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  • 1.
    Hemmaty, Mona
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Hansen, Christina
    School of Business, Economics and IT, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Khoury, Nadeen
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    “We Never Say We Are Integrating People!” Interpretative Repertoires of Integration Among Local Stakeholders in Sweden2024In: Journal of International Migration and Integration, ISSN 1488-3473, E-ISSN 1874-6365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how local stakeholders in Scania, the southernmost county of Sweden, talk about integration. Drawing on 28 qualitative interviews, we use the theoretical concept of interpretative repertoires to analyze perceptions and conceptualizations among those who work closely with migrant integration. We identify two interpretative repertoires that stakeholders draw upon to make sense of the concept on the ground: the separation and de-migranticization repertoires. The repertoires display a shared understanding among the stakeholders of integration as a failure, although they do not agree on the extent or cause of the perceived failures of integration, or even how the problems should be defined or tackled locally. Within the separation repertoire, integration is failing in terms of processes where primarily migrants are seen as accountable and responsible for their (in)ability to adapt to the Swedish society. Within the de-migranticization repertoire, integration is differently perceived as something that is plagued with misdirected or even false boundaries between groups (in this case “migrants” and “non-migrants”), and authorities are held accountable for problems beyond migrants and migration, such as inequality, racism, and discrimination. The findings reflect the contested field of integration on the ground and contribute to ongoing critical debates on the concept of integration within migration research, by providing snapshots from a bottom-up perspective of local stakeholders’ acceptance of, or resistance to, present-day integration discourses. 

  • 2.
    Hermansson, Linus
    et al.
    Church of Sweden.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Gruber, Sabine
    Linköping University.
    Jolly, Andrew
    University of Wolverhampton.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Righard, Erica
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Scott, Hanna
    Linköping University.
    Firewalls: A necessary tool to enable social rights for undocumented migrants in social work2022In: International Social Work, ISSN 0020-8728, E-ISSN 1461-7234, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 678-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firewalls are clear divisions between border policing and the provision of basic social rights. They have a dual character: to ensure that no information collected with the purpose of safeguarding basic social rights should be shared for immigration control purposes; and that migrants should not be subject to immigration control when being present at, or in the vicinity, of religious, private and public institutions upholding and providing social rights. This article suggests a normative argument for ‘firewalls’ in the context of social work and develops the concept theoretically as a principle practised and negotiated at different scales.

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  • 3.
    Jolly, Andy
    et al.
    Institute for Community Research and Development, University of Wolverhampton, UK.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Firewalls as a resource for resistance: separating border policing from social service provision in Sweden and the UK2021In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 183-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firewalls separate rights provision for undocumented migrants from the border policing of migration authorities. In this article, we compare how firewalls have been negotiated during recent years in Sweden and the UK. Firewalls have been partly strengthened in the UK as a result of the ‘Windrush scandal’. Simultaneously, firewalls have been increasingly contested in Sweden after the 2015 ‘long summer of migration’ as a result of continuously more repressive migration policies. On the basis of this detailed comparison, we argue that firewalls are a useful conceptual lens to understand migrant struggles and the development of migration policies. Moreover, we suggest that firewalls can be a useful resource for social service providers using their discretion to resist repressive migration governing at different levels and scales and for organizing political work by and for people at risk of deportation. 

  • 4.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Book review of Herz, Marcus and Lalander, Philip 2021. Social Work, Young Migrants and the Act of Listening: Becoming an Unaccompanied Child. London: Routledge. 177 pp2023In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 13, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 5.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Comparing the Everyday Lives of Undocumented Migrants in Birmingham and Malmö2023In: Migration, Displacement and Diversity: The IRiS anthology / [ed] L. Lessard-Phillips, A. Papoutsi, N. Sigona, & P. Ziss, Oxford: Oxford Publishing Services , 2023, p. 138-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Governing vulnerabilised migrant childhoods through children’s rights2019In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 337-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses four different contexts in Sweden where children’s rights have been mobilised to govern vulnerabilised migrant childhoods. The concept of ‘vulnerabilisation’ is suggested to capture the political processes creating the conditions for defining and attributing vulnerability. To enable children’s rights to be a productive tool for challenging the repressive governing of migrant families and children, the article argues for the need of a problematisation and contextualisation of both the children’s rights paradigm and the vulnerabilisation of migrant childhoods.

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  • 7.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Sacrificing parents on the altar of children's rights: Intergenerational struggles and rights in deportability2019In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 32, article id 100529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    State actors arguing for the rights of undocumented children often attempt to strengthen children's deservingness by portraying their parents as bad parents who put their children at risk. Through ethnographic observations in Malmö, Sweden and Birmingham, UK, this article shows how such demonization of the parents by the state is not reflected in the everyday life experiences of undocumented families themselves. While the state views the parents as putting their children at risk by ‘hiding’ them, the parents view the state as putting their children at risk by trying to deport them. The article discusses how parents act as ‘humanitarian agents’ responsible for caring for the children when state support to the deserving, rights-bearing child is limited by the notion of the deportable migrant child. These parental practices of unrecognized emotional labour are analysed as mother- work. The interdependent character of family life in deportability is highlighted through how children take on parental responsibilities as well and how stress and knowledge about their irregular situation is shared across generations. To conclude, the article argues that if one neglects the intergenerational context of undocumented children's rights, one risks marginalising the human rights of both children as well as adults.

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  • 8.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    The Continuous Spatial Vulnerability of Undocumented Migrants: connecting Experiences of “Displaceability” at Different Scales and Sites2020In: ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies, E-ISSN 1492-9732, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 385-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Undocumented migrants often experience how their spatial vulnerability continues across their life trajectories through different forms of displacements in the form of forced migration, being at risk of deportation and being victims of gentrification or policies that make it difficult to find a stable housing situation. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in Sweden and the UK, the paper shows how weak the position of undocumented migrants is on the housing market through recently established policies in the UK which criminalizes the letting of housing to undocumented migrants and the practice of sharing address information between the social services and the border police in Sweden. This intervention argues that these policies that construct spatial vulnerabilities locally are connected to national and transnational policies of displacement globally and suggest that “displaceability”, the potential of being displaced, is a strategy for governing vulnerable groups at every scale where governing takes place. Consequently, this intervention suggests that displaceability can help us capture the universal, interconnected experience of spatial vulnerability shared by many differently positioned groups in the world who are susceptible to forced mobility or removal.

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  • 9.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    The duality of children’s political agency in deportability2017In: Politics, ISSN 1945-3191, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 288-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on in-depth ethnographic observations among irregularised migrant families in Birmingham, UK, this article discusses how children’s political agency manifests in everyday life. It shows how children who become aware of their legal status as ‘deportable’ reject this subject position and offer their own definitions of who they are and where they belong. Simultaneously, it is argued that children with varying degrees of knowledge about their legal status also express political agency through their struggle to sustain the inclusion they experience. Such expressions highlight the duality of children’s political agency in irregular situations.

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  • 10.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    The Method of Ethics-as-Process: Embracing Ambivalence in Research on Childhood and Deportability2017In: Migraciones, ISSN 2341-0833, Vol. 42, p. 93-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though ethics should not be instrumentalised, discussing ethical issues with participants and gatekeepers can nevertheless lead to new knowledge. Through examples from eth- nographic research among children and families fearing deporta- tion in Birmingham, UK and Malmö, Sweden, this article reflects upon how an ethics-as-process approach can become part of the knowledge production itself in sensitive and politicised research contexts. This is a result of the ambivalent nature of ethnographic research with vulnerable groups and the article therefore encourag- es researchers to embrace the ambivalences of co-constructing the field, working with gatekeepers and establishing trust and consent to enable a more transparent and reflexive knowledge production. In conclusion, it is suggested that the increased politicisation of the issue of child and family migration will make necessary that researchers, who wish to embrace this ambivalence, align with the self-expressed struggle of participants to enable high-quality partici- patory research among these groups.

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  • 11.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    The politics of undocumented migrant childhoods: Agency, rights, vulnerability2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, I investigate the paradoxical characteristics of political struggles that take place in relation to undocumented migrant childhoods. Drawing on ethnographic research in Birmingham, UK and Malmö, Sweden between 2014 and 2017, I take as my starting point the everyday life experiences of children and families who have experienced living under an immanent risk of deportation. Through a critical engagement with issues of agency, rights and vulnerability, I contrast the experiences of the children and their families with the development of policies and political debates in both countries. By analysing the contexts of Birmingham, UK and Malmö, Sweden in parallel as sites of irregular migration, I contribute with a clearer understanding of the specific characteristics of how each context constructs and governs irregular migration and how this is experienced by migrants themselves.

    In this thesis, I argue that a discussion about the political agency of children positioned as undocumented migrants is crucial for an informed and contextualised understanding of the political conflicts that characterise the issue of undocumented migrant childhoods. Through an analysis of the children and families’ everyday struggles, I highlight the role played by children’s rights as being perhaps the most important resource for enabling limited forms of support for these families from the host societies. However, I also show how the arguments and practices surrounding rights can be mobilised for migration control. In this sense,rights are “dangerous”.

    I suggest that if the intergenerational context of undocumented children’s rights is neglected, there is a risk that the human rights of children as well as adults will be marginalised. State actors arguing for the rights of undocumented migrant children often attempt to strengthen children’s deservingness by portraying their parents as “bad parents”who put their children at risk of increased vulnerability. While the state views the parents as putting their children at risk by “hiding” them, the parents view the state as putting their children at risk by trying to deport them. Parents are then forced to act as “humanitarian agents” responsible for caring for the children when state support to the rights-bearing migrant child is limited by the notion of the migrant child at risk of deportation.

    This “child migrant paradox” is an overall entrance point from which many of the political issues discussed in the thesis can be traced. The politics of rights in the context of undocumented migration is closely related to processes of vulnerability. Rights are mostly perceived as a matter of implementation while vulnerabilities, which rights are supposed to ameliorate, are mainly understood as descriptively self-evident. In this thesis, I problematise such commonplace understandings of rights and vulnerabilities and theorises them as fundamentally political concepts that need to be understood as enacted and reproduced through different political processes at different scales.

    I introduce the concept of “vulnerabilisation” to capture how states first create vulnerability through hostile policies towards undocumented migrants, then label the targeted groups as vulnerable and finally utilise this vulnerability to rationalise the governing of undocumented migrant children and families’ mobility and territorial presence. To enable children’s rights to be a productive tool for challenging the repressive governing of migrant families and children, I argue in this thesis that both the children’s rights paradigm and the vulnerabilisation of migrant childhoods need to be problematised and contextualised. Rights struggles by and on behalf of undocumented migrant children and families thus need to be aware of the fundamentally political character of rights and vulnerability.

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  • 12.
    Lind, Jacob
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Djampour, Pouran
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Sager, Maja
    Söderman, Emma
    Nordling, Vanna
    Mulinari, Diana
    Neergard, Anders
    Pull, Emil
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Keshavarz, Mahmoud
    Montesino, Norma
    Lundberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Ascher, Henry
    Cuadra, Carin
    Farahani, Fataneh
    Wikström, Hanna
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Selberg, Niklas
    Holgersson, Helena
    Knezevic, Zlatana
    Persdotter, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Moksnes, Heidi
    Wahlström Smith, Åsa
    Öberg, Klara
    Herbert, Mikaela
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Selberg, Rebecca
    Sigvardsdotter, Erika
    Grander, Martin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Claesson, Ragnhild
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Stretmo, Live
    Hansen, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Jerve Ramsøy, Ingrid
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Spång, Mikael
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Staaf, Annika
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Tsoni, Ioanna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Mc Glinn, Malin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Elsrud, Torun
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Molina, Irene
    Aracena, Paula
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Herz, Marcus
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Lalander, Philip
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Mulinari, Paula
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Kalm, Sara
    Jakt på papperslösa gör oss till en polisstat2016In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 2016-10-04Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Regeringen föreslår nio åtgärder för att hitta och utvisa papperslösa. Det kommer att slå hårt och främst gå ut över redan svaga och jagade människor. Vi uppmanar därför regeringen att ta tillbaka åtgärderna, skriver 43 forskare.

  • 13.
    Lind, Jacob
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Hansen, Christina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Khoury, Nadeen
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    The Impact of Temporary Residence Permits on Young Refugees’ Abilities to Build a Life in Sweden2023In: Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on interviews with young refugees, 20–30 years old, mainly from Syria and Afghanistan, we discuss the effects that temporary residence permits have on their ability to build a life in Sweden. The article includes both unaccompanied and accompanied youth that at some point had been given temporary residence permits. These permits could later be renewed or turned into permanent permits if the youth fulfilled certain tough requirements. Through rich empirical data, we show how these temporal techniques of border control keep young refugees in a state where they fear deportation, which have detrimental effects for their ability to build a life in Sweden. They are not able to plan ahead and they feel forced to work although they would have preferred to study, which puts them out of sync with other young people around them, challenges their sense of agency and increases their vulnerability. Temporary residence permits severely limit the life opportunities of young refugees in Sweden, and thus hamper their ability to achieve the “migrant integration” that is expected of them.

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  • 14.
    Lind, Jacob
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Persdotter, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Differential Deportability And Contradictions Of A Territorialised Right To Education: A Perspective From Sweden2017In: movements : Journal für kritische Migrations- und Grenzregimeforschung, ISSN 2364-8732, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 51-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How is it possible to argue that one group of children should be excluded from education when it has been defined as a fundamental right of all children residing in Sweden? In this article, we explore this question through a comparative reading of two different sets of government reports: the first establishes that »children who reside in Sweden without permission« should have an unrestricted right to education, while the second proposes that so-called »children of vulnerable EU-citizens« should not. These positions appear incommensurable. We suggest, however, that they are thoroughly entan- gled. Under the current regime of migration control, deportation and deportability is what makes it possible for the Swedish government to grant rights on the basis of territorial presence without abandoning its commitment to regulate residence. Thus, the notion that »vulnerable EU-citizens« cannot easily be deported is mobilised to argue that they should be excluded from the right to education. We see this as an expression of how rights are integral to the governance of migrations to and through the European Union.

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  • 15.
    Lundberg, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Technologies of Displacement and Children’s Right to Asylum in Sweden2017In: Human Rights Review, ISSN 1524-8879, E-ISSN 1874-6306, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 189-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through an analysis of 100 asylum decisions and 10 interviews with 20 asylum officers at the Swedish Migration Agency this article reveals two intricate processes through which children’s rights are displaced in the Swedish asylum process; by overlooking children’s individual claims for asylum through a circle of neglect, and negating children’s best interests. The article demonstrates how the balancing act between migration control on one hand and children’s rights on the other hand plays out in the asylum process, which results in a double displacement; the children are not adult enough to be addressed as asylum seekers and not children enough to deserve qualification as bearer of children’s rights. An in-depth analysis of everyday practices at institutions applying children’s rights is essential both to understand the reproduction of discrepancies between rights on paper and rights in practice, and to explore the potential of rights to disrupt oppressive vehicles of power.

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  • 16.
    Lundberg, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Spång, Mikael
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    “Politiken tvingar flyktingar att riskera livet”2015In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 20151018Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Persdotter, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Lind, JacobMalmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).Righard, EricaMalmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Bordering practices in the social service sector: Experiences from Norway and Sweden2021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the 2015-peak of asylum-seeking migrants in Europe, asylum-policies have become increasingly restrictive. As bordering has become a prioritized issue among many European national governments, including in the Nordic countries, practices of bordering have also become more decentralised, diffuse and dispersed. This special issue set focus on such bordering practices as these are manifest in the social service sector. It draws on research conducted in Norway and Sweden and consists, besides this introduction, of seven original articles.Of particular focus is how social work, in its regulations and practices, are involved in the bordering of both the nation and the welfare state. Connecting insights from border studies – and related critical research – with social work research, the articles present empirical analyses of the dynamics of bordering practices among varying practitioners and in varying organizations, including legislators, courts, municipalities, street-level social workers and civil society organizations. The special issue as a whole also raises questions about the ethical and political challenges that emerge at the nexus of bordering and social service provision. In this introductory article, we provide an overview of the field of border studies and discuss how it relates to social work research. This serves as a conceptual foundation which we hope will enable critical reflections on the relationships between social service provision and bordering practices in Norway, Sweden and beyond.

  • 18.
    Persdotter, Maria
    et al.
    Post doc fellow in Welfare Law, Department of Culture and Society, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Righard, Erica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Introduction to special issue: Bordering practices in the social service sector: experiences from Norway and Sweden2021In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 95-102Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the 2015-peak of asylum-seeking migrants in Europe, asylumpolicies have become increasingly restrictive. As bordering has become a prioritized issue among many European national governments, including in the Nordic countries, practices of bordering have also become more decentralised, diffuse and dispersed. This special issue set focus on such bordering practices as these are manifest in the social service sector. It draws on research conducted in Norway and Sweden and consists, besides this introduction, of seven original articles.Of particular focus is how social work, in its regulations and practices, are involved in the bordering of both the nation and the welfare state. Connecting insights from border studies – and related critical research – with social work research, the articles present empirical analyses of the dynamics of bordering practices among varying practitioners and in varying organizations, including legislators, courts, municipalities, street-level social workers and civil society organizations. The special issue as a whole also raises questions about the ethical and political challenges that emerge at the nexus of bordering and social service provision. In this introductory article, we provide an overview of the field of border studies and discuss how it relates to social work research. This serves as a conceptual foundation which we hope will enable critical reflections on the relationships between social service

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  • 19.
    Pull, Emil
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Tsoni, Ioanna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Baeten, Guy
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Introduction to the Themed Issue "Narratives of Displacements"2020In: ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies, E-ISSN 1492-9732, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a themed issue about displacements. Or more precisely, about research grounded in narratives of people suffering displacement in its various forms, and their all too visible and yet oftentimes made-invisible demographics. ‘All too visible’ as those individuals or groups stand out either as scapegoats on which to lay blame for urban problems, or as the human fallout of ongoing processes of class struggles and racialised conflicts under neoliberal, neocolonial and neonationalist regimes of spatial encroachment. Yet, their subjectivity, agency and voice are invisibilised in public and political discourse, as well as in academic research, or they are altogether erased through the poor selection of methodologies that fail to capture the discrete statistical categories that can register displacement. Therefore, those afflicted by it become un-researchable. The papers within this themed issue collectively seek to re-center displacement, through investigations and narratives of displaced populations.

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  • 20.
    Reimers, Eva
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Wahlström Smith, Åsa
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Hammarén, Nils
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sjögren, Hanna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Childhood, Education and Society (BUS).
    Martín Bylund, Anna
    Linköpings universitet.
    Martinsson, Lena
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Bengtsson, Jenny
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholms universitet.
    Bodén, Linnea
    Stockholms universitet.
    Lundberg, Osa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Åkerblom, Annika
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Gren, Nina
    Lunds universitet.
    Bayati, Zahra
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Backelin, Louise
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Vento, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Childhood, Education and Society (BUS).
    Lind, Jacob
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Piltz, Åse
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Childhood, Education and Society (BUS).
    León Rosales, René
    Mångkulturellt centrum i Fittja.
    Hedersproblematik är varken utmärkande eller exklusivt för islam2022In: Sydsvenska dagbladet, ISSN 1652-814X, no 2022-01-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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