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  • 1. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    De Michelis, Giorgio
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jacucci, Giulio
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wagner, Ina
    Design Things2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Design Things offers an innovative view of design thinking and design practice, envisioning ways to combine creative design with a participatory approach encompassing aesthetic and democratic practices and values. The authors of Design Things look at design practice as a mode of inquiry that involves people, space, artifacts, materials, and aesthetic experience, following the process of transformation from a design concept to a thing. Design Things, which grew out of the Atelier (Architecture and Technology for Inspirational Living) ...

  • 2. Binder, Thomas
    et al.
    De Michelis, Giorgio
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jacucci, Giulio
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wagner, Ina
    What is the object of design?2012In: Proceeding: CHI EA '12 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA , 2012, p. 21-30Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we reflect upon design at a conceptual level, discussing how creativity can be coupled with participation and experience, dialoguing with philosophers and social theorists, and looking for the experiential grounds of our understanding of the very nature of design. Three words:'drawing','thing'and'together', are at the center of our discourse. We propose a view of design as accessing, aligning, and navigating among the'constituents' of the object of design. People interact with the object of design through its constituents. The ...

  • 3.
    Björgvinsson, Erling
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Birt, Arlene
    Cuartielles, David
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Davidsson, Paul
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Ginslov, Jeannette
    Gustafsson Friberger, Marie
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Hobye, Mads
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Jacobson, Bob
    Jacobsson, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Kozel, Susan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Nilsson, Elisabet M.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Peterson, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Rosenqvist, Karolina
    Topgaard, Richard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea. Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Prototyping Futures2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Prototyping Futures gives you a glimpse of what collaborating with academia might look like. Medea and its co-partners share their stories about activities happening at the research centre – projects, methods, tools, and approaches – what challenges lie ahead, and how these can be tackled. Examples of highlighted topics include: What is a living lab and how does it work? What are the visions behind the Connectivity Lab at Medea? And, how can prototyping-methods be used when sketching scenarios for sustainable futures? Other topics are: What is the role of the body when designing technology? What is collaborative media and how can this concept help us understand contemporary media practices? Prototyping Futures also discusses the open-hardware platform Arduino, and the concepts of open data and the Internet of Things, raising questions on how digital media and connected devices can contribute to more sustainable lifestyles, and a better world.

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  • 4.
    Boztepe, Suzan
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Glöss, Mareike
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Grönvall, Erik
    Department of Digital Design, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Christiansson, Jörn
    Department of Digital Design, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Designing the city: challenges and opportunities in digital public service design2023In: C&T '23: proceedings of the 11th international conference on communities and technologies, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, , p. 3p. 266-269Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Municipalities around the world have become increasingly reliant upon digital technologies in their everyday operations. In pursuit of a faster, cheaper, and more efficient local government, service platforms and applications that mediate citizen-government inter- actions, smart city infrastructures, and automated decision-making systems have proliferated. More recently, digital technologies are also sought to address socially complex issues and foster civic en- gagement. These ambitions, motivated by both rational and demo- cratic perspectives, however, confront many challenges such as de- signing with wide heterogeneous groups, navigating organizational structures, and dealing with the political agendas and conflicting perspectives of multiple stakeholders. Designing digital technolo- gies for municipalities, therefore, requires an ability to address the technical, social, institutional, and political challenges critically, practically, and holistically. This hybrid workshop aims to bring together researchers and practitioners to (1) explore how this could be achieved and (2) map the existing and emerging challenges and opportunities for designing public digital services and technologies.

  • 5.
    Boztepe, Suzan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Smedberg, Alicia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design making its way to the city hall: Tensions in design capacity building in the public sector2023In: IASDR 2023: Life-Changing Design, 9-13 October, Milan, Italy / [ed] De Sainz Molestina, D.; Galluzzo, L.; Rizzo, F.; Spallazzo, D., Milan, Italy: Design Research Society, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public sector organizations have been increasingly turning to design in their pursuit to innovate and address pressing challenges that seem intractable through their existing ways of working. Design’s presence in the public sector is still a relatively recent phenomenon ridden with many challenges. Through a study of three municipalities in Sweden, we present tensions designers face as they work their way to build design capacity. We argue that making a place for design in organizational systems and their ways of working requires skillfully navigating these tensions. We describe each tension in terms of their contradictions embedded in dualities and discuss designers’ ways of managing them. Practical applications for design and public administration are also discussed.

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  • 6.
    Davidsson, Paul
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Langheinrich, MarcUniversità della Svizzera italiana, Lugano, Switzerland.Linde, PerMalmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).Mayer, SimonUniversity of St. Gallen, Switzerland.Casado-Mansilla, DiegoUniversity of Deusto, Spain.Spikol, DanielMalmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).Kraemer, Frank AlexanderNorwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.Russo, Nancy LMalmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    IoT '20 Companion: 10th International Conference on the Internet of Things Companion2020Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 7.
    de Götzen, Amalia
    et al.
    Service Design Lab, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Starostka, Justyna
    Service Design Lab, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna
    Digital Design, IT University, Denmark.
    Ehrenberg, Nils
    Department of Design, Aalto University, Finland.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    PDC Place Nordic: participatory design in/for the digitalization of public services2022In: PDC '22: Proceedings of the Participatory Design Conference 2022 - Volume 2, ACM Digital Library, 2022, p. 286-287Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public libraries are more and more recognized to become partners in co-design and technology education, also aiming to bridge the digital divide. We see it as a great opportunity to expand the roles of public libraries even further, engaging citizens in co-design processes, improving existing public e-services and co-designing new services. That shift requires new roles taken by librarians, but also new processes, as well as new methods of development of e-services in the public sector. In PDC Place Nordic we explore this new role of libraries in participatory future making, engaging librarians, academics, practitioners, and different local communities. Events will take place in Copenhagen, Malmö, and Helsinki/Espoo.  

  • 8.
    Ehn, Pelle
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Eriksen, Mette Agger
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Peterson, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Niedenthal, Simon
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Binder, Thomas
    Jacucci, Giulio
    Kuutti, Kari
    De Michelis, Giorgio
    Rumpfhuber, Andres
    Wagner, Ina
    Opening the Digital Box for Design Work: Supporting performative interactions, using inspirational materials and configuring of place2007In: The Dissapperaing Computer: Interaction Design, System Infrastructures and Applications for Smart Environments / [ed] Norbert Streitz, Achilles Kameas, Irene Mavrommati, Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2007, p. 50-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Engberg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Creating the city: the right to history and the fictionalizing of data2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As digital media increasingly become entangled with urban culture, new cultural practices emerge and affect how we understand and experience contemporary cities. The experience of place alongside digitally mediated content has been a focal point for media artists and researchers working in the field of locative media in the past decade. The term locative media refers to how interactive media is bound to a specific location, or in McCullough’s term how digital media moves into “sites and situations of everyday urban life” ( 2006). This presentation focuses on the ongoing work of the design and artistic research project “City Fables.” We reflect on the role of fiction in participatory engagement and how the remediation of historical events can provide input for public debates that address the relationship of everyday life to larger political and cultural events. In particular, our approach takes seriously the potential of narrativization and possible worlds explorations through methods of, what we in our work have called, “fableing.” In our project, the fableing is performed upon historical material from Malmö 1900-- ‐1925 in order to design a locative media experience, connected to specific sites in Malmö. Historical moments and people have the potential to serve as counterpoint to the stories and realities of contemporary cities, and we work with fictionalizing characters and events as a way of informing public debate. In particular, we stress how constituting publics foregrounds an engagement with authority structures (LeDantec and DiSalvio, 2013). From this perspective official archives can be seen as one such authority structure, providing specific facts and viewpoints. By contrast, remediating and fictionalizing in public settings create an experimental zone, which does not rely on one actor, but rather integrates the translations of a multitude. This in turn highlights knowledge creation, knowledge sharing and agency in a similar way as design labs (Smördahl and Stuedahl, 2015). The presentation will position the project in the context of other similar research projects and raises issues of representation, identity and participation in the context of practical design work as well as the reconceptualization of representational practices. References Le Dantec, Christopher and DiSalvio, Carl, (2013) Infrastructuring and the formation of publics in participatory design, Social Studies of Science 43(2) 241–264 McCullough, Malcolm. (2006). On the Urbanism of Locative Media [Media and the City]. Places, 18(2), 26. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/84x6m3nf Stuedahl, Dagny and Smördal, Ole (2015), Matters of becoming, experimental zones for making museums public with social media, CoDesign: International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts Volume 11, Issue 3--‐4, 2015

  • 10.
    Engberg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Turmoil Alley and the Fableing of Cities2018In: Looking Forward, Looking Back: Interactive Digital Storytelling and Hybrid Art Approaches / [ed] Rebecca Rouse, Mara Dionisio, Carnegie Mellon University ETC , 2018, p. 119-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 11.
    Eriksen, Mette Agger
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Design impulses: artefacts, contexts and modes of activities2006In: Working Papers in Art & Design, E-ISSN 1466-4917, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design-artefacts are not interpreted in isolation but in various contexts and as part of various modes of activities. This paper aims to provide a broad methodological framework emphasizing careful combinations of artefact, context and mode of activity to create powerful design impulses in interdisciplinary it-design research teams. Critical evaluation of examples from the project PalCom: A new perspective on ambient computing serve to illustrate the effects and dynamics as well as challenges generated through such careful interventions. We focus on interdisciplinary and participatory design in the domain of hand surgery rehabilitation, which is used to inform and challenge the overall design of an open software architecture for ‘palpable computing’ within the PalCom project. Four typical design artefacts – ‘Native’ artefacts, Fieldcards, Mock-ups and Prototypes – and their use in different contexts as part of different modes of activities are discussed to draw out the design impulses they provided for the ongoing design work in the project. The paper concludes by discussing the possibilities and difficulties of providing constructive design impulses by carefully manipulating combinations of artefacts, contexts and modes of activities.

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  • 12. Gkouskos, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Reddy, Anuradha
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Where is the interface?: Appropriating Interaction with IoT in the Smart Home2019In: EAI Endorsed Transactions on Creative Technologies, ISSN 2409-9708, Vol. 6, no 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the proliferation of IoT the home is becoming a “smart” space that provides new opportunities for supporting creative experiences for the user. Adaptable IoT devices offer the possibility for users to appropriate interaction in the home. The objective of this paper is to explore the use of a configurable, placeable, IoT enabled button as a way for users to appropriate interaction with the smart home. The study employs the methods of technology probes, photography, and contextual interviews. Our findings show that our users configured the IoT enabled button to manage automation in the home, to install place-significant shortcuts for relevant smart home features, and to create interaction points for tasks that support the user’s daily routines. We propose that IoT should not only be seen as a way to increase efficiency in the home but also as a vehicle for user-created interaction opportunities that can creatively support rising needs in each user’s daily life.

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  • 13.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Peterson, Bo
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Matryoshka dolls and boundary infrastructuring: navigating among innovation policies and practices2013In: Proceedings of the Participatory Innovation Conference, Lappeenranta University of Technology Press, 2013, p. 424-429Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In several present discourses and practices that are involved in innovation and development projects it seems like there is a strong emphasis on management and planning with agreements and clear goals as the crucial components. In this paper we propose another approach that more acknowledge the complexity and messiness of innovation. We will discuss how we through Malmö Living Labs have navigated across an ecology of ongoing projects and innovation policies that we try to merge into something coherent and meaningful in multiple ways. The networks resemble the nested Russian Matryoshka dolls; unveiling one dimension you find another one. Inspired by the concepts of boundary objects and boundary infrastructuring we will argue that, by acknowledging these concepts as the strongest common frame during complex collaboration across disciplines and communities of practice, an informal, creative and flexible practice can get more space to flourish.

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  • 14.
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Lindström, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Strange, Michael
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Witmer, Hope
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Ehn, Pelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Gottschalk, Sara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Jönsson, Li
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Light, Ann
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Reimer, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Restrepo, Juliana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Schmidt, Staffan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Smedberg, Alicia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design..
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Glossary: Collaborative Future-Making2020Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative Future-Making is a research platform at the Faculty of Culture and Society at Malmö University that is concerned with how to envision, elaborate and prototype multiple, inclusive, and sustainable futures. The platform gathers around 20 researchers that share a methodological interest in how critical perspectives from the humanities and social sciences can be combined with the constructive and collaborative aspects of making and prototyping in design research.

    The research centers around two major themes:

    • Critical imagination​, which focuses on how basic assumptions, norms and structures can be challenged to widen the perspectives on what can constitute socially, culturally, ecologically and economically sustainable and resilient futures.
    • Collaborative engagements​, which focuses on how we can set up more inclusive collaborations to prototype and discuss alternative futures, engaging not only professionals and policy makers but also citizens and civil society.

    During 2019 the research group set out to make a shared glossary for collaborative future-making. The glossary is multiple in purpose and exists in several versions. Hopefully there will be more to come. At first, the making and articulation of the glossary was used within the research group as an exercise to share concepts that we found central to collaborative future-making, coming from different disciplines. This published version of the glossary was assembled to be used during a workshop called ​Imagining Collaborative Future-Making,​ which gathered a group of international researchers from different disciplines.

    The collection of concepts reflects the heterogeneous and diverse character of the research group and a strong belief in that plurality regarding ontologies and epistemologies will be crucial to be able to handle the multiple uncertainties and complex challenges we have to face in the future. Some of the concepts are already well established within different research communities, but gain a specific meaning in relation to the research area. Others are more preliminary attempts to advance our understanding or probe into new potential practices within collaborative future-making. In that sense the concepts in the glossary are well situated and grounded in past and ongoing research within this research group, at the same time as they are meant to suggest, propose and point towards practices and approaches yet to come.

    The concepts in this glossary are not only meant to be descriptive but also performative. In that sense, assembling and circulating this glossary is part of collaborative future-making. As pointed out by Michelle Westerlaken in her articulation of “Doing Concepts” (see page 15), “...without proposing, critiquing, or working towards a common or uncommon understanding of certain concepts, it becomes impossible to ‘make futures’ in any deliberate fashion.”

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  • 15.
    Holmberg, Lars
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Davidsson, Paul
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    A Feature Space Focus in Machine Teaching2020In: 2020 IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops (PerCom Workshops), 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary Machine Learning (ML) often focuseson large existing and labeled datasets and metrics aroundaccuracy and performance. In pervasive online systems, conditionschange constantly and there is a need for systems thatcan adapt. In Machine Teaching (MT) a human domain expertis responsible for the knowledge transfer and can thus addressthis. In my work, I focus on domain experts and the importanceof, for the ML system, available features and the space they span.This space confines the, to the ML systems, observable fragmentof the physical world. My investigation of the feature space isgrounded in a conducted study and related theories. The resultof this work is applicable when designing systems where domainexperts have a key role as teachers.

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  • 16.
    Holmberg, Lars
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Davidsson, Paul
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Evaluating Interpretability in Machine Teaching2020In: Highlights in Practical Applications of Agents, Multi-Agent Systems, and Trust-worthiness: The PAAMS Collection / [ed] Springer, Springer, 2020, Vol. 1233, p. 54-65Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Building interpretable machine learning agents is a challenge that needs to be addressed to make the agents trustworthy and align the usage of the technology with human values. In this work, we focus on how to evaluate interpretability in a machine teaching setting, a settingthat involves a human domain expert as a teacher in relation to a machine learning agent. By using a prototype in a study, we discuss theinterpretability denition and show how interpretability can be evaluatedon a functional-, human- and application level. We end the paperby discussing open questions and suggestions on how our results can be transferable to other domains.

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  • 17.
    Holmberg, Lars
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Davidsson, Paul
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Mapping Knowledge Representations to Concepts: A Review and New Perspectives2022In: Explainable Agency in Artificial Intelligence Workshop Proceedings, 2022, p. 61-70Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The success of neural networks builds to a large extent on their ability to create internal knowledge representations from real-world high-dimensional data, such as images, sound, or text. Approaches to extract and present these representations, in order to explain the neural network's decisions, is an active and multifaceted research field. To gain a deeper understanding of a central aspect of this field, we have performed a targeted review focusing on research that aims to associate internal representations with human understandable concepts. In doing this, we added a perspective on the existing research by using primarily deductive nomological explanations as a proposed taxonomy. We find this taxonomy and theories of causality, useful for understanding what can be expected, and not expected, from neural network explanations. The analysis additionally uncovers an ambiguity in the reviewed literature related to the goal of model explainability; is it understanding the ML model or, is it actionable explanations useful in the deployment domain? 

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  • 18.
    Holmberg, Lars
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Davidsson, Paul
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Olsson, Carl Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Contextual machine teaching2020In: 2020 IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops (PerCom Workshops), IEEE, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Machine learning research today is dominated by atechnocentric perspective and in many cases disconnected fromthe users of the technology. The machine teaching paradigm insteadshifts the focus from machine learning experts towards thedomain experts and users of machine learning technology. Thisshift opens up for new perspectives on the current use of machinelearning as well as new usage areas to explore. In this study,we apply and map existing machine teaching principles ontoa contextual machine teaching implementation in a commutingsetting. The aim is to highlight areas in machine teaching theorythat requires more attention. The main contribution of this workis an increased focus on available features, the features space andthe potential to transfer some of the domain expert’s explanatorypowers to the machine learning system.

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  • 19.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Emerging Publics: Totem-Poling the ‘We’s and ‘Me’s of Citizen Participation2014In: Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design, and democracy / [ed] Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M Nilsson, Richard Topgaard, MIT Press, 2014, p. 269-276Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 20.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Metamorphing: the transformative power of digital media and tangible interaction2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis explores how interactive technologies and digital media can be used as transformative mediators and tools. They have the potential to strengthen and enrich the experience of different transformations that are discussed as being important for practices of creativity and learning, where the engagement and relationship to processes of change is fundamental. The flexibility of digital media and forms for tangible interaction constitutes major elements in the design experiments described in the thesis. Material artefacts and physical space play a central role in how people make sense of the world. Looking closely at practices where creativity, learning and communication are important for collaborative work it becomes clear that this insight implies that the concepts of objects and space carry quite a portion of multiplicity. They are used differently and with different intentions, they are understood differently from different perspectives and the look and feel of them appears differently even if they can be described as “one” thing or “one” space. Dealing with these heterogeneities challenges the way we use objects and spaces. It becomes a matter of connecting the multiplicities and how we configure them in relation each other. The research discusses how the discipline of interaction design can support dealing with multiplicity, configuring and mixing of objects and spaces. They are not only used or inhabited; they are performed and enacted. In exploring these issues the thesis discusses the development and experiments with a couple of design prototypes that rests upon basically the same technology, which is a combination of technologies for tracking and/or tagging. Studies and experiments have been performed in three different domains; design work, patient learning while undergoing lengthy rehabilitation and artistic work and performances. The diversity of studied domains provides a way of talking about design that focus on use and users’ appropriation of technology rather than reflecting the technology itself. From a methodological perspective issues of participatory design have been foundational to the research. Some design consequences refers to how we can not only regard interactive artefacts as bundles of functionality. We must also look into issues of giving form to them as material things and the thesis especially reflect how we can override a distinction of things being either material or virtual. Another consequence is how digital technologies often does not replace “analogue” media and material things, but instead are used in parallel and must find a place in an already existing ecology of artefacts, devices and services. In the thesis there is a strong focus on how human action is co-shaped together with artefacts and technology as we perform specific tasks or simply go on about our living and making sense of the world.

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  • 21.
    Linde, Per
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Book, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Performing the city: exploring the bandwidth of urban place-making through new media tactics2014In: Making futures: marginal notes on innovation, design and democracy / [ed] Pelle Ehn, Elisabet M. Nilsson, Richard Topgaard, MIT Press, 2014, p. 277-302Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 22.
    Linde, Per
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hillgren, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Collaborative articulation in health care settings: Towards increased visibility, negotiation and mutual understanding2006In: Proceedings of the 4th Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction: changing roles, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As digital media are becoming more and more ubiquitous in our environments, it has the potential to capture and mediate situated information expressing the embedded nature of practice. Within healthcare settings, such information is often important for patients' learning about diseases or injuries as well as their own engagement in rehabilitation and treatment. It is possible to design the necessary interaction around digital media in such a way that it becomes part of a collaborative articulation in consultations, hence increasing the degree of patient participation. This paper reports on two interrelated projects exploring how this can be achieved within the domain of hand surgery rehabilitation. Our aim is to contribute to patients' possibilities to learn about the injury and the recovery process. Furthermore we seek to contribute to the field of human-computer interaction by showing how physical forms and explicit interaction can facilitate collaborative articulation processes.

  • 23.
    Linde, Per
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Seravalli, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Between empowerment and exploitation: PD ethics in the era of participation2018In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 70-73Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When addressing societal change and civic engagement, the idea of participatory culture as a cultivator of issue formation and collaborative engagement has, for a long time, been a foundational aspect of participatory design (henceforth co-design). It has also been a vivid and dynamic topic of discussion in this Interactions forum. We have observed the ways in which the problems and issues that design aims to address are becoming increasingly challenging to formulate in projects. This is because the participating sets of stakeholders most often are quite diverse and have conflicting agendas and interests. To address this complexity, participation is becoming a widespread approach in traditional innovation processes and in processes aiming for societal change. The era of participation carries both promises of empowerment as well as risks of exploitation. We argue that co-designers engaging with participatory processes need to pay particular attention to ethical concerns regarding representation, accountability, tradition and transcendence, and mutual learning.

  • 24. Paskaleva, Krassimira
    et al.
    Cooper, Ian
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Peterson, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Götz, Christina
    Stakeholder engagement in the smart city: making living labs work2015In: Transforming City Governments for Successful Smart Cities / [ed] Manuel Pedro Rodrígues-Bolívar, Springer, 2015, p. 115-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Reddy, Anuradha
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    The Role of Participation in Designing for IoT2016In: Proceedings of DRS 2016: Design + Research + Society Future–Focused Thinking 50th Anniversary International Conference, Brighton, UK, 27–30 June 2016, Design Research Society , 2016, p. 913-926Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread proliferation of the internet-of-things (IoT) has led to the shift in focus from the technology itself to the way in which technology affects the social world. Being inspired by the emerging intersection between actor network theory and co-design, this paper emphasizes the role of participation in designing IoT-based technologies by suggesting alternative ways to appropriate IoT into people’s lives. It is argued that prototyping becomes crucial for designing IoT-based technologies where the invisible aspects of “agency” and “autonomy” are highlighted while still drawing on its full capabilities. In that, the value of tinkering and exploration are seen as ways to experiment with and constitute one’s subjectivities in relation to IoT-based technologies. Taking these points into consideration, it is suggested that there is a need to move towards a cosmopolitics of design where aesthetics and materialisation of technology also act as inquiries into issues of performance and social meaning-making.

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  • 26.
    Smedberg, Alicia
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Nilsson, Magnus
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Medea.
    Thinking about the future through fiction2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Medea Vox, an academic podcast. Episode 21: Fiction holds the ability of imagining alternative futures. Through comics, novels and videogames, we can explore social and technical “What If’s.” In this Medea Vox episode, we discuss how fiction can contribute to our thinking about the future in ways which other schools of thought – such as the scientific – cannot.

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  • 27. Sokoler, Tomas
    et al.
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Agger Eriksen, Per
    Olofsson, Stefan
    The CARE Concept - Holding on to augmentable paper during post surgery rehabilitation2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents our early experiences with the design of digital technology that aims to support the process of collaborative articulation taking place at patient-caregiver consultations during post surgery rehabilitation. We will suggest that augmentable paper documents (CARE paper) can be powerful resources in this process for caregiver as well as patient. The CARE paper can carry links to digital media. A prototype implementation demonstrating how to create and retrieve links between digital media and the CARE paper will be presented. The work presented was carried out and assessed along with studies at a major hand surgery clinic and with the active participation from patients and staff at this clinic.

  • 28. Sokoler, Tomas
    et al.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Eriksen, Mette Agger
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Olofsson, Stefan
    Explicit interaction for surgical rehabilitation2007In: Proc. Int. Conf. Tangible and Embedded Interaction (TEI'07), New York: ACM Press., ACM Press, 2007, p. 117-124Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss the design ideal of explicit interaction, which is a way to approach the dimensions of explicitness versus ambience and explicitness versus obtrusiveness in ubiquitous computing. Explicit interaction refers to interaction techniques designed to make actions and intentions visible, understandable and accountable. We introduce three levels of analysis—usability, materialization, and social performance— and present the design of an explicit interaction assembly of devices for rehabilitation after hand surgery. The assembly, intended to support video recording during patient-therapist consultations, is evaluated and we find that it provides superior usability and the potential to improve rehabilitation outcomes through materialization. Moreover,we find that the design of cues to support the social practice in the rehabilitation ward needs to be improved since the assembly allowed for uses unanticipated during the design.

  • 29. Storni, Cristiano
    et al.
    Binder, Thomas
    Linde, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Stuedahl, Dagny
    Designing things together: intersections of co-design and actor-network theory2015In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 11, no 3-4, p. 149-151Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Telier, A
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Telier, A
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Drawing things together2012In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 34-37Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This shift in meaning of the word thing is also of interest when reflecting on the practice of design. We suggest that we revisit and partly reverse the etymological history of things. A major challenge for design today has to do with what is being designed—not just a thing

  • 31.
    Dorthé, Lotti (Curator)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Olsson, Annsofie (Curator)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Spikol, Daniel (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Spalazzese, Romina (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Linde, Per (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Leckner, Sara (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Russo, Nancy (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Eriksson, Jeanette (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Persson, Jan (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Holmberg, Johan (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Olsson, Carl Magnus (Creator, Researcher)
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Brandström, Maria (Designer)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Tosting, Åsa (Designer)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Egevad, Per (Lightning designer)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Svensson, Anneli (Contributor)
    Malmö University, Malmö University Library.
    Topgaard, Richard (Contributor)
    Malmö University, Joint University Administration and Services. Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Forskarnas galleri #5: People have the power: IOTAP on exhibit2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All around us sensors collect data, which is analyzed to figure out how to save energy, how much insulin to inject, where the closest rental bike is located, how many people are still inside a building that is on fire… This fast-spreading technology is called the Internet of Things, or IoT for short. People have the power, or do we really? How much do we value our privacy? What internet connected gadgets will help us lead a healthy, sustainable life – and what gadgets will only increase our stress level? When does use become abuse? This exhibition explores how IoT affects people, society and industry. You are welcome to try out IoT through demos and hands-on experiences based on research projects at Malmö University. Research projects in the exhibition: Emergent Configuration for IoT Systems (ECOS+), Smart energy management and security (SEMS), Fair Data, Walk the ward, Dynamic Intelligent Sensor-Intensive Systems (DISS), PELARS project and Busrunner are presented in the "IOTAP-lab"

  • 32.
    Engberg, Maria (Creator)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Linde, Per (Creator)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Karlsson, Johannes (Creator)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Bengtegård, Sebastian (Creator)
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS).
    Larmgränd2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turmoil Alley/Larmgränd is an interactive exhibition that uses mixed media: paper and digital film in a mobile application that employs image recognition. The work consists of two posters with houses from Malmö, Sweden which are used as a canvas for story fragments about people who lived and worked in Malmö between 1900 and 1925. To access these fragments, the user uses her iPhone and the Argon web AR application (created by the Augmented Environments Lab at Georgia Institute of Technology with whom we have collaborated).

1 - 32 of 32
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