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  • 1.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Department of Education, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Högskolevägen, Sweden.
    The ‘body pedagogics’ of an elite footballer’s career path: analysing Zlatan Ibrahimovic’s biography2017Ingår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 22, nr 5, s. 502-517Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    School of Health, Örebro University, Orebro.
    Risberg, Jonas
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    The walking rhythm of physical education teaching: an in-path analysis2019Ingår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 24, nr 4, s. 402-420Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: While studies of teaching frequently preserve an interest in teacher–pupil encounters that take place in certain spots, this article shows how teachers’ can be understood as in-path instructors, which is significant for student-based learning. This complements studies that have mainly focused on teachers instructional work taking place at certain spots.

    Purpose: The purpose is to describe how a PE teacher’s rhythmic labouring of the diverse settings in the gym creates a learning environment. By examining emplacement (spatial) and empacement (temporal) as important aspects of how learning environments are constituted, this article contributes a framework for studying and analysing a teacher’s work from a moving vantage point.

    Conclusions: Based on a video ethnographic approach and using a wearable camera attached to the teacher’s chest, the analysis of a station-wise lesson show how the teacher frequently covers a large part of the room and creates a web of educational challenges and possibilities. These brief encounters are identified as important tools that support each pupil’s rhythm and engagement in the learning activities and maintain the corporate rhythm of a class. Furthermore, by analysing the teacher’s temporal and spatial walking technique, which helps the pupils to transit between and accomplish practical exercises, the article highlights how the teacher’s ability to support pupils’ progression partly builds on a regional knowledge that is cultivated by the array of encounters

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  • 3.
    Bergentoft, H.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Box 100, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Annerstedt, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Box 100, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Barker, D.
    Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth Sci, Orebro, Sweden..
    Holmqvist, Mona
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för skolutveckling och ledarskap (SOL).
    Teachers' actor-oriented transfer of movement pedagogy knowledge in physical education2022Ingår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Physical education (PE) teachers in practically all countries are expected to help their students develop movement capability. To achieve this objective, teachers need certain knowledge and competencies. The question of how PE teachers should develop their capacities to achieve this task has received only limited research attention. Aim The broad objective of this paper is to contribute to the literature on how PE teachers can develop knowledge and competencies in the area of movement capability related to students' learning. The specific aim is to identify aspects of the design of instruction in physical education that enhance teachers' actor-oriented transfer of movement pedagogy knowledge, during a collaborative professional development intervention. Method The study is an analysis of three conducted learning studies in PE at upper secondary schools in Sweden. The studies involved seven PE teachers from two different schools. Our empirical material consists of (a) notes from team meetings (n = 14), (b) lesson plans (n = 9), (c) video-recorded and transcribed lessons (n = 9), and (d) results of students' learning outcomes (n = 9). Findings PE teachers' analysis of their own teaching sequences in teams supported their actor-oriented transfer of movement pedagogy knowledge, which developed their abilities to further elaborate their instruction in new teaching situations. Moreover, teachers gained insights into how to further develop the quality of instructional design as expansions of earlier experiences. Lastly, a relationship between PE teachers' actor-oriented transfer and students' increased learning of movements was found. Conclusion Our conclusion is that collaborative professional development for PE teachers, which supports actor-oriented transfer, should be offered to enhance teachers' movement pedagogy knowledge.

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  • 4.
    Ekberg, Jan-Eric
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen Idrottsvetenskap (IDV).
    Knowledge in the school subject of physical education: a Bernsteinian perspective2021Ingår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 26, nr 5, s. 448-459Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this conceptual article is to explore how Bernstein's concepts can further our understanding of the internal structure of knowledge informing physical education (PE) and the transmission of knowledge from its site of production into the school subject. In the process of constructing a school subject, knowledge is chosen and decontextualised from where it is produced and then recontextualised into the pedagogic context. This process involves a subjective selection of what is valued as important knowledge. That which is stipulated in the curriculum is regarded as legitimate knowledge worth transmitting to the younger generation. This article offers a deepened understanding of the organising principles of knowledge and the transformation of knowledge into the recontextualised field of PE.Background: The subject of PE has been legitimised in various ways over time, yet in many parts of the world PE as a school subject remains under discussion. Competing ideas have appeared over the years about what constitutes PE, and these have been compared and contrasted with each other. Researchers in the field are concerned with a range of different yet related issues regarding the aim of the subject, the relevance of the content knowledge, and the legitimacy of PE as a school subject.Key concepts: Bernstein's concepts ofpedagogic deviceandknowledge structureswill be applied as explanatory frameworks. The current PE syllabus and support documents in Sweden serve as examples to illustrate how the use of these two overarching concepts can help deepen the understanding of the internal structure of knowledge informing PE and the transmission of knowledge from its site of production into the school subject.Conclusion: This article demonstrates how applying Bernstein's concepts as an explanatory framework helps identify the characteristics of the knowledge that informs PE and the origin and site of this knowledge. PE appears to be informed by a wide range of different knowledge domains, with each one possessing its own knowledge structure with different characteristics and ways of constructing knowledge. The article suggests that an understanding of the complexity of knowledge informing PE must be taken into consideration in the debate about the subject.

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  • 5.
    Ekberg, Jan-Eric
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen Idrottsvetenskap (IDV).
    What knowledge appears as valid in the subject of Physical Education and Health? A study of the subject on three levels in year 9 in Sweden2016Ingår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 21, nr 3, s. 249-267Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many studies have found that Physical Education and Health (PEH) is a popular subject among the majority of pupils. Still, there is an on-going discussion concerning the aim of PEH and what legitimises it as a school subject. It is difficult to identify what knowledge appears as legitimate within PEH, and this creates conflicts within the field. Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to contribute to the on-going debate regarding the knowledge content and the identity problems described in PEH. The conceptual framework used is curriculum theory, inspired by Bernstein's and Lundgren's theoretical work on the social construction of knowledge and the relationship between the production and reproduction of curricular knowledge, further developed by Linde. The specific research questions are the following: (1) What knowledge appears as legitimate in the subject in Sweden on these three levels: In the syllabus, as viewed by teachers, and during the realisation of lessons? (2) What are the similarities and differences between these levels with regard to legitimate subject knowledge? (3) Can we understand the described identity problem in the subject with the help of what knowledge appears legitimate? Research design and data collection: The data used originate from three empirical materials obtained in Sweden from 2003 to 2005: the syllabus valid for compulsory school (i.e. Lpo 94) at the time the interviews and observations took place, material from semi-structured interviews with six PEH teachers who teach year 9 in four different secondary schools, and information from 20 videotaped PEH lessons taught by the interviewed teachers. Findings: The results indicate that one can distinguish two largely dissimilar objects of learning which differ most markedly between the field of formulation and the field of transformation and realisation. The content knowledge of the field of formulation is largely reformulated in the field of transformation, but no major change takes place from the field of transformation to the field of realisation. The ‘formulated object of learning’ primarily comprises functional physical exercise, conceptual development, and the understanding of health and lifestyles. The ‘realised object of learning’ consists of formalised sport and physical exercise, with a minor focus on conceptual development. Conclusions: Since two largely different objects of learning emerge in the subject, consensus is low regarding what knowledge is considered legitimate; the knowledge domain on the primary field most likely differs between the two arenas. A main problem for PEH in trying to gain legitimacy is that there are many different actors in the primary field who are related to and have interest in the subject and the knowledge basis of the subject derives from several different academic disciplines and from non-academic ones.

  • 6.
    Ericsson, Ingegerd
    Malmö högskola, Lärarutbildningen (LUT), Idrottsvetenskap (IDV).
    Effects of increased physical activity on motor skills and marks in physical education: an intervention study in school years 1 through 9 in Sweden2011Ingår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 16, nr 3, s. 313-329Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies have shown that some children do not participate in sport or exercise because they did not establish early coordination and basic motor skills while at school. Basic motor skills form significant parts of the goals for students to achieve in the Swedish school subject Physical Education and Health (PEH). Aims: The aim was to study effects of an extension of physical activity and motor training, during a period of nine years, on motor skills and marks in the school subject PEH. Furthermore, a motor training program called Motor Development as Ground for Learning [Motorisk Utveckling som Grund för Inlärning] (MUGI) was tested and evaluated. Method: The study is longitudinal and two groups of students were followed during nine school years. At the start of the project the students were seven years old, and 15 years old at the follow-up. An intervention group (n = 161) had one scheduled lesson of physical activity and motor training every school day. A control group (n = 102) had the school's usual two PEH lessons per week. Motor skills observations were carried out in the school years 1, 2, 3, and 9 according to the MUGI checklists. Extra motor skill training, according to the MUGI model, was given to students in the intervention group who had motor skills deficits. The method was hypothetic-deductive and two hypotheses were tested: (1) Students' motor skills will improve with extended PEH and extra motor training according to the MUGI model, and (2) boys' and girls' marks in PEH will improve with extended PEH and extra motor training in school. Findings: The results confirmed the hypothesis that students' motor skills improve with extended physical activity and motor training. After only one year the students in the intervention group had significantly better motor skills (balance and coordination) than students in the control group. These differences remained and were also found at follow-up school years 3 and 9. Differences in motor skills between boys and girls decreased with extended physical activity and extra motor training in school. Significant correlations were found between motor skills school year 2, 3, and 9 and marks in PEH school year 9. The second hypothesis was confirmed by significantly higher marks in the school subject PEH school year 9 in the intervention than in the control group. Although there were no significant differences in motor skills between boys and girls in school year 9, girls had significantly lower marks in PEH than boys. Conclusions: The school has good potential for stimulating students' development of motor skills, but two lessons of PEH per week are not enough. Differences in motor skills between boys and girls may decrease with extended physical activity and extra motor training in school. The MUGI program can be useful as a pedagogic model for observing and improving motor skills in school.

  • 7.
    Ericsson, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen Idrottsvetenskap (IDV).
    Cederberg, Margareta
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS).
    Physical activity and school performance: a survey among students not qualified for upper secondary school2015Ingår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 45-66Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many students leave compulsory school without being qualified to apply for national upper secondary school programmes. Despite efforts, the number of unqualified students in Sweden has increased. Grades from compulsory school have direct implications for students' educational futures and the requirement to qualify for an upper secondary school programme is at least the grade G (pass), in the subjects Swedish/Swedish as a second language, Mathematics, and English. Earlier research shows that the amount of physical activity, students' motor skills, and grades in Physical Education can have an impact on school achievements, but no study has examined the relationships of these factors in this particular group of students. Purpose: The aim was to study relationships between physical activity and school performance among Swedish compulsory school students who fail to achieve sufficient grades to move on to upper secondary school (about one in five students in the city of Malmö). Method: The population consisted of 389 students of which 76% (147 male, and 146 female) participated in a web inquiry. For statistical analyses of the responses, the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences program was used. Non-parametric tests (Chi-squared, Kruskal–Wallis, and Mann–Whitney) were used to study differences between groups, and Spearman's rank correlation and Pearson's product moment correlation were used for correlation analyses. Findings: The results show that less than 50% were physically active in the school subject physical education and health (PEH), and 14% never participated. Forty-five per cent were never physically active during their spare time. Twenty-nine per cent failed to reach the goals in PEH. Nine per cent (14% of boys, and 4% of girls), received the highest grade in PEH: pass with special distinction. Significant correlations were found between the level of physical activity and grade in PEH, as well as between physical activity and total grades. Grades in PEH correlated with grades in Swedish, Mathematics, and English. Students who responded that they skipped lessons once a week or more, had significantly lower grades in PEH and in total than students who never or less often skipped school lessons. Students who had good self-esteem (n = 162) were significantly more physically active than those who had low self-esteem (n = 32). Their answers to the question, ‘How physically active were you during school year 9?’ showed that they moved and became breathless and sweaty more than students who had lower self-esteem. They also did sports/exercise significantly more both in and outside of sports clubs. Conclusion: The findings of the relatively low levels of physical activity and the significant correlation between physical activity and school performance indicate the importance of examining how schools can improve students' self-esteem and motivation to be physically active and participate in PEH and other lessons.

  • 8.
    Lindberg, Matilda
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen Idrottsvetenskap (IDV). Malmö universitet, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Mattsson, Torun
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen Idrottsvetenskap (IDV).
    How much circus is allowed?: Challenges and hindrances when embracing risk in physical education2022Ingår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, s. 1-14Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Research has indicated that Physical Education (PE) is often characterized by teacher-centred teaching (e.g. Byra 2006; Tinning 2010), where the pupils follow instruction and perform pre-established movements (Karlefors and Larsson 2018). Pupils are expected to listen, do as they are told, and follow rules (Fitzpatrick and Russell 2015; Quennerstedt 2013). PE teaching has been described as an act of control (Quennerstedt 2013), and teachers face the dilemma of letting go of control and still having enough control to make sure that the lesson smoothly moves forward (Alfrey and O'Connor 2020). However, when the pupils are given more power and the teacher applies student-centred teaching, the pupils get to come up with ideas and make decisions (e.g. Byra 2006; Garrett and Wrench 2018; Mattsson and Larsson 2021). This is significant because it can develop PE and contribute to meaning making among pupils and their experiences of movement. This article aims to analyse the use of exploratory circus assignments in PE teaching and to discuss this in relation to current school norms. Biesta's (The Beautiful Risk of Education [Paradigm Publishers 2014]) concept of risk, which means not knowing the outcome, is used. The article problematizes pupils' own ideas and suggestions in relation to prevailing norms in school. What happens when pupils participate in teaching based on exploratory circus assignments? Exploration, playfulness, and expression were focused, and the lessons were characterized by the absence of primary focus on competitiveness as a counterweight to traditional PE content. Methods: A research teacher (a university teacher with experience teaching school PE and circus) conducted 10 lessons together with 20 pupils (aged 10) and their PE teacher using exploratory circus assignments. Data was collected through participant observation, video observation, and field diary. The data analysis generated three themes, Following instruction, Limited exploration, and Shared power, that were reviewed in relation to the theoretical framework. Results: The results show that the research teacher and the PE teacher resisted embracing risk in PE due to the prevailing norms and what Biesta (2014) describes as the practice of schooling. They focused on keeping the pupils in order rather than being flexible and open to unknown outcomes. The exploratory circus assignments involved risk to different extents, and the research teacher's tendency to embrace risk increased over time. Her letting go of control enabled her to embrace risk. It did not mean a total relinquishment of control, but rather not having exclusive control over the decision-making and meaning-making processes. When she shared the power with the pupils, new and other movements could be explored. The results show that pupils' actions can be more educative than what teachers initially consider. Conclusion: Teachers need to relinquish control to conduct teaching which embraces risk. Doing so enables them to share power with the pupils, which allows pupils to explore and discover different ways of moving and using the material. Exploratory circus assignments can enable risk embracement in PE and function as a way for teachers to reflect upon pedagogical considerations and practice the sharing of power with their pupils.

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  • 9.
    Mattsson, Torun
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen Idrottsvetenskap (IDV).
    Larsson, Håkan
    'There is no right or wrong way': exploring expressive dance assignments in physical education2021Ingår i: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 26, nr 2, s. 123-136Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research has indicated that an aesthetic perspective on movement is lacking in physical education and that exploratory teaching assignments are rare. Purpose: The aim of the paper is to explore how PE teachers approach the issue of teaching expressive dance and which learning processes students are involved in while dancing. Participants, research design and data collection: Sixty-eight students from three different secondary school classes and four PE teachers at one municipal school in Sweden participated in a pedagogical intervention. A dance education unit built around Rudolf Laban's framework of movement was video recorded. Careful attention was paid to ethical considerations. Data analysis: Using Dewey's transactional perspective as a holistic starting point contributed to dissolve the dualism between individuals and the environment (Dewey and Bentley 1949/1991). The analysis was informed by practical epistemology analysis [Wickman, P.-O., and L. ostman. 2002. "Learning as a Discourse Change: a Sociocultural Mechanism." Science Education 86 (5): 601-623], where the terms gaps, relations and encounters were applied to distinguish various types of transactions. The concept of risk [Biesta, G. 2013. The Beautiful Risk of Education. Boulder: Paradigm Publishers] was utilised to explore how teachers' pedagogical methods interacted with the environment in the pedagogical intervention. Findings: Most transactions occurring during the dance unit were interpreted as narrow transactions, meaning that the students' actions followed responses to the teachers' initiation of a dance assignment. Expanded transactions occurred when the students were given the opportunity and responsibility to find their own solutions to dance assignments. This is interpreted as leading to an expanded purpose, which involves new ways of moving. Interrupted transactions, i.e. when actions were stopped and no encounters occurred, were observed in the form of students hesitating or avoiding participation. Teaching methods involving a certain degree of risk enable creative and non-predetermined movements. The use of unfamiliar music avoided a reproduction of stereotypical dance styles. Dimmed lighting in the sports hall and the opportunity to work in separate rooms helped the students negotiating environmental risks by attending to the organisation and aesthetics of the space. Conclusions: Expressive dance assignments can take teaching in PE in new and expanded directions. The teachers programmed gradually more risks into their lessons, which in line with Biesta's understanding (2013) enabled the students to explore new and unpredictable movements. The students developed new ways of expressing themselves and were able to focus on the meaning of the movements. Expressive dance assignments are well suited to an exploratory method of teaching and this interplay can challenge existing logics of competition and ranking in PE.

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