2024In: Alter – European Journal of Disability Research, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 5-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decade, several inclusive dance projects, in which professional dancers with and without disabilities collaborate, have been started in Sweden. The article explores disabled and able-bodied dancers’ and leaders’ experiences of and strategies for managing gazes and emotions – in encounters with the audience and other surrounding people – from a phenomenological perspective. Eleven qualitative interviews were conducted. The interviewees meet gazes filled with benevolence, surprise, pity and fascination. The emotions stick to the disabled dancers’ bodies, distance them from their own bodies and arouse uneasiness that needs to be handled. However, disabled dancers and disabled persons in the audience may also meet in the gaze of recognition. The companies’ internal gazes are important, too. When disabled dancers are only physically integrated or when differences are hidden, the potential for change gets lost. If choreographers and audiences succeed in looking beyond the body itself, an empathetic identification may take place. Another strategy is to completely break with voyeurism by blocking all gazes. The companies show new ways of interacting, thus expanding the possibilities for both able and disabled bodies.

  • 7.
    Samzelius, Tove
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    De första åren i Sverige: Ukrainska mammor berättar2024Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Med studien De första åren i Sverige – ukrainska mammor berättar vill Rädda Barnen belysa hur några ukrainska mammor upplever sin egen och sina barns situation i Sverige.  

     I den här studien låter vi sex mammor från Ukraina, bosatta i olika delar av Sverige sedan 2022, få komma till tals. De berättar om sina upplevelser under de första åren i Sverige. Deras berättelser ger en ögonblicksbild av hur livet har tett sig för några av de tusentals familjer som sökt trygghet i Sverige.

     Sammantaget beskriver kvinnorna hur mottagandet har sett ut för olika familjer, de ekonomiska utmaningar och förutsättningar för egen försörjning de stött på. Vi tar del av familjernas boendeförhållanden, barnens situation och de problem som uppstår när man lever med tillfälliga uppehållstillstånd och utan personnummer under en längre tid. Mammorna beskriver den hjälp de har fått av enskilda svenskar med tacksamhet men även de svårigheter de mött på vägen för att kunna leva ett drägligt liv här och nu. Några drömmer om att återvända hem till Ukraina medan andra vill stanna i Sverige och bygga sin framtid här.

     ”Det är svårt med massflyktsdirektivet eftersom det gör att stödet har varit begränsat. Till exempel så fick vi inte läsa SFI i början […] Vi vill stanna i Sverige. Jag är trött på att flytta. Det viktigaste för mig är att mina barn är glada och att de trivs.” -Olena, mamma från Ukraina

     Studien är framtagen som en del av det arvsfonds-finansierade projektet Starka mammor – trygga barn som under 2023 har hållit i ett anpassat föräldrastöd för familjer från Ukraina.

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  • 8.
    Holeksa, Julie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    "I knew it was different there": a qualitative study of the motivations and risks of drug policy migrants going to Denmark from Sweden2024In: Drugs: education prevention and policy, ISSN 0968-7637, E-ISSN 1465-3370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    This study explores why Swedish people who use drugs (PWUD) relocate to Denmark, in the context of differing drug policy approaches in the two countries. Specifically, the aim was to understand how PWUD experience and value different drug scenes and policy contexts, and reason about the benefits and risks of changing environments.

    Methods:

    We conducted 17 semi-structured interviews with PWUD who moved from Sweden to Denmark, recruiting participants from harm reduction sites in both countries, and through snowball sampling.

    Results:

    Key drivers for relocation included: harm reduction service availability, stigma, social networks, policing, and financial factors. Mobility between settings increased risks such as violence, exposure to new drugs, polysubstance use, and incomplete access to care. Participants presented evolving motivations over time, all but one participant reported several motivations.

    Conclusion:

    The study presented a contextual view of the nature and character of PWUD’s movement. The policy environment particularly influenced mobility. While aspects in one setting may promote well-being, other factors can increase potential for risk. Given the rapidly changing drug policy landscape in many parts of the world, this study offers insights into how PWUD navigate these settings, and can offer opportunities to better meet the needs of these individuals.

  • 9.
    Hemmaty, Mona
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Hansen, Christina
    School of Business, Economics and IT, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Khoury, Nadeen
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    “We Never Say We Are Integrating People!” Interpretative Repertoires of Integration Among Local Stakeholders in Sweden2024In: Journal of International Migration and Integration, ISSN 1488-3473, E-ISSN 1874-6365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how local stakeholders in Scania, the southernmost county of Sweden, talk about integration. Drawing on 28 qualitative interviews, we use the theoretical concept of interpretative repertoires to analyze perceptions and conceptualizations among those who work closely with migrant integration. We identify two interpretative repertoires that stakeholders draw upon to make sense of the concept on the ground: the separation and de-migranticization repertoires. The repertoires display a shared understanding among the stakeholders of integration as a failure, although they do not agree on the extent or cause of the perceived failures of integration, or even how the problems should be defined or tackled locally. Within the separation repertoire, integration is failing in terms of processes where primarily migrants are seen as accountable and responsible for their (in)ability to adapt to the Swedish society. Within the de-migranticization repertoire, integration is differently perceived as something that is plagued with misdirected or even false boundaries between groups (in this case “migrants” and “non-migrants”), and authorities are held accountable for problems beyond migrants and migration, such as inequality, racism, and discrimination. The findings reflect the contested field of integration on the ground and contribute to ongoing critical debates on the concept of integration within migration research, by providing snapshots from a bottom-up perspective of local stakeholders’ acceptance of, or resistance to, present-day integration discourses. 

  • 10.
    Grönvall, Ylva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    The Purchase of Sex: Perceptions, Experiences, and Social Work Practices2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore sex buyers’ perceptions and experiences of purchasing sex, and to study how the purchase of sex is constructed as a social problem in Swedish social work practice. The empirical material consists of interviews with 30 men with experiences of purchasing sex and with ten social workers conducting counselling or outreach work with men who purchase sex. The dissertation is a compilation thesis that consists of four papers, that have been published in international peer-review journals. The first paper focuses on how men who buy sex as one-time visitors navigate between commercialization and intimacy in a national context criminalizing their actions. The paper explores the construction of meaning and intimacy in commercial relationships for Swedish men buying sex, and how these men describe relational practices and strategies used when they purchased sex. The second paper explores the construction of intimacy among men engaged in longterm transactional relationships with women. The paper focuses on the meaning of transactions for intimacy in long-term paid sexual relationships. The third paper explores how men who purchase sex in a context in which their activities are criminalized understand and perceive risk. The paper focuses on individual assessments of risk in relation to experiences of crime, exploitation, and stigma. The fourth paper aims at exploring social workers’ understanding of the purchase of sex as a social problem. The study focuses on social workers’ approaches to the purchase of sex in relation to values, professional practices, and political goals, and how they navigate these aspects in their encounters with individuals who purchase sex. The four papers show how individual experiences are understood, navigated, and conceptualized in relation to social interaction and social norms. The participants in both sub-studies navigate between their own experiences and perceptions, moral values, and social norms in regard to the purchase of sex in Sweden. Both the sex buyers and the social workers conceptualize and make sense of the purchase of sex based on their individual experiences as sex buyers or as social workers meeting sex buyers, but they also relate to normative ideas about the purchase of sex and about ‘sex buyers’.

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