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  • 1.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    A sense of presence: empathic ethnographic encounter and participatory 360-video with Syrians in Jordan2022Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past 5 years, immersive media technologies continue to provide new and challenging opportunities for participatory approaches in social sciences. In particular the use of small 360-video cameras for visual ethnographic work provides new innovative research methods for migration research and participatory action research (PAR). This paper describes and analyses the preliminary results of a 6-year research programme entitled 'Refugee Migration and Cities: Social Institutions, Political Governance and Integration in Jordan, Turkey and Sweden', led by Gothenburg University in collaboration with Malmö University, Sweden and Bogazici University in Turkey. How does immersive 360-video enhance the ability to understand the Other? This paper aims to give insight into ongoing longterm research on attitudes towards refugees of war, in which participatory 360-video is used as a methodology for ethnographic enquiry with Syrians in Sweden, Turkey and Jordan. The programme implemented a methodology based on the use of immersive 360-video technology for a visual multi-sited ethnographic study on refugee lifeworlds, encounters and conviviality, conducted in three different geographical locations with Syrian refugees. The study makes use of 360-video cameras to capture and document everyday life from the point of view of Syrian refugees in respectively Gothenburg, Sweden, Adana, Turkey and Irbid, Jordan. Providing preliminary conclusions, the author will reflect on building rapport with refugees in the field and various levels of agency and authorship of the research participants.

  • 2.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    A sense of Presence; visual ethnography using immersive 360-video with Syrian refugees2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Cosmopolitanism, Activism and Arab Documentary Film2020In: Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication, ISSN 1873-9857, E-ISSN 1873-9865, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 210-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1970s, Arab documentary filmmakers have highlighted struggles for personal freedom, dignity and democracy by those restricted by oppressive systems of colonialism, occupation and authoritarianism. In this article I study four contemporary Arab documentary films to identify a path vital for the rethinking of cosmopolitanism and global citizenship in Middle East studies. After the 2011 global interest in the Arab uprisings, Syrian and Palestinian documentaries rose to acclaim at international film festivals, and won Emmys and Oscar nominations. The often character-led stories of these films defy orientalist views of the Middle East. Creative global communities at international film festivals are emerging, where Arab documentary filmmakers and their non-elitist stories connect on various humanistic, sociocultural and political levels with non-Arab peers. In this article my aim is to contribute to a redefinition of cosmopolitanism, one not based on the rationalism of the Enlightenment but on the universality of human emotion and sentiment.

  • 4.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Documenting Syria: Filmmaking, video activism and revolution2019Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Syria is now one of the most important countries in the world for the documentary film industry. Since the 1970s, Syrian cinema masters played a defining role in avant-garde filmmaking and political dissent against authoritarianism. After the outbreak of violence in 2011, an estimated 500,000 video clips were uploaded making it one of the first YouTubed revolutions in history.This book is the first history of documentary filmmaking in Syria. Based on extensive media ethnography and in-depth interviews with Syrian filmmakers in exile, the book offers an archival analysis of the documentary work by masters of Syrian cinema, such as Nabil Maleh, Ossama Mohammed, Mohammed Malas, Hala Al Abdallah, Hanna Ward, Ali Atassi and Omar Amiralay. Joshka Wessels traces how the works of these filmmakers became iconic for a new generation of filmmakers at the beginning of the 21st century and maps the radical change in the documentary landscape after the revolution of 2011. Special attention is paid to the late Syrian filmmaker and pro-democracy activist, Bassel Shehadeh, and the video-resistance from Aleppo and Raqqa against the regime of President Bashar al-Assad and the Islamic State. An essential resource for scholars of Syrian Studies, this book will also be highly relevant to the fields of media & conflict research, anthropology and political science

  • 5.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö university.
    Families in Flux: a longitudinal study of life histories, communitas and dispersal based on multi-sited and digital ethnography with Syrians conducted over two decades2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper traces migration histories of an extended patronymic Syrian family group and explores how these experiences over time define and structure the daily lives of Syrians and their transnational family bonds. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Syria, Turkey, Germany and the Netherlands and a unique archive of ethnographic film extending 21 years (1999-2020), The paper discusses trajectories of migration and an anthropology of events based on interviews with respondents between the ages of 17 and 48 of both genders, from three extended families from Aleppo and Raqqa province (northern Syria), with whom I have built and developed rapport since my long-term visual ethnographic fieldwork between 1999 and 2002 in their original village in northern Syria. The study demonstrates how temporality and processes of migration and displacement, transformed marriage conditions and customs between extended family members across generations and geography. This study considers how communitas is maintained and affected by the violence of war, and different trajectories of younger generations in the Netherlands and Germany and their friendships with family members of the same age and the same extended family group, still living in northern Syria. The paper analyzes how distant memories of a nostalgic place, important for a study on mobility, migration and Syrian refugees, have become a bonding force to connect the “we” from which the world is perceived, to construct the communitas.

  • 6.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö university.
    Graffiti and Mural Arts for Visions of Sustainable Futures in Sudan2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2019, the Sudanese people managed to bring down an authoritarian regime that ruled the country for over 3 decades. Their visions for change in Sudan can be seen and observed in the large body and collections of graffiti art and mural paintings throughout the public space in the city of Khartoum. Some of these murals give a clear image of how the revolutionaries see and envision the Sudan they want to build (‘Hanabniho’ = ‘we will build’). The term ‘Hanabniho’ derives from a poem written by Mahjoub Sharif and sung by legendary Nubian Sudanese singer Mohammed Wardi; ‘We will build Sudan, how we dreamt it every day, homeland of goodness, homeland of democracy’ It was sung during the 2019 Sudanese Revolution. The creative and imaginary capacities of Sudanese young revolutionaries to imagine Sudan’s future, are the basis for a research project that explores collaborative storytelling and future making through bringing together Sudanese graffiti artist collectives and environmental activists for future visioning exercises to imagine a sustainable future for Sudan. Since January 2020, the author has documented the Sudanese revolutionary graffiti and murals using ArcGIS story mapping in which locations of important mural are geolocated and presented interactively to document and explore important relations between places, spaces and stories. In February 2022, the author conducted ethnographic fieldwork with environmentalists and mural artists in Khartoum. In this paper, she will present preliminary results of the study and participatory future workshopping as a method that she applied during the fieldwork. The goal of the future workshop was to creatively explore how Sudanese graffiti artists and environmentalists can co-create sustainable future visions for Sudan. Both groups exchanged knowledge, discussed SDGs, sketched together and collaborated in telling their stories for earthly survival and human rights with the walls as canvas.

  • 7.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Graffiti and Mural Arts for Visions of Sustainable Futures in Sudan - final report2022Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Keynote Speech - Street Art and Graffiti in Sudan: An Overview of Revolutionary Murals from the Sudanese Revolution of 2019.2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Killing the dispensables: massacres perpetrated in the villages of Eastern Aleppo Province in 20132022In: British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, ISSN 1353-0194, E-ISSN 1469-3542, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 463-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2013, Aleppo province was engulfed in violence. The Syrian Arab Army (SAA) and affiliated Shi'a militias executed a campaign of massacres in the rural areas located on the eastern fringes of the province. The violence caused an exodus from this region, eventually dissipating local rural communities entirely. What can explain such extreme and brutal political violence perpetrated at a local level in the east Aleppo countryside throughout 2013? To find an answer, I analyse the personal accounts of those who witnessed the violence and YouTube videos. Taken together, these sources provide a visceral description of the massacres-in particular the summary executions in the village of Rasm al-Nafl, as a case study of extreme violence in one of the poorest rural areas of Syria. Problematizing mono-causal sectarian explanations, I argue that a deeper non-sectarian complex of rurality and a process of subaltern othering in combination with opportunism, governmental retribution, and strategic military concern for territorial control in order to secure alternative supply routes to Aleppo, ultimately led to the eradication of life and cultural genocide in these rural areas.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 10.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Messianic “Masquerades of War” in the Middle-East2012Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Messianic “Masquerades of War” and foreign interventions in the Middle East. Fox news reports that a commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard admitted that Tehran is fighting both a…

  • 11.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Multimodal data collection to document graffiti of the 2019 Sudanese Revolution2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to document and capture past and future visions of Sudan’s revolutionary youth. The 2019 Sudanese revolution ousted dictator Omar el-Bashir after decades of authoritarian rule. In the words of its own revolutionaries, this is thanks to a vibrant artistic public sphere on the streets and its connection to online digital dissidence. The Sudanese revolution caused an explosion of  vibrant urban art made by street artists who expressed their thoughts and voices through mural paintings and graffiti. In 2020 and 2022, I conducted fieldwork in Khartoum with the Sudanese revolutionary artists. My study focuses on the role of mural art and graffiti in the Sudanese protests, through digital ethnography, extensive digital photo documentation of revolutionary graffiti street art and photo elicitation interviews with Sudanese revolutionary artists, both on zoom and irl, in combination with organizing a collaborative visioning workshop. My geolocated photographic data are combined with regular and VR360 video data, embedded in a georeferenced ARcGIS storymap that enables everyone to digitally conduct an immersive tour through Khartoum city and virtually visit the sites of important political graffiti. My challenge is how to analyse and interpret the multimodal data to capture the visual cultures surrounding the Sudanese revolution.

  • 12.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Lund University.
    Only a comprehensive arms trade embargo and an IMMEDIATE massive UN observer force in Syria can save the unarmed majority of Syrians now!2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Our dream is simple Peace, safe and freedom: Regime-critical activism and artistic expression by Syrians in Denmark and Sweden2020In: Journal of Arab & Muslim Media Research, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 7-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article seeks to understand mediatized dynamics of regime-critical activism and cultural performances by Syrians in Europe. The focus of this research is on the Öresund-region between Denmark and Sweden. Sweden was the first country in Europe to give immediate permanent residence to Syrian refugees. It initially received most of the Syrian refugees in 2015. After the arrival of large groups of Syrians at Malmö station in that year, a growing network of volunteers responded to the influx of refugees. Syrians started to build relationships with local activists and have since joined in organizing publicly mediated events, creating a new landscape for creative industries and performance arts in the region. Applying a protest communication ecology approach, I use a wide definition of media which includes the aesthetics of street demonstrations, performance arts and music, mediated and communicated through digital online platforms. I apply an adjusted concept of communitas, including digital media and online communication as analytical concept to observe and describe not only how communitas is re-formed between Syrian refugees after arrival but also how it emerges between Syrians and local hosts.

  • 14.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Participatory visual and immersive methods: show and tell2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Research on Climate Change in Sudan at Malmö University2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Resilience in Urban Sudan: participatory story-mapping and immersive visual technology to study community responses to climate change in Khartoum2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking the material turn as a theoretical framework following a socio-ecological approach, offers scholars in African studies the opportunity to focus on the understanding, production and circulation of grassroot environmental and ecological knowledge. This article focuses on the use of story-maps as sources for a study of climate change resilience in urban Sudan. Urban areas worldwide are increasingly affected and impacted by climatic events such as flooding, erratic weather events, storms, droughts and sandstorms. In particular African cities find themselves at the frontlines of climate change, which requires the development of greater resilience. Greater Khartoum, is one of those African cities that has faced major climatic changes over the past decades. In order to face environmental threats, there is a scholarly need to better understand the proactive or reactive acts of resilience that urban communities develop at grassroots level. To study this, our research team has applied a variety of innovative methods focused on a selected area in Greater Khartoum, in this particular case Tuti Island. 

    Our team consists of researchers based in Sweden and Sudan, working on interdisciplinary knowledge co-production in an international study entitled “An Interdisciplinary Spatial and Temporal Study of Social Cohesion and Resilience to tackle the consequences of Climate and Environmental Change in Urban Khartoum.”a collaboration between Malmö University and Lund University in Sweden and the University of Khartoum in Sudan.[1] In this paper, we will reflect on the methods implemented within the study; such as story-mapping, oral history and the use of georeferenced digital data and participatory photography on ongoing floods in Tuti island during the summer of 2020. These methods produced a constellation of ArcGIS esri story-maps to study resilience to climate change, agricultural land use changes, migration and diversity and social and environmental memory. The story-maps function as sources that translate localised knowledge. Following the description of the technique of story-mapping, we will present two story-maps from the project and reflect on their analytical value, concerning the context surrounding the production of story-maps as data sources and as a form of co-production of environmental knowledge. 

  • 17.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Revolutionary Video Activism in and from Syria2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Spatialised visual stories of climate change impact in Greater Khartoum2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Spatialised visual stories of climate change impact in Greater Khartoum2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Subversive documentary cinema and people in concert prior to the Syrian Revolution2023Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    My talk focused on the development of subversive documentary cinema in Syria since the early 1970s which is part of the multidimensional foundations for the popular uprisings and artistic protests that emerged in the streets of Syria in 2011. I read from my book "Documenting Syria", published in 2019. I argue that the subversiveness of Syrian documentary cinema is directly linked to the emergence of critical exchanges between Syrian and Palestinian filmmakers who collaborated artistically and experimentally on cinema and political dialogues in Damascus (Damascus Cinema Club) and Amman (Palestinian Film Unit). This nexus continued to influence a younger generation of Syrian filmmakers throughout the first decade of the rule of Bashar al Assad of whom some became icons and martyrs of the Syrian Revolution. 

    I exemplified this cinematic development with several cinematic works by Mohammed Malas, Rami al-Farrah, and Bassel al Shehadeh and the 2021 film by Abdallah al Khatib “Little Palestine, Diary of a Siege” filmed in the biggest Palestinian refugee camp – Yarmouk, in Damascus, Syria.

  • 21.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Sustainable Sudan: documenting the past and visioning the future through graffiti and environmentalism2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Syrian Families in Flux: a longitudinal study based on multi-sited, digital and visual ethnography conducted over two decades2022Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper traces migration histories of an extended patronymic Syrian family group and explores how these experiences over time define and structure the daily lives of Syrians and their transnational family bonds. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Syria, Turkey, Germany and the Netherlands and a unique archive of ethnographic film extending 21 years (1999-2020). The paper discusses trajectories of migration and an anthropology of events based on interviews with respondents between the ages of 17 and 48 of both genders, from three extended families from Aleppo and Raqqa province (northern Syria), with whom I have built and developed rapport since my long-term visual ethnographic fieldwork between 1999 and 2002 in their original village in northern Syria. The study demonstrates how temporality and processes of migration and displacement, transformed marriage conditions and customs between extended family members across generations and geography. This study considers how communitas is maintained and affected by the violence of war, and different trajectories of younger generations in the Netherlands and Germany and their friendships with family members of the same age and the same extended family group, still living in northern Syria. The paper analyzes how distant memories of a nostalgic place, important for a study on mobility, migration and Syrian refugees, have become a bonding force to connect the “we” from which the world is perceived, to construct the communitas.

  • 23.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The webinar as a tool for diasporic political communication to counter mis/disinformation about Syria2023In: Middle Eastern Diasporas and Political Communication / [ed] Ehab Galal, Mostafa Shehata, Claus Valling Pedersen, Routledge, 2023, p. 67-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under the global pandemic, the webinar has become a popular tool of digital communication to reach global audiences. Aimed at shedding light on how misinformation affects diasporic political communication, this chapter investigates how Syrian pro-democracy activists and diasporic political entrepreneurs use the webinar to counter mis/disinformation and conspiracies about Syria. During the Covid-19 pandemic, alignment between conspiracy narratives on both the far right and the left became stronger, forming a so-called red-brownist alignment (Bevensee, 2020). These narratives include anti-vaccination arguments and mis/disinformation about Syria. In August 2020, a webinar series entitled Common Sense on Syria, by Just World Educational (JWE), provided a platform for communicating misinformation narratives about Syria, which Yassin al-Haj Saleh calls a ‘top-down anti-imperialist discourse’ (al-Haj Saleh, 2021). Syrian diaspora actors countered with another webinar series, The Syrian Revolution: A History from Below, to unpack the root causes and context of the Syrian revolution. Through the method of discourse analysis, with the webinar as unit of analysis, this chapter unpacks the discursive structures and narrative intentions of these two webinar series, which represent polar positions on the spectrum between conspiracy theories, mis/disinformation and fact-based opinions about Syria.

  • 24.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Transitional Justice for Syrians in Sweden, why many cannot return to Syria as long as Assad is in power2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation sets out the anti-regime activism by Syrians in Sweden through their national networks and cooperation with Stockholm based organisation Civil Right Defenders for transitional justice for victims of the Assad regime. New Danish legislation in 2020 made it easier to enact forced return of Syrians to the Damascus region. This decision sent shockwaves through the Syrian community in Sweden. With the rise of right-wing support, the upcoming parliamentary elections in September and a Syrian embassy that still is keeping a tab on political activities by Syrians in exile, the fear has not subsided. The paper concludes with a reflection on the moral obligation of Sweden to protect Syrians at risk, in the light of the ongoing judicial process that was started with the filing of cases of nine complainants at the Swedish War Crime unit against the Assad regime.

  • 25.
    Wessels, Josepha
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Hedberg, Helene
    Rädda Barnen.
    Oud, Qanoun and Darbukkah: the meaning of traditional Arabic musical instruments in postmigrant Sweden.2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Together with a growing population of a migrant background from Arab descent, three seminal Arabic musical instruments have entered Swedish society; the Oud, the Qanoun and the Darbukkah. These instruments were introduced in different ways, by professional Arabic music players to Swedish audiences, at local music schools and educational institutions, but also in specific musical instrument shops. This paper reflects on the symbolism of these instruments for the post-migrant condition, providing a vehicle to fuse Swedish and Arabic musical cultures and heritage. The paper describes, how these instruments. entrenched in Arabic culture, provide Arabic-speaking Swedes with a sense of home, while at the same time changing the musical landscape in Sweden. The study is based on participant observation, semi-structured interviews with Arabic musicians who play these instruments professionally within the Swedish cultural production sector, as well as auto-ethnography following the pedagogical application of these instruments, how they are introduced to, and taken up by, Swedish people without Arabic background. Understanding postmigration as a transient concept, marked by continuous transformation, the three instruments and music-making are used analytically as a lens to disentangle how negotiations of identity, belonging, culture and heritage take place within the context of increasing diversity in society (Gebauer et al, 2019, p.35). 

  • 26.
    Wessels, Josepha
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Zakieldeen, Sumaya
    University of Khartoum, Sudan.
    Sustainability and climate change resilience in urban Sudan: translating research into policy and practice2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sudan will increasingly become severely affected by climate change with alarming projections of rising temperatures up until 3.1 degrees celsius in 2060.  In addition to a hotter climate, the country is also challenged by erratic rainfall, drought and extreme flooding events, dust storms, thunderstorms, and heatwaves. 

    This paper assesses and analyses the results of a study on climate change resilience in urban Sudan, supported by the Swedish Research Council, implemented by Malmö University in collaboration with the Institute of Environmental Studies (IES) at Khartoum University and the Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS). In order to integrate local knowledge into national and international policy strategies and governmental practices, the study is focused on learning from the grassroots in two different urban localities in Khartoum that differ in size, population diversity and are affected by climate change threats, specifically erratic flood events.  

    An interdisciplinary Swedish-Sudanese research team studied various aspects of two selected neighbourhoods in Khartoum using a mix of research methods. Between 2020 and 2022, the researchers have conducted over 30 semi-structured interviews in person, on zoom and via digital means in over two different selected study sites, it also implemented a participatory approach to photography and ESRI story mapping and organised community level workshops on local knowledge and its important role for policy development on climate change and flood mitigation. 

    Focusing on the extreme floods of 2020, gave the researchers an excellent data range to closely observe a climate change event. A series of community workshops gave wider insight into local knowledge. A delegation of the research team also participated in COP26 to engage with international policy makers. The results indicate that an elaborate knowledge system present at grassroots level is present and provides excellent opportunities to develop and implement good governance and policy on climate change action and development plans. The study organised two seminars to engage with a wider stakeholder group, including policymakers and politicians.

    The researchers conclude that the generated data, in particularly composed and compiled through storymaps, video and 360 degree video content has good potential to be translated into policy documents at both national level at the Sudanese Higher Council for Environment and Natural Resources as well as international level at COP 26 and through the IPCC delegations in which the Sudanese counterparts in this study participated. The final step is to translate this policy making into practice and good governance.

  • 27.
    Wessels, Joshka
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Syria goes deeper into the abyss and the world watches2012Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is Syria today. Yesterday, I chat with a very good friend in wartorn Aleppo who finds Jihadi Tawhid fighters in the street below his house and I get very worried about his safety. He is Christ…

  • 28.
    Wessels, Joshka
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Syria’s moving images: Moral outrage and the role of grassroots videos in conflict escalation2019In: Resolving International Conflict: Dynamics of Escalation, Continuation and Transformation / [ed] Isabel Bramsen, Poul Poder, Ole Waever, Routledge, 2019, p. 87-101Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main focus of this chapter is how the grassroots videos from Syria influenced emotional dynamics of conflict escalation. Rapid technological developments offer an opportunity for innovative research addressing the role of digital media in peace and conflict in a variety of ways. The speed and transparency of user-generated videos gave rise to a certain kind of democratization of the Syrian media landscape since the Syrian uprisings, which started in the early months of 2011. The videos provide documentation of human rights violations and, at the same time, through their graphic nature and the rapid virality, the videos enhanced rapid escalation over a vast geographical distance. The often extremely graphic nature of the videos provides a glimpse into what living in a warzone means to the Syrians who are recording the videos at the grassroots level. Furthermore, the grassroots videos from Syria have had a generic impact on the development of conflicts as a particularly engaging form of conflict communication. This chapter analyses how watching these graphic videos have a strong potential to provoke the emotion of moral outrage, which can escalate other events and actions in the country.

  • 29.
    Yu, David J.
    et al.
    Lyles School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA;b Department of Political Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA.
    Haeffner, Melissa
    Department of Environmental Science and Management, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, USA.
    Jeong, Hanseok
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
    Pande, Saket
    Department of Water Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    Dame, Juliane
    South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Geography, Bonn University, Bonn, Germany.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Garcia-Santos, Glenda
    Department of Geography, University of Klagenfurt, Klagenfurt, Austria.
    Hermans, Leon
    Department of Land and Water Management, IHE Delft, Delft, Netherlands; Department of Multi-Actor Systems, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    Muneepeerakul, Rachata
    Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
    Nardi, Fernando
    Water Resources Research and Documentation Centre (WARREDOC), University for Foreigners of Perugia, Perugia, Italy; Institute of Environment and College of Arts, Sciences & Education (CASE), Florida International University (FIU), Miami, Florida, USA.
    Sanderson, Matthew R.
    Department of Sociology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, USA; Department of Geography and Geospatial Sciences, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, USA.
    Tian, Fuqiang
    Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Wei, Yongping
    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia.
    Wessels, Josepha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Sivapalan, Murugesu
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA; Department of Geography and Geographic Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA.
    On capturing human agency and methodological interdisciplinarity in socio-hydrology research2022In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435, Vol. 67, no 13, p. 1905-1916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-hydrology has expanded and been effective in exposing the hydrological community to ideas and approaches from other scientific disciplines, and social sciences in particular. Yet it still has much to explore regarding how to capture human agency and how to combine different methods and disciplinary views from both the hydrological and the social sciences to develop knowledge. A useful starting ground is noting that the complexity of human–water relations is due to interactions not only across spatial and temporal scales but also across different organizational levels of social systems. This calls for consideration of another analytical scale, the human organizational scale, and interdisciplinarity in study methods. Based on the papers published in this journal’s Special Issue Advancing Socio-hydrology over 2019–2022, this paper illuminates how the understanding of coupled human–water systems can be strengthened by capturing the multi-level nature of human decision making and by applying an interdisciplinary multi-method approach.

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  • 30.
    Wessels, Josepha (Cinematographer, Creator)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    A Visit to Sällbo: JPI Urban Europe Housing and Integration study visit - 8 June 20222022Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 31.
    Wessels, Josepha (Cinematographer, Creator)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Research Film Resilience in Urban Sudan 20222022Artistic output (Unrefereed)
1 - 31 of 31
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