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  • 1. Ambrus, Livia
    et al.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Asp, Marie
    Westling, Sofie
    Westrin, Åsa
    Coping and suicide risk in high risk psychiatric patients2020In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 27-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A dysfunctional use of coping strategies has repeatedly been linked to suicidal behaviour in non-psychiatric populations. However, data regarding association between coping strategies and suicidal behaviour in psychiatric populations are limited. Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate the possible relationship between self-reported suicide risk, suicidal ideation and coping strategies in three psychiatric cohorts. Method: Three cohorts of psychiatric patients were involved in the study; recent suicide attempters (n = 55), suicide attempters at follow-up 12 years after a suicide attempt (n = 38) and patients with ongoing depression without attempted suicide (n = 72). Patients filled in the self-rating version of The Suicide Assessment Scale (SUAS-S) from which items no. 17–20 addressing current suicidal ideation were extracted. To investigate coping strategies, the Coping Orientation of Problem Experience Inventory (COPE) was used. Results: In all cohorts, regression analyses showed that only avoidant coping was significantly correlated with the scores of SUAS-S adjusted for covariates. The items no. 17–20 correlated significantly to avoidant coping but not with other coping strategies in all cohorts. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that among coping strategies only avoidant coping may be associated with suicide risk in psychiatric patients independently of history of attempted suicide.

  • 2. Ambrus, Livia
    et al.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Ekman, Agneta
    Suchankova, Petra
    Träskman-Bendz, Lil
    Westrin, Åsa
    Associations between avoidant focused coping strategies and polymorrphisms in genes coding for brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in suicide attempters: a preliminary study2014In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 220, no 1-2, p. 732-733Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the genes coding for BDNF (Val66Met) and VEGF(C2578A) may be associated with maladaptive strategies among suicide attempt patients. We found that BDNF Val66Met gene polymorphism probably affect avoidant coping strategies.

  • 3. Ambrus, Livia
    et al.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Ekman, Rolf
    Träskman-Bendz, Lil
    Westrin, Åsa
    Plasma Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Psychopathology in Attempted Suicide2016In: Neuropsychobiology, ISSN 0302-282X, E-ISSN 1423-0224, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 241-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Increasing evidence suggests a link between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and suicidal behaviour (SB). Furthermore, decreased peripheral BDNF levels have been associated with clinical symptoms in various psychiatric disorders as well as with personality dimensions in healthy individuals. However, the relationship between BDNF and psychopathology is poorly investigated regarding SB. Methods: Plasma BDNF concentrations were analysed in 61 recent suicide attempters. Clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale. Personality dimensions were assessed using the Marke-Nyman Temperament Scale. Results: Plasma BDNF correlated positively and significantly with the personality dimension Solidity but not with the other personality dimensions or with clinical symptoms. Conclusion: BDNF plays an important role in the regulation of neuroplasticity and neurogenesis in humans. Our results indicate that lower BDNF concentrations are associated with higher levels of impulsiveness and changeability (low scores on the Solidity scale). Furthermore, low plasma BDNF levels may be proposed as a trait marker rather than a state marker for attempted suicide. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 4.
    Bergqvist, Erik
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Psychiat, Baravagen 1, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Reg Halland, Hallands Sjukhus Varberg, Psychiat In Patient Clin, S-43281 Varberg, Sweden..
    Probert-Lindstrom, Sara
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Psychiat, Baravagen 1, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Reg Skane, Off Psychiat & Habilitat, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Froding, Elin
    Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping Acad Improvement Hlth & Welf, Sch Hlth & Welf, S-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden.;Reg Jonkopings Lan, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Palmqvist-Oberg, Nina
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Psychiat, Baravagen 1, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Reg Skane, Off Psychiat & Habilitat, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Ehnvall, Anna
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Psychiat & Neurochem, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Reg Halland, Psychiat Out Patient Clin, S-43243 Varberg, Sweden..
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sellin, Tabita
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, S-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Vaez, Marjan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Div Insurance Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Waern, Margda
    Reg Vastra Gotaland, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Psychosis Clin, S-43130 Molndal, Sweden..
    Westrin, Asa
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Psychiat, Baravagen 1, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.;Reg Skane, Off Psychiat & Habilitat, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Health care utilisation two years prior to suicide in Sweden: a retrospective explorative study based on medical records2022In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Previous literature has suggested that identifying putative differences in health care seeking patterns before death by suicide depending on age and gender may facilitate more targeted suicide preventive approaches. The aim of this study is to map health care utilisation among individuals in the two years prior to suicide in Sweden in 2015 and to examine possible age and gender differences. Methods Design: A retrospective explorative study with a medical record review covering the two years preceding suicide. Setting: All health care units located in 20 of Sweden's 21 regions. Participants: All individuals residing in participating regions who died by suicide during 2015 (n = 949). Results Almost 74% were in contact with a health care provider during the 3 months prior to suicide, and 60% within 4 weeks. Overall health care utilisation during the last month of life did not differ between age groups. However, a higher proportion of younger individuals (< 65 years) were in contact with psychiatric services, and a higher proportion of older individuals (>= 65 years) were in contact with primary and specialised somatic health care. The proportion of women with any type of health care contact during the observation period was larger than the corresponding proportion of men, although no gender difference was found among primary and specialised somatic health care users within four weeks and three months respectively prior to suicide. Conclusion Care utilisation before suicide varied by gender and age. Female suicide decedents seem to utilise health care to a larger extent than male decedents in the two years preceding death, except for the non-psychiatric services in closer proximity to death. Older adults seem to predominantly use non-psychiatric services, while younger individuals seek psychiatric services to a larger extent.

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  • 5.
    Glantz, Andreas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Committee on Psychiatry, Habilitation and Technical Aids, Lund, Sweden.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Västra Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The time, places, and activities of nurses in a psychiatric inpatient context: A time and motion study with a time-geographic perspective2023In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 387-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nurses in psychiatric inpatient care spend less time than desired with patients and investigation of the nature of nursing in this setting is needed. This study explores how nursing activities in psychiatric inpatient wards is distributed over time, and with a time-geographic perspective show how this relates to places. Observations were used to register place, activity, and time. A constructed time-geographic chart mapped the nurses’ path which showed that nurses spent little time in places where patients are. There might be constraints that affect nursing. Nurses need to evaluate where time is spent and interventions that facilitate relationships are needed.

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  • 6. Lanthén, Klas
    et al.
    Rask, Mikael
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Psychiatric Patients Experiences with Mechanical Restraints: An Interview Study2015In: Psychiatry Journal, ISSN 2314-4327, E-ISSN 2314-4335, Vol. 2015, article id 748392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine psychiatric patients’ experience of mechanical restraints and to describe the care the patients received. Background. All around the world, threats and violence perpetrated by patients in psychiatric emergency inpatient units are quite common and are a prevalent factor concerning the application of mechanical restraints, although psychiatric patients’ experiences of mechanical restraints are still moderately unknown. Method. A qualitative design with an inductive approach were used, based on interviews with patients who once been in restraints. Results. This study resulted in an overbridging theme: Physical Presence, Instruction and Composed Behavior Can Reduce Discontent and Trauma, including five categories. These findings implicated the following: information must be given in a calm and sensitive way, staff must be physically present during the whole procedure, and debriefing after the incident must be conducted. Conclusions. When mechanical restraints were unavoidable, the presence of committed staff during mechanical restraint was important, demonstrating the significance of training acute psychiatric nurses correctly so that their presence is meaningful. Nurses in acute psychiatric settings should be required to be genuinely committed, aware of their actions, and fully present in coercive situations where patients are vulnerable.

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  • 7. Niméus, Anders
    et al.
    Hjalmarsson Ståhlfors, Fredrik
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Stanley, Barbara
    Träskman-Bendz, Lil
    Evaluation of a modified interview version and of a self-rating version of the Suicide Assessment Scale2006In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 471-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Suicide Assessment Scale (SUAS) was constructed to be sensitive to change of suicidality. It was recently found to be predictive of suicide in a group of suicide attempters. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a modified interview version of SUAS with defined scores and also a new self-rating version (SUAS-S). The subjects consisted of former inpatients, 42 persons who had been admitted because of a suicide attempt about 12 years ago and 22 control patients. The subjects were rated according to the SUAS, the SUAS-S, as well as the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The interrater reliability was found to be high. The SUAS correlated significantly with the MADRS, but the concordance was not consistent, which indicates that the SUAS measures something different from depression. The SUAS-S correlated significantly with the interview-rated SUAS, thus exhibiting good concurrent validity. In summary, both the modified interview version of SUAS and the SUAS-S seem to be valid, reliable and easily used suicide assessment instruments. © 2006 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

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  • 8.
    Sjögran, Lotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wangel, Anne-Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). The Region Västra Götaland Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg.
    Sjöström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). The Region Skåne, Committee on Psychiatry, Habilitation and Technical Aids, Lund.
    Self-Reported Experience of Abuse During the Life Course Among Men Seeking General Psychiatric or Addiction Care-A Prevalence Study in a Swedish Context.2023In: Violence and Victims, ISSN 0886-6708, E-ISSN 1945-7073, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 111-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prevalence study was conducted using the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire for men (m-NorAQ) to estimate the prevalence of self-reported experience of life-course abuse and to identify the perpetrators of the abuse. This among men seeking general psychiatric and addiction care in a Swedish context. In total, 210 men completed the questionnaire, and were included in the study. The total prevalence of life-course abuse (i.e., any emotional, physical or sexual abuse during the life course) was 75% (n = 157). The results of this study indicate the importance of identifying experiences of life-course abuse among men in general psychiatric and addiction care settings.

  • 9.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Berngarn, Angelica
    Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Region Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ekezie, Promise Ezinne
    Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Region Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Emma
    Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Region Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Region Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Region Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    A pilot evaluation of a prehospital emergency psychiatric unit: The experiences of patients, psychiatric and mental health nurses, and significant others2022In: Perspectives in psychiatric care, ISSN 0031-5990, E-ISSN 1744-6163, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 2255-2262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To explore the significance of the alliance with the Prehospital Emergency Psychiatric Unit for patients, psychiatric and mental health nurses, and significant others, and to evaluate their experiences of treatment and care. Design and Methods A qualitative inductive interview study with 11 participants: four patients, six nurses, and one significant other. The interviews were analyzed with content analysis. Findings The analysis resulted in four subcategories: To be met with respect, presence and time, knowledge and experience, and feeling of support, and one category: A psychiatric team with knowledge and experience creating stability and a sense of self-worth. Practice Implication The Prehospital Emergency Psychiatric Unit enables a safe, person-centered service.

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  • 10.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Karlsson, Karin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Lindell, Lisbeth
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Fors, Uno
    Virtual patient simulation in psychiatric care: A pilot study of digital support for collaborate learning2016In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 17, p. 30-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychiatric and mental health nursing is built on a trusted nurse and patient relationship. Therefore communication and clinical reasoning are two important issues. Our experiences as teachers in psychiatric educational programmes are that the students feel anxiety and fear before they start their clinical practices in psychiatry. Therefore there is a need for bridging over the fear. Technology enhanced learning might support such activities so we used Virtual patients (VPs), an interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate 4th term nursing students’ opinions on the use of Virtual Patients for assessment in a Mental Health and Ill-health course module. We asked 24 volunteering students to practise with five different VP cases during almost 10 weeks before the exam. The participants were gathered together for participating in a written and an oral evaluation. The students were positive to the use of VPs in psychiatry and were very positive to use VPs in their continued nursing education. It seems that Virtual Patients can be an activity producing pedagogic model promoting students’ independent knowledge development, critical thinking, reflection and problem solving ability for nurse students in psychiatric care.

  • 11.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Persson, Ulla
    Lenntorp, Bo
    Träskman-Bendz, Lil
    Time geography: a model for psychiatric life charting?2007In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 14, p. 250-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since many years, life charting has been used to describe the life course and life events of psychiatric patients. The aim of the present study was to describe and evaluate time geographic life charts of 11 former psychiatric patients in order to promote systematic descriptions of their life events over time. Information on all events which was gathered from the life charts was analysed by manifest content analysis and reduced to four categories: information received by asking only about moves, social capacity, predisposing life events and/or stressful as well as precipitating life events. Our findings showed that this kind of life charts offered a comprehensive and structured picture. They describe a detailed life situation from one time period to another, where geographical sites serve as anchors. The patients expressed satisfaction with this method of combining an interview with a time geographic life line.

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  • 12.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Persson, Ulla
    Westrin, Åsa
    Träskman-Bendz, Lil
    Lenntorp, Bo
    Grasping the dynamics of suicidal behaviour: combining time-geographic life charting and COPE ratings2012In: Journal of Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 336-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A primary aim of suicide research is to gain a profound knowledge of the suicidal individual so preventive strategy can be formulated. •  Time-geographic life charting used in combination with the pattern of coping strategies may be helpful when assessing risk of suicidal behaviour. •  It can also be a therapeutic intervention to look back and to reflect coping styles. ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to explore whether a time-geographic life charting, combined with a survey of a person's coping capacities over time, elucidates the pathway to suicidal behaviour, and therefore could be useful in suicide prevention. Twenty-three patients were recruited shortly after a suicide attempt. A time-geographic life charting and COPE inventory ratings were used separately and in combination. According to COPE ratings, the participants could be divided into three groups using different coping strategies: (1) adaptive, (2) maladaptive, and (3) both adaptive and maladaptive coping. Within these subgroups, three different pathways to suicidal behaviour were described and illustrated. We conclude that time-geographic life charting used in combination with the pattern of coping strategies may be helpful when assessing risk of suicidal behaviour, because this approach strengthens the comprehensive picture of the patient's life situation.

  • 13.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Time Geography, a Method in Psychiatric Nursing Care2020In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 1004-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients' life history is of primary interest in psychiatric nursing care. Our aim was to illustrate how we used time geography as a method to identify individuals' patterns in relation to certain situations in place. We have used interviews and diaries to construct life charts by hand and with a computer software program. By using time geography, we provide a rich amount of information, which can generate a broader picture of a person's life, to identify stressful as well as social aspects of a person's life. Patients with mental ill health need and value the therapeutic relationship using time geography.

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  • 14.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjögran, Lotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Mårdhed, Emma
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Tidsgeografiska livslinjer, en metod för psykiatrisk omvårdnad2023In: Psyche : psykiatrisk vårdtidskrift, ISSN 0283-3468, no 1, p. 18-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Att skapa livslinjer för patienter i olika sammanhang är för många av oss ganska välbekant, men vad innebär tidsgeografiska livslinjer? Hur kan dessa användas av specialistsjuksköterskan i den psykiatriska omvårdnaden? I denna artikel berättar författarna om en narrativ omvårdnadsmetod som kan hjälpa till att skapa en helhetsbild av patientens livsförlopp och stärka den personcentrerade vården.

  • 15.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjöström, Karin
    Finnbogadóttir, Hafrún
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Depressive symptoms during pregnancy and postpartum in women and use of antidepressant treatment: a longitudinal cohort study2019In: International Journal of Women's Health, E-ISSN 1179-1411, Vol. 11, p. 109-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective; The aim of this study was to investigate whether women, who reported “symptoms of depression” during pregnancy and up to 1.5 years postpartum, who reported domestic violence or not, were treated with antidepressant medication. Material and Methods; A prospective longitudinal cohort study recruited primi- and multiparous women (n=1939). The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire, and a questionnaire about medication during pregnancy were distributed and administered three times, during early, late pregnancy and during the postpartum period. Antidepressant medication was compared between women with EPDS scores < 13 and scores EPDS ≥ 13 as the optimal cut-off for lower and higher symptoms of depression. Results; EPDS scores > 13 were detected in 10.1 % of the women during the whole pregnancy, of those 6.2 % had depressive symptoms already in early pregnancy and 10.0 % during the postpartum period. Women with EPDS scores ≥ 13 and non-exposure to domestic violence were more often non-medicated (p < 0.001). None of the women with EPDS scores ≥ 13 exposed to domestic violence had received any antidepressant medication, albeit the relationship was statistically non-significant. Conclusion; Pregnant women who experienced themselves as having several depressive symptoms, social vulnerability and even a history of domestic violence, did not receive any antidepressant treatment during pregnancy nor postpartum. This study shows the importance of detecting depressive symptoms already during early pregnancy and a need for standardized screening methods.

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  • 16.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Träskman-Bendz, Lil
    Westrin, Åsa
    Coping strategies used by suicide attempters and comparison groups2013In: Open Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 2161-7325, E-ISSN 2161-7333, Vol. 3, p. 256-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A variety of factors have been identified as being risk factors for suicidal behaviour. One of them is the handling of stressful events. The aim of the present study was to investigate the coping-strategies used by suicide attempters and comparison groups. 37 pa- tients who had recently made a suicide attempt, 38 suicide attempters at follow up, 20 psychiatric follow up controls, and 19 healthy controls filled in the COPE. We found that suicide attempters at long term follow up and healthy controls used more adaptive problem solving strategies than patients who had re- cently made a suicide attempt, or psychiatric controls at follow up, who used more maladaptive coping strategies. Our findings suggest that suicide attempt- ers in a twelve year follow up are able to use coping strategies similarly to healthy controls by e.g. ap- proaching the stressor actively. Further examinations of the impact of long term professional care and treatment of suicide attempters on their coping strategies are necessary.

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  • 17.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Westrin, Åsa
    Träskman-Bendz, Lil
    Suicide attempters :biological stressmarkers and adverse life events2008In: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, ISSN 0940-1334, E-ISSN 1433-8491, Vol. 258, no 8, p. 456-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk factors for suicidal behaviour include adverse life events as well as biochemical parameters acting, e.g. within the hypothalamic–pituitary– adrenal axis and/or monoaminergic systems. The aim of the present investigation was to study stressful life events and biological stress markers among former psychiatric inpatients, who were followed up 12 years after an index suicide attempt. At the time of the index suicide attempt, and before treatment, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were taken, and 24 h (h) urine (U) was collected. 3-Methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycole (MHPG) in CSF and 24 h urinary samples of cortisol and noradrenaline/adrenaline (NA/A) were analysed. Data concerning stressful life events were collected retrospectively from all participants in the study through semi-structured interviews at follow-up. We found that patients who reported sexual abuse during childhood and adolescence had significantly higher levels of CSF-MHPG and U-NA/A, than those who had not. Low 24 h U-cortisol was associated with feelings of neglect during childhood and adolescence. In conclusion, this study has shown significant and discrepant biological stress-system findings in relation to some adverse life events.

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  • 18. Vang, Fredrik J
    et al.
    Lindström, Mats
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Bah-Rösman, Jessica
    Johanson, Aki
    Träskman-Bendz, Lil
    Life-Time Adversities, Reported Thirteen Years After a Suicide Attempt: Relationship to Recovery, 5HTTLPR Genotype, and Past and Present Morbidity2009In: Archives of Suicide Research, ISSN 1381-1118, E-ISSN 1543-6136, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 214-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we investigated how adversities related to past and present morbidity, and genotype. Forty-two, suicide attempters and 22 matched control patients were followed-up after 13 years. Life-time adversities were explored in an interview, and the patients were reassessed psychiatrically. The serotonin-transporter-linked promotor region (5-HTTLPR) was typed. More adversities were reported by suicide attempters than controls, and by still-ill than recovered suicide attempters. Adversities reported at follow-up were related to psychiatric morbidity at follow-up, but not to morbidity 13 years earlier. The 5-HTTLPR, genotype was associated with reported adversities, but not chances of recovery. Adversities potentially affected chronic morbidity. 5-HTTLPR genotype did not affect long-term recovery.

  • 19.
    Vuckovic, Verica
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Office of Psychiatry and Habilitation, Psychiatric Clinic in Helsingborg, Region Skane, Sweden.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    'Working as a Real Nurse': Nursing Students' Experiences of a Clinical Education Ward in Psychiatric Care2021In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 1038-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the concept of clinical education wards has shown encouraging outcomes regarding nursing students' satisfaction with clinical placements in somatic care, the existing research in a psychiatric context is sparse. This study aims to explore nursing students' experience during clinical education at a psychiatric clinical education ward. A qualitive descriptive study with content analysis, using interviews with 16 bachelor's degree nursing students was conducted. The results indicated that an enriched and adapted learning environment focusing on psychiatric nursing with peer learning supported independence and progression into the future nursing role.

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  • 20. Vuckovic, Verica
    et al.
    Karlsson, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Preceptors' and nursing students' experiences of peer learning in a psychiatric context: A qualitative study2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 41, article id 102627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate preceptors' and nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in a psychiatric context during their clinical education. Design: A qualitative research design was used in this study. Data were analysed with qualitative content analysis. The study was conducted in 2017 with 17 preceptors and 11 students, constituting four focus groups with preceptors and four focus groups with nursing students. Participants: The preceptors were nurses and specialist nurses who worked in inpatient psychiatric care. Nursing students seeking their bachelor's degrees were placed in clinical settings at different psychiatric units for 4 weeks during the fourth semester. Results: One theme emerged: Knowledge acquisition as an interactive process from the two shared categories for students and preceptors: reciprocal learning by communication, doing and reflection and the importance of a supportive relationship. Conclusions: The result of this study suggested that peer learning in clinical education in psychiatric care promoted the learning process for nursing students.

  • 21.
    Wangel, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Persson, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Duerlund, Sara
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Fhager, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Mårdhed, Emma
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjögran, Lotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjöström, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Glantz, Andreas
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Örmon, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Götaland Region Competence Centre on Intimate Partner Violence, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    The Region Skåne Committee on Psychiatry, Habilitation and Technical Aids, Lund, Sweden;Department of Clinical Sciences Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The Core Elements of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing: Time, Honest Engagement, Therapeutic Relations, Professional Nursing and Lifetime-Perspective2024In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, p. 1-10Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Defining psychiatric and mental health nursing has been a challenge for decades, and it is still difficult to find a comprehensive definition. We have identified a possibility to clarify psychiatric and mental health nursing based on humanistic philosophy in a general psychiatric care context. The aim was therefore to identify and synthesize the theoretical frameworks from which psychiatric and mental health nursing models are developed. We systematically collected and evaluated articles based on Grounded Theory (GT) methodology regarding psychiatric or mental health nursing. The PRISMA statement for systematic reviews was used and the formal process of synthesis, as a three-step process of identifying first -, second - and third-order themes following the examples of Howell Major and Savin-Baden. The synthesis resulted in a model describing five core elements of psychiatric and mental health nursing: 'professional nursing', 'therapeutic relationships' and 'honest engagement', with time as the all-encompassing theme, including the patients' 'lifetime perspective'. Psychiatric and mental health nursing is a caring support towards recovery, where the patient's lifetime perspective must be in focus during the caring process with a relationship built on an honest engagement. Time is therefore essential for psychiatric and mental health nursing.

  • 22. Westling, Sofie
    et al.
    Ahrén, Bo
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Träskman-Bendz, Lil
    Altered glucose tolerance in women with deliberate self-harm2009In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 878-883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbances in glucose metabolism are of importance for violent behaviour in men, but studies in women are lacking. We used the 5 h-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in this study of 17 female psychiatric patients, selected for violent behaviour directed against themselves (deliberate self-harm) and 17 healthy controls matched for age and BMI. Following OGTT, patients had higher glucose levels at 30 min (p = 0.007) and increased glucagon area under the curve (p = 0.011). Since a co-morbid eating disorder might affect results, we as a post-hoc analysis subgrouped the patients and found that the increased glucagon levels only were present in patients with an eating disorder. In contrast, those without an eating disorder showed a significantly lower p-glucose nadir (p = 0.015) and unaltered glucagon levels compared to controls. There were no significant differences in insulin and C-peptide levels between patients and controls. We conclude that deliberate self-harm in women may be associated with alterations in carbohydrate metabolism in certain groups. Eating disorder is a confounding factor.

  • 23.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bramhagen, Ann-Cathrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Vejzovic, Vedrana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The experience of polyethylene glycol (PEG) bowel preparation in adolescents undergoing colonoscopy2020In: BMC Research Notes, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the experience of polyethylene glycol (PEG) bowel preparation in adolescents undergoing colonoscopy.

    RESULTS: 32 adolescents, 10-18 years of age self-reported a minimum of complications 1 week after colonoscopy when PEG was used for bowel preparation. 17 adolescents, 10-18 years were also interviewed about bowel preparation with PEG. Using qualitative content analysis, two categories were extracted from the data: "Being decisive makes it manageable" and "Be prepared for a horrible experience." The adolescents reported PEG intake difficulty; the intake was, however, manageable if they received appropriate information.

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  • 24.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Experiences of the Provided Care in a General Psychiatric Context After Disclosure of Abuse2015In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 30, no S1Abstracts of the 23rd European Congress of Psychiatry, article id 0978Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Experiences of abuse during childhood and/or adulthood has an impact on women's mental health as well as generating frequent hospital admission. Experiences of abuse are common among female patients in general psychiatric care. Aims and Objectives The aim of the study is to elucidate how nine women with experiences of physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse experienced the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after disclosure of abuse. Method Qualitative design with an inductive approach. Interviews with nine women who were recipients of general psychiatric care in an urban area in Sweden. The women had disclosed experiences of abuse to a member of staff. Qualitative inductive content analysis was used. Results The nine women reported being subjected to abuse during childhood and adulthood, only one of them reported only being abused as an adult. The overall theme emerging from the narratives, 'Dependency as a reality containing a duality of suffering and trust' describe the general psychiatric care as caring and noncaring. In a caring environment was the women acknowledged, listened to and treated with sensitivity. Experiences of noncaring were when the abuse was disregarded, the women were not believed in, offended or self-blamed for the abuse. A noncaring environment focused primarily on the diagnosis and the experienced abuse was seen as secondary. Conclusions Women who have experienced abuse experience the care provided as caring as well as noncaring. General psychiatric could be supportive as well as belittling depending on staff at the clinic.

  • 25.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    "Finally, my life story is my own”: a time geographic study2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Time Geographic Life Charting: a Computer Program for a Life-course Approach!2015In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 30, no S1, article id 1917Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Life charting seems to be an increasing trend in psychiatric care, and the essential idea is that patients’ life histories are of primary interest for diagnosis, care and treatment and it can also be a helpful tool in the progress of communication. Objectives Patients with a history of suicide behavior were assessed as well as female patients with experiences of physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse in general psychiatric care, in urban areas in Sweden. Aims To create and to evaluate the life course of patients seeking general psychiatric care Method We used the Hägerstand (1985) Time Geography model, and constructed the life charts together with the patient using a computer program covering both time and geographical aspects. Manifest content analysis was used for analyzing the life charts. Results Stressful events as well as social capacities was identified across the life course and provided rich information regarding the lived lives of patients seeking general psychiatric care. The life charts have a therapeutic value due to its focus on both stressful events and capacities. The use of Time Geography life charting can also be a helpful tool in the progress of communication as well as an apparatus for identifying stressful and prosperous life periods. Conclusions A profound knowledge of the patients was illustrated and therefor preventive strategy can be formulated.

  • 27.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Torstensson Levander, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Disclosure of abuse among female patients within general psychiatric care: a cross sectional study2016In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, no 16, article id 79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Experiences of abuse are common among women in general psychiatric care. Even so, there are to our knowledge no previous national or international studies exploring disclosure in a general psychiatric setting of female patient’s experiences of abuse to staff or to formal and informal networks. This study aimed to explore women’s disclosure of experiencing physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse during their most recent contact with staff at a general psychiatric clinic. The study also aimed to determine whether the women have previously disclosed abuse to anyone. Methods A consecutive sampling of eligible female patients at a general psychiatric clinic in an urban area of southern Sweden answered the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire, NorAQ, a self-administrated questionnaire. NorAQ has previously been used and further developed to compare the prevalence of abuse in women present in gynecological outpatient settings in the five Nordic countries. Seventy-seven women with experiences of abuse participated in the research. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Results Most respondents did not disclose their experiences of abuse to staff at the general psychiatric clinic. Women with experiences of physical abuse (n = 40), emotional abuse (n = 37) and sexual abuse (n = 37) chose not to disclose their experiences. Respondents disclosed abuse more often to others than to staff. Conclusions Our findings indicated the importance of including routine questions concerning abuse experiences as a natural part of female patients’ medical history.

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  • 28.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Torstensson Levander, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    The life-time experience of abuse and suicidal behavior among abused women in a general psychiatric context2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: Research concerning domestic violence and intimate partner violence reports life time prevalence of abuse and associations between suicidal behaviors among female psychiatric patients. The aim of the study was to describe abused women’s experiences of emotional, physical, sexual abuse and suicidal behavior experienced by women in general psychiatric care. METHODS: Women attending general psychiatric in-and outpatient care were asked to participate, using the NorVold abuse questionnaire, and seventy seven abused women contributed. RESULTS: Thoughts of suicide were significantly more common among women subjected to severe emotional abuse (n= 35, 71%), compared to women not subjected (n=14, 29%).Women suffering from mild emotional abuse register higher frequency of thoughts of suicide (n=39, 80%) compared to women with no experience (n=10, 20%). Suicide attempts were significantly higher among women experiencing severe emotional abuse (n=14, 82%) compared to women with no experience (n=3, 18%). Women who endured severe physical abuse made suicide attempt significantly more often (n=14, 74%) than women with no experience (n=5, 26%). Acts of self-deliberate harm were significantly higher among women experiencing mild emotional abuse (n=24, 86%) compared to the women with no experience (n=4, 14%). CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that women with suicidal behavior could be victims of mild and severe emotional abuse and severe physical abuse. Even when suffering from the abuse, the women rarely confide to personnel.

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  • 29.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Torstensson Levander, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The life course of women who have experienced abuse: a life chart study in general psychiatric care2015In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 316-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violence against women is a worldwide problem and has an impact on the lives of women and girls. The study aims to investigate the life course of women within psychiatric care who have experienced abuse. The women’s resources, stressful events, experience of abuse, perpetrators, mental ill health, and care and support throughout the life course are also highlighted. Eleven women who had all sought general psychiatric care in an urban area in Sweden participated. A computer software program was used for constructing life charts for each participant, and manifest content analysis was used to analyse the data. The women’s social status and resources differed, and some of them spoke of only experiencing few stressful events growing up, while others described a stressful childhood. All of the women had been abused sometime during their life course, and most of the perpetrators were known to the women. Even so, the women had seldom disclosed their childhood abuse. As adults, the women were diagnosed with psychiatric diagnoses, and suicidal behaviour increased. The life chart offers rich information and a broader picture of the life history of women who experienced abuse as well as constituting a tool useful for identifying women with experiences of abuse.

  • 30.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Torstensson Levander, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The duality of suffering and trust: abused women's experiences of general psychiatric care: an interview study2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 15-16, p. 2303-2312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To elucidate how women subjected to physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse experience the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after the disclosure of abuse. Background Violence against women is a major global public health issue, which has an impact on women's lives and mental health as well as generating frequent hospital admission. Design Qualitative design with an inductive approach. Methods Interviews with nine women who were recipients of general psychiatric care and had disclosed experiences of abuse to a member of staff were conducted. Qualitative inductive content analysis was used. Results The overall theme emerging from the narratives, ‘dependency as a reality containing a duality of suffering and trust,’ links the categories together. Each subcategory is presented in relation to the categories ‘being belittled,’ ‘being misinterpreted’ and ‘being cared for.’ Experiences of care as caring and noncaring were found in the narratives. Caring could include situations experienced as the women being acknowledged and listened to, situations where staff approached and supported the women in a sensitive way. Experiences of noncaring were when the abuse was disregarded, and when the women were not believed in, were left with burdens of guilt and were offended. A noncaring environment focused primarily on the diagnosis, and the experienced abuse was seen as secondary. Conclusions Abused women are subjected to psychiatric environments where staff are divided into groups of those who believed in and supported the abused women and those who regarded experiences of abuse as a secondary issue and focused on the mental disorder. Relevance to clinical practice This study provides knowledge of how abused women experience the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after the disclosure of abuse.

  • 31.
    Örmon, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Torstensson Levander, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Sunnqvist, Charlotta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Vulnerable and without protection: Lifetime experiences of abuse and its influence on mental ill health2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 34-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violence against women is a major global public health issue, and experiencing violence has substantial consequences for the lives of abused women. This study aims to illustrate experiences of abuse and its influence on mental ill health among women seeking general psychiatric care. Ten women seeking general psychiatric care in southern Sweden participated in a qualitative interview study. Content analysis resulted in four categories: Living in fear that persistently influences the substance of life, living with the sense of being worthless, living with a constant question about who you are and living between hope and despair. The theme evolving from the analysis was: Being vulnerable and without protection in a frightful reality that limits one’s possibilities of living and being the person one wishes to be. The results showed that the women described their mental ill health not only in terms of depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation and self-harm, but also in relation to feelings of hope and despair, fear, worthlessness and living with a constant question about who they are. The abuse reduces freedom of action, and leads to feelings of insecurity, of not having any boundaries, isolation, and self-contempt and a need to escape. This study provides knowledge of abused women self-reported mental ill health in relation to abuse.

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