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  • 1.
    Andersson, Catrine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    More-Than-Two-Parent Families: Displaying Legitimate Parenthood in Swedish Media2019In: Lambda Nordica, ISSN 1100-2573, E-ISSN 2001-7286, Vol. 24, no 2-3, p. 81-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Norms concerning family formation are generally based on ideals of coupled love and the two-parent-family, however, family practices frequently go beyond these norms. Families consisting of more than two parents that are co-parenting have only been studied to a small extent. Analysing Swedish newspaper and magazine articles on more-than-two-parent families between 1992 and 2016 we ask: How are more-than-two-parent families displayed in Swedish media stories? Are they portrayed as legitimate families, and if so, how is this legitimacy discursively constructed? What role does recognition play in the media stories and how is it negotiated in the narratives? We use the concepts display (Finch 2007) and recognition/redistribution (Fraser 1998; 2003) in exploring the significance that recognition and legitimacy have for the depiction of families with more than two parents in the media material. The display of more-than-two-parent families in the Swedish media stories analysed is generally characterised by repertoires of modern family life, of love and intimacy and responsible and successful parenting. These repertoires are used to display the families as normal, modern, and legitimate. In addition to the repertoires mentioned, there are repertoires of importance of geographical location, of strategies and of critique of current legislation that further emphasise the legitimacy of the more-than-two-parent families in contrast to an outdated legislation that forces these legitimate families to strategise their intimate relationships. Despite several of the people interviewed being described as polyamorous or gay/lesbian, there are no tendencies in the empirical material to motivate the need for rights based on an essentialised polyamorous identity; rather, the focus is on the fact that it is the practical care relations that need to be protected.

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  • 2.
    Andersson, Catrine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Polyamorous Parenthood – Kinship, Gender and Morality2021In: Close Relations: Family, Kinship and Beyond / [ed] H Wahlström Henriksson; K Goedecke, New York: Springer, 2021, p. 139-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on polyamorous parenthood has mainly focused on aspects of interactions with schools and authorities, where polyamorous parents have had to develop strategies of openness and concealment and dealing with stigmatization (Palotta-Chiarolla 2010; Riggs 2010; Sheff 2010). Aspects of sex and morality have primarily been explored in general in relation to non-monogamous practice and not specifically in relation to parenthood (Ritchie 2010; Samuels 2010). Based on interviews with 22 persons in Sweden who in different ways have experience of non-monogamous practice, we explore polyamorous parenthood, focusing on kinship practices, gender and sexual morality. The results of these analyses show that there are recurring themes of promiscuity as a risk that polyamorous parents have to handle. This can take the form of negative interactions with family members and society, practical issues with having sex with several partners or identity issues where good parenthood risks being at odds with non-monogamous practices. The boundaries of good parenthood and promiscuity and the negotiations between them are rarely highlighted in research, but have implications for the moral order of kinship for non-monogamous practice today. 

  • 3.
    Andersson, Catrine
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Södertörn Univ, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Swedish poly utopia: Dreams, revolutions, and crushed hopes2023In: Sexualities, ISSN 1363-4607, E-ISSN 1461-7382, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 695-710, article id 13634607211056887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyamory means having a sexual and/or intimate relationship with more than one person at a time. In this study, we use in-depth interviews with 22 persons in Sweden who have experience of polyamorous or non-monogamous relationships to explore how polyamory can include imagining utopian relationships and spaces. Thematic analysis was done which indicated narratives of politically invested attempts to create communal living or societal change that resists capitalist and heteronormative nuclear-family arrangements as well as stories of everyday events that do not explicitly involve political ambitions. The range of utopian dreams and practices of the non-monogamous participants in our study, we argue, are examples of what Munoz calls concrete utopias, filled with joy and laden with disappointment in the face of potentiality and reality.

  • 4.
    Augustsson, Dennis
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Carlström, CharlottaMalmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).Hall, EmmaMalmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).Liljefors Persson, BodilMalmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Religion och samhällsförändring: Aktuella perspektiv i religionsvetenskaplig forskning2023Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna antologi erbjuder forskningsbaserade och didaktiska perspektiv på religion och samhällsförändringar. Antologin är resultatet av ett samarbete mellan forskare från flera olika discipliner vid Malmö universitet och visar på den mångfald av forskningsperspektiv som ryms inom ämnesområdet religionsvetenskap i Sverige idag.

    Antologin vänder sig till studenter och verksamma lärare samt en vidare intresserad läsekrets som önskar få tillgång till aktuell forskning och fördjupa sin ämnesteoretiska kunskap. Genom fyra teman belyses aktuella perspektiv på brännande frågor inom samtida religionsvetenskaplig forskning: Religion, kön och sexualitet, Religion, unga och skola, Religion, möten och förändringar samt Religion, politik och samtid.

    I en samtid som präglas av ständigt pågående förändring är religion och livsåskådningsfrågor synnerligen aktuella. Mötet mellan historiska traditioner och nutida samhällsutveckling visar hur inte bara religiösa rörelser, utan också människors trosuppfattningar och identiteter, omtolkas och förändras över tid. Undervisningen i religionskunskap i grund- och gymnasieskolan utgår från att kunskap om religion och andra livsåskådningar är central för vår förståelse av en omvärld som i allt större utsträckning präglas av mångfald och förändring.

  • 5.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    BDSM – the antithesis of good Swedish sex?2019In: Sexualities, ISSN 1363-4607, E-ISSN 1461-7382, Vol. 22, no 7-8, p. 1164-1181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, based on ethnographic fieldwork, and interviews with 29 self-defined BDSM practitioners, I explore the incorporation process of BDSM (Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission, Sadism and Masochism) in Swedish society. I argue that the so-called ‘good sexuality’ described by Gayle Rubin (2011) and Don Kulick (2005) is still alive as a normative principle in this context. Drawing on Foucault’s concept ‘biopower’ (1976), I show that to gain acceptance and to fit into a society characterized by ‘good sexuality’, BDSM has to be normalized. This normalization process is closely connected to a middle-class hegemony and results in limitations that in various ways affect the practitioners, as well as impacting the transgressive core of BDSM.

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  • 6.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    BDSM, becoming and the flows of desire.2019In: Culture, Health and Sexuality, ISSN 1369-1058, E-ISSN 1464-5351, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 404-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a five-year qualitative ethnographic study of Bondage and Discipline/Dominance and Submission/Sadism and Masochism (BDSM) in Sweden, this paper examines the process of becoming among BDSM practitioners. In-depth interviews were completed with 29 self-defined BDSM practitioners, and their accounts were analysed using thematic analysis. Focusing on the Deleuzian concept of becoming, BDSM is understood as a dynamic and collective phenomenon closely connected to fantasies, memories and longing, and enabled through flows of desire. Practising BDSM can be understood as a process of increasing expansion, creation and connection, in which desire is seen not as something we lack or need but rather as a process of striving and self-enhancement. Exploring the becoming process more fully can provide a better understanding as to why some people choose to practise BDSM.

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  • 7.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    BDSM fantasies become practice2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BDSM fantasies become practice This study is part of my dissertation and is intended to contribute to the understanding of Bondage and Dominance/Sadism and Masochism (BDSM) fantasies. The paper will be presented at the conference and has been accepted as a contribution to an upcoming international anthology about sexual fantasies. It is based on 28 interviews with people who define themselves as BDSM practitioners. The practitioners highlight the impact of fantasies in their encounters. They also talk about fantasies that eroticise dominance and submission as a reason for why they became involved in BDSM. The BDSM practice has given them an opportunity to live out their fantasies. The BDSM scene is built on fantasies, daydreams, thoughts and feelings; the practice stresses taboos, boundaries, prohibitions and social norms. The scene can function as an alibi, allowing practitioners to play with power, gender and race in a way that would be impossible outside the scene. I discuss the following questions: Does BDSM provide a subversive freedom to go beyond race, gender and trauma? Can playing with taboos be understood as the “allure of the forbidden” and as a tangible and concrete approach to the exchange of power in BDSM play, or should the phenomenon rather be seen as expressions of pure racism, sexism and oppression? I argue that living out fantasies and playing with taboos implies a complicated and complex chain of symbolism that affects overall perspective on gender, ethnicity, oppression and power.

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  • 8.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    BDSM fantasies become practice2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BDSM fantasies become practice This study is part of my dissertation and is intended to contribute to the understanding of Bondage and Dominance/Sadism and Masochism (BDSM) fantasies. It is based on 28 interviews with people who define themselves as BDSM practitioners. The practitioners highlight the impact of fantasies in their encounters. They talk about fantasies that eroticise dominance and submission as a reason for why they became involved in BDSM. The BDSM practice has given them an opportunity to live out their fantasies. The BDSM scene is built on fantasies, daydreams, thoughts and feelings; the practice stresses taboos, boundaries, prohibitions and social norms. The scene can function as an alibi, allowing practitioners to play with power, gender and race in a way that would be impossible outside the scene. I discuss the following questions: Does BDSM provide a subversive freedom to go beyond race, gender and trauma? Can playing with taboos be understood as the “allure of the forbidden” and as a tangible and concrete approach to the exchange of power in BDSM play, or should the phenomenon rather be seen as expressions of pure racism, sexism and oppression? I argue that living out fantasies and playing with taboos implies a complicated and complex chain of symbolism that affects overall perspective on gender, ethnicity, oppression and power.

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  • 9.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    BDSM, Interaction Rituals and Open Bodies2017In: Sexuality & Culture, ISSN 1095-5143, E-ISSN 1936-4822, Vol. 22, p. 209-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, based on ethnographic fieldwork in Bondage and Disci- pline, Dominance and Submission, Sadism and Masochism (BDSM) communities in Sweden, I explore the ritual aspects of BDSM. Drawing on Douglas and Collins’ theories of interaction rituals, I analyse the creation of emotional energy during humiliation practice through connection and intimacy between the participants. The article examines how the ritual aspect of BDSM sessions can be understood as an enabler of expressions and emotional energy. BDSM becomes a free zone in which bodies are allowed to be open in a Bakhtinian sense, that is, transgressive and beyond control.

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  • 10.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    BDSM, intercorporeality and the feeling body2023In: Routledge Handbook of Sexuality, Gender, Health and Rights / [ed] Peter Aggleton, Rob Cover, Carmen H. Logie, Christy E. Newman, Richard Parker, Routledge, 2023, 2, p. 250-258Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter, informed by ethnographic fieldwork in BDSM communities in Sweden focuses on the bodily aspects of BDSM. Drawing on the philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty's concepts of the living body and intercorporeality, it analyses the embodied interactions, sensations and emotions that encompasses BDSM practice. BDSM can create spaces in which practitioners not only explore bodily boundaries, strong emotions and states of subspace and domspace, but it can also enable a wordless bodily empathy in which practitioners can experience feelings of belonging, intimacy and trust.

  • 11.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    BDSM: paradoxernas praktiker2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BDSM, i.e. Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission and Sadism and Masochism is an acronym used to describe a variety of (sexual) behaviours including an implicit or explicit erotic power exchange. The aim of the thesis is to understand BDSM as a dynamic, complex and collective phenomenon. It focuses on how practitioners, through their stories, give meaning to their experiences. A theoretical framework that includes both poststructuralism and symbolic interactionism is used. Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted in 2012 and 2013 within different BDSM communities in Sweden. The fieldwork included interviews, observations and participation in meetings, workshops, pub evenings and club ventures. In total, 29 persons, defining themselves as practitioners of BDSM, were interviewed. The thesis shows how different interpretations and political-ideological perspectives have shaped the social reality, which constitutes BDSM today. This process has taken place in different discursive arenas; from medicine and research to political activism, literature, film and media. Existing discourses, where power and violence are central, are challenged by counter discourses, where resistance against heteronormative norms and sexuality are significant. BDSM is seen as ways to achieve feelings of security and belonging. The practice enable strong emotions, bodily sensations, altered states of consciousness and spiritual experiences. Acts, which could be seen as incorrect and immoral, are made morally defensible within the BDSM context. The discourses both enable and limit the practitioners, and the thesis highlights both ambivalences and paradoxes in the practices.

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  • 12.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Emotions, power and BDSM: the stance of the ethnographer2023In: The power of BDSM: Play, Communities, and Consent in the 21st Century / [ed] Brandy Simula; Robin Bauer; Liam Wignall, Oxford University Press, 2023, p. 284-298Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter examines ethnographic fieldwork within the realm of BDSM, with a focus on the ethnographer´s emotions, participation, and etic reflections. Based on years of researching Swedish BDSM communities, with diary and field notes, the author reflects upon different situations and events which, in various ways, have had personal effects and given rise to ethical reflections and dilemmas as well as strong emotions. The complex relationships between the field, its actors, and the ethnographer are important and salient for all of those who engage in such fieldwork. Ethnographic work requires a high level of personal commitment but also enables a voice to be given to stigmatized populations, prejudices to be revealed, and informants’ feelings, lives, situations, dilemmas, and ambitions to be nuanced, though it can sometimes be very exhausting emotionally for the ethnographer. 

  • 13.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    En villkorad gemenskap: Hbtq, sexualitet och kristen frikyrklighet2023Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homosexuality, bisexuality, transgender and queer have long been a sensitive topic in Christian churches. As society has changed, some denominations have become increasingly affirming, while others see the changes as incompatible with Christian values.

     A Conditional Community is based on in-depth interviews with 29 lgbtq Christians and is the first Swedish scientific study on the subject. Using a phenomenological approach, the author investigate how sexuality, intimacy and faith are experienced by the interviewees and how their Christian identity interacts with their identity as lgbtq people. 

    A Conditional Community is aimed at teachers, researchers and students in fields such as religious studies, sexology, gender studies and psychology. The book is also of interest to professionals who require knowledge on the subject, such as pastors and therapists. Furthermore, it can serve as a basis for discussions and reflection on faith, sexuality and lgbtq in the Free Church contexts.

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  • 14.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Fantasies Becoming Practice: BDSM as Ritual2015In: Sexual Fantasies: At the Convergence of the Cultural and the Individual / [ed] Mariah Larsson, Sara Johnsdotter, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015, p. 113-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Gender equal BDSM practice: a Swedish paradox?2017In: Psychology & Sexuality, ISSN 1941-9899, E-ISSN 1941-9902, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 268-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I examine power and BDSM, that is, Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission, and Sadism and Masochism, within Swedish society. The main research question is: How do practi- tioners relate to power, gender and consent in Swedish society, which has been characterised by a long tradition of gender equality? The study is based on 29 in-depth interviews with self-defined BDSM practitioners and ethnographic fieldwork in Swedish BDSM communities. The article shows that there is a strong preoccupation of gender and equality among Swedish practitioners. They express gender awareness and pro- blematise the practice in relation to societal power structures. For BDSM to fit into a society with a strong egalitarian discourse like Sweden, the practitioners need to reconcile BDSM and gender equality. To defend an interest in BDSM, the practitioners emphasise the voluntariness, the central role of consent, and the defined staging in the practices. By highlighting the consent, the informants thus position themselves against the discourse of BDSM as violent, oppressive and patriarchal.

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  • 16.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Pleasure and Pain - BDSM Activities Within Relationships2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to highlight experiences of living in a relationship where BDSM is being exercised. The acronym is an umbrella term for bondage/discipline, dominance/submission and sadomasochism. The study is based on interviews with persons who define themselves as BDSM practitioners. The overall questions of this study are: How does the BDSM practice appear in everyday life? How did the practice start and how has it developed over time? What is included in the sexual BDSM practice? The empirical material has been analyzed with interactionism as the theoretical framework. The picture that emerges is complex. To define oneself as a BDSM practitioner might mean different things for different people where the extent of the practice, what it consists of and how integrated it is in the lives of people might vary from person to person. But despite differences there are also recurring, common patterns in the stories of the informants. All of them describe the practice in positive terms. To a great extent the practice has to do with sexuality where an explicit power exchange, an assuming of dominant and submissive roles and an everyday life filled with rituals, rules and agreements are described as being key elements. Punishment, in the form of physical pain or humiliation, is common when the rules are not obeyed. All the interviewees use safe words to make sure both are comfortable about what's happening. Some sorts of tools are utilized by all. The most common are whips, bonds, chains and locks, paddles, clamps/clothespins, knives, butt plugs and ropes. There is a concern among the informants to find and to form strategies to cope and to adapt the BDSM role to other roles and here the parental role is the most apparent. Also an ambition to create a balance between the personal norms and the norms of the BDSM culture and those of the overall society can be seen. The interviewees express a search for answers to why one practices BDSM. In this process they return to experiences, almost exclusively of a destructive nature, and they wonder if these experiences have affected their sexuality and their preference for BDSM. It is like this even if the common attitude in society actually has become more accepting, for example with the help of media, recent research and the fact that BDSM is not considered a disorder in Sweden anymore.

  • 17.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Health and Welfare Studies (HV).
    Pleasure and Pain: BDSM in Relationships2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to highlight experiences of living in a relationship where BDSM is being exercised. The acronym is an umbrella term for bondage/discipline, dominance/submission and sadomasochism. The study is based on interviews with persons who define themselves as BDSM practitioners. The overall questions of this study are: How does the BDSM practice appear in everyday life? How did the practice start and how has it developed over time? What is included in the sexual BDSM practice? The empirical material has been analyzed with interactionism as the theoretical framework. The picture that emerges is complex. To define oneself as a BDSM practitioner might mean different things for different people where the extent of the practice, what it consists of and how integrated it is in the lives of people might vary from person to person. But despite differences there are also recurring, common patterns in the stories of the informants. All of them describe the practice in positive terms. To a great extent the practice has to do with sexuality where an explicit power exchange, an assuming of dominant and submissive roles and an everyday life filled with rituals, rules and agreements are described as being key elements. Punishment, in the form of physical pain or humiliation, is common when the rules are not obeyed. All the interviewees use safe words to make sure both are comfortable about what's happening. Some sorts of tools are utilized by all. The most common are whips, bonds, chains and locks, paddles, clamps/clothespins, knives, butt plugs and ropes. There is a concern among the informants to find and to form strategies to cope and to adapt the BDSM role to other roles and here the parental role is the most apparent. Also an ambition to create a balance between the personal norms and the norms of the BDSM culture and those of the overall society can be seen. The interviewees express a search for answers to why one practices BDSM. In this process they return to experiences, almost exclusively of a destructive nature, and they wonder if these experiences have affected their sexuality and their preference for BDSM. Even though the attitude in society actually has become more accepting, for example with the help of media, recent research and the fact that BDSM no longer is considered a disorder in Sweden.

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  • 18.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Spiritual experiences and altered states of consciousness: Parallels between BDSM and Christianity2021In: Sexualities, ISSN 1363-4607, E-ISSN 1461-7382, Vol. 24, no 5-6, p. 749-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a five-year qualitative ethnographic study of bondage and discipline/dominance and submission/sadism and masochism (BDSM) in Sweden. In-depth interviews were completed with 29 self-defined BDSM practitioners. In the article, I investigate spirituality in two different contexts, namely within BDSM practice and in the charismatic Christianity. With a focus on power dynamics, pain rituals, and altered states of consciousness, I discuss the questions: What meaning is given to the concept of spirituality in a BDSM context, and how does this spirituality resemble spirituality in Christianity? Which common denominators between BDSM practice and Christian belief can be found, and how should we interpret the parallels that the informants emphasize between practicing BDSM and having a Christian affiliation? The article aims to broaden our understanding for spirituality in different contexts, and thus contribute to both the research field of BDSM as well as to religion studies. And as such, I hope this study can bring some clarity to the different spiritual experiences individuals may encounter, whether it happens in a BDSM context or in a religious context.

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  • 19.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Tensions, Power, and Commitment:: LGBTQ and Swedish Free Churches2022In: Lambda Nordica, ISSN 1100-2573, E-ISSN 2001-7286, Vol. 27, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiences of being LGBTQ1 within Swedish free-church environments have not been highlighted to any great extent. In the autumn of 2020, I participated, as an observing researcher, in a study group consisting of LGBTQ persons and LGBTQ allies focusing on LGBTQ in the Christian free-church environment. The discussions took their point of departure in the question how we ensure that congregations are a welcoming and safe place for LGBTQ people. This article is based on the conversations that took place during these meetings. In the articleI will examine how power relations and tensions were described and investigate how LGBTQ persons and their allies handle and challenge them. The results of the investigation show that free-church contexts are permeated with hegemonic heteronormativity, the structural power of which operates both visibly and covertly. The participants talk about unlivable compromises, emanating from membership always being conditional and subject to certain terms for LGBTQ persons. The participants narrated their experiences, ranging from subtle com- ments or silences to ostracism and exclusion. All participants testified to the existence of various forms of conversion efforts in contemporary free church environments and recounted examples of how they had been pressured in prayer and pastoral care and conversations in which they had been silenced or told that it is possible to change one’s sexual orientation or identity.

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  • 20.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    "Vi bad att det skulle hända en naturkatastrof så att pride inte skulle bli av": pridefestivaler och frikyrklig kristendom2023In: Religion och samhällsförändring: Aktuella perspektiv i religionsvetenskaplig forskning / [ed] Dennis Augustsson; Charlotta Carlström; Emma Hall; Bodil Liljefors Persson, Stockholm: Liber, 2023, p. 72-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Living Outside Protocol: Polyamorous Orientations, Bodies, and Queer Temporalities2019In: Sexuality & Culture, ISSN 1095-5143, E-ISSN 1936-4822, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 1315-1331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates experiences of polyamory in a society where monogamy is the norm. Polyamory is when more than two people are involved in an intimate and/or sexual relationship. The relationships are known to those involved, and everyone has the opportunity to have multiple relationships at the same time. In-depth interviews were completed with 22 persons in Sweden who identify as polyamorous. Drawing on Ahmed’s phenomenological concepts of turning points and lines and Halberstam’s concept of queer time and temporality, the following questions are explored: What turning points can be seen in the informants’ stories? And what consequences are the informants exposed to when heteronormative expectations are not followed? In the theoretical language of Ahmed, living a life within monogamous boundaries would be considered as being “in line”. Going beyond these monogamous heteronormative lines can result in more relational choices by which one has to find out what kind of relationship works best instead of following a ready-made template. The majority of the informants feel forced to conceal their relationship constellations in several situations and contexts. Living a queer life is seen by others in society as not only incomprehensible but also immature and inexperienced. Interactions with healthcare professionals seldom offer any relief from this; instead, the informants’ stories of these encounters can be interpreted as instances of being stopped and blocked, resulting in stress and shame.

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  • 22.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    The queer spaces of BDSM and non-monogamy2019In: Journal of Positive Sexuality., Vol. 5, no 1, p. 14-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on interviews and ethnographic fieldwork within BDSM communities in Sweden, this article focuses on links between non-monogamy and BDSM. Drawing on Halberstam´s concept of queer space, the following questions are investigated: What are the connections between BDSM and non-monogamous communities? How does interaction between BDSM and non-monogamous practices create non-normative logic? The transgression of one norm makes it easier to transgress other norms as well, providing opportunities to find new ways of organizing relationships beyond the norms of monogamy. In order for an individual to be able to fully explore kinks in BDSM practices and at the same time respect the boundaries of a partner, nonmonogamy emerges as one logical answer.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 23.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Lindroth, Malin
    Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    LGBTQ plus Affirmative State Care for Young People in Sweden: New Knowledge and Old Traditions2023In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 3744-3760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young LGBTQ+ people are over-represented in various forms of state care. They experience hardships during their placements and staff competence in addressing specific needs among LGBTQ+ youth is lacking. In this article, we investigate whether and how LGTBQ+ issues are considered and described in digital marketing for state care providers. The material consists of the homepages of residential care homes and secure state care institutions, which we analyse using critical discourse analysis. The results show that LGBTQ+ issues are largely invisible. Of the approximately 1,000 existing state care providers, only twenty stated that they worked with or had competence in LGBTQ+ issues. Among these, no secure state care institution offered LGBTQ+ competence at the time of the study. The descriptions of how care providers work with LGBTQ+ issues are characterised by heteronormativity where there is a mix of two types of language on the homepages regarding LGBTQ+ youth; on the one hand, a heteronormative, traditional description based on a binary understanding of gender; and, on the other, an LGBTQ+ inclusive language is used. However, the LGBTQ+ affirmative language has been imposed upon the traditional rather than being integrated into it, which comes across as superficial and unclear. International studies show that LGBTQ+ youth are over-represented in various forms of state care. Using critical discourse analysis, we investigated how LGBTQ+ youth, as a target group, are described and how LGBTQ+ competence is presented on the home pages of residential care homes and secure state care institutions for young people in Sweden. The results show that LGBTQ is largely invisible. Of the approximately 1,000 existing residential care homes, only 20 stated that they worked with or had competence in LGBTQ+ issues. No secure state care institution offered LGBTQ+ competence at the time of the study.

  • 24.
    Lindqvist, Siri
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Girlfags and Guydykes: “Too Queer for Straights and too Straight for Queers"2020In: Journal of Positive Sexuality, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 45-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article is to highlight the experiences of those who call themselves “girlfags” and “guydykes” and to interpret the identity labels associated with these terms. Online, the communities that refer to themselves by these terms all define the labels and what they signify in terms of identity differently. These include descriptions of people who consider themselves gay but “in the wrong body”, for example, when a woman is sexually oriented toward gay men or when a man is sexually oriented toward lesbian women, most often with a gender or queer element to the definitions. Little to no previous research can be found on these identities, and what is known is mainly found on internet blogs and forums. The participants were sought through a Facebook forum, resulting in a total of 11 interviews with two guydykes and nine girlfags. The results were analyzed within the framework of social constructionism and applied with Butler’s (1990) concept of the heterosexual matrix and van Anders’ (2015) Sexual Configurations Theory (SCT), involving concepts of gender/sex sexuality, nurturance, and eroticism. The results show that those who identify as girlfags and guydykes are proud of their identity, but the complexity of the identity nevertheless affects many aspects of their lives. The respondents reveal how the labels involve one’s sense of self and gender identity. In addition, they touch upon transgender issues, sexual identity, sexual orientation, and other relational aspects. These identities break gender norms, sexual practices, and even sexual orientations within the LGBT context. The results indicate the need for further research on transgender issues; in particular, the relational and social aspects of the girlfag and guydyke identities. 

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  • 25.
    Dorthé, Lotti (Curator)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Olsson, Annsofie (Curator)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Johnsdotter, Sara (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Larsson, Camilla (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Löfgren-Mårtenson, Charlotta (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Ouis, Pernilla (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Holmström, Charlotta (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Petersson, Charlotte C (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Carlström, Charlotta (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Brandström, Maria (Designer)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Tosting, Åsa (Designer)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Svensson, Anneli (Designer)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Landin, Kajsa (Filmmaker)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Egevad, Per (Lightning designer)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Wogensen, Lotta (Project director)
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    Forskarnas galleri #2: 6 om sex2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core of the exhibition is a presentation of six researchers, linked to the Center for Sexology and Sexual Studies, presenting their respective fields of research. The exhibition also consists of a timeline with stops in Swedish sexuality history, a curiosity cabinet and a collection of literature. The visitors can leave comments or ask questions to the researchers in a mailbox. The questions and the answers are then projected on the wall for everyone to see. Two public talks are held and filmed; “Sex and Power” and “Theme Erotic Literature”. The art project "Kiss" (an interpretation of the song of Songs) by the priest and artist Kent Wisti and the author Maria Küchen can also be seen in the exhibition.

1 - 25 of 25
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