Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aho, Anna Carin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Renmarker, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Experiences of Playing Volt Hockey With Focus on Well-Being According to Positive Emotion, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning, Achievement: An Interview Study2022In: Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, ISSN 0736-5829, E-ISSN 1543-2777, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 160-178, article id apaq.2021-0035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volt hockey is a team sport developed for persons with physical disabilities, but its influence on well-being is unknown. Elements of well-being have been described as positive emotions, engagement, relationships, meaning, and achievement constituting a theoretical framework referred to as PERMA. The purpose of this study was to describe how well-being according to PERMA is reflected in the experiences of playing volt hockey. Data were collected through focus group and individual interviews including 21 players. A deductive analysis was conducted using the elements in PERMA as preexisting main categories with an additional main category, named resources needed. Findings showed that all five elements constituting well-being according to PERMA were reflected in the experiences of playing volt hockey. In addition, players emphasized the importance of having the resources needed to play volt hockey. In conclusion, having the opportunity to enjoy playing volt hockey enabled the players to flourish and experience feelings of subjective well-being.

  • 2.
    Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Which nursing students are more ready for interprofessional learning? A cross-sectional study2019In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 79, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has been argued that the significance of personality in relation to students' readiness for interprofessional collaboration is an area where more research is needed. Nursing students in particular seem to be unsure about their role in the interprofessional team. Objective: To explore associations between nursing students' readiness for interprofessional learning and personality traits with regard to biological sex, and previous work experience from health care. Design: A cross-sectional questionnaire study. Setting: Nursing students in year one and three enrolled in a three-year undergraduate bachelor in nursing programme. Participants: Nursing students (n = 284) in semester two and six. Methods: The participants completed the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale and the Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Openness to experience Five Factor Inventory-3. The data were statistically analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-tests, correlations and linear regressions. Results: Four of the five investigated personality traits – Extraversion, Openness to experiences, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness - were associated with nursing students' readiness for interprofessional learning. Moreover, nursing students in semester six were more ready for interprofessional learning regarding Negative professional identity and Roles and responsibilities than students in semester two. Female students were more ready for Teamwork and collaboration than male students. Conclusions: Nursing students being more outgoing, open-minded, agreeable or conscientious seem to be more ready for interprofessional learning. Consequently, personality is of significance for nursing students' readiness for interprofessional learning.

  • 3.
    Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Skane Univ Hosp, Vasc Ctr, Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Malmo, Sweden..
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Translation and validation of the Swedish version of the IPECC-SET 9 item version2022In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 900-907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interprofessional Education (IPE) is essential to prepare future health-care professionals for collaborative practice, but IPE requires evaluation. One psychometrically sound instrument is the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Competence Self-Efficacy Tool consisting of nine items (IPECC-SET 9). This tool does not, to date, exist in a Swedish version. Therefore, the aim of this study was to translate and validate the Swedish version of the IPECC-SET 9. The English version was translated into Swedish and tested among 159 students in the 3-year Bachelor Programs in Nursing and in Biomedical Laboratory Science. The psychometric analysis was guided by a Rasch model, which showed that the items functioned well together, confirming unidimensionality, and that the person misfit was also lower than the set criterion. The separation index was 2.98, and the Rasch-equivalent Cronbach-alpha measure was estimated to .92, supporting internal consistency. No systematic differences on item level in IPECC-SET 9 further supported fairness in testing. The Swedish IPECC-SET 9 demonstrates sound psychometric properties and has the potential to be used as a measure of self-efficacy for competence in interprofessional collaborative practice among health profession students. However, the IPECC-SET 9 is recommended to be further tested in larger samples representing the entirety of health-care teams.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Division of Nursing Science, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Engström, My
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Surgery Sahlgrenska, Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jangland, Eva
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Nursing Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Unit for Public Health and Statistics, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Malmström, Marlene
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Surgery and Gastroenterology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Factors related to a successful professional development for specialist nurses in surgical care: a cross-sectional study2023In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A high level of competence among staff is necessary for providing patient-safe surgical care. Knowledge regarding what factors contribute to the professional development of specialist nurses in surgical care and why they choose to remain in the workplace despite high work requirements is needed. To investigate and describe the organizational and social work environment of specialist nurses in surgical care as part of studying factors that impact on professional development.

    METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study with a strategic convenience sampling procedure that recruited 73 specialist nurses in surgical care in Sweden between October to December 2021. The study was guided by STROBE Statement and checklist of cross-sectional studies. The validated Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used, and additional demographic data. Descriptive statistics were performed and the comparison to the population benchmarks was presented as the mean with a 95% confidence interval. To study potential differences among the demographic and professional characteristics, pairwise t tests were used with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons with a significance level of 5%.

    RESULTS: Five domains were identified as factors related to success, as they received higher scores in relation to population benchmarks: quality of leadership, variation of work, meaning of work and work engagement as well as job insecurity. There was also a significant association between a having a manager with low nursing education and job insecurity (p = 0.021).

    CONCLUSIONS: Quality of leadership is important for the professional development of specialist nurses in surgical care. Strategic work seems to include managers with a higher nursing education level to prevent insecure professional working conditions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Fast-track kirurgi för den äldre populationen2013In: Omvårdnad på avancerad nivå: kärnkompetenser inom sjuksköterskans specialistområden / [ed] Anna-Karin Edberg, Anna Ehrenberg, Febe Friberg, Lars Wallin, Helle Wijk, Joakim Öhlén, Studentlitteratur AB, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Psychometric Evaluation of the Postoperative Recovery Profile2023In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2023, article id 3745570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To further evaluate the postoperative recovery profile regarding its psychometric properties.

    BACKGROUND: The postoperative recovery profile is an instrument for the self-assessment of general postoperative recovery that has received increased attention within nursing research. However, psychometric evaluation during development was sparse.

    DESIGN: Psychometric evaluation was done using classical test theory.

    METHOD: Data quality, targeting, reliability, and scaling assumptions were measured. In addition, confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate construct validity. Data collection was made during 2011-2013.

    RESULT: Data derived from this study showed acceptable quality; however, item distribution was skewed, with ceiling effects in the majority of items. Cronbach's alpha showed high internal consistency. Item-total correlations indicated unidimensionality, whereas six items demonstrated high correlations pointing at redundancy. The confirmatory factor analysis confirmed problems related to dimensionality as the five proposed dimensions were highly correlated with each other. Furthermore, items were largely uncorrelated with the designated dimensions.

    CONCLUSION: This study shows that the postoperative recovery profile needs to be further developed to serve as a robust instrument within nursing as well as medical research. Arguably, values from the instrument should not be calculated at a dimensional level for the time being because of discriminant validity issues.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    State of Recovery 6 Months After Rectal Cancer Surgery: Postoperative Symptoms and Differences With Regard to Surgical Procedure2021In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rectal cancer surgery has developed to be highly technological and precise. Nevertheless, postoperative symptoms can affect patients for a long time after surgery and might also be persistent. The purpose of this study was to describe the level of postoperative symptoms 6 months after rectal cancer surgery as well as differences in symptoms with regard to surgical procedure. Data from 117 patients recovering from rectal cancer surgery were collected 6 months after surgery using the Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP) questionnaire measuring self-reported postoperative symptoms. Results showed that the majority of patients had no or mild problems with the 19 symptoms recorded in the questionnaire. There was a significant difference between surgical procedures: patients after anterior resection experienced mild problems in gastrointestinal function (physical domain) and interest in their surroundings (social domain), whereas most patients after abdominoperineal resection and abdominoperineal resection with myocutaneous flap showed no problems. In all groups, a considerably high proportion of patients reported severe problems in sexual activity (physical domain). Findings in this study emphasize that healthcare professionals should pay attention to patients recovering from anterior resection especially regarding problems in the gastrointestinal function. Moreover, there is a need to acknowledge eventual sexual dysfunctions in all rectal cancer patients.

  • 8.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The process of recovery after colorectal cancer surgery: patients' experiences and factors of influence2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to describe and compare how patients recovering from different forms of colorectal cancer surgery experience their postopera-tive recovery, general health, and anxiety, up to six months after surgery. In addition, the aim was to describe the influence of patient- and surgery-related factors on patient-reported recovery. Data was collected through questionnaires containing instruments measuring general health, trait and state anxiety, and recovery. Recruitment was made consecutively. In total, 176 patients chose to participate and received the questionnaires before surgery, on the day of discharge, and one and six months after surgery. In addition, information concerning patient character-istics and factors related to surgery were retrieved from the patients’ medical journals. Data was also collected through in-depth interviews one and six months after surgery with ten purposefully included patients. Postoperative recovery after colorectal cancer surgery was described as a pro-gressive process. Experiences of physical powerlessness, difficulties with food intake, altered bowel function, and dependence on others, were prominent and changed from being intense in the beginning of the process to gradually disappearing as time went by. On the day of discharge, no patient was considered fully recovered or almost fully recovered. Thereafter, it could be seen that patients after colonic resec-tion improved regarding the majority of symptoms connected to recovery al-ready during the first month after surgery, while patients after abdominoper-ineal resection deteriorated somewhat. Patients after rectal resection recovered better during the first month than those after an abdominoperineal resection but not as well as patients after colonic resection. Health was shown to be generally good preoperatively. One month after surgery, patients recovering from abdominoperineal resection and rectal resection had a temporary reduc-tion in health, while patients after a colonic resection had improved. Six months after surgery, health had improved to better than preoperative values without any differences between groups of patients. Regarding anxiety, both as a trait and as a state, this was shown to be low, without any differences between groups. Once at home from hospital, the patients experienced a continued difficulty with food intake, and the physical powerlessness made them initially de-pendent on relatives or friends in order to manage everyday life. The bowel function as well as the practical management of a possible stoma caused feel-ings of insecurity and concern. During the period from one month to six months after surgery, improvements were seen in symptoms connected to re-covery for all patients and especially after abdominoperineal resection. How-ever, it was also clear that patients after a rectal resection had not recovered to the same extent as those after an abdominoperineal or colonic resection. Some factors related to patient characteristics and surgery were shown to be associated with the odds for a good recovery one and six months after sur-gery. Those factors were age, grade of ASA, EQ VAS, EQ index, BMI, dura-tion of surgery, APR procedure, presence of stoma, LoS, and postoperative treatment. In addition, the dimensional levels of recovery could to a great ex-tent predict recovery in corresponding dimensions. The result of this thesis showed a diverse pattern of recovery. Nevertheless, there were also some similarities. This illustrates the complexity of postoper-ative recovery. In order to avoid unnecessary concerns, it is important for health care professionals to provide the patients with appropriate infor-mation and support throughout the whole recovery period and to design in-dividual follow-up strategies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 9.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The Face of Workplace Violence: Experiences of Healthcare Professionals in Surgical Hospital Wards2020In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2020, article id 1854387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Though workplace violence (WPV) is a global problem for healthcare professionals, research within in-hospital care has mainly focused on WPV in emergency healthcare settings. Thus, the number of qualitative studies that explores experiences of WPV in general hospital wards with a longer length of stay is limited.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore how healthcare professionals in surgical hospital wards experience and manage WPV perpetrated by patients or visitors.

    Method: . Exposure to WPV is a problem for healthcare professionals in surgical wards and has consequences for the patients. Preventive strategies, guidelines, and action plans are urgently needed to minimise the risk of WPV and to ensure a safe work and care environment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Cornelius, Maria
    Optimal kirurgisk återhämtning (ERAS)2016In: Omvårdnad och kirurgi / [ed] Christine Kumlien, Jenny Rystedt, Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, p. 157-163Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Patient characteristics and surgery-related factors associated with patient-reported recovery at 1 and 6 months after colorectal cancer surgery2017In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 26, no 6, article id e12715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predictors for postoperative recovery after colorectal cancer surgery are usually investigated in relation to length of stay (LoS), readmission, or 30-day morbidity. This study describes patient characteristics and surgery-related factors associated with patient-reported recovery 1 and 6 months after surgery. In total, 153 consecutively included patients who were recovering from colorectal cancer surgery reported their level of recovery using the Postoperative Recovery Profile. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to calculate associations with recovery, defined as good or poor, divided into five recovery dimensions: physical symptoms, physical functions, psychological, social and activity. Better preoperative health predicted good recovery regarding three dimensions 1 month after surgery. Regarding all dimensions 1 month after surgery, poor recovery was predicted by a poor recovery on the day of discharge within corresponding dimensions. Higher age was associated with good recovery 6 months after surgery, while chemotherapy showed negative associations. Overall, a majority of factors had a negative impact on recovery, but without any obvious relation to one specific dimension or point in time. Those factors were: high Body Mass Index, comorbidity, abdominoperineal resection, loop ileostomy, colostomy and LoS. This study illustrates the complexity of postoperative recovery and a need for individualised follow-up strategies.

  • 12.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The lived experience of recovery during the first 6 months after colorectal cancer surgery2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 4498-4505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe the lived experience of recovery during the first 6 months after colorectal cancer surgery. BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosis worldwide. Early discharge places demands on healthcare professionals to prepare patients for their return home and to provide them with appropriate support throughout the recovery process. This requires knowledge of what it is like to recover from colorectal cancer surgery. DESIGN: A qualitative phenomenological design was used to describe the structure of recovery after colorectal cancer surgery. METHODS: Ten patients recovering from colorectal cancer surgery were interviewed at one month and six months after surgery. The descriptive phenomenological method by Giorgi was used throughout the study. RESULTS: Postoperative recovery was described as a progressive process. This process was accompanied by experiences of physical powerlessness, difficulties with food intake, altered bowel function and dependency on others. The experiences were most intense at the beginning of the recovery but disappeared as time went by and normality in life returned. CONCLUSION: While recovering from colorectal cancer surgery, patients experience obstacles that impede their ability to live life as normal. Six months after surgery, those experiences disappear or become adjusted to being part of normal life. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Patients should be provided with information about the expected postoperative recovery before discharge from hospital. The need for professional support appears to be most frequently needed in early recovery, but it should be considered on an individual basis.

  • 13.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    General health and state anxiety in patients recovering from colorectal cancer surgery2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 328-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe and compare general health and state anxiety before surgery and up to 6 months after surgery in patients with colorectal cancer undergoing elective rectal resection, abdominoperineal resection or colonic resection in an enhanced recovery context. BACKGROUND: Little is known about patient-reported health and anxiety after colorectal cancer surgery in an enhanced recovery context. DESIGN: A prospective cohort study. METHODS: Data were collected from October 2011-February 2013. The questionnaires - EuroQol 5-Dimensions 3-Levels and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - were answered before surgery, at discharge and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Data were analysed using inferential statistics to describe differences between groups of patients (Kruskal-Wallis test) and between assessments within groups (Friedman's anova). RESULTS: Patients (N = 105), divided into three groups based on surgical procedure, showed a high health index and a low state anxiety in all assessments without differences between the groups. Patients considered for abdominoperineal resection rated their pre-operative health as significantly higher than patients after rectal and colonic resections did. Within groups, patients recovering from abdominoperineal resection and rectal resection deteriorated significantly in health index 1 month after surgery. However, after 6 months they had improved again. After colonic resection, patients improved significantly in self-rated health and anxiety 1 month after surgery with no further discernible improvement after 6 months. CONCLUSION: The study showed that patients generally had a high level of health and a low level of anxiety throughout the study period. Only a few differences occurred between assessments within groups.

  • 14.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Patient-reported recovery after enhanced colorectal cancer surgery: a longitudinal six-month follow-up study2014In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, ISSN 0179-1958, E-ISSN 1432-1262, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 989-998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The concept of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) is a modern regime of care, and numerous studies have proved its beneficial impact on recovery after colorectal surgery. However, little is known about patients’ continuing recovery after discharge. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe patient-reported recovery after colorectal cancer surgery in the context of ERAS from the day of discharge until one month and six months after surgery. Method: Assessments were made at discharge, at one month, and at six months after surgery using the questionnaire Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP). In all, 119 patients recovering from abdominoperineal resection, rectal resection, or colonic resection completed all three assessments. Results: The global score of recovery showed that no patient experienced being fully recovered at discharge. After rectal resection, patients frequently reported being not at all recovered. One month after surgery, patients recovering from colonic resection reported significant improvements regarding 11 of 17 questionnaire items, whereas abdominoperineal resection patients reported no significant improvements regarding any item. Instead, significantly higher levels of problems were reported in the items fatigue, muscle weakness, and feeling down. Rectal resection patients reported significant improvements between one and six months after surgery regarding 7 of 19 items. However, the item gastrointestinal function distinguished, as patients reported significant deterioration towards higher levels of problems six months after surgery. Conclusion: This study elucidates the difference between groups of colorectal patients and the diverse patterns of their recovery, implying different needs in terms of prolonged support after discharge.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 15.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jangland, Eva
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Nursing Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engström, My
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Surgery Sahlgrenska, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Malmström, Marlene
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Surgery and Gastroenterology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö/Lund, Sweden.
    Drott, Jenny
    Division of Nursing Science, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Work conditions influencing professional development of specialist nurses in surgical care explored using the Job Demand-Resources theory: A qualitative study2023In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 79, no 7, p. 2610-2621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to explore the work conditions that influence the opportunities for professional development of specialist nurses in surgical care.

    DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design was used.

    METHODS: With a purposeful sampling procedure, 14 specialist nurses in surgical care were included. Four focus-group interviews were conducted during November to December 2021 and deductively analysed using the Job Demand-Resource theory as a guiding framework. Reporting adheres to COREQ guidelines.

    FINDINGS: Work conditions that were identified as job demands and that inhibited nurses' opportunities for professional development were mainly found at an organizational and leadership level. Primarily, those conditions included role ambiguity and time constraints caused by uncompensated nursing shortages that restricted the nurses from exercising their role. Such conditions could also discourage other nurses from further education. Job demands were seen as largely compensated for by work conditions identified as job resources and located mainly at an individual level, for example finding the work interesting and multifaceted. Most prominent was the participants' inner motivation to work with surgical patients and to continue to develop themselves and other nurses professionally.

    CONCLUSIONS: A prerequisite for professional development is that the specialist role is clearly defined in collaboration with representatives from the nursing profession and universities. Hence, hospital organizations need to reflect on how to utilize the competence. Also, it is important that nurse leaders promote the specialist nurses' motivation by supporting them in the exercise of their role.

    IMPACT: Findings from this study revealed work conditions that need to be acknowledged during hospital organizations' endeavours to maintain and enhance nursing competence.

    PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Patient or public contribution was not applicable since the study focused on specialist nurses' working conditions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Vascular Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Everyday challenges following hospital discharge. A multi-method study identifying and describing areas of concern for patients during the first month after colorectal cancer surgery2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 2172-2181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Identify and describe areas of concern focusing on day-to-day variations during the first month after surgery for patients recovering from colorectal cancer surgery.

    DESIGN: A multi-method design was applied using diaries and interviews.

    METHOD: Data was collected using semi-structured diaries kept 1 month after surgery by seven patients recovering from colorectal cancer surgery. Also, face-to-face interviews were conducted 1 month after surgery. Data from the diaries constituted a framework for the following directed content analysis of interviews.

    FINDINGS: Low levels of pain were experienced but caused reduced mobility and tiredness. Practical matters in daily living were restricted, while social life could be hampered by a frequent need to defecate. Appetite and consequently the ability to eat and drink was the most prominent concern, due to changes in taste and ability to tolerate food. Worries were mainly related to changes in bowel movements. No Patient or Public Contribution.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Perlqvist, Agnetha
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Searching for Evidence Regarding Using Preoperative Disinfection Showers to Prevent Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review2011In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 143-152Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Postoperative surgical site infections (SSI) are the third most common health care associated infection. Even though several studies have pointed out the benefits of disinfection showers prior to surgery in order to reduce SSI, it remains unclear how to optimize this disinfection procedure. Aim: To find evidence for how many times preoperative disinfection showers should be performed in order to reduce bacterial colonies and minimize the risk of SSI. Method: A comprehensive literature search of multiple databases published during 1986-2008, supplemented by a manual search of the references in all relevant articles. Protocols were used in quality assessment and the data synthesis is descriptive in a narrative form. Results: The 10 studies included had different designs, interventions, and samples, which makes it difficult to compare them. Moreover, the quality of the reviewed studies varied and only four had a high level of evidence. Therefore, the results failed to give an unambiguous answer about the optimal number of preoperative showers, so only assumptions can be made. It is quite obvious, however, that preoperative disinfection showers with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) are effective from a microbiological point of view since eight of the reviewed studies showed a sharply reduced skin flora after using CHG. Conclusions: Currently, clear evidence for how many times preoperative disinfection showers should be performed to minimize the risk of SSI is missing. This highlights the need for further research that focuses on the number of preoperative disinfection showers in relation to SSI, in order to obtain optimal effect. Until then, it would be wise to follow previously made recommendation of three to five preoperative showers. Moreover, in order to have the intended effect of preoperative disinfection, it is important that health care professionals have the knowledge to guide patients with information and clear instructions about disinfection shower procedures.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 18.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Nurses' perceptions of working according to standardized care plans: a questionnaire study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 945-952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The aim of this study was to investigate nurses′ perceptions of working according to standardized care plans (SCPs), regarding usability, documentation, quality of care and the implementation process. Background Administrative work is an extensive part of nursing practice which leads to decreased time for the near patient-related care. In addition, the number of very sick patients with short hospital stays has increased. This places new demands on healthcare teams to guarantee a high quality of care. For this reason development and use of standardized care plans has increased in Sweden during recent years. Method This was a cross-sectional survey and 116 registered nurses who had experience of working according SCPs answered a questionnaire with the option of providing written comments. Result The nurses reported that the use of SCPs facilitated their daily work, especially for new employees and worked well as a checklist ensuring the quality of care. The documentation was experienced as easy, less time consuming with less redundant information. The implementation process of SCPs was reported as satisfactory but a majority reported that they were not involved in the development of the SCP. However, even though 85.5% reported a positive attitude towards working according to an SCP, it was also sometimes experienced as inflexible. Conclusion The nurses had overall positive perceptions of working according to an SCP mainly in terms of usability, documentation and quality of care. The implementation process was not optimal and it was doubtful whether the SCP rendered any positive side effects.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 19.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). The Västra Götaland Region Competence Center on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Exploring workplace violence on surgical wards in Sweden: a cross-sectional study2023In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Workplace violence is a global threat to healthcare professionals' occupational health and safety and the situation has worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to explore workplace violence directed against assistant and registered nurses working on surgical wards in Sweden.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in April 2022. Using a convenience sampling procedure, 198 assistant and registered nurses responded to an online questionnaire developed for this specific study. The questionnaire comprised 52 items and included, among other items, subscales from validated and previously used instruments. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, the chi-square test, and independent-samples t-test.

    RESULTS: The most frequently reported type of workplace violence was humiliation (28.8%), followed by physical violence (24.2%), threats (17.7%), and unwanted sexual attention (12.1%). Patients and patients' visitors were reported as the main perpetrators of all kinds of exposure. Additionally, one third of the respondents had experienced humiliation from colleagues. Both threats and humiliation showed negative associations with work motivation and health (p < 0.05). Respondents classified as working in a high- or moderate-risk environment were more frequently exposed to threats (p = 0.025) and humiliation (p = 0.003). Meanwhile, half of the respondents were unaware of any action plans or training regarding workplace violence. However, of those who indicated that they had been exposed to workplace violence, the majority had received quite a lot or a lot of support, mainly from colleagues (range 70.8-80.8%).

    CONCLUSION: Despite a high prevalence of workplace violence, and especially of humiliating acts, there appeared to be low preparedness within the hospital organizations to prevent and/or handle such incidents. To improve these conditions, hospital organizations should place more emphasis on preventive measures as part of their systematic work environment management. To help inform such initiatives, it is suggested that future research should focus on the identification of suitable measures regarding different types of incidents, perpetrators, and settings.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). The Västra Götaland Region Competence Center on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Workplace violence from the perspective of hospital ward managers in Sweden: A qualitative study2022In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 1523-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aims of the study are to explore workplace violence perpetrated by patients or visitors from the perspective of hospital ward managers and to describe how ward managers perceive their leadership role and manage related incidents.

    BACKGROUND: Few studies focus on workplace violence from the perspective of ward managers even though they are the closest managers to the operational staff.

    METHOD: Fifteen semistructured interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Four categories emerged: the face of workplace violence, a two-fold assignment, strive towards readiness to act, and managing incidents.

    CONCLUSION: While the most common acts of workplace violence are considered less serious and related to patients' medical conditions or dissatisfied visitors, hospital organizations focus on serious but rarely occurring incidents. Consequently, ward managers have limited opportunities to ensure a safe work environment on an everyday basis.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: To support ward managers' occupational safety and health management, workplace violence prevention and management should be acknowledged as an important responsibility for senior management in hospitals. It is important to identify incidents that most likely will occur at the wards and to create strategies related to those incidents. Strategies could include risk assessments, prevention, evaluation, education and reflection combined with, for example, scenario training.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Peterson, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
    Keehn, Mary Therese
    Office of the Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
    Hasnain, Memoona
    Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
    Gruss, Valerie
    College of Nursing, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Exploring differences in and factors influencing self-efficacy for competence in interprofessional collaborative practice among health professions students2024In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The value of health care delivered via effective interprofessional teams has created an imperative for interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaborative practice (ICP). To inform IPE strategies, we investigated differences in perceived self-efficacy (SE) for competence in ICP among health professions students. Study data was collected between 2015-2019 from students from 13 different programs (N=3,496) before an annual institutional interprofessional program. Students completed the IPECC-SET, a validated instrument evaluating perceived SE for competence in ICP, and rated their 1) amount of previous contact with, and 2) perceived understanding of the role of different health professions.  Student groups were compared using parametric statistics. Regression analyses explored factors influencing SE for competence in ICP. Findings revealed significant differences in perceived SE for competence in ICP between programs (p<.05). Specifically, health information management/health informatics, dental, medicine, and nursing students expressed relatively higher SE, whereas physical and occupational therapy students expressed relatively lower SE. Perceived understanding of the role of health care professions (p<.01) and gender (p<.01) contributed significantly to predict perceived SE for competence in ICP, while amount of previous contact with other health professions did not (p=.42).  Findings highlight the value of IPE designed with consideration of specific learner needs.

  • 22.
    Samuelsson, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wennick, Anne
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Lydrup, Marie-Louise
    Skåne University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Cancer specialist nurses' experiences of supporting family members of persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer: A qualitative study2022In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 61, p. 102205-102205, article id 102205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to explore cancer specialist nurses' experiences of supporting family members of persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

    Method: The study was designed as a qualitative study. Data was collected using individual semi-structured telephone interviews with 21 cancer specialist nurses. The interviews were transcribed and analysed with reflexive thematic analysis.

    Results: The analysis generated one overarching theme, In the shadow of the person diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and four themes: striving for confidence, searching for ways to support, seeking individualization, and balancing between needs. Swedish colorectal cancer care is organized with the persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer as the centre of care and lacks both structure and allocated resources for supportive care for family members. Thus, support for family members has to be provided within the existing colorectal cancer care. The support provided focuses mainly on strengthening the family members' ability in the caregiving role and is offered primarily at the time of diagnosis.

    Conclusion: There is an apparent need for developing supportive care plans for family members, involving repeated assessments of multidimensional needs, a tailored support, and follow-ups. Accordingly, a re-evaluation of the cancer specialist nurse's role is needed so that key nursing responsibilities are not ranked second to administrative tasks.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Samuelsson, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Malmö, Sweden..
    Wennick, Anne
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Lydrup, Marie-Louise
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Surg & Gastroenterol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Surg & Gastroenterol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Translation, cultural adaptation, and psychometric testing of the supportive care needs survey for partners and caregivers for swedish family members of persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer2023In: Journal of patient-reported outcomes, E-ISSN 2509-8020, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosis globally and is increasing in both incidence and prevalence. Despite evidence showing that family members of persons diagnosed with cancer have supportive care needs, no validated questionnaire measuring the needs of family members of persons diagnosed with CRC exists in Swedish. Thus, the objective of the present study was to translate, culturally adapt, and evaluate the psychometric properties the Supportive Care Needs Survey - Partners and Caregivers 45.

    Methods: The translation and cultural adaptation followed a systematic yet iterative process. Firstly, the questionnaire was translated using a forward-backward approach. Secondly, face and content validity and comprehensibility were evaluated by two expert panels of colorectal cancer specialist nurses and family members, respectively. Lastly, the psychometric properties, validity, and reliability of the translated questionnaire were evaluated among 45 Swedish family members of persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

    Results: The face, content, and construct validity of the translated questionnaire were evaluated as satisfying. Moreover, psychometric evaluations showed high data quality and satisfactory internal consistency. However, the results also revealed unsolved issues regarding relevance, targeting, and internal consistency, as well as a probable scaling failure.

    Conclusion: The translated and adapted questionnaire can be used to identify family members unmet needs of support throughout the colorectal cancer trajectory. The questionnaire showed promising validity and reliability in the target population. However, it needs to be further evaluated in a larger sample, preferably involving factor analysis and stability over time.

    Plain language summary: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnose globally. At times of cancer, also the health and wellbeing of the surrounding family members is negatively affected. As a result, family members of persons diagnosed with cancer report that they too need support. Still, no validated questionnaire that enable measurement of family members needs of support throughout the colorectal cancer trajectory existed in Swedish. Thus, the present study undertook the process of translation of a questionnaire from English to Swedish. Thereto, evaluated it among Swedish family members of persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer. The evaluation showed a successful translation and the translated questionnaire appeared reliable and useful for measuring the family members´ needs of support throughout the colorectal cancer trajectory. However, it requires further evaluation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Samuelsson, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Pediatrics, Skåne University Hospital.
    Wennick, Anne
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Models of support to family members during the trajectory of cancer: A scoping review2021In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 30, no 21-22, p. 3072-3098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To map the existing literature on support models provided to family members during the cancer trajectory. Background Cancer diagnosis, treatment and survivorship have a profound influence on the surrounding family members. This scoping review is part of the development of a support model for family members of persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Design The method was guided by the Arksey and O'Malley framework, described in the Joanna Briggs Institute guidelines, and the reporting is compliant with PRISMA-ScR Checklist. Searches were conducted in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO from November 2019-February 2020 with no limitation in publication year or study design. Complementing searches were conducted in reference lists and for grey literature, followed by an additional search in September 2020. Inclusion criteria were primary research about support provided by health care, to family members, during cancer, of an adult person, in Swedish or English, of moderate or high methodological quality. Quality was assessed using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tools. Data were extracted using a charting form. Result A total of 32 studies were included in the review describing 39 support models. Conclusion The mapping of the existing literature resulted in the identification of three themes of support models: psychoeducation, caregiver training and psychological support. In addition, that future research should target a specific diagnosis and trajectory phase as well as include family members and intervention providers in model development. Relevance for clinical practice Knowledge from the literature on both the needs of the family members and existing support models should be incorporated with the prerequisites of clinical practice. Clinical practice should also be complemented with structured assessments of family members' needs conducted regularly.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Samuelsson, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wennick, Anne
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Models of support to family members during the trajectory of cancer: a scoping review protocol.2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 9, article id e037633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: A cancer diagnose, for example, colorectal cancer, not only affects the cancer-person stricken, but also the surrounding family. Thus, this scoping review intends to identify appropriate models of support that will guide the development of a model of support to family members during the trajectory of colorectal cancer.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: , and described by the Joanna Briggs Institute. All the stages will be conducted iteratively and reflexively. First, a search strategy will be developed with a librarian and applied in the following peer-reviewed databases: PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PsycINFO. Additional searches will be performed in Google Scholar and SwePub for identification of grey literature and hand searched in the reference lists. Searches will be conducted from December 2019 to February 2020. A draft of the preliminary search strategy was performed in PubMed in November 2019. Subsequently, three members of the research team will independently screen all abstracts for relevance, as well as the full-text articles. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria will be critically evaluated using the Joanna Brigg Institute Critical Appraisal Tools. A descriptive summary of study characteristics and of the scoping review process will be presented, including a visual flow diagram. Lastly, a thematic analysis as presented by Braun and Clarke will be conducted. To enhance validity, contact nurses of persons with colorectal cancer will be provided an overview of the preliminary results.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Being a secondary analysis, ethical approval is not needed for this study. The findings of the analysis will be used to inform the design of a future study aiming to develop a model of support and an upcoming scoping review, which will be published in a scientific journal and presented at relevant conferences.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26. Wong, Arnold Y L
    et al.
    Sjögren Forss, Katarina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Schoeb, Veronika
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Older adult's experience of chronic low back pain and its implications on their daily life: Study protocol of a systematic review of qualitative research2018In: Systematic Reviews, E-ISSN 2046-4053, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 81Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Of various chronic diseases, low back pain (LBP) is the most common and debilitating musculoskeletal condition among older adults aged 65 years or older. While more than 17 million older adults in the USA suffer from at least one episode of LBP annually, approximately six million of them experience chronic LBP that significantly affects their quality of life and physical function. Since many older adults with chronic LBP may also have comorbidities and are more sensitive to pain than younger counterparts, these older individuals may face unique age-related physical and psychosocial problems. While some qualitative research studies have investigated the life experiences of older adults with chronic LBP, no systematic review has integrated and synthesized the scientific knowledge regarding the influence of chronic LBP on the physical, psychological, and social aspects of lives in older adults. Without such information, it may result in unmet care needs and ineffective interventions for this vulnerable group. Therefore, the objective of this systematic review is to synthesize knowledge regarding older adults’ experiences of living with chronic LBP and the implications on their daily lives. Methods/design: Candidate publications will be sought from databases: PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. Qualitative research studies will be included if they are related to the experiences of older adults with chronic LBP. Two independent reviewers will screen the titles, abstracts, and full-text articles for eligibility. The reference lists of the included studies will be checked for additional relevant studies. Forward citation tracking will be conducted. Meta-ethnography will be chosen to synthesize the data from the included studies. Specifically, the second-order concepts that are deemed to be translatable by two independent reviewers will be included and synthesized to capture the core of the idiomatic translations (i.e., a translation focusing on salient categories of meaning rather than the literal translation of words or phrases). Discussion: This systematic review of qualitative evidence will enable researchers to identify potential unmet care needs, as well as to facilitate the development of effective, appropriate, person-centered health care interventions targeting this group of individuals. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO 2018: CRD42018091292

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf