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  • 1.
    Aalbers, Sander
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Back to the Roots: Re-Connecting Humanity and the Natural World by Merging Interactive Technology and Plants2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis project explores combining interactive technology and the natural world, through a more-than-human design approach. This project aims to step away from an industry-driven design by valuing plants as equal in the design process. Throughout this report, an overview of the relevant theory and examples are elaborated on. This overview has informed the project in two ways. It formed the foundation of a concept aiming to improve the user’s interconnectedness with nature and it formed the foundation of an evaluation tool developed for aiding designers in design for plants by addressing three design fields: Design for Care, Design for Cohabitation, and Design for Noticing. The concept and the evaluation tool have been developed in parallel and informed each other throughout the project. The final concept contributes to the discussion about addressing more-than-human actors in design. In this case by addressing plant blindness. The evaluation tool contributes to more-than-human design as a tool to evaluate ideas and projects. This project included an extensive analysis of a design collection, workshops regarding the materiality of living plants and assessment of the evaluation tool, an interdisciplinary design approach, and a prototyping phase during which assumptions regarding the concept were tested.

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  • 2.
    Ahrling, Julia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Franzén, Jonna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Exploring Emely: An exploratory case study on the usability and user experience of a conversational agent for L2 learning2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on evaluating and enhancing the user experience of Emely, a conversational agent aimed at improving language skills for second language learners, particularly those who want to increase their chances of securing employment in Sweden. Usability testing was conducted in two test rounds, with the first round providing design implications for the user interface in the second round. However, assessing the effectiveness of the interface improvements was challenging due to low Swedish proficiency among the test groups consisting of potential users of Emely. Although the study did not result in design implications for the user interface, important findings highlight the need to adapt conversational agents, like Emely, for users with low literacy levels and illiteracy, emphasizing the importance of inclusive design for effective language learning support.

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  • 3.
    Aldulaymi, Mohammed
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Transparency between consumers and grocery stores: Evincer - A design prototype to empower consumer experience during grocery shopping2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how the interaction design techniques approach can contribute to enabling more transparency in physical shopping by creating bridges between consumers and various stakeholders. The aim is to empower the consumers to make informed decisions through obtaining and understanding health and environmental information for individual commodities.

    Through close collaboration with users, and with the support of active designers, the design process results in the development of an interactive mobile application proposal. The prototype aims to create a hub between consumers and different stakeholders concerning individual products. Furthermore, the prototype grants consumers access to the information they desire, sharing or requesting product feedback from stakeholders and consumers, focusing on the environment and health aspects.

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  • 4.
    Alhalaby, Ghaith
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reinventing The Switch: How Might We Facilitate Adapting Lighting Conditions To Users’ Needs In Homes2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Light shapes the environment we live in and thereby our lives. The advancement in technology made it possible to accurately adjust different light properties. This high level of control is promising and changing at the same time. Taming this complexity and providing users with meaningful ways to interact with light is at the core of this mission. This study seeks ways to facilitate adapting lighting conditions to users’ needs in homes. The answer rests on a synergistic collaboration between the user and the intelligent system, in which the system unobtrusively supports the user through the process of adapting the light. Sustaining the user's agency is crucial, therefore delegating or claiming control should be facilitated and the user should be able to easily comprehend and guide the behaviour of the system. Moreover, user experience should be considered at all levels of attention: focused, peripheral, and implicit. This aims to seamlessly fit the interaction with light in the context of everyday life at home. 

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  • 5.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Exploring Game Design through Human-AI Collaboration2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Game design is a hard and multi-faceted task that intertwines different gameplay mechanics, audio, level, graphic, and narrative facets. Games' facets are developed in conjunction with others with a common goal that makes games coherent and interesting. These combinations result in plenty of games in diverse genres, which usually require a collaboration of a diverse group of designers. Collaborators can take different roles and support each other with their strengths resulting in games with unique characteristics. The multi-faceted nature of games and their collaborative properties and requirements make it an exciting task to use Artificial Intelligence (AI). The generation of these facets together requires a holistic approach, which is one of the most challenging tasks within computational creativity. Given the collaborative aspect of games, this thesis approaches their generation through Human-AI collaboration, specifically using a mixed-initiative co-creative (MI-CC) paradigm. This paradigm creates an interactive and collaborative scenario that leverages AI and human strengths with an alternating and proactive initiative to approach a task. However, this paradigm introduces several challenges, such as Human and AI goal alignment or competing properties.

    In this thesis, game design and the generation of game facets by themselves and intertwined are explored through Human-AI collaboration. The AI takes a colleague's role with the designer, arising multiple dynamics, challenges, and opportunities. The main hypothesis is that AI can be incorporated into systems as a collaborator, enhancing design tools, fostering human creativity, and reducing workload. The challenges and opportunities that arise from this are explored, discussed, and approached throughout the thesis. As a result, multiple approaches and methods such as quality-diversity algorithms and designer modeling are proposed to generate game facets in tandem with humans, create a better workflow, enhance the interaction, and establish adaptive experiences.

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  • 6.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Exploring the Dynamic Properties of Interaction in Mixed-Initiative Procedural Content Generation2020Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As AI develops, grows, and expands, the more benefits we can have from it. AI is used in multiple fields to assist humans, such as object recognition, self-driving cars, or design tools. However, AI could be used for more than assisting humans in their tasks. It could be employed to collaborate with humans as colleagues in shared tasks, which is usually described as Mixed-Initiative (MI) paradigm. This paradigm creates an interactive scenario that leverage on AI and human strengths with an alternating and proactive initiative to approach a task. However, this paradigm introduces several challenges. For instance, there must be an understanding between humans and AI, where autonomy and initiative become negotiation tokens. In addition, control and expressiveness need to be taken into account to reach some goals. Moreover, although this paradigm has a broader application, it is especially interesting for creative tasks such as games, which are mainly created in collaboration. Creating games and their content is a hard and complex task, since games are content-intensive, multi-faceted, and interacted by external users. 

    Therefore, this thesis explores MI collaboration between human game designers and AI for the co-creation of games, where the AI's role is that of a colleague with the designer. The main hypothesis is that AI can be incorporated in systems as a collaborator, enhancing design tools, fostering human creativity, reducing their workload, and creating adaptive experiences. Furthermore, This collaboration arises several dynamic properties such as control, expressiveness, and initiative, which are all central to this thesis. Quality-Diversity algorithms combined with control mechanisms and interactions for the designer are proposed to investigate this collaboration and properties. Designer and Player modeling is also explored, and several approaches are proposed to create a better workflow, establish adaptive experiences, and enhance the interaction. Through this, it is demonstrated the potential and benefits of these algorithms and models in the MI paradigm.

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  • 7.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Learning the Designer’s Preferences to Drive Evolution2020In: EvoApplications 2020: Applications of Evolutionary Computation, Springer, 2020, p. 431-445Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the Designer Preference Model, a data-driven solution that pursues to learn from user generated data in a Quality-Diversity Mixed-Initiative Co-Creativity (QD MI-CC) tool, with the aims of modelling the user’s design style to better assess the tool’s procedurally generated content with respect to that user’s preferences. Through this approach, we aim for increasing the user’s agency over the generated content in a way that neither stalls the user-tool reciprocal stimuli loop nor fatigues the user with periodical suggestion handpicking. We describe the details of this novel solution, as well as its implementation in the MI-CC tool the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer. We present and discuss our findings out of the initial tests carried out, spotting the open challenges for this combined line of research that integrates MI-CC with Procedural Content Generation through Machine Learning.

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  • 8.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    TropeTwist:Trope-based Narrative Structure Generation2022In: Proceedings of the 13th Workshop on Procedural Content Generation, FDG, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Games are complex, multi-faceted systems that share common elements and underlying narratives, such as the conflict between a hero and a big bad enemy or pursuing a goal that requires overcoming challenges. However, identifying and describing these elements together is non-trivial as they might differ in certain properties and how players might encounter the narratives. Likewise, generating narratives also pose difficulties when encoding, interpreting, and evaluating them. To address this, we present TropeTwist, a trope-based system that can describe narrative structures in games in a more abstract and generic level, allowing the definition of games' narrative structures and their generation using interconnected tropes, called narrative graphs. To demonstrate the system, we represent the narrative structure of three different games. We use MAP-Elites to generate and evaluate novel quality-diverse narrative graphs encoded as graph grammars, using these three hand-made narrative structures as targets. Both hand-made and generated narrative graphs are evaluated based on their coherence and interestingness, which are improved through evolution.

  • 9.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Dahlskog, Steve
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Togelius, Julian
    New York University.
    Assessing the Effects of Interacting with MAP-Elites2021In: Proceedings of the seventeenth {AAAI} Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence , 2021, Vol. 17, p. 124-131Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MAP-Elites has been successfully applied to the generation of game content and robot behaviors. However, its behavior and performance when interacted with in co-creative systems is underexplored. This paper analyzes the implications of synthetic interaction for the stability and adaptability of MAP-Elites in such scenarios. We use pre-recorded human-made level design sessions with the Interactive Constrained MAP-Elites (IC MAP-Elites). To analyze the effect of each edition step in the search space over time using different feature dimensions, we introduce Temporal Expressive Range Analysis (TERA). With TERAs, MAP-Elites is assessed in terms of its adaptability and stability to generate diverse and high-performing individuals. Our results show that interactivity, in the form of design edits and MAP-Elites adapting towards them, directs the search process to previously unexplored areas of the fitness landscape and points towards how this could improve and enrich the co-creative process with quality-diverse individuals.

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  • 10.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Grevillius, Eric
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Olsson, Elin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Font, Jose
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Questgram [Qg]: Toward a Mixed-Initiative Quest Generation Tool2021In: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021, p. 1-10, article id 6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quests are a core element in many games, especially role-playing and adventure games, where quests drive the gameplay and story, engage the player in the game’s narrative, and in most cases, act as a bridge between different game elements. The automatic generation of quests and objectives is an interesting challenge since this can extend the lifetime of games such as in Skyrim, or can help create unique experiences such as in AI Dungeon. This work presents Questgram [Qg], a mixed-initiative prototype tool for creating quests using grammars combined in a mixed-initiative level design tool. We evaluated our tool quantitatively by assessing the generated quests and qualitatively through a small user study. Human designers evaluated the system by creating quests manually, automatically, and through mixed-initiative. Our results show the Questgram’s potential, which creates diverse, valid, and interesting quests using quest patterns. Likewise, it helps engage designers in the quest design process, fosters their creativity by inspiring them, and enhance the level generation facet of the Evolutionary Dungeon Designer with steps towards intertwining both level and quest design.

  • 11.
    Alvarez, Alberto
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Vozaru, Miruna
    IT University of Copenhagen.
    Perceived Behaviors of Personality-Driven Agents2019In: Violence - Perception - Video Games: New Directions in Game Research / [ed] Federico Alvarez Igarzábal, Michael S. Debus, Curtis L. Maughan, Transcript Verlag, 2019, p. 171-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 12.
    Angenius, Max
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Talkus AI-relius: An Interactive Journaling Artifact That Supports Reflection Through Conversation2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project investigates the intersection between reflection through journaling and Artificial Intelligence (AI), more specifically Conversational Agents (CA) in interaction design. Journaling together with a CA is a relatively unexplored area in HCI and Interaction Design, especially when studying the experiential aspect. Furthermore, designing for reflection has been a rising topic within HCI and Interaction Design. The project used a modified version of the double diamond model as a design process to research, create and test a concept for multimodal interactive journaling using a conversational agent. The results suggest that conversational agents have the potential to play an influential and positive role in evoking reflection in an individual through collaborative and conversational interaction. The project provides design recommendations for designing an interactive journaling experience with a conversational agent and an example of how designers can design using interaction, AI, and language as a design material. The project contributes insights to designing artifacts for reflection and how a design process can be designed to design for AI and conversational interfaces.

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  • 13.
    Angenius, Max
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design Principles for Interactive and Reflective Journaling with AI2023In: Intelligent Computing: Proceedings of the 2023 Computing Conference, Volume 2 / [ed] Kohei Arai, 2023, p. 62-81Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing for reflection and journaling have been prominent research areas in HCI and Interaction Design. However, designing for the experience of journaling that is supported by conversations with AI–Conversational Agent (CA)–to foster reflection seems to be a relatively unexplored area. Furthermore, while there are an abundant number of general guidelines and design principles for designing human-AI interactions, a set of guidelines for designing an interactive and reflective journaling experience with AI is lacking. This paper is a first attempt to address that need. We present the result of a qualitative user study on interactive and reflective journaling. We were interested in attending to our participants’ experiences and finding out their needs regarding the interactive journaling experience with CA. The user needs then were translated to design requirements and thereafter to themes or design principles. Some of our findings suggest that one of the important factors in journaling is the personal aesthetics of writing, by using carefully selected personal tools, specific materiality and interactions. Further, the flow of writing is considered sacred, hence it is almost like an untouchable, reflective ritualistic flow. Reflecting on the findings, we believe the outcome of this study can create opportunities for designing for human-AI interactions that are generative and reflective for activities that require such qualities, such as journaling or creativity.

  • 14.
    Angenius, Max
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Interactive Journaling with AI: Probing into Words and Language as Interaction Design Materials2023In: Chatbot Research and Design: 6th International Workshop, CONVERSATIONS 2022, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, November 22–23, 2022, Revised Selected Papers, Springer, 2023, p. 150-170Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conversational Agents (CAs) are making human-computer interaction more collaborative and conversational through using natural language. The HCI and interaction design communities, have been experimenting with and exploring the area of designing conversational interactions. Furthermore, interaction designers may need to acquire new skills for designing, prototyping, and evaluating artifacts that embody AI technologies in general, and CAs in particular. This paper builds upon a previous study on principles of designing interactive journaling experiences with CA and explores the practice of designing such experiences, using words, language, and conversations as design materials. We present a prototype for interactive and reflective journaling interaction with CA and the result of a Wizard of Oz experiment. Our findings suggest that designing interactions with CA challenges designers to use materials with inherently different natures and qualities. Despite this challenge, words appear to have unique characteristics to support designers to externalize and iterate on ideas, e.g., tone and intent. Hence, we suggest considering words, language, and conversations as the primary design materials, and the AI’s predictability, adaptivity, and agency as secondary materials, while designing human interactions with Conversational Agents.

  • 15.
    Azadvar, Ahmad
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Ubisoft Sweden, User Research.
    Predictive Psychological Player Profiling2021Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Video games have become the largest portion of the entertainment industry and everyday life of millions of players around the world. Considering games as cultural artifacts, it seems imperative to study both games and players to understand underlying psychological and behavioral implications of interacting with this medium, especially since video games are rich domains for occurrence of rich affective experiences annotated by and measurable via in-game behavior. This thesis is a presentation of a series of studies that attempt to model player perception and behavior as well as their psychosocial attributes in order to make sense of interrelations of these factors and implications the findings have for game designers and researchers. In separate studies including survey and in-game telemetry data of millions of players, we delve into reliable measures of player psychological need satisfaction, motivation and generational cohort and cross reference them with in-game behavioral patterns by presenting systemic frameworks for classification and regression. We introduce a measurement of perceived need satisfaction and discuss generational effects in playtime and motivation, present a robust prediction model for ordinally processed motivations and review classification techniques when it comes to playstyles derived from player choices. Additionally, social aspects of play, such as social influence and contagion as well as disruptive behavior, is discussed along with advanced statistical models to detect and explain them.   

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  • 16.
    Azadvar, Ahmad
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Ubisoft Massive, Consumer Experience, User Research.
    Dalqvist, Ebba
    Aging Agents: Cross Generational Analysis of Behavior and Need Satisfaction Among Players of Tom Clancy’s The Division 22020In: The Computer Games Journal, ISSN 2052-773X, Vol. 9, p. 245-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research investigated the effect of age on players of an online multiplayer shooter. Through combining the data from two large scale surveys, we collected information regarding age, gaming habits, game rating and psychological need satisfaction for 8120 players of Tom Clancy’s The Division. Behavioral data extracted from the game’s tracking engine was then cross-referenced for different age groups to indicate motivational, behavioral and habitual characteristics of each age group. To find the importance of measured factors we employed a rank-based model for comparing independent sample means for intergenerational analysis (Kendall’s tau for non-parametric correlations) as well as multiple Machine Learning algorithms. Results found that different measures of playtime vary significantly among generations. Baby Boomers showed significantly higher playtime, days played and group playtime. Intergenerational comparison of perceived need satisfaction also found that older gamers feel more agentic, present in the narrative, closer to non-playable characters but less competent at the game. Percentage of group playtime also showed a decrease in older generations. Future research may expand cross generational analysis to other game types and include more granular behavioral measures.

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  • 17.
    Bacaksizlar, Ecenur
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    U-Med: A Mobile Application and a Reverse Vending Machine for Individuals to Reduce Unused Medication Waste2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 18.
    Bacaksizlar, Ecenur
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    urStory: A Tool to Connect Generations Through Voice-Recorded Memories and Experiences2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decades, there has been a decline in the recognition and prevalence of communication and interaction between people of different age groups. This change can be perceived as a loss of value in societies on several different levels while this societal segregation continues to create larger divisions within societies. These divisions in generations may have different causes such as different interests, lifestyles, values, technological developments, politics and so forth. 

    This dissertation focuses on exploring the social dynamics, connections and interactions between older and younger generations and the project is situated in Sweden. The project adopts a user-centred design approach with several participatory design methods such as omnipresent workshops with focus groups, anecdotes and interviews with participants from different age groups. It proposes urStory, a platform that enables individuals to share life experiences, stories and memories with their voices only. The concept also discovers the accessibility and usability of such tools across generations.     

    Findings from the workshops and interviews indicated the awareness and the recognised value of intergenerational interactions are limited. Addressing the reacquaintance between generations and mutual respect were requirements to foster meaningful connections. Results from the testing sessions and the follow-up discussions provided valuable insights including the aspects from alternative use cases and accesibility to moderation and safety of the platform.

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  • 19.
    Bahaviddinova, Aziza
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Opportunities of an Abusive Game Probe2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    How might we encourage playful yet provocative attitudes to explore unfamiliar methods? This thesis investigates how interaction designers can use unusual and thought-provoking methods in their design process. It focuses on understanding the challenges, limitations and opportunities of these types of approaches.

    The thesis explores the use of an abusive game probe as a way to spark conversations between participants and designers. The abusive game probe has the potential to generate meaningful and insightful outcomes. The proposed abusive game probe provided difficulties, being a unique and untested method. The topic of abuse presents challenges such as ethical consideration, which still requires further research. While determining its effectiveness can be complex, the main purpose is to encourage designers to embrace unexpected and unknown elements.

    This thesis provides guidance for future designers to incorporate these methods into their research, continue on this project or venture out and create new and alternate methods as contributions to the field of interaction design.

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  • 20.
    Bakic, Jovan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Supporting informal awareness in order to facilitate informal communication in remote work contexts2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis seeks to understand how informal awareness, the presence and availability information of coworkers, can be provided in remote contexts through technology. Based on a workplace study, it was discovered that informal communication is an important part of work and is inadequately supported by current technology. Through research, it was suggested that information on presence and availability is that which facilitates informal communication. In order to design for this situation, this thesis features six interactive peripheral display prototypes which seek to provide informal awareness in an unobtrusive and effortless way to geographically distributed coworkers. Going beyond monitors, these prototypes seek to utilize natural human sensory-motor capabilities to ease perception and interaction. The results suggest such devices are appropriate at mediating awareness and have the potential to facilitate informal communication. 

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  • 21.
    Banach, Patryk
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Assistive Technology for Users with ADHD2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores how assistive technology can be useful for users with ADHD when it comes to their usage of smartphones. The design explores the importance of role and interaction aesthetic in regards to designing assistive technology. Additionally, this paper highlights the importance of including users with disabilities in the design and research process. The study focuses on the lived experience of an individual with ADHD rather than looking at symptoms in order to get closer to the needs and issues of the end user. The results show that focusing on the daily life of the user rather than their symptoms brings the research closer to the actual needs.

    The design solution offers an interactive social media post that takes the users in-situ needs into consideration by proposing multiple cues to take a break from social media. By creating actionable insights it gives the user agency and better support in comparison to other screen time-management tools.

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  • 22. Bardzell, Jeffrey
    et al.
    Bolter, Jay
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Interaction criticism: Three readings of an interaction design, and what they get us2010In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. xvii, no 2, p. 32-37Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Criticism is an integral part of the ongoing knowledge construction that is embraced in the more mature design disciplines—architecture, industrial design—and in the arts. Critics interpret, contextualize, interrelate, abstract, and question the artifacts of design to clarify opportunities for designs to improve everyday life and to explore the ways in which designs deliver on this promise. In doing so, they feed an ongoing dialogue between design and criticism, through which knowledge grows for the benefit of practitioners, scholars, and the general public. Interaction design, in general, does not really accommodate criticism and the role of the critic, with some exceptions in new media [1, 2], HCI [3, 4], and video-game studies. As HCI's interdisciplinary expansion continues to incorporate design, criticism's day is coming. As our work becomes increasingly culturally and socially complex, we will need both the "expert readings" of erudite critics and everyday design "crits" from practitioners to provide the knowledge we need to design. We expect interaction criticism to emerge as a skilled practice, closely tied to interaction design. Our intention here is to fuel this development by providing an example of what interaction criticism could offer members of the interaction design community.

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  • 23.
    Beignon, Anaëlle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design for obsolete devices.: Exploring the marginalization of users of obsolete devices regarding the Swedish public services’ digitalization.2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis project addresses the obsolescence of technology through the lens of accessibility to public services. It explores the processes by which electronic devices age in regards to a technological normativity that marginalizes owners of obsolete devices.

    My research focuses on two main questions:

    How might we enable owners of non-smart phones to have access to public services that have been digitalized?

    How might we design public services’ infrastructure in a way that challenges the obsoletion processes of technological devices? 

    The research is based upon a critical analysis of the term ‘obsolescence’, low-tech approaches and studies that examine the accessibility of technology. This work is based on the study of the digitalization of public services in Sweden, with specific attention to public transportation and to the electronic identification technology which enables access to various essential public services. I present the exploration of these services through the lens of obsolescence and encounter with users of obsolete devices. This leads to the design of two prototypes that propose ways of integrating obsolete devices’ users in the existing digitalized Swedish infrastructures, followed by their analysis.

    The designs seek to take a critical stand on technological progress as it is understood in the technology industry and propose ways of reimagining the digitalization of public services while taking into account the obsoletion processes they foster. Overall, I argue for design for obsolete devices as a way of caring for groups that are put aside during technological innovation processes. I propose ways of ‘circuit bending’ public services’ infrastructures in a way that is more hospitable to obsolete devices.

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  • 24.
    Bekker, Tilde
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Fougt Skov, Simon
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Hansen, Anne-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nilsson, Elisabet M.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Yoo, Daisy
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Challenges in Teaching More-Than-Human Perspectives in Human-Computer Interaction Education2023In: EduCHI '23: Proceedings of the 5th Annual Symposium on HCI Education, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 55-58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss challenges emerging in connection to teaching for and with more-than-human values and stakeholder perspectives in human-computer interaction (HCI) curriculum. Recently, we have experienced a rise in interest in more-than-human perspectives in various HCI venues. However, there is still a lack of published work on how to teach such perspectives, as well as practical educational resources for supporting the more-than-human HCI in education.

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  • 25.
    Benson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Exploring Emotionally Evocative Experiences with Sound2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In our relationship with the world around us, emotions play a vital role. As technology has become increasingly integrated and influential in our daily lives and activities, the design of systems that can support the human experience is of high interest. 

    This thesis explores how the emergence of emotional response in sound- based interaction can be facilitated. Through an exploratively based design process three affectively inspired soundscapes are designed. The states they relate to are Happiness, Sorrow and Fear. The experience of interacting with the soundscapes through ultrasonic distance sensors is then evaluated through three user testing sessions. The findings from this points to potential in the use of affectively aimed soundscapes to facilitate emotional response. Further, the findings indicate that levels of abstractions in subjective experience allow space for personal interpretation making for a more involving experience. The importance and potentials of contextual influences are also highlighted. 

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  • 26.
    Berg Nordström, Pontus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Lee, Kin Lok
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    The use of retail self checkout systems and its influence on the experiences of the Swedish shopper2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional retail with personal service is becoming scarce. The personal interaction is replaced with self service alternatives, and the consumer is now seen as a co-service producer. What is the general attitude towards the service provided within these automated experiences? Is the automated experience of service comparable to the traditional service that is expected from the customer, or is the industry moving too fast, risking the exclusion of certain consumer groups in the quest for automation? This study conducted semi-structured interviews with a broad range of consumers and used thematic analysis in an effort to discover consumers' unique motivations in regards to self service alternatives in physical stores. The result showed that most consumers are satisfied as long as the service works as intended. But when problems arise, many of the respondents point out the lack of standardization, human support, long waiting times, and control within the user interface. Findings in this study contribute to the industry by identifying traits within the technology viewed by the consumer as enablers or disablers. 

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  • 27. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    Löwgren, JonasMalmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).Malmborg, Lone
    (Re)Searching the Digital Bauhaus2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 28. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    Malmborg, Lone
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Messeter, Joern
    Lee, Yanki
    Gumbo, Sibukele
    What Can Design Laboratories Do?2013In: Human-Computer Interaction: INTERACT 2013, PT IV / [ed] Kotze, P Marsden, G Lindgaard, G Wesson, J Winckler, M, Springer, 2013, p. 775-775Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Socio-material mediations: learning, knowing and self-produced media within healthcare2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis discusses lessons learned and issued raised when exploring how self-produced rich media can facilitate sharing of meaning between healthcare professionals at an intensive care unit and between healthcare professionals and patients within a hand surgery clinic. Design experiments conducted at the intensive care unit focused on how healthcare professionals could collaboratively produce ‘best practice’ videos displayed on handheld devices and accessed through barcodes placed out in the unit. The making of the videos it is argued can be seen as a temporary convergence of different views when reifying ‘best practice.’ Design experiments conducted at the hand surgery clinic focused on how healthcare professional and patients collaboratively could produce, during consultations, rich media documents that are tailored to the patients’ specific needs. The rich media documents made can be seen as a temporary convergence of two distinct practices; namely that of hand surgery treatment and the practice of everyday life. Making of rich media documents in both projects resulted in developing relational spaces of informal learning, which engendered the making of rich reifications that function well in close relation to participation. To engender the making of the rich media documents demanded the establishment and hardening of a socio-technical infrastructure which can be seen as a temporary convergence between tools and practices where both the tools and practices are changed. In both cases using these videos in turn demanded that the videos, a form of local collaborative hardenings, needed to be translated anew and so to speak “defrosted.” The design consequences are that designers need to acknowledge materiality as an ongoing process which is given meaning through participation over time within and across communities of practice. Materiality and human agency in this instance are not seen as discrete elements, but rather highly intertwined. The second design consequence is that we need to acknowledge the complexity, partiality, and multiplicity of such relational spaces. Methodologically, the consequences are that it is important to consider where the designers position themselves and the artifacts in the network of relations, since different positioning will have different implications for the subsequent spaces of action.

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  • 30.
    Boateng, Vera
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Speculating How Things May Encourage Physical Activity at Home2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Physical inactivity has increased significantly over the past years, andthe advancement of technology has contributed to it. Paradoxically,domestic IoT shapes human behavior through human interaction. Aseveryday objects become a part of the Internet of Things (IoT), thisthesis aims to investigate how the IoT devices and everyday objects cancollaborate with humans to address growing physical inactivity.Using a speculative and critical design approach, design proposals in theform of physical and video prototypes are constructed and discussed in aseries of workshops. Participation in the workshops moves theparticipants from being passive consumers of technology to citizens thatactively debate and design their own future.The outcomes of the workshops are themes that critically address theimplications of domesticating technology and its future roles andfunctions. Also, a set of characteristics is outlined to illustrate desirable,undesirable, and preferred characteristics of networked technologies thatmay encourage physical activity.

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  • 31.
    Bogdanov, Kristian
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Designing a Game Controller for Players with Motor Impairments: An Aim at Increasing Accessibility in Playful Experiences2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the obstacles encountered by people with motor impairments in their pursuit of playing and enjoying video games. The design process involved gathering valuable insights from relevant to the topic literature and observations, due to the lack of access to individuals with motor disabilities. The resulting controller prioritized button layout customization and incorporated ergonomic considerations to ensure comfort and easier interaction. The feedback and user testing conducted provided valuable insights, allowing for iterative improvements and refinement of the controller design in the future.

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  • 32.
    Bogeva, Snezhana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Designing for children with food allergies2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Around 2.5% of the world population are affected by allergies. Children and their families are part of that affected group. However, there seems to be lack of research and tools that would help and provide valuable designs for these families. This thesis explored if and how interaction design might contribute to make the everyday life easier for families with allergic children. 

    A design process was conducted based upon both theoretical and qualitative research. With the help of methods from interaction design, this thesis has analyzed and brainstormed possible concepts. The final result is a wearable called All-gen that helps children to scan and get feedback if their food is safe or not. 

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  • 33.
    Borgström, Linn
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Luengprakarn, Thiptida
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Designing Accessible Medical Information: Understanding the Challenges and Opportunities for Blind and Visually Impaired Individuals2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents the result of a research conducted with the blind and visually impaired in scanning a QR-code and finding medical product information. Three prototypes were developed through Design Science Research Methodology and tested via a talk aloud protocol and observation. Qualitative data was gathered through a semi-structured interview for background of the participants and after each test. The participants came from the Swedish Association of the Visually Impaired in Malmö and consisted of four people. The development of the prototypes was conducted iteratively with the feedback from the tests. The first two prototypes were designed to find navigational and contrast issues and the third prototype, to correct the issues. The result was a solution that effectively met the needs and preferences of the participants as well as the insights to take the information architecture into account when developing, before the design and functionality.

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  • 34.
    Boztepe, Suzan
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Connected Eating: Servitising the Human Body through Digital Food Technologies2020In: Digital Food Cultures / [ed] Deborah Lupton and Zeena Feldman, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2020, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35. Brooks, A
    et al.
    Petersson, Eva
    Halmstad University.
    Humanics 2: Human Computer Interaction in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation2005In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Human-Computer-Interaction, Las Vegas, USA, July 2005, Lawrence and Erlbaum Associates , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Brooks, A
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Petersson, Eva
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Play Therapy Utilizing the Sony EyeToy ®2005In: Proceedings of the 8th Presence 2005, London, the UK, September 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An international collaborative explorative pilot study is detailed between hospitals in Denmark and Sweden involving rehabilitation medical staff and children where the affordable, popular and commercially available Sony Playstation 2 EyeToy® is used to investigate our goal in enquiring to the potentials of games utilizing mirrored user embodiment in therapy. Results highlight the positive aspects of gameplay and the evaluand potential in the field. Conclusions suggest a continuum where presence state is a significant interim mode toward a higher order aesthetic resonance state that we claim inherent to our interpretation of play therapy.

  • 37.
    Brooks, A
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Petersson, Eva
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Raw emotional signalling, via expressive behaviour2005In: ICAT '05: Proceedings of the 2005 international conference on Augmented tele-existence, ACM Digital Library, 2005, p. 133-141Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38. Brooks, Anthony
    et al.
    Petersson, Eva
    Recursive reflection and learning in raw data video analysis of interactive ’play’ environments for special needs health care2005In: Proceedings of 7th International Workshop on Enterprise networking and Computing in Healthcare Industry, 2005. HEALTHCOM 2005. / [ed] Heung Kook Choi, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE , 2005, p. 83-87, article id 1500399Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology influences the situation of people’s every day life and this, in turn, has an impact on opportunities for health related quality of life. This paper presents how findings from two separate and distinct feasibility investigations under the SoundScapes body of research corroborate an important aspect of the original methodology of the concept such as to have influenced its future design and application in its health field context. The primary purpose of the independent studies was to test the potential of utilizing sensor technology to empower control of multimedia feedback across different sample groups of abilities and to test the effects on these participants. © 2005 IEEE.

  • 39.
    Brooks, Jas
    et al.
    University of Chicago, United States.
    Bahremand, Alireza
    School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, United States.
    Lopes, Pedro
    University of Chicago, United States.
    Spackman, Christy
    School for the Future of Innovation in Society | School of Arts, Media and Engineering, Arizona State University, United States.
    Amores Fernandez, Judith
    Microsoft Research, United States.
    Ho, Hsin-Ni
    Kyushu University, Japan.
    Inami, Masahiko
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Niedenthal, Simon
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Sharing and Experiencing Hardware and Methods to Advance Smell, Taste, and Temperature Interfaces2023In: CHI EA '23: Extended Abstracts of the 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, article id 362Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a monumental push from the CHI community to bring more human senses to interactive devices. This trend is significant because we use all our senses in everyday interactions but only an extremely narrow subset when interacting with computers. This workshop focuses on bringing together researchers to advance some of the most challenging senses to embed into interfaces, but arguably the most exciting: smell, taste, and temperature. To integrate these modalities into interfaces, researchers not only use methods from traditional mechanics or haptics (e.g., pumps, heating pads, etc.) but must also acquire tacit skills and understandings from psychophysics, neuroscience, anatomy, and chemistry (e.g., receptor signaling pathways or food chemistry). This demo-based workshop provides a platform to come together and bring their demonstrations, experiments, and hardware to experience, discuss, and advance the field.  

     

  • 40.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bleecker, Julian
    D’Adamo, Marco
    Ferreira, Pedro
    Formo, Joakim
    Glöss, Mareike
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holm, Maria
    Höök, Kristina
    Johnson, Eva-Carin Banka
    Kaburuan, Emil
    Karlsson, Anna
    Vaara, Elsa
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    Lampinen, Airi
    Leahu, Lucian
    Lewandowski, Vincent
    McMillan, Donald
    Mellbratt, Anders
    Mercurio, Johanna
    Norlin, Cristian
    Nova, Nicolas
    Pizza, Stefania
    Rostami, Asreen
    Sundquist, MÃ¥rten
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    Wang, Jinyi
    Windlin, Charles
    Ydholm, Mikael
    The IKEA Catalogue: Design Fiction in Academic and Industrial Collaborations2016In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Supporting Group Work, ACM , 2016, p. 335-344Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Brunkhorst, Johanna Katharina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Support Humans to Socialise Outdoors: How Ambient Technology Enhances Interactions in the non-human World2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis project aims to explore social interactions in outdoor scenarios and understand how interaction design can benefit group experiences in a non-human world. By taking a human-centred approach to this project, relevant theory and design examples have been researched and synthesised. In addition, extensive fieldwork was conducted through a series of interviews and a questionnaire addressed to outdoor enthusiasts. The project implemented ambient technology to foster human relationships through conversation and shared non-human knowledge acquisition. The designed outcome benefits people's sense of community, physical health and mental well-being. Furthermore, interaction in a non-human environment contributes to a harmonious relationship between humans and the non-human world.

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  • 42.
    Bucuroiu, Denisa Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Emergent Social Interactions between a Hospital Patient and a Service Robot: A Research Through Design inquiry into the social dynamics of the interaction framework hospital patient, service robot, caregiver2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The following documents a research through design inquiry into how socialites of a hospital environment are disrupted or improved by implementing a service robot. The robot, support for excessive work, represents a new intermediary between a patient and a caregiver. Robotic work routines appear as better, more efficient, and more affordable. Apart from other ethical and inclusive considerations given to this dialogue, the social values hidden in traditional workflows are of equal importance. 

    This thesis attempts to generate constructive design research about emergent social norms and social dynamics caused by service robots’ implementation. The lessons learned are presented in a final research discussion. Further applied, the knowledge held common grounds with a rehabilitation robot developed by Blue Ocean Robotics. 

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  • 43.
    Campbell, Cassandra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Varför Ava-tar de på allt?: En kvalitativ analys av hur visualiseringen av händers interaktion påverkar hur åskådare upplever världen i filmen Avatar2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is a phenomenological study that explores how the visualisation of hands affects the viewer’s perception of the world in the movie Avatar. The essay analyses three scenes from Avatar, consisting of hands that interact with objects that are unknown to both the movie character and the viewer. The analysis applies theories within phenomenology, perception, cognition, and science fiction as a narrative form, as it aims to explore how viewers perceive the interaction of hands in the context of watching a movie.

    The results suggest that the visualisation of hands can have several outcomes, regarding how the viewer reacts while watching the scenes that were involved in this study. The interactions serve a narrative function, as they convey information about the construction of the fictional film world. This in turn, engages the viewer’s interest and creates anticipation. Theories within phenomenology support that viewers can experience sensory perceptions, such as tactile sensations, while watching the scenes. The analysis also concludes that viewers may wish to interact with the film world by using their own hands, as cognition theories support that the presence of hands in our field of vision, prompts us to interpret our surroundings as being interactive.

    The findings in this study also conclude that experiences are difficult to measure and interpret, since our perceptions are shaped by our previous experiences and interests. The essay closes with a critical reflection on the results and elaborates on how the findings can be applied to different research fields, such as film narration, medicine, interaction design, UX design, and visual communication, followed by how the analysis in this essay could be expanded into a larger study.

     

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  • 44.
    Canete Yaque, Raquel
    et al.
    Univ Seville, Dept Ingn Diseno, Escuela Politecn Super, Seville, Spain..
    Svarrer Larsen, Henrik
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Peralta Alvarez, Maria Estela
    Univ Seville, Dept Ingn Diseno, Escuela Politecn Super, Seville, Spain..
    Pepe: an adaptive robot that helps children with autism to plan and self-manage their day2021In: 11TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE INTERNET OF THINGS, IOT 2021, ACM Digital Library, 2021, p. 223-227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Covid19 has heightened physical and mental challenges for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). One of the main difficulties that parents of children with ASD faced during the pandemic was to plan and structure a daily routine for their kids. The disruption of the routine, together with the difficulty of combining work and the care of children has resulted in behavioral problems and stress, and anxiety for children and their parents. For these reasons, the main goal of this work was to develop an adaptive robot that helps children with autism to plan and self-manage their day, allowing children to become more independent. While most interactive tools for children with ASD are meant for professional use in therapy, Pepe robot is developed as a support tool for these children to use along the way, with adaptability, agencies, senses, and playfulness at the core of the design. By collecting information from the performance of the kid, it is able to adapt its behavior to the child ' s (and parent ' s) needs and desires, and therefore progress with the child. Building upon the principles of Positive Behavioral Support, emotional crises are prevented by embracing a long-run negotiation process, by which the child gets gradually closer to the end goal of self-autonomy. Intended to be adapted to the accentuated needs of these children, the robot combines traditional and computational elements to make the most out of the experience. This project included in-depth user research together with parents and experts, an interdisciplinary design approach, and a prototyping phase in which a prototype was tested with children with ASD.

  • 45. Canossa, Alessandro
    et al.
    Azadvar, Ahmad
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Ubisoft Massive, Consumer Experience, User Research.
    Harteveld, Casper
    Drachen, Anders
    Deterding, Sebastian
    Influencers in Multiplayer Online Shooters: Evidence of Social Contagion in Playtime and Social Play2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI '19, ACM Digital Library, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a wide range of social networks, people’s behavior is influencedby social contagion: we do what our network does.Networks often feature particularly influential individuals,commonly called “influencers’.’ Existing work suggests thatin-game social networks in online games are similar to reallifesocial networks in many respects. However, we do notknow whether there are in-game equivalents to influencers.We therefore applied standard social network features usedto identify influencers to the online multiplayer shooter TomClancy’s The Division. Results show that network featuredefinedinfluencers had indeed an outsized impact on playtimeand social play of players joining their in-game network.

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  • 46. Cuartielles, David
    et al.
    Göransson, Andreas
    Olsson, Tony
    Telehaptic Awareness2013In: Proceedings of the 7th conference on Tangible,embodied and embedded Interaction, ACM Digital Library, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47. Cuartielles, David
    et al.
    Göransson, Andres
    Olsson, Tony
    Stenslie, Sthal
    Developing Visual Editors for High-Resolution Haptic Patterns2012In: HAID12 / [ed] Charlotte Magnusson, 2012, p. 42-45Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Cuartielles Ruiz, David Joaquin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Platform Design: Creating Meaningful Toolboxes When People Meet2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Platform Design is a study of different viewpoints on the creation of digital systems, and how they converge in platforms designed, built, and managed by communities. As sociotechnical constructs in which features emerge through the interaction of different stakeholders, platforms are understood as both means and outcomes—the ‘things’ or boundary objects in a design process—generating the spaces where communities of practice can form. Utilizing two strongly interwoven timelines in education and research (both in academia and industry), the thesis shifts the centre of balance in actor–networks by iteratively recalibrating from a techno-deterministic analysis towards a community-driven one. The theoretical background in the fields of cybernetics, critical theory, design, and the sociology of technology frames the empirical work, which consists of academic publications, design reports, and the publicly available documentation of realized projects. In the space between theory and praxis, a methodological toolbox is developed, a posteriori revisiting experiences gathered over a decade Drawing on a series of functional concepts, the thesis proposes an alternative co-design framework, termed inclusive multiple prototyping. Meant to augment new sensibilities that are pertinent to the design process of platforms, this framework addresses the inherent complexity of actor–networks and human–machine communities. In practical terms, the thesis describes a series of projects, some of which can be considered platforms, while others would be better categorized as tools, toolboxes, kits, or infrastructure. These include co-creating the Arduino community, repurposing kitchen appliances for connection to the cloud, designing a modular prototyping platform involving programming and electronics, deploying an indoor location system, creating educational kits for upper secondary school teachers, and inventing new haptic interactive interfaces. Some of the projects required the long-term involvement of the researcher in intimate communities of practice; others were temporal interventions, yet reached thousands of users. Practice-based and transdisciplinary, the thesis contributes to the field of interaction design by bringing in elements of a sociotechnical discourse, while problematizing notions such as democracy and governance, openness of tools and outcomes, modularity, generalizability, and transferability—the three latter terms further fuelling the research questions. The research shows that these are properties that enable the creation of platforms, although the question remains whether there is such a thing as a standardized platform. While this thesis touches upon the potentials of state-of-the-art platform technology, it also points to the fact that there is work to be done, socially, ethically, and politically, when considering the augmentation of platforms for everyday use as pervasive and artificial intelligence agents.

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  • 49.
    Edin, Fredrik
    Karlstad universitet.
    Exkluderande design2017Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Ehn, Pelle
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Embodied Interaction: Designing Beyond the Physical-Digital Divide2004In: DRS2004: Futureground / [ed] Redmond, J.; Durling, D.; de Bono, A, Design Research Society, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical and digital worlds are wide apart. Each has its own design professionals: product designers and human-computer interaction experts. However, as computers are becoming ubiquitous, embedded in our everyday objects and environments and embodied in the way we experience them in our everyday lives, this divide becomes problematic. This dilemma is accentuated by the parallel threat of demassification, the potential loss of material and social properties when artefacts become digital. In this paper we argue for embodied interaction as a useful stance for designing beyond this physical-digital divide. This term has been coined by Paul Dourish in the phenomenological tradition, for the creation, manipulation and sharing of meaning through engaged interaction with artefacts. 

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