Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 37 of 37
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Brorson, Hanna
    et al.
    Plymoth, Henrietta
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bolmsjö, Ingrid
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Pain Relief at the End of Life: Nurses’ Experiences Regarding End-of-Life Pain Relief in Patients with Dementia2014In: Pain Management Nursing, ISSN 1524-9042, E-ISSN 1532-8635, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 315-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with dementia receive suboptimal palliative care, and this patient group is at risk to have pain at the end of life. Because communicative impairments are common in this patient group, nurses play an important caregiver role in identifying, assessing, and relieving patients’ pain. This study aimed to describe nurses’ experiences regarding end-of-life pain relief in patients with dementia. This descriptive exploratory qualitative study was based on seven semistructured interviews. Burnard’s content analysis inspired the data analysis. Two main categories were identified: (1) nurses’ experience of difficulties concerning pain relief and (2) nurses’ experience of resources concerning pain relief. Nurses experienced difficulties, such as feeling of powerlessness because of difficulties in obtaining adequate prescriptions for analgesics, ethical dilemmas, feeling of inadequacy because analgesia did not have the desired effect, and a feeling of not being able to connect with the patient. Factors, including knowledge about the patient, professional experience, utilization of pain assessment tools, interpersonal relationships, and interprofessional cooperation, served as resources and enabled end-of-life pain relief. The results of this study highlight the complexity of pain relief in patients with dementia at the end of life from a nursing perspective. The inability of patients with dementia to verbally communicate their pain makes them a vulnerable patient group, dependent on their caregivers. Knowing the life story of the patient, professional experience, teamwork based on good communication, and use of a pain assessment tool were reported by the nurses to improve pain relief at the end of life for patients with dementia.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Linnea
    et al.
    The Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence; The Sahlgrenska Academy.
    Lysell, Henrik
    The Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence; Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare.
    Enander, Viveka
    he Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence; University of Gothenburg.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). The Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence.
    Lövestad, Solveig
    The Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence; University of Gothenburg.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    The Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence; University of Gothenburg.
    Socio-demographic and psychosocial characteristics of male and female perpetrators in intimate partner homicide: A case-control study from Region Västra Götaland, Sweden2021In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 8, article id e0256064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk factor studies on male-perpetrated intimate partner homicide (IPH) are often compared with studies on intimate partner violence (IPV) or non-partner homicide perpetrators. This not only excludes female perpetrators, but also fails to take socio-demographic and psychosocial differences between perpetrators and the general population into consideration. The aim of this study was to examine male- and female-perpetrated IPH cases, and to compare socio-demographic factors in IPH perpetrators and in matched controls from the general population. Data were retrieved from preliminary inquiries, court records and national registers for 48 men and 10 women, who were perpetrators of IPH committed in 2000–2016 and residing in Region Västra Götaland, Sweden. The control group consisted of 480 men and 100 women matched for age, sex and residence parish. Logistic regression, yielding odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), was performed for male perpetrators and male controls to investigate associations for selected socio-demographic and psychosocial characteristics. This was not performed for females due to the small sample size. Female perpetrators were convicted of murder to a lesser extent than male perpetrators. No woman was sentenced to life imprisonment while five men were. Jealousy and separation were the most common motivational factors for male perpetration while the predominant factor for female perpetrators was subjection to IPV. Statistically significant differences were found between male perpetrators and male controls in unemployment rate (n = 47.9%/20.6%; OR 4.4; 95% CI 2.2–8.6), receiving benefits (n = 20.8%/4.8%; OR 5.2; 95% CI 2.3–11.7) and annual disposable income (n = 43.8%/23.3% low income; OR 5.2; 95% CI 1.9–14.2) one year prior to the crime. Female IPH perpetrators were less educated than female controls (≤ 9-year education 30%/12%) and were more often unemployed (70%/23%) one year before the crime. Male and female IPH perpetrators were socio-economically disadvantaged, compared with controls from the general population.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Enander, Viveka
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lysell, Henrik
    Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence, Sweden.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence, Sweden.
    Before the killing: intimate partner homicides in a process perspective, part I2021In: Journal of Gender Based Violence, ISSN 2398-6808, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 59-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article puts intimate partner homicide (IPH) into a process perspective, and describes the situational precursors that constitute the build-up, that is, the first stage of the IPH process that precedes the deed. Fifty court files, from cases involving 40 male and ten female perpetrators, underwent thematic analysis. Our findings indicate that the build-up phase of an IPH is complex and encompasses several different features, of which some are clearly gendered. The results point to an escalation during the build-up: of possessiveness and violent behaviour in male-to-female cases, of alcohol/drug abuse, of mental health problems and/or of fears for the future, often connected to separation. Concurrent with previous research we found that women often kill in the context of their own victimisation. There were, however, other situations and motives that also stood out as being pertinent.The practical implications of these findings are that practitioners should be particularly attentive to escalation of known risk factors, especially male possessiveness, and be aware that (the victim wanting) a separation may initiate escalation with lethal consequences.

    Key messages: IPH is a process that builds up over time.

    Risk factors for IPH should be contextualised, in order to determine which are pertinent at the time of the crime.

    The build-up to an IPH is complex, with several overlapping features. Some of these are clearly gendered and thus differ between male and female perpetrators.

  • 4.
    Enander, Viveka
    et al.
    Göteborg University.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    Göteborg University.
    Lövestad, Solveig
    Göteborg University.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). VKV – The Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence.
    The killing and thereafter: intimate partner homicides in a process perspective, part II2022In: Journal of Gender-Based Violence, ISSN 2398-6808, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 501-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article puts intimate partner homicide (IPH) into a process perspective, and describes the latter two stages of the IPH process, that is, ‘changing the project’ and ‘the aftermath’. The focus of analysis is on the moment when the perpetrator chooses to kill the victim, and what s/he does and says in the wake of the killing. Fifty court files, from cases involving 40 male and 10 female perpetrators, underwent thematic analysis. Regarding the final trigger pertaining to changing the project, some situational factors that trigger male-perpetrated IPH seem to differ from the corresponding factors in female-perpetrated IPH. Feelings of rejection and jealousy seemed to be more common as triggers to kill for men than for women, while some cases of female-perpetrated IPH were linked to self-defence in response to IPV. Moreover, as noted previously, no female perpetrators displayed possessiveness.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5. Enander, Viveka
    et al.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Lysell, Henrik
    Krantz, Gunilla
    Intimate partner homicide in West Sweden 2000-20162017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Fhager, Johan
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology Lund University Skåne University Hospital Lund Sweden.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Fischer, Tobias W.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology Kepler University Hospital Johannes Kepler University Linz Austria.
    Sjöström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The hairdex quality of life instrument: a translation and psychometric validation in patients with alopecia areata2023In: Skin Health and Disease, E-ISSN 2690-442X, Vol. 3, no 3, article id e220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The German Hairdex quality of life (QoL) instrument is specific to hair and scalp diseases, developed for self-rating and consists of 48 statements divided into five domains: Symptoms, Functioning, Emotions, Self-confidence and Stigmatisation. There was a need of a Swedish reliability tested, validated hair and scalp specific QoL instrument why the German Hairdex was chosen to be translated and reliability tested in a systematic way.

    Objectives: To make a translation, a reliability test of stability, and validation of the German Hairdex QoL instrument among 100 Swedish patients with a dermatological ICD-10 diagnosis of alopecia areata (AA).

    Methods: An eight-step method by Gudmundsson was used as a model with a forward and backward translation and with comments from an expert panel. A statistical test–retest (ICC (2,1)) analysis was made, followed by an internal consistency analysis. A comparison between the German and Swedish Hairdex-S constructs by a principal component analysis was performed.

    Results: The Hairdex-S was very well accepted by patients. The ICC(2,1) test–retest showed a good to excellent correlation of 0.91 (CI [0.85–0.95]). Internal consistency was α = 0.92. Like the original Hairdex, Hairdex-S showed good factorability with a Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin measure of 0.82 and with one component explaining 70% of the variance: original Hairdex instrument (69%). When tested on patients with AA, the domains Functioning and Emotions had the strongest loadings, followed by Stigmatisation and Self-confidence. Younger AA patients at self-assessment and patients who reported to be younger at the onset of AA, scored statistically significantly higher on the Hairdex-S, indicating an overall lower QoL on domains Emotions and Functioning, respectively.

    Conclusions: The Hairdex-S is very well accepted by AA patients, shows very good psychometric properties, and a very good agreement with the original Hairdex. The Swedish Hairdex instrument can be recommended for evaluation of patients QoL as well as for research purposes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Glantz, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Committee on Psychiatry, Habilitation and Technical Aids, Lund, Sweden.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The time, places, and activities of nurses in a psychiatric inpatient context: A time and motion study with a time-geographic perspective2023In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 387-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nurses in psychiatric inpatient care spend less time than desired with patients and investigation of the nature of nursing in this setting is needed. This study explores how nursing activities in psychiatric inpatient wards is distributed over time, and with a time-geographic perspective show how this relates to places. Observations were used to register place, activity, and time. A constructed time-geographic chart mapped the nurses’ path which showed that nurses spent little time in places where patients are. There might be constraints that affect nursing. Nurses need to evaluate where time is spent and interventions that facilitate relationships are needed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Glantz, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sandström, Boel
    “How do we use the time?”: an observational study measuring the task time distribution of nurses in psychiatric care2019In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 18, article id 67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The nurse’s primary task in psychiatric care should be to plan for the patient’s care in cooperation with the patient and spend the time needed to build a relationship. Psychiatric care nurses however claim that they lack the necessary time to communicate with patients. To investigate the validity of such claims, this time-motion study aimed at identifying how nurses working at inpatient psychiatric wards distribute their time between a variety of tasks during a working day. Methods: During the period of December 2015 and February 2016, a total of 129 h and 23 min of structured observations of 12 nurses were carried out at six inpatient wards at one psychiatric clinic in southern Sweden. Time, frequency of tasks and number of interruptions were recorded and analysed using descriptive statistics. Results: Administering drugs or medications accounted for the largest part of the measured time (17.5%) followed by indirect care (16%). Relatively little time was spent on direct care, the third largest category in the study (15.3%), while an unexpectedly high proportion of time (11.3%) was spent on ward related tasks. Nurses were also interrupted in 75% of all medication administering tasks. Conclusions: Nurses working in inpatient psychiatric care spend little time in direct contact with the patients and medication administration is interrupted very often. As a result, it is difficult to establish therapeutic relationships with patients. This is an area of concern for both patient safety and nurses’ job satisfaction.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 9.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The Face of Workplace Violence: Experiences of Healthcare Professionals in Surgical Hospital Wards2020In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2020, article id 1854387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Though workplace violence (WPV) is a global problem for healthcare professionals, research within in-hospital care has mainly focused on WPV in emergency healthcare settings. Thus, the number of qualitative studies that explores experiences of WPV in general hospital wards with a longer length of stay is limited.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore how healthcare professionals in surgical hospital wards experience and manage WPV perpetrated by patients or visitors.

    Method: . Exposure to WPV is a problem for healthcare professionals in surgical wards and has consequences for the patients. Preventive strategies, guidelines, and action plans are urgently needed to minimise the risk of WPV and to ensure a safe work and care environment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). The Västra Götaland Region Competence Center on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Exploring workplace violence on surgical wards in Sweden: a cross-sectional study2023In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Workplace violence is a global threat to healthcare professionals' occupational health and safety and the situation has worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to explore workplace violence directed against assistant and registered nurses working on surgical wards in Sweden.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in April 2022. Using a convenience sampling procedure, 198 assistant and registered nurses responded to an online questionnaire developed for this specific study. The questionnaire comprised 52 items and included, among other items, subscales from validated and previously used instruments. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, the chi-square test, and independent-samples t-test.

    RESULTS: The most frequently reported type of workplace violence was humiliation (28.8%), followed by physical violence (24.2%), threats (17.7%), and unwanted sexual attention (12.1%). Patients and patients' visitors were reported as the main perpetrators of all kinds of exposure. Additionally, one third of the respondents had experienced humiliation from colleagues. Both threats and humiliation showed negative associations with work motivation and health (p < 0.05). Respondents classified as working in a high- or moderate-risk environment were more frequently exposed to threats (p = 0.025) and humiliation (p = 0.003). Meanwhile, half of the respondents were unaware of any action plans or training regarding workplace violence. However, of those who indicated that they had been exposed to workplace violence, the majority had received quite a lot or a lot of support, mainly from colleagues (range 70.8-80.8%).

    CONCLUSION: Despite a high prevalence of workplace violence, and especially of humiliating acts, there appeared to be low preparedness within the hospital organizations to prevent and/or handle such incidents. To improve these conditions, hospital organizations should place more emphasis on preventive measures as part of their systematic work environment management. To help inform such initiatives, it is suggested that future research should focus on the identification of suitable measures regarding different types of incidents, perpetrators, and settings.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). The Västra Götaland Region Competence Center on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berthelsen, Hanne
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Workplace violence from the perspective of hospital ward managers in Sweden: A qualitative study2022In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 1523-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aims of the study are to explore workplace violence perpetrated by patients or visitors from the perspective of hospital ward managers and to describe how ward managers perceive their leadership role and manage related incidents.

    BACKGROUND: Few studies focus on workplace violence from the perspective of ward managers even though they are the closest managers to the operational staff.

    METHOD: Fifteen semistructured interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Four categories emerged: the face of workplace violence, a two-fold assignment, strive towards readiness to act, and managing incidents.

    CONCLUSION: While the most common acts of workplace violence are considered less serious and related to patients' medical conditions or dissatisfied visitors, hospital organizations focus on serious but rarely occurring incidents. Consequently, ward managers have limited opportunities to ensure a safe work environment on an everyday basis.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: To support ward managers' occupational safety and health management, workplace violence prevention and management should be acknowledged as an important responsibility for senior management in hospitals. It is important to identify incidents that most likely will occur at the wards and to create strategies related to those incidents. Strategies could include risk assessments, prevention, evaluation, education and reflection combined with, for example, scenario training.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Krantz, Oskar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Municipal information on assistive devices in Sweden2016In: Life Span and Disability, ISSN 2035-5963, no 2, p. 131-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, supply of assistive devices is a municipal/county council responsibility. Earlier research has mainly focused the matching of person and device. In contrast, this study concerns the process before the actual supply is initiated. Aim: Discuss the experience among persons who, for the first time, seek municipal information on assistive devices and the provision thereof through internet pages and contacts with prescribers. Methods: A combined analysis of data from two earlier studies was performed, focusing overall process perspectives: Study 1 described the experience of seeking information from municipal internet pages, and study 2 described the experience of personal contacts with municipal prescribers. Results: Internet pages and prescribers were, in general, perceived as lacking information on assistive devices, whereas information on provision was clearer. Internet sites were difficult to navigate, prescribers difficult to contact. Conclusions: The experience of seeking information on assistive devices through municipal internet pages and contacts with municipal prescribers was less empowering. From a process perspective, for a person to become an active partner in the actual provision of assistive devices, a person-centered process with improved accessibility to adequate information on assistive devices and provisioning may be a viable step.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 13.
    Krantz, Oskar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Provision of Assistive Technology in Relation to Person-Centered Care and Health Literacy2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 14.
    Krantz, Oskar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Upplevelser av information vid kontakt med kommunala hjälpmedelförskrivare2015In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 5, no 92, p. 605-614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte: Beskriva upplevelser hos personer som för första gången får kontakt med en kommunal hjälpmedelsförskrivare för att få information om förskrivning av hjälpmedel. Metod: Trettiosex studenter kontaktade hjälpmedelsförskrivare i de 33 skånska kommunerna och rapporterade sina upplevelser. Dessa bearbetades och analyserades genom en tematisk innehållsanalys. Resultat: Det var svårt att nå förskrivare per telefon, både direktnummer och via växel. Bemötandet varierade från stressat och korthugget till välkomnande och hjälpsamt. Förskrivare använde termen ”patient” om hjälpmedelsanvändare, och underströk individens skyldigheter. Informationsinnehållet var magert. Förskrivare hänvisade till ospecificerade internetsökningar. Slutsatser: Kontaktmöjligheter och informationsinnehåll behöver ses över. Personcentrerad hjälpmedelsförskrivning kan öka personens empowerment genom ökat inflytande över innehåll och genomförande. Därigenom kan självbestämmande och delaktighet öka.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 15.
    Manderius, Charlotta
    et al.
    Psychiatric assessment unit, adult psychiatry, Region Skane, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Clintståhl, Kristofer
    Psychiatric psychosis unit, adult psychiatry, Region Skane, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Regionhälsan, The Västra Götaland Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The psychiatric mental health nurse's ethical considerations regarding the use of coercive measures: a qualitative interview study2023In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In psychiatric inpatient care, situations arise where it may be necessary to use coercive measures and thereby restrict individual autonomy. The ethical principles of healthcare, i.e., respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice, are recognized as central aspects in healthcare practice, and nurses must be clear about which ethical theories and principles to prioritize and what values are needed for a thorough ethical consideration. The aim of this study is to shed light on psychiatric mental health nurses' ethical considerations and on the factors influencing them when performing coercive measures.

    METHODS: This qualitative interview study included twelve psychiatric mental health nurses with experience from psychiatric inpatient care. A content analysis was made. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and categories were formulated.

    RESULTS: The study revealed a duality that created two categories: Ethical considerations that promote the patient's autonomy and health and Obstacles to ethical considerations. Based on this duality, ethical considerations were made when performing coercive measures to alleviate suffering and promote health. The result shows a high level of ethical awareness in clinical work. However, a request emerged for more theoretical knowledge about ethical concepts that could be implemented among the staff.

    CONCLUSION: The psychiatric mental health nurses in this study strive to do what is best for the patient, to respect the patient's autonomy as a guiding principle in all ethical considerations, and to avoid coercive measures. An organizational ethical awareness could increase the understanding of the difficult ethical considerations that nurses face with regard to minimizing the use of coercive measures in the long run.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Sjögran, Lotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wangel, Anne-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). The Region Västra Götaland Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg.
    Sjöström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). The Region Skåne, Committee on Psychiatry, Habilitation and Technical Aids, Lund.
    Self-Reported Experience of Abuse During the Life Course Among Men Seeking General Psychiatric or Addiction Care-A Prevalence Study in a Swedish Context.2023In: Violence and Victims, ISSN 0886-6708, E-ISSN 1945-7073, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 111-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prevalence study was conducted using the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire for men (m-NorAQ) to estimate the prevalence of self-reported experience of life-course abuse and to identify the perpetrators of the abuse. This among men seeking general psychiatric and addiction care in a Swedish context. In total, 210 men completed the questionnaire, and were included in the study. The total prevalence of life-course abuse (i.e., any emotional, physical or sexual abuse during the life course) was 75% (n = 157). The results of this study indicate the importance of identifying experiences of life-course abuse among men in general psychiatric and addiction care settings.

  • 17.
    Sundberg, Kajsa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Vistrand, Cecilia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjöström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Nurses' leadership in psychiatric care: A qualitative interview study of nurses' experience of leadership in an adult psychiatric inpatient care setting2022In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, no 5, p. 732-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Research shows that psychiatric nursing care puts additional demands on the nurse as a leader due to the psychological complexity of care. Experience and leadership training are most important to exert leadership. In Sweden, demands for leadership exists already at the beginning of a nursing career, and in psychiatry it may lead to an overwhelming workload.

    AIM/QUESTION: The aim of the present study is to highlight nurses' experiences of leading the psychiatric nursing care in an adult psychiatric context.

    METHOD: A qualitative interview study of eleven registered nurses within psychiatric inpatient care. Content analysis were used for analysis.

    RESULTS: Leading with combined feelings of both meaningfulness and uncertainty were the theme arising from the result.

    DISCUSSION: Findings from Swedish and international studies, stresses special demands on leadership in psychiatric care. The result show that nurses perceived an ambivalence of their leadership in terms of both meaningfulness and uncertainty.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: An official mandate to lead as well as leadership guidance in communication and teambuilding will enhance leadership, especially among newly graduated nurses. Heightened awareness within health care organisations about difficulties in leading psychiatric nursing care, could increase the possibility to create right prerequisites for leadership.

  • 18.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Berngarn, Angelica
    Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Region Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ekezie, Promise Ezinne
    Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Region Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Emma
    Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Region Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Region Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Region Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    A pilot evaluation of a prehospital emergency psychiatric unit: The experiences of patients, psychiatric and mental health nurses, and significant others2022In: Perspectives in psychiatric care, ISSN 0031-5990, E-ISSN 1744-6163, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 2255-2262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To explore the significance of the alliance with the Prehospital Emergency Psychiatric Unit for patients, psychiatric and mental health nurses, and significant others, and to evaluate their experiences of treatment and care. Design and Methods A qualitative inductive interview study with 11 participants: four patients, six nurses, and one significant other. The interviews were analyzed with content analysis. Findings The analysis resulted in four subcategories: To be met with respect, presence and time, knowledge and experience, and feeling of support, and one category: A psychiatric team with knowledge and experience creating stability and a sense of self-worth. Practice Implication The Prehospital Emergency Psychiatric Unit enables a safe, person-centered service.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Time Geography, a Method in Psychiatric Nursing Care2020In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 1004-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients' life history is of primary interest in psychiatric nursing care. Our aim was to illustrate how we used time geography as a method to identify individuals' patterns in relation to certain situations in place. We have used interviews and diaries to construct life charts by hand and with a computer software program. By using time geography, we provide a rich amount of information, which can generate a broader picture of a person's life, to identify stressful as well as social aspects of a person's life. Patients with mental ill health need and value the therapeutic relationship using time geography.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Vejzovic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Undergoing colonoscopy as experienced by adolescents2020In: Journal for specialists in pediatric nursing : JSPN, ISSN 1744-6155, Vol. 25, no 3, article id e12290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe the phenomenon of undergoing colonoscopy as experienced by adolescents.

    DESIGN: This study was a qualitative study in which data were collected and analyzed in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research with a phenomenological approach.

    METHODS: Face-to-face interviews were performed with 17 adolescents after undergoing the first colonoscopy.

    RESULTS: The phenomenon of undergoing colonoscopy as experienced by adolescents can be described as a collision between emotions and a desire to obtain answers to questions about the examination, as well as concerns about its result and the meaning of undergoing colonoscopy. The essential meaning is additionally described through its constituents: a sense of vulnerability, an opportunity for symptom explanation, and sensibility regarding information.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results can be concluded in terms of the knowledge that for adolescents a colonoscopy means more than an examination. Although colonoscopy is not experienced as painful, it evokes different emotions that affect adolescents. Therefore, a psychological preparation, on an individual level, is required before the colonoscopy. Our results showed that adolescents need to understand the connection between their symptoms, their body, and the colonoscopy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Wangel, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Persson, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Duerlund, Sara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Fhager, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Mårdhed, Emma
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjögran, Lotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjöström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Glantz, Andreas
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    The Region Skåne Committee on Psychiatry, Habilitation and Technical Aids, Lund, Sweden;Department of Clinical Sciences Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The Core Elements of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing: Time, Honest Engagement, Therapeutic Relations, Professional Nursing and Lifetime-Perspective2024In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, p. 1-10Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Defining psychiatric and mental health nursing has been a challenge for decades, and it is still difficult to find a comprehensive definition. We have identified a possibility to clarify psychiatric and mental health nursing based on humanistic philosophy in a general psychiatric care context. The aim was therefore to identify and synthesize the theoretical frameworks from which psychiatric and mental health nursing models are developed. We systematically collected and evaluated articles based on Grounded Theory (GT) methodology regarding psychiatric or mental health nursing. The PRISMA statement for systematic reviews was used and the formal process of synthesis, as a three-step process of identifying first -, second - and third-order themes following the examples of Howell Major and Savin-Baden. The synthesis resulted in a model describing five core elements of psychiatric and mental health nursing: 'professional nursing', 'therapeutic relationships' and 'honest engagement', with time as the all-encompassing theme, including the patients' 'lifetime perspective'. Psychiatric and mental health nursing is a caring support towards recovery, where the patient's lifetime perspective must be in focus during the caring process with a relationship built on an honest engagement. Time is therefore essential for psychiatric and mental health nursing.

  • 22.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Att fråga om våld inom hälso-och sjukvården2018In: Våld i nära relationer: socialt arbete i forskning, teori och praktik / [ed] Eveliina Sinisalo, Linn Moser Hällen, Liber, 2018, p. 89-99Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Experiences of abuse during the life course: disclosure and the care provided in a general psychiatric context2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiences of abuse are common among women in Sweden and being abused during childhood as well as adulthood has consequences for the lives of girls and women. One consequence of abuse is the impact on their mental health, which entails them seeking psychiatric care as a consequence of this. Being abused as a child has consequences during childhood as well as during adolescence and adulthood and there is a link between childhood abuse and mental ill health as an adult. Adults who have experienced abuse during their childhood have poorer mental health as adults and are overrepresented within the health care systems. Women who experience abuse as adults often describe consequences such as depression, posttraumatic stress disorder and anxiety. The psychiatric context is often described as being unhelpful when you have experience of abuse and women could be reluctant to disclose their experiences to staff for a variety of reasons. This thesis aims to identify experiences of abuse during childhood and adulthood among women who have experienced abuse and have mental ill health. The thesis also aims to explore women’s disclosure of abuse and experiences of the care provided in a general psychiatric context. The first study aimed to explore women’s disclosure of experiencing physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse to staff during their latest contact at a general psychiatric clinic. The study also aimed to explore whether the women had ever disclosed abuse to anyone at all. Seventy-seven women completed a questionnaire at the clinic and the results showed that the women often disclosed their experiences of abuse to others, but they had often chosen not to disclose their experiences during their latest contact with staff at the general psychiatric clinic. In the second study 10 women were interviewed regarding their experiences of physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse and its influence on their self-reported mental ill health. The overall theme evolving from the interviews were, “Being vulnerable and without protection in a frightful reality that limits one’s possibilities of living and being the person one wishes to be”. The categories that emerged were: ”Living in fear that persistently influences the substance of life”, “Living with the sense of being worthless”, “Living with a constant question about who you are” and “Living between hope and despair”. The third study aimed to elucidate how women subjected to physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse experience the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after the disclosure of abuse. The overall theme capturing the essence of the nine interviews was visualized as ”Dependency as a reality containing a duality of suffering and trust”. The categories that emerged in the text were: “Being belittled”, “Being misinterpreted” and “Being cared for”. The fourth study aimed to investigate the life course of women within psychiatric care who had experienced abuse. The study also aimed to focus on the women’s resources, stressful events, experience of abuse, perpetrators, mental ill health and care and support throughout the life course. The subcategories that shaped the categories were presented within the life spans; childhood 0-12 years, adolescence 13-19 years and adulthood 20 years and above. The life charts revealed that adulthood was the period of life that had most frequent events of abuse. The women who had few experiences of abuse during childhood had also only a few noted events of mental ill health during that period of life. Emotional abuse was most frequent throughout the life course. Sexual abuse was the lesser noted abuse during childhood, but increased during adolescence and adulthood. The life charts also visualize that the women had seldom revealed the abuse during their childhood to others growing up and as adults the women often went to formal networks for support and care. The results of the thesis show that the general psychiatric care must improve their efforts to identify and support women who have experienced abuse. The women’s own stories regarding experiences of abuse during the life course must be recognized and integrated with traditional biomedical care.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 24.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The life time experience of abuse, the severity and mental illness among abused women in a general psychiatric context2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 25.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The life time experience of abuse, the severity and mental illness among abused women in a general psychiatric context2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Tidsgeografi: en metod för att screena våldsutsatta kvinnor i en allmänpsykiatrisk kontext2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 27.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bramhagen, Ann-Cathrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Vejzovic, Vedrana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The experience of polyethylene glycol (PEG) bowel preparation in adolescents undergoing colonoscopy2020In: BMC Research Notes, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the experience of polyethylene glycol (PEG) bowel preparation in adolescents undergoing colonoscopy.

    RESULTS: 32 adolescents, 10-18 years of age self-reported a minimum of complications 1 week after colonoscopy when PEG was used for bowel preparation. 17 adolescents, 10-18 years were also interviewed about bowel preparation with PEG. Using qualitative content analysis, two categories were extracted from the data: "Being decisive makes it manageable" and "Be prepared for a horrible experience." The adolescents reported PEG intake difficulty; the intake was, however, manageable if they received appropriate information.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Abused women's vulnerability in daily life and in contact with psychiatric care: in the light of a caring science perspective2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 15-16, p. 2384-2391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives The aim of the study is to deepen the understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with health care professionals affect life. A further aim is to highlight abused women's vulnerability with a caring science perspective. Background Experience of abuse has consequences for the mental health of women and girls. Abused women may experience health care as unsupportive, and as a result, often chose not to disclose their experiences of abuse. Design and methods The results of two qualitative empirical studies were analysed along with a phenomenological meaning analysis in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. Findings Living one's life with experiences of abuse implies vulnerability, which can prevent abused women from achieving good health. This vulnerability results from insecurity regarding identity, along with the sense that one could have been a different individual if it were not for the abuse and thereby have a more fair chance in life. Being cared for within general psychiatric care could further increase this vulnerability. The healthcare professional's ability to care for the women who have experienced abuse leads to either an encounter of trust or else further suffering for the women. Conclusion A lifeworld-oriented caring science perspective as a foundation for care can contribute to care for abused women which reaches the existential dimensions of their vulnerability and vulnerable life situation. Relevance to clinical practice It is evident that healthcare professionals should deepen their understanding of how abused women live, within a general psychiatric context. This study enables a deeper understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with healthcare professionals affect life.

  • 29.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    The unnecessary suffering and abuse caused by healthcare professionals needs to stop: A study regarding experiences of abuse among female patients in a general psychiatric setting2017In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 5, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Healthcare, from a caring science perspective, aims to support the patients’ health processes. All healthcare is, however, not experienced as being caring by the patients. Consequences of abuse in healthcare (AHC) services have effects on the patients’ health and well-being. The aim of this study was to explore experiences of abuse from healthcare professionals among female patients in a general psychiatric clinic. Methods: In the cross-sectional study design, data from female patients receiving outpatient or inpatient care at a general psychiatric clinic about their experiences of abuse were gathered by using the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ) Descriptive statistics were used to describe experiences of abuse in the health care sector. Results: Fifty-six women reported abuse by healthcare professionals. Being offended or grossly degraded while visiting health services, was experienced by almost all the women (n = 50). Experiences that a “normal” event while visiting health services suddenly became a really terrible and insulting experience, without fully knowing how this could happen was experienced by 38 women in the study. During their current care episode at the general psychiatric clinic a majority of the female patients chose not to reveal their experiences of abuse in the health care sector (n = 34). Conclusions: The fact that patients experience suffering and abuse from healthcare professionals is a serious problem that needs to be highlighted and discussed within all healthcare contexts. Attention needs to be paid to the suffering and abuse that is related to encounters and relationships between patients and healthcare professionals.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 30.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Experiences of the Provided Care in a General Psychiatric Context After Disclosure of Abuse2015In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 30, no S1Abstracts of the 23rd European Congress of Psychiatry, article id 0978Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Experiences of abuse during childhood and/or adulthood has an impact on women's mental health as well as generating frequent hospital admission. Experiences of abuse are common among female patients in general psychiatric care. Aims and Objectives The aim of the study is to elucidate how nine women with experiences of physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse experienced the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after disclosure of abuse. Method Qualitative design with an inductive approach. Interviews with nine women who were recipients of general psychiatric care in an urban area in Sweden. The women had disclosed experiences of abuse to a member of staff. Qualitative inductive content analysis was used. Results The nine women reported being subjected to abuse during childhood and adulthood, only one of them reported only being abused as an adult. The overall theme emerging from the narratives, 'Dependency as a reality containing a duality of suffering and trust' describe the general psychiatric care as caring and noncaring. In a caring environment was the women acknowledged, listened to and treated with sensitivity. Experiences of noncaring were when the abuse was disregarded, the women were not believed in, offended or self-blamed for the abuse. A noncaring environment focused primarily on the diagnosis and the experienced abuse was seen as secondary. Conclusions Women who have experienced abuse experience the care provided as caring as well as noncaring. General psychiatric could be supportive as well as belittling depending on staff at the clinic.

  • 31.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    "Finally, my life story is my own”: a time geographic study2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Time Geographic Life Charting: a Computer Program for a Life-course Approach!2015In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 30, no S1, article id 1917Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Life charting seems to be an increasing trend in psychiatric care, and the essential idea is that patients’ life histories are of primary interest for diagnosis, care and treatment and it can also be a helpful tool in the progress of communication. Objectives Patients with a history of suicide behavior were assessed as well as female patients with experiences of physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse in general psychiatric care, in urban areas in Sweden. Aims To create and to evaluate the life course of patients seeking general psychiatric care Method We used the Hägerstand (1985) Time Geography model, and constructed the life charts together with the patient using a computer program covering both time and geographical aspects. Manifest content analysis was used for analyzing the life charts. Results Stressful events as well as social capacities was identified across the life course and provided rich information regarding the lived lives of patients seeking general psychiatric care. The life charts have a therapeutic value due to its focus on both stressful events and capacities. The use of Time Geography life charting can also be a helpful tool in the progress of communication as well as an apparatus for identifying stressful and prosperous life periods. Conclusions A profound knowledge of the patients was illustrated and therefor preventive strategy can be formulated.

  • 33.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Torstensson Levander, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Disclosure of abuse among female patients within general psychiatric care: a cross sectional study2016In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, no 16, article id 79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Experiences of abuse are common among women in general psychiatric care. Even so, there are to our knowledge no previous national or international studies exploring disclosure in a general psychiatric setting of female patient’s experiences of abuse to staff or to formal and informal networks. This study aimed to explore women’s disclosure of experiencing physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse during their most recent contact with staff at a general psychiatric clinic. The study also aimed to determine whether the women have previously disclosed abuse to anyone. Methods A consecutive sampling of eligible female patients at a general psychiatric clinic in an urban area of southern Sweden answered the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire, NorAQ, a self-administrated questionnaire. NorAQ has previously been used and further developed to compare the prevalence of abuse in women present in gynecological outpatient settings in the five Nordic countries. Seventy-seven women with experiences of abuse participated in the research. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Results Most respondents did not disclose their experiences of abuse to staff at the general psychiatric clinic. Women with experiences of physical abuse (n = 40), emotional abuse (n = 37) and sexual abuse (n = 37) chose not to disclose their experiences. Respondents disclosed abuse more often to others than to staff. Conclusions Our findings indicated the importance of including routine questions concerning abuse experiences as a natural part of female patients’ medical history.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Torstensson Levander, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    The life-time experience of abuse and suicidal behavior among abused women in a general psychiatric context2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: Research concerning domestic violence and intimate partner violence reports life time prevalence of abuse and associations between suicidal behaviors among female psychiatric patients. The aim of the study was to describe abused women’s experiences of emotional, physical, sexual abuse and suicidal behavior experienced by women in general psychiatric care. METHODS: Women attending general psychiatric in-and outpatient care were asked to participate, using the NorVold abuse questionnaire, and seventy seven abused women contributed. RESULTS: Thoughts of suicide were significantly more common among women subjected to severe emotional abuse (n= 35, 71%), compared to women not subjected (n=14, 29%).Women suffering from mild emotional abuse register higher frequency of thoughts of suicide (n=39, 80%) compared to women with no experience (n=10, 20%). Suicide attempts were significantly higher among women experiencing severe emotional abuse (n=14, 82%) compared to women with no experience (n=3, 18%). Women who endured severe physical abuse made suicide attempt significantly more often (n=14, 74%) than women with no experience (n=5, 26%). Acts of self-deliberate harm were significantly higher among women experiencing mild emotional abuse (n=24, 86%) compared to the women with no experience (n=4, 14%). CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that women with suicidal behavior could be victims of mild and severe emotional abuse and severe physical abuse. Even when suffering from the abuse, the women rarely confide to personnel.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT02
  • 35.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Torstensson Levander, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The life course of women who have experienced abuse: a life chart study in general psychiatric care2015In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 316-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violence against women is a worldwide problem and has an impact on the lives of women and girls. The study aims to investigate the life course of women within psychiatric care who have experienced abuse. The women’s resources, stressful events, experience of abuse, perpetrators, mental ill health, and care and support throughout the life course are also highlighted. Eleven women who had all sought general psychiatric care in an urban area in Sweden participated. A computer software program was used for constructing life charts for each participant, and manifest content analysis was used to analyse the data. The women’s social status and resources differed, and some of them spoke of only experiencing few stressful events growing up, while others described a stressful childhood. All of the women had been abused sometime during their life course, and most of the perpetrators were known to the women. Even so, the women had seldom disclosed their childhood abuse. As adults, the women were diagnosed with psychiatric diagnoses, and suicidal behaviour increased. The life chart offers rich information and a broader picture of the life history of women who experienced abuse as well as constituting a tool useful for identifying women with experiences of abuse.

  • 36.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Torstensson Levander, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The duality of suffering and trust: abused women's experiences of general psychiatric care: an interview study2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 15-16, p. 2303-2312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To elucidate how women subjected to physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse experience the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after the disclosure of abuse. Background Violence against women is a major global public health issue, which has an impact on women's lives and mental health as well as generating frequent hospital admission. Design Qualitative design with an inductive approach. Methods Interviews with nine women who were recipients of general psychiatric care and had disclosed experiences of abuse to a member of staff were conducted. Qualitative inductive content analysis was used. Results The overall theme emerging from the narratives, ‘dependency as a reality containing a duality of suffering and trust,’ links the categories together. Each subcategory is presented in relation to the categories ‘being belittled,’ ‘being misinterpreted’ and ‘being cared for.’ Experiences of care as caring and noncaring were found in the narratives. Caring could include situations experienced as the women being acknowledged and listened to, situations where staff approached and supported the women in a sensitive way. Experiences of noncaring were when the abuse was disregarded, and when the women were not believed in, were left with burdens of guilt and were offended. A noncaring environment focused primarily on the diagnosis, and the experienced abuse was seen as secondary. Conclusions Abused women are subjected to psychiatric environments where staff are divided into groups of those who believed in and supported the abused women and those who regarded experiences of abuse as a secondary issue and focused on the mental disorder. Relevance to clinical practice This study provides knowledge of how abused women experience the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after the disclosure of abuse.

  • 37.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Torstensson Levander, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Vulnerable and without protection: Lifetime experiences of abuse and its influence on mental ill health2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 34-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violence against women is a major global public health issue, and experiencing violence has substantial consequences for the lives of abused women. This study aims to illustrate experiences of abuse and its influence on mental ill health among women seeking general psychiatric care. Ten women seeking general psychiatric care in southern Sweden participated in a qualitative interview study. Content analysis resulted in four categories: Living in fear that persistently influences the substance of life, living with the sense of being worthless, living with a constant question about who you are and living between hope and despair. The theme evolving from the analysis was: Being vulnerable and without protection in a frightful reality that limits one’s possibilities of living and being the person one wishes to be. The results showed that the women described their mental ill health not only in terms of depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation and self-harm, but also in relation to feelings of hope and despair, fear, worthlessness and living with a constant question about who they are. The abuse reduces freedom of action, and leads to feelings of insecurity, of not having any boundaries, isolation, and self-contempt and a need to escape. This study provides knowledge of abused women self-reported mental ill health in relation to abuse.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
1 - 37 of 37
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf