Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Ahonen, Pasi
    et al.
    University of Essex UK.
    Blomberg, Annika
    University of Turku Finland.
    Doerr, Katherine
    University of Texas at Austin USA.
    Einola, Katja
    Hanken School of Economics Finland.
    Elkina, Anna
    University of Turku Finland.
    Gao, Grace
    Northumbria University UK.
    Hambleton, Jennifer
    University of Western Ontario Canada.
    Helin, Jenny
    Uppsala University Sweden.
    Huopalainen, Astrid
    Åbo Akademi University Finland.
    Johannsen, Bjørn Friis
    University College Copenhagen Denmark.
    Johansson, Janet
    Linnea University Sweden.
    Jääskeläinen, Pauliina
    University of Lapland Finland.
    Kaasila‐Pakanen, Anna‐Liisa
    University of Oulu Finland.
    Kivinen, Nina
    Åbo Akademi University Finland.
    Mandalaki, Emmanouela
    NEOMA Business School France.
    Meriläinen, Susan
    University of Lapland Finland.
    Pullen, Alison
    Macquarie University Australia.
    Salmela, Tarja
    University of Lapland Finland.
    Satama, Suvi
    University of Turku Finland.
    Tienari, Janne
    Hanken School of Economics Finland.
    Wickström, Alice
    Aalto University Finland.
    Zhang, Ling Eleanor
    Loughborough University London UK.
    Writing resistance together2020In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 447-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This piece of writing is a joint initiative by the participants in the Gender, Work and Organization writing workshop organized in Helsinki, Finland, in June 2019. This is a particular form of writing differently. We engage in collective writing and embody what it means to write resistance to established academic practices and conventions together. This is a form of emancipatory initiative where we care for each other as writers and as human beings. There are many author voices and we aim to keep the text open and dialogical. As such, this piece of writing is about suppressed thoughts and feelings that our collective picket line allows us to express. In order to maintain the open-ended nature of the text, and perhaps also to retain some 'dirtiness' that is essential to writing,

  • 2.
    Doerr, Katherine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    Chutes and Ladders: Gendered Systems of Privilege and Marginalization in University Science Teaching2023In: Journal of Women and Gender in Higher Education, ISSN 2637-9112, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 115-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on how gender shapes the work of university science faculty. Theories of gender as a social system are used to disentangle how individuals, social interactions, and institutions (re)produce inequality by sustaining occupational gender segregation in higher education science. The study uses qualitative data from an ethnography of six teaching faculty at a large research-intensive public university in the United States. These teaching faculty, largely women in a department in which the majority are men, are ineligible for tenure and institutionally positioned as having lower status. The disadvantages are experienced in different ways across all the women on the teaching faculty. In contrast, men on the teaching faculty are recognizable as scientists and are by default treated with respect. As such, they are elevated regardless of their skill as teachers. This study offers a theoretical contribution to the current understanding of gendered occupations by suggesting that the experiences of the science teaching faculty can be conceptualized as chutes and ladders. Ladders are mechanisms reserved for the elevation of men. Chutes are reserved for women because regardless of how women approach their work, the gender system is constructed to hold them back.

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  • 3.
    Doerr, Katherine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    "Flying under the radar": Postfeminism and teaching in academic science2022In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neoliberal academia is marked by vertical and horizontal gender segregation, and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) is a particularly concerning case. Women with PhDs are underrepresented, and when they do participate, they are more likely than men to be in teaching-intensive roles. Beyond equality concerns, this is problematic because when women are interpreters rather than producers of disciplinary knowledge, the STEM enterprise remains gender-biased. Using data from a 2-year ethnography with physical science faculty in teaching-intensive roles, this paper argues that gender inequity is reproduced through postfeminist discourses of work-life balance. Participants who are mothers say they are flying under the radar at work. They self-surveille as they engage in both paid labor as university educators and unpaid carework at home. Importantly, when participants challenge hegemonic gender norms, they attract the radar's attention and are sanctioned. This study contributes to a growing understanding of how and why women are marginalized in STEM careers. Women with science PhDs fulfill their university's teaching mission with minimal support for the implied compensation of work-life balance, leaving the institutional structures which privilege men's participation in STEM research intact.

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  • 4.
    Doerr, Katherine
    The University of Texas at Austin, USA.
    Is College Science Teaching Women's Work?: Gender Inequity in the Physical Sciences2021Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After decades of virtual exclusion from participation in STEM, women have majored in, earned graduate degrees in, and forged careers in male-dominated fields such as the physical sciences in increasing numbers. At each step of the way, however, women’s participation diminishes, and this is especially apparent in the workforce. Moreover, these women are likely to be doing different work than men; that is, STEM workplaces are vertically segregated by gender, and women’s work, while important, is often lower-paid and lower-prestige than men’s work. The purpose of this research was to characterize one example of vertical segregation, teaching-intensive faculty positions in a university physical science department, and to explore how and why gender matters for the women, and men, who are on the teaching faculty. Using ethnographic methodology to trace, through their social interactions, how individuals’ experiences are shaped by institutional viii norms and ideologies, the analysis was shaped by theories of gender as a social system that works to perpetuate inequality. The teaching track is an alternative job track that allows participants to have work-life balance, which is commonly explained to be more suitable than the research track for women in science who want to have children. Concerningly, there are significant negative consequences for pursuing this track, at least for the women. Fundamental aspects of fulfilling and equitable work, such as fair pay, respect, and advancement pathways, are elusive. When women do resist or challenge their marginalization, they are met with unfair treatment and even harassment. The experience of men on teaching faculty is a sharp contrast; as men, they belong in science and this brings a default of respect as well as elevation to higher pay. Thus, the teaching faculty has an internal gender hierarchy. As such, this inquiry offers the conclusion that college science teaching is women’s work not because it offers a safe and fair space to have a career and a family, but because the neoliberal academy requires low-cost and flexible labor to carry out its teaching mission, and women are easily exploited to provide this labor. 

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  • 5.
    Doerr, Katherine
    The University of Texas at Austin, USA.
    Never forget Sandy Hook Elementary: Haunting memorials to a school massacre2019In: Reconceptualizing Educational Research Methodology (RERM), ISSN 1892-042X, E-ISSN 1892-042X, ISSN 1892-042X, Vol. 10, no 2-3, p. 173-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this methodological inquiry, I attune to the materiality of erasure and haunting. With Deleuze’s theories of difference/repetition as a theoretical tool, I examine the aftermath of the Sandy Hook school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut with the mantra, Never Forget. I structure this article around the concept of a pilgrimage, taking inspiration from Chaucer by selecting tales from my journey. Theories of re-membering and dis-membering are developed as embodied and affective responses to this troubled place. As such, I put forth this inquiry as response-able, a way to stay “with the trouble” and interrogate violence in settler colonial societies such as the United States.

  • 6.
    Doerr, Katherine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    Queering the glass ceiling: alpha females, cyborgs, and the non-tenure track in science2023In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 35, no 6-7, p. 537-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This inquiry into the nature of feminist solidarity in the academic sciences is guided by the intra-activity of gendered bodies in teaching-intensive faculty positions. It uses diffractive methodology to examine how response-able research practice can account for enactment of social discourse through agential cuts. Over the course of a two-year ethnography in a university with high research activity, gender performativity in the contested space of feminized teaching and masculine science was analysed. This article aims to make visible how researcher subjectivities entangle with data collection. Results show how specific agential cuts – alpha female, silencing, less-than-person, squashing passion, and staying to get tenure – illuminate a unique diffractive pattern. The pattern troubles structural notions of feminist solidarity, as ethnographic participants marginalized by institutional hierarchies survive by queering it. Furthermore, the inquiry gestures towards a humble, local, and tentative contribution to post-human theorizing on ‘queering the glass ceiling’.

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  • 7.
    Doerr, Katherine
    The University of Texas, Austin, USA.
    Testing and cheating: technologies of power and resistance2021In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 1315-1334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cheating, a form of academic dishonesty, is commonly regarded as a problem in science education. This inquiry theorizes cheating not as a moral failing on the part of students or a lack of surveillance by teachers but rather as a resistance to testing. Ethnographic data from a university physical science department, analyzed with Michel Foucault’s theory of governmentality, suggests testing as a technique of disciplinary power to produce normalized cases, schooled subjects of a certain type. The resistance of cheating is an assertion of agency within inequitable power relations. As such, cheating and testing are mutually constituting. This inquiry aims to trouble the notion that testing is educationally beneficial by discussing how testing may be placing students in morally compromised positions and teachers in morally complicit positions.

  • 8.
    Doerr, Katherine
    et al.
    University of Texas At Austin, USA.
    Riegle-Crumb, Catherine
    University of Texas At Austin, USA.
    Russo-Tait, Tatiane
    University of Texas At Austin, USA.
    Takasaki, Kara
    University of Texas At Austin, USA.
    Sassler, Sharon
    Cornell University, USA.
    Levitte, Yael
    Cornell University, USA.
    Making Merit Work at the Entrance to the Engineering Workforce: Examining Women’s Experiences and Variations by Race/Ethnicity2021In: Sex Roles, ISSN 0360-0025, E-ISSN 1573-2762, Vol. 85, no 7-8, p. 422-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study utilizes interviews from 22 young female engineers from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds as they first entered the White and male-dominated engineering labor force with the goal of examining: (1) how these women endorsed a gender- blind frame that characterizes their workplaces as fundamentally meritocratic, and alternatively, (2) how they named gender as relevant or salient to experiences and interactions at work. Drawing on the insights of intersectional scholars to answer the previous questions, the study calls attention to how the invocation of these frames differed for women of color compared to their majority White female peers. Results revealed that most respondents strongly endorsed the idea that engineering workplaces are meritocratic and that their gender is not relevant. However, there is also evidence of racial divergence in the themes expressed. For example, some White women expressed a narrative contradictory to meritocracy, discussing their workplaces as like family, while in contrast, women of color often expressed uncomfortable experiences of standing out. Overall, the results suggest that female engineers’ tendency to disavow, either explicitly or implicitly, that discrimination and bias occurs in their workplaces, likely contributes to continued gender and racial inequality; subsequently, programs and interventions to facilitate awareness of inequality are critically needed.

  • 9.
    Nguyen, Ursula
    et al.
    Univ Texas Austin, STEM Educ, Dept Curriculum & Instruct, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
    Russo-Tait, Tatiane
    Univ Texas Austin, STEM Educ, Dept Curriculum & Instruct, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
    Riegle-Crumb, Catherine
    Univ Texas Austin, STEM Educ, Dept Curriculum & Instruct, Austin, TX 78712 USA.;Univ Texas Austin, Populat Res Ctr, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
    Doerr, Katherine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    Changing the gendered status quo in engineering?: The encouraging and discouraging experiences of young women with engineering aspirations2022In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 106, no 6, p. 1442-1468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young women remain underrepresented among engineering bachelor's degree holders. While there is a relatively large body of extant research on the many factors that curtail young women's interest in pursuing engineering, less is known about high school girls who are on an engineering pathway. Therefore, this study focuses on a select group of precollege young women who express a strong interest in engineering. Specifically, informed by theories of gender as a social system and previous empirical research, this mixed-methods study explores the constellation of significant actors within the daily lives of these young women, to understand from whom and how they are supported in pursuing this gender-atypical field, and simultaneously, from whom and how they are discouraged. To do so, the researchers analyzed survey and interview data from a sample of diverse high school girls who participate in the Society of Women Engineers' (SWE) SWENext programme. Quantitative results indicate that young women report high levels of encouragement from most sources, including parents, teachers, and other young women. However, across various peer contexts, they receive much more support from other young women than from young men. Qualitative results further reveal that parents and teachers stand out in young women's recollections of encouragement, often through advocating their participation in engineering activities or providing mentoring support. In contrast, young men in engineering spaces were recalled as particularly discouraging of their engineering participation, by socially or physically excluding them or refusing to provide recognition. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

  • 10.
    Riegle-Crumb, Catherine
    et al.
    Univ Texas Austin, STEM Educ & Sociol, Austin, USA..
    Russo-Tait, Tatiane
    Univ Georgia, Cellular Biol Educ, Athens, USA..
    Doerr, Katherine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    Nguyen, Ursula
    Univ Texas Austin, STEM Educ, Austin, USA..
    Critical Consciousness of Gender Inequality: Considering the Viewpoints of Racially Diverse High School Girls with Engineering Aspirations2023In: Sociological perspectives, ISSN 0731-1214, E-ISSN 1533-8673, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 5-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study utilizes interviews with 33 racially diverse high school girls who have expressed interest in engineering careers. Using the framework of critical consciousness and informed by intersectional theories, the authors examine their views about gender inequality in engineering. Results revealed that while most articulated systemic understandings of inequality, Black participants were particularly likely to exhibit this critical reflection. Yet many young women revealed a more emerging form of critical reflection, particularly Asian participants. Few respondents expressed critical self-efficacy, or confidence to challenge gender inequality in their future careers; such views were almost exclusively held by Black and Latinx respondents. In contrast, White respondents commonly invoked a "lean-in" self-efficacy to be successful navigating, but not challenging, the White male-dominated engineering workforce. Overall, we find clear evidence that young women's racialized identities have implications not only for their understandings of gender inequality, but also for their motivation to disrupt it.

  • 11.
    Stigmar, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    Lundberg, Adrian
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Leijon, Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    Auer, Nathalie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    Rosenlund, David
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).
    Doerr, Katherine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    Round table: University educators’ profession in post-pandemic hybrid higher education teaching and learning environments- opportunities and challenges.2023Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 11 of 11
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