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  • 1.
    Christensen, Jonas
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Hjortsjö, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Academic writing in social work education: reflections from an international classroom2017In: China Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1752-5098, E-ISSN 1752-5101, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The affordances of processing subject knowledge through academic writing are rarely explicitly realised in social work education. In this article, we highlight the link between instructors’ efforts to facilitate students’ academic writing and students’ perceived increase of knowledge in the subject of social work in an international context. Based on instructors’ and students’ reflections collected before, during, and after a course, we aimed to answer the following questions: in what way can academic writing support students’ learning in social work? What are students’ reflections on the pedagogical model involving academic writing? The theoretical framework for the analysis was based on learning theories focusing on collaborative learning. The main conclusion is that the instructors’ awareness of how to scaffold students’ ability to write in an academic context and to develop the students’ understanding of social work in a local and global context is an important factor in student learning.

  • 2.
    Christensen, Jonas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Reflective Writing in Course Design for Active Learning in Social Work Education2023In: Journal of social work education, ISSN 1043-7797, E-ISSN 2163-5811, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 756-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study explores student learning progression through reflective writing on a tertiary-level course in social work. The study is based on the content analysis of three sets of data: student reflective writing, instructor formative feedback on this writing, and student end-of-course reflections. Our findings demonstrate that structured, scaffolded reflection and continuous formative feedback stimulated learning progression, increased awareness of one’s own learning strategies, and supported the adoption of an explorative, reflective stance in students. Therefore, the experimental course design with several reflective tasks created the sought-after intersection of the academic and professional literacies. This design stimulated student engagement and resulted in high attendance. This design is particularly suitable in heterogeneous classrooms and promotes student inclusion and active learning.

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  • 3. Cutrim Schmid, Euline
    et al.
    O'Dowd, Robert
    Rogaten, Jekaterina
    Vinagre, Marga
    Torres, Laura
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Martinc, Urška
    Zemljak, Dejan
    Gutiérrez, Begonia F.
    Experimentation Protocol of the VALIANT Project2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    About the VALIANT project:

    VALIANT is a European Policy Experiment under Erasmus+ KA3 (EACEA/38/2019): Priority 3 - Strengthening teacher training and education by using the opportunities of new technologies (School education). The policy measure in this experimentation, Virtual Innovation and Support Networks, are defined as Virtual Exchange programmes which bring together teachers, student teachers and experts in facilitated online collaboration around real-world educational issues. VALIANT’s first objective is to test the efficiency of Virtual Innovation and Support Networks as an approach which will contribute to overcoming teachers’ sense of isolation and low motivation in rural areas and isolated contexts and also to developing teachers’ ability to operate effectively in online international networks of professional collaboration. The second objective of the experimentation is to test the efficiency of this form of Virtual Exchange for providing students of Initial Teacher Education with access to the realities of the teaching profession through regular interaction with in-service teachers integrated into their study programme.

    About this publication:

    This research protocol contains a detailed description of the tools and procedures which are used in the VALIANT experimentation. It includes all the elements that have been recommended in the guide to social experimentation (J-Pal Europe, 2011): a) the principles and procedures for identification and selection of the groups of participants; b) the size, type, and features of the group of participants; c) the timing of the field trials; d) evaluation plans; e) the evaluation benchmarks and qualitative and quantitative indicators and finally f) the monitoring and quality control measures and ethical guidelines.

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  • 4. Eriksson, Andreas
    et al.
    Finnegan, Damian
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wiktorsson, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Language and Linguistics (SPS).
    Withers, Peter
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    MUCH: The Malmö University-Chalmers Corpus of Academic Writing as a Process2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    MUCH: THE MALMÖ UNIVERSITY-CHALMERS CORPUS OF ACADEMIC WRITING AS A PROCESS Andreas Eriksson, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg; Damian Finnegan, Asko Kauppinen, Maria Wiktorsson, Anna Wärnsby, Malmö University, Malmö; Peter Withers, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen This poster introduces a recently-launched corpus project which aims to compile and monitor various text drafts involved in the writing process of EFL students in higher education. The corpus material will consist of three drafts of undergraduate, master or PhD student texts. Additionally, the corpus will contain a collection of self-reflective papers. Papers will be collected from approximately 400 students per year over a three-year period. In addition to parts-of-speech tagging, the corpus will include peer comments between the first and second drafts and teacher comments between the second and third drafts, as well as annotations of information structure and rhetorical structures. Upon its completion, the corpus will consist of about 500,000 words, excluding the metadata and peer and teacher comments. The corpus is primarily an academic writing research corpus, but also a pedagogic and linguistic corpus, and it is the combination of these perspectives that we would like to emphasise. One important aim of the project is to narrow the gap between writing pedagogy and the use of corpora for teaching and learning purposes. In writing pedagogy, the focus has been on issues such as writing as social action (Miller 1984), feedback processes (Hyland & Hyland 2006) and the development of academic literacy (Lea & Street 1998, Lillis & Scott 2007, Street 2004), whereas there has been a tendency in corpus-driven and corpus-based pedagogy to focus on linguistic aspects of language learning, such as vocabulary, grammar and phraseology. This tendency is, for instance, evidenced in Flowerdew’s (2010) comprehensive overview of how corpora have been used in writing instruction. There are obviously notable exceptions to this somewhat sweeping description (see e.g. Charles 2007 and Flowerdew 2008). However, a lot more can be done to merge these two perspectives. We believe that a corpus containing drafts tagged for information structure, rhetorical structures, and linguistic structures as well as peer and teacher feedback is an important step in such a process. In this poster, we will establish the rationale for the project by exemplifying how the corpus can be used for research purposes as well as teaching and learning purposes. We will show how the corpus can be employed in the study of: 1) peer and teacher comments; 2) thesis statements and how these are formed, located and realised in students’ writing processes; and 3) linguistic structures, such as elements recurring in thesis statements. References: Charles, M. 2007. Reconciling top-down and bottom-up approaches to graduate writing: Using a corpus to teach rhetorical functions. Journal of English for Specific Purposes 6: 289-302. Flowerdew, L. 2008. Corpus linguistics for academic literacies mediated through discussion activities. In D. Belcher & A. Hirvela (eds), The Oral-Literate Connection: Perspectives on L2, speaking, writing and other media interactions. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, p. 268-287 Flowerdew, L. 2010. Using a corpus for writing instruction. In O’Keeffe, Anne & McCarthy, Michael (eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Corpus Linguistics. London/New York: Routledge, pp. 444-457. Hyland, K. & Hyland, F. (eds.). 2006. Feedback in Second Language Writing: Contexts and Issues. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Miller, C. R. 1984. Genre as social action. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 70:151-167. Lea, M. R. and Street, B. (1998) Student writing in higher education: an academic literacies approach. Studies in Higher Education 23(2): 157–172. Lillis, T. & Scott, M. 2007. Defining Academic Literacies Research: Issues of epistemology, ideology and strategy. Journal of Applied Linguistics, 4(1): 5-32. Street, B. (2004) Academic Literacies and the ‘new orders’: implications for research and practice in student writing in higher education. Learning and Teaching in the Social Sciences, 1(1): 9–20.

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  • 5.
    Finnegan, Damian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Eskandari, Reihaneh
    Runnqvist, Hannah
    Teubler, Lisa-Marie
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Academic Writing in a Multi-lingual and Multi-disciplinary Context at Malmö University2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Informative presentation of the pedagogy of writing at the English Studies Programme, Malmö University

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  • 6.
    Finnegan, Damian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Eskandari, Reihaneh
    Teubler, Lisa-Marie
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    The Role of Student Experience in Integrating E-platforms in Teaching Academic Writing2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rayann Eskandari (reihaneh.s@hotmail.com) Damian Finnegan (damian.finnegan@mah.se) Asko Kauppinen (asko.kauppinen@mah.se) Lisa-Marie Teubler (lisa.marie.teubler@googlemail.com) Anna Wärnsby (anna.warnsby@mah.se) The Role of Student Experience in Integrating E-platforms in Academic Writing Although e-platforms are becoming ubiquitous in teaching academic writing, noticeable differences in the ways in which they are integrated into course design and curricula remain. Further, student experience of these resources has often been overlooked. In this workshop, we explore how to integrate e-platforms into teaching academic writing to enhance positive student experience. We demonstrate a design of an existing course in academic writing at Malmö University, Sweden, which currently enrolls approximately 300 students per term. The distinctive feature of this course is the very tight integration of the e-platform Mycomplab (http://www.mycomplab.com) and teaching material. We evaluate critically empirical data pertaining to student experience of i. the e-platform interface, ii. the link between the e-platform and the teaching material, iii. the different levels and forms of feedback provided through the e-platform, and iv. the e-platform’s impact on learning. Participants of this workshop can test various tasks to emulate student experience of the e-platform. Furthermore, we welcome participants to contribute and discuss other e-platform solutions to the above issues. This workshop aims to provide a clearer understanding of the potential of e-platforms to enhance positive student experience, and it allows participants to gain an overview of different e-platform solutions available and currently in use in academic writing courses. From this workshop, we intend to establish a forum for discussing use of e-platforms in academic writing.

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  • 7.
    Finnegan, Damian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Academic Writing in a Multi-lingual and Multi-disciplinary Context2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Damian Finnegan (damian.finnegan@mah.se) Asko Kauppinen (asko.kauppinen@mah.se) Anna Wärnsby (anna.warnsby@mah.se) Academic Writing in a Multi-lingual and Multidisciplinary Context One crucial challenge of academic writing concerns the increasing heterogenisation of student populations. In many writing classes, we now find “any combination of native-born, international, refugee, permanent resident, and naturalized students,” exhibiting considerable linguistic diversity and multiple levels of English proficiency (Preto-Bay and Hansen, 2006; see also Hall, 2009). At the same time, interest towards academic writing in European higher education is growing, yet resources for teaching do not reflect this. Moreover, the wider student base demands practical application from their writing courses, not theoretical knowledge of language skills (see, for example, Anderson 1983, 2009 on procedural vs. declarative knowledge). To show how these problems can be addressed, we discuss the course Academic Writing in English offered at Malmö University, Sweden, which currently enrolls approximately 300 students per year. The course design is explicitly based on the general model of information processing, which assumes that “complex behavior builds on simple processes” (McLaughlin and Heredia, 1996, p. 213). The focus of all learning activities is on acquisition of procedural knowledge geared towards comprehension and production. One distinctive feature of this course is the very tight integration of electronic resources and other teaching material. This provides student populations various types of continuous feedback and highly individualised learning paths. In this paper, we present and evaluate empirical data pertaining to students’ experience of the content, structure and resources in this course. We also discuss the preliminary results obtained through tests administered before, during and after the course. References Anderson, J. R. 2009. Cognitive Psychology and Its Implications. 7th edition. New York: Worth Publishers. Anderson, J. R. 1983. The Architecture of Cognition. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Hall, Jonathan. 2009. “WAC/WID in the Next America: Redefining Professional Identity in the Age of the Multilingual Majority.” The WAC Journal. Vol. 20, November. 33-49. McLaughlin, B. and Hereda, J. L. C. 1996. “Information-processing Approaches to Research on Second Language Acquisition and Use.” In Ritchie, W. C. and Bhatia, T. K. (eds.), Handbook of Second Language Acquisition. San Diego: Academic Press, 213-228. Preto-Bay, Ana Maria and Kristine Hansen. 2006. “Preparing for the Tipping Point: Designing Writing Programs to Meet the Needs of the Changing Population.” WPA: Writing Program Administration, Vol. 30, Nos. 1-2, Fall. 37-57.

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  • 8.
    Finnegan, Damian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Automated Feedback in a Blended Learning Environment: Student Experience and Development2015In: Learning and Teaching Writing Online: Strategies for Success / [ed] Mary Deane, Teresa Guasch, Brill Academic Publishers, 2015, p. 31-45Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, e-platforms designed specifically to cater for academic writing offer a new range of feedback possibilities for instructors. On our writing courses we use automated feedback, that is, metalinguistic comments generated within the e-platform on skill-building assignments in the form of multiple-choice exercises pertaining to the surface-level features of writing: grammar, punctuation, and citation conventions. In this chapter we explore the impact that automated feedback has on student experience of learning and development of skills pertaining to these features from beginner to advanced courses. Some of the key features of automated feedback which we consider are immediacy, metalinguistic explanations, and links to additional readings and exercises. We suggest that surface-level features can successfully be taught as part of academic writing courses, but the focus should be on improving writing fluency rather than language proficiency. Automated feedback on surface-level features is a particularly successful form of feedback on both our beginner and intermediate courses, but it performs less successfully on our advanced-level courses.

  • 9.
    Finnegan, Damian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Automated Feedback, Student Experience and Writing as a Process2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Damian Finnegan (damian.finnegan@mah.se) Asko Kauppinen (asko.kauppinen@mah.se) Anna Wärnsby (anna.warnsby@mah.se) Automated Feedback, Student Experience and Writing as a Process Many EFL learners struggle with issues pertaining to grammar, style and idiomaticity, and, traditionally, language teachers spend a lot of time addressing these mechanical errors (see Zamel 1985). This corrective practice seems to shape learner expectations of the type of feedback that is most effective or useful to them (Hedgcock and Lefkowitz 1996). In the context of teaching academic writing, this may easily pose a problem for allocating teacher resources away from teaching writing as a process to taking care of the learner language issues. Nowadays, e-platforms designed specifically to cater for academic writing offer a new range of feedback possibilities for teachers. Tasks pertaining particularly to language use can, for example, be created so that the feedback is fully automated. The easy and immediate access to such feedback is beneficial for learners with different proficiency levels (Brandl 1995). In our course, in order to free teacher resources for feedback on students’ critical thinking, treatment of sources, structure and context, we used automated feedback, i.e. direct corrections with metalinguistic comments generated within the e-platform, to feedback on skill building exercises pertaining to grammar, style and idiomaticity. Previous research indicates that direct corrective feedback on mechanical errors is efficient in facilitating learning (see Sheen 2007 for an overview of the field). In a pilot study on student experience of the writing process, we noticed that the level of student satisfaction with this automated feedback was surprisingly high and valued as much as the extensive written teacher feedback on papers submitted for examination. In our current study, we explore the impact automated feedback has on student experience of learning skills pertaining to the mechanics of writing as described above from beginner to advanced students of academic writing. Some of the factors we consider are the immediacy/remoteness of the feedback, the extent of the metalinguistic comment and the connection of the skill building exercises to the teaching materials. References Brandl, K. K. 1995. Strong and Weak Students' Preferences for Error Feedback Options and Responses. The modern Language Journal, vol. 79, no. 2, 194-211. Hedgcock, J. and Lefkowitz, N. 1996. Some Input on Input: Two Analyses of Student Response to Expert Feedback in L2 Writing. The Modern Language Journal, vol. 80, no. 3, 287-308. Sheen, Y. 2007. The Effect of Focused Written Corrective Feedback and Language Aptitude on ESL Learners' Acquisition of Articles. TESOL Quaterly, vol. 41, no. 2, 255-283. Zamel, V. 1985. Responding to student writing. TESOL Quaterly, 19, 79-101.

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  • 10.
    Finnegan, Damian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Scaffolding writing process in an EFL and multidisciplinary context2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One crucial challenge for teaching academic writing concerns the increasing heterogenisation of student populations. In many writing classes, we now find “any combination of native-born, international, refugee, permanent resident, and naturalized students,” exhibiting considerable linguistic diversity and multiple levels of English proficiency (Preto-Bay and Hansen, 2006; see also Hall, 2009). At the same time, interest towards academic writing in European higher education is growing, yet resources for teaching do not reflect this. Moreover, the wider student base demands practical application from their writing courses, not theoretical knowledge of language skills (see, for example, Anderson 1983, 2009 on procedural vs. declarative knowledge). To show how these problems can be addressed, we discuss the course in Academic Writing in English offered at Malmö University, Sweden, which currently enrolls approximately 300 students per year. Our students come from different disciplines, and English is a foreign language for most of them. The course design is explicitly based on the general model of information processing, which assumes that “complex behavior builds on simple processes” (McLaughlin and Heredia, 1996, p. 213). The focus of all learning activities is on acquisition of procedural knowledge geared towards comprehension and production. One distinctive feature of this course is the very tight integration of electronic resources and other teaching material. By utilizing technology to facilitate the writing process (see, for example, Askov and Bixler 1998 on computer-assisted instruction as means for achieving learner-centered classrooms), we provide diverse student populations with ample scaffolding in terms of various types of continuous feedback and highly individualised learning paths. REFERENCES Anderson, J. R. 2009. Cognitive Psychology and Its Implications. 7th edition. New York: Worth Publishers. Anderson, J. R. 1983. The Architecture of Cognition. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Askov, E., & Bixler, B. 1998. “Transforming Adult Literacy Instruction Through Computer-Assisted Instruction.” In D. Reinking, M. McKenna, L. Labbo, & R. Kieffer (Eds.). 2009. Handbook of literacy and technology: transformations in a post-typographic world.184-203. Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers. Hall, Jonathan. 2009. “WAC/WID in the Next America: Redefining Professional Identity in the Age of the Multilingual Majority.” The WAC Journal. Vol. 20, November. 33-49. McLaughlin, B. and Hereda, J. L. C. 1996. “Information-processing Approaches to Research on Second Language Acquisition and Use.” In Ritchie, W. C. and Bhatia, T. K. (eds.), Handbook of Second Language Acquisition. San Diego: Academic Press, 213-228. Preto-Bay, Ana Maria and Kristine Hansen. 2006. “Preparing for the Tipping Point: Designing Writing Programs to Meet the Needs of the Changing Population.” WPA: Writing Program Administration, Vol. 30, Nos. 1-2, Fall. 37-57.

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  • 11.
    Finnegan, Damian
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Salih, Jasmin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Language and Linguistics (SPS).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    On the Importance of Teaching Writing to Teacher Trainees2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Damian Finnegan (damian.finnegan@mah.se) Asko Kauppinen (asko.kauppinen@mah.se) Anna Wärnsby (anna.warnsby@mah.se) On the Importance of Teaching Academic Writing to Teacher Trainees Many EFL learners struggle with issues pertaining to grammar, style and idiomaticity, and, traditionally, language teachers spend a lot of time addressing these mechanical errors (Zamel 1985). This corrective practice seems to shape learner and teacher expectations of the type of feedback that is most effective or useful to learners (Hedgcock and Lefkowitz 1996). In the context of teaching academic writing, this may easily pose a problem for allocating teacher resources away from teaching writing as a process to taking care of the learner language issues. In the new Swedish school curriculum for English, however, the ability to write for different purposes and audiences and the familiarity with different text types is made prominent (Lgr11). Therefore, the teachers’ ability to reflect on the writing process as such and not only on the mechanical learner errors is crucial for the pupils’ achievement of the learning outcomes specified in the curriculum. At Malmö University, we facilitated systematic instruction to teacher trainees, amongst others, through the creation of courses in academic writing in English across the curriculum (WAC). The design of our courses is explicitly based on the general model of information processing, which assumes that “complex behavior builds on simple processes” (McLaughlin and Heredia, 1996, p. 213). The focus of all learning activities is on acquisition of procedural knowledge geared towards comprehension and production (see Anderson 1983, 2009). Specifically, we gear our courses to equip teacher trainees with tools that can later aid them in their reflection on elements of the writing process other than those that are traditionally addressed in the language classroom. In this paper, we address particularly the increased ability in teacher trainees to reflect upon their own and their peers’ writing. We look at their ability to identify core elements of the writing process, for example, purpose, audience, genre, structure, critical thinking, and meta-cognitive analysis. These data have been compiled in the form of self-reflective papers produced by teacher trainees upon completion of our course. References Anderson, J. R. 2009. Cognitive Psychology and Its Implications. 7th edition. New York: Worth Publishers. Anderson, J. R. 1983. The Architecture of Cognition. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Hall, Jonathan. 2009. “WAC/WID in the Next America: Redefining Professional Identity in the Age of the Multilingual Majority.” The WAC Journal. Vol. 20, November. 33-49. Hedgcock, J. and Lefkowitz, N. 1996. Some Input on Input: Two Analyses of Student Response to Expert Feedback in L2 Writing. The Modern Language Journal, vol. 80, no. 3, 287-308. McLaughlin, B. and Hereda, J. L. C. 1996. “Information-processing Approaches to Research on Second Language Acquisition and Use.” In Ritchie, W. C. and Bhatia, T. K. (eds.), Handbook of Second Language Acquisition. San Diego: Academic Press, 213-228. Preto-Bay, Ana Maria and Kristine Hansen. 2006. “Preparing for the Tipping Point: Designing Writing Programs to Meet the Needs of the Changing Population.” WPA: Writing Program Administration, Vol. 30, Nos. 1-2, Fall. 37-57.

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  • 12.
    Kauppinen, Asko
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Politeness, Criticism & Praise in Student Peer Reviews: A Cross-Cultural Analysis2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this exploratory, descriptive study, we examine ways in which students negotiate symmetrical and asymmetrical power relations and express their authority and expertise in reviewing their peers’ writing. Furthermore, we question the ways in which the context for these peer reviews may explain differences in commenting styles. This mapping of peer reviews is layered by different cultural and developmental contexts. Our corpus is composed by students and faculty at Malmö University (Sweden), the University of South Florida (U.S.) and the University of Tartu (Estonia). These students were enrolled in a variety of courses at different educational levels: the Malmö students were enrolled in an English teacher trainee program, the USF students were enrolled in first-year composition, and the students at Tartu were doctoral students working on their journal articles. To conduct this analysis, we will pay particular attention to linguistic expressions such as modality markers, verbs, adverbs and adjectives, and transitions as indicators of politeness, criticism and praise. One of the dimensions for comparison is the difference, if any, manifested in the peer reviews depending whether the peer reviewer is a native speaker of English or an EFL learner. Brown, P., & Levinson, S. C. (1987). Politeness: some universals in language usage ([Rev. ed.] with corr., new introd. and new bibliogr). Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press. Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (1999). Critical Inquiry in a Text-Based Environment: Computer Conferencing in Higher Education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2–3), 87–105. http://doi.org/10.1016/S1096-7516(00)00016-6 Gielen, S., Peeters, E., Dochy, F., Onghena, P., & Struyven, K. (2010). Improving the effectiveness of peer feedback for learning. Learning and Instruction, 20(4), 304–315. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2009.08.007 Martin, J. R., & White, P. R. R. (2007). The Language of Evaluation. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Retrieved from http://www.palgraveconnect.com/doifinder/10.1057/9780230511910 Nelson, M. M., & Schunn, C. D. (2009). The nature of feedback: how different types of peer feedback affect writing performance. Instructional Science, 37(4), 375–401. Sadler, D. R. (1989). Formative Assessment and the Design of Instructional Systems. Instructional Science, 18(2), 119.

  • 13.
    Leijen, Djuddah
    et al.
    Tartu university.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    NB!Write: Sustaining Writing Initiatives through The Nordic and Baltic Network for Writing in Higher Education2021In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1, p. 1-8, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper takes the dichotomy between the unified context for teaching writing and writing research in North America and the diversified contexts for writing in Europe as its point of departure to outline several challenges such diversification in Europe may present to students and staff in higher education. The paper further argues for the need of unifying initiatives and describes the rationale for NB!Write, The Nordic and Baltic Network for Writing in Higher Education, and outlines the goals of this initiative. The network strives to determine how the Nordic and Baltic institutional, national, and cultural contexts may help find possible answers to common pedagogical questions and develop sustainable solutions for writing support.

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  • 14.
    Lindberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Nordenstam, Anna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Persson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Culture on the move: Language and Literature as Vectors for Cultural Empowerment in Swedish Education2024In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, transformations of cultures and languages are increasingly noticeable due to heightened international mobility and intensified global communication and information flows. How such transformations play out and are met in Swedish education is a pressing topic to address to ensure relevant and inclusive quality education for all. The theme of this special issue, Culture on the Move, foregrounds language and literature both as pedagogical tools and disciplinary fields necessary for learning to live and work in a culturally diverse world. The contributions stem from the initial activities within the graduate school “Culturally Empowering Education through Language and Literature” (CuEEd-LL). Centre-staging teaching and learning in Swedish education, the articles in this issue present a range of inroads into how language and literature can be used to support cultural diversity among pupils, students and teachers since cultural diversity is steadily gaining attention both as a resource and a challenge in education and society.

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  • 15.
    Lindberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Nordenstam, Anna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Persson, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the guest editors2024In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1, p. i-iiArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue consists of five position papers, four articles and two essays covering diverse aspects of the theme Culture on the Move that foregrounds language and literature both as pedagogical tools and disciplinary fields necessary for learning to live and work in a culturally diverse world. The contributions stem from the initial activities within the graduate school “Culturally Empowering Education through Language and Literature” (CuEEd-LL). Centre-staging teaching and learning in Swedish education, the texts in this issue present a range of inroads into how language and literature can be used to support cultural diversity among pupils, students and teachers since cultural diversity is steadily gaining attention both as a resource and a challenge in education and society.

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  • 16.
    Malmbjer, Anna
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    Olsson Jers, Cecilia
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Vikten av ett nationellt professionsspråk för teori- och praktikutveckling i svensk högre utbildning: Exemplet forskning om respons på studenters skriftliga och muntliga framställning2022In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 3, p. 62-74, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    To compile empirical research published in Swedish about instructor feedback on student written and oral production in Swedish higher education, we have conducted a systematic survey of recent publications (2010-2020) in seven Swedish academic peer-reviewed journals with educational foci. The results of this survey were surprising: during the last ten years, only two studies in Swedish investigating instructor feedback on student writing were published. We found no studies on instructor feedback on student oral production. Moreover, these studies defined the concept of feedback vaguely and used it inconsistently. Not only is the fact that there are so few studies in Swedish on feedback in higher education remarkable, but the inconsistent use of the concept also makes theoretical and pedagogical development difficult. Based on these findings and, to a degree, contrary to the current policies encouraging international publication, we argue that more research publication should also be encouraged in Swedish on Swedish higher education for higher education practitioners.

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  • 17.
    Olsson Jers, Cecilia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Assessment of situated orality: The role of reflection and revision in appropriation and transformation of new knowledge2018In: Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, ISSN 0260-2938, E-ISSN 1469-297X, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 586-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we aim to investigate how students on a cross-disciplinary postgraduate course in research communication describe the formative peer feedback they have received on their oral presentations and what impact they report it has had on their performance. The study is based on a qualitative analysis of 36 transcribed video recordings from the course. Our findings show that the students, through their reflections and revisions, clearly demonstrate to have appropriated and, in some cases, also transformed the course content: they were able to select parts of the feedback relevant to their development and redefine some of the concepts to suit rhetorical situations. Surprisingly, feedback on deficits in student presentations resulted both in reflection and revision, while affirmatory feedback resulted, if at all, in reflection only. These results may help develop effective educational tools for assessment of oral performances in higher education.

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  • 18.
    Olsson Jers, Cecilia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Hinder och frihet: Forskarstuderande reflekterar över actio och pronuntiatio i forskningskommunikation2022In: Rhetorica Scandinavica, ISSN 1397-0534, E-ISSN 2002-7974, no 84, p. 23-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis of 45 written reflections on the rhetorical working process from a postgraduate course in research communication reveals the postgraduate students to reflect on actio and pronuntiatio in standardised ways and to a lesser extent than on the other canons. This applies both to the physical and the digital iterations of the course. The students often link actio and pronuntiatio to elocutio and memoria and view oral presentations from a speaker-centered rather than audience-centered perspective. Not surprisingly, the students note that their body language becomes limited in the digital classroom and that they, therefore, must utilise their voices more. Depending on the students’ understanding of actio and pronuntiatio, utilising these can become a barrier or a breakthrough for successful research communication. These results prompt further discussion of actio’s and pronuntiatio’s potential for teaching research communication in the physical and the digital spaces.

  • 19.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Indeterminacy and the interpretation patterns for modal utterances in English and Swedish2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The interpretation of modal verbs continues to pose both theoretical and descriptive problems. Many studies on modal verbs appeal to notions of context (e.g. Kratzer 1991, Coates 1983, Papafragou 2000). Few studies, however, undertake a task of actually defining these contexts. This study is usage-based. It investigates a large number of naturally occurring examples in order to outline patterns of interpretation of utterances containing modal verbs (see Wärnsby 2006). It is based on approximately 3,000 examples of the English must and may, and their Swedish counterparts måste and kan. These examples are extracted with co-text from the English-Swedish Parallel Corpus. The data are subjected to a data mining analysis using 21 different contextual variables, including time reference, type of subject, type of verb, aspectual modification. The results of this analysis support the hypothesis that disambiguating utterances containing modal verbs is a process where certain variables or combinations of variables are of crucial importance, whereas others are not. 96.5% of examples containing must and 94.2% of måste-data are correctly predicted as being epistemic or deontic. 77.6% of may-data and 66.1% of kan-data are correctly predicted according to the different interpretations these utterances receive in context. Furthermore, the patterning of the contextual variables investigated with respect to modal interpretations is similar in the two languages under investigation, English and Swedish. Some of the examples, however, have eluded data analysis. Most of these examples are indeterminate. Contrary to what is observed in the clearly epistemic and deontic examples, in the indeterminate examples there is no apparent systematicity in the co-occurrence patterns of the variables discussed. References Coates, Jennifer. 1983. The semantics of modal auxiliaries. London and Canberra: Croom Helm Kratzer, Angelika. 1991. Modality. In von Stechow, A. and D. Wunderlich (eds.), Semantics: an international handbook of contemporary research, 639-650. Berlin: De Gruyter Papafragou, Anna. 2000. Modality: issues in the semantics-pragmatics interface. Amsterdam, Lausanne, New York, Oxford, Shannon, Singapore and Tokyo: Elsevier Wärnsby, Anna. 2006. (De)coding modality: The case of Must, May, Måste and Kan. Lund studies in English 113, Thormählen, M. and B. Warren (eds.). Lund: Department of English, Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University

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  • 20.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    Interpreting Modal Utterances in English and Swedish2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interpreting modal utterances in English and Swedish Anna Wärnsby (Lund University) The interpretation of modal verbs continues to pose both theoretical and descriptive problems. Many studies on modal verbs appeal to notions of context (e.g. Kratzer 1991, Coates 1983, Papafragou 2000). Few studies, however, undertake a task of actually defining these contexts. This study is usage-based. It investigates a large number of naturally occurring examples in order to outline patterns of interpretation of utterances containing modal verbs (see Author X 2006). It is based on approximately 3,000 examples of the English must and may, and their Swedish counterparts måste and kan. These examples are extracted with co-text from the English-Swedish Parallel Corpus. The data are subjected to a data mining analysis using 21 different contextual variables, including time reference, type of subject, type of verb, aspectual modification. The results of this analysis support the hypothesis that disambiguating utterances containing modal verbs is a process where certain variables or combinations of variables are of crucial importance, whereas others are not. 96.5% of examples containing must and 94.2% of måste-data are correctly predicted as being epistemic or deontic. 77.6% of may- data and 66.1% of kan-data are correctly predicted according to the different interpretations these utterances receive in context. Furthermore, the patterning of the contextual variables investigated with respect to modal interpretations is similar in the two languages under investigation, English and Swedish. Some of the examples, however, have eluded data analysis. Most of these examples are indeterminate. Contrary to what is observed in the clearly epistemic and deontic examples, in the indeterminate examples there is no apparent systematicity in the co-occurrence patterns of the variables discussed.

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  • 21.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter form the Editor2018In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 2, p. i-ivArticle in journal (Other academic)
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  • 22.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2022In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 4, p. I-IVArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The current issue consists of six articles and a position paper covering diverse aspects of educational issues: preschool teachers discussing physics in preschool, the role of Swedish as a second language (SSL) teachers in language introduction programmes, undergraduate Swedish EFL (English as a foreign language) critical thinking skills online, the need of a developed conceptual framework to describe preschool teachers leadership in preschool and within education and research, the emergence of learning in dating television, smartphones as a resource for adult immigrants' multi modal text production and VTS (Visual Thinking Strategies) in a Swedish EFL classroom.

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  • 23.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2021In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 4, p. 4p. i-ivArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This December issue consists of eight articles. In focus are several pertinent educational questions: how pre-service teachers’ reflect on interculturality prompted by an international virtual exchange (VE), how control is divided between preschool teachers and special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs) when dealing with special needs children, what parents’ reflections are on the transition of their children from preschool to school, how teacher feedback promotes the development of mathematical reasoning in secondary school pupils, how the concept of systematic leadership is addressed in recent Nordic research on kindergartens, what work preconditions school-age educare teachers have for support and development of pupils in leisure centres, how preschool teachers develop professional knowledge within the preschool context and, finally, what classroom management choices teachers report making.

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  • 24.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2020In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1, p. 1p. i-iArticle in journal (Other academic)
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  • 25.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2021In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 3, p. 3p. i-iiiArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This summer issue consists of seven articles and a position paper. In focus in this issue are several pertinent educational questions: how the concept of proven experience shapes teaching practice in school, how professional orality should be viewed from ethical perspectives, what is the essential meaning of joy in learning, how pupils develop narrative competencies and identities through consuming and producing stories in various forms, in what ways the Swedish minorities are represented in the steering documents (Lgr11), how taste can be reconceptualised to contribute to sustainable food consumption, what teaching means for pre-school and school-age recreation leaders and how PE teachers legitimise pupils’ writing in their subject.

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  • 26.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2021In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 2, p. 3p. i-iiiArticle in journal (Other academic)
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  • 27.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2020In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 4, p. 3p. i-iiiArticle in journal (Other academic)
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  • 28.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2019In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1, p. 1p. i-iArticle in journal (Other academic)
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  • 29.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2020In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 2, p. 2p. i-iiArticle in journal (Other academic)
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  • 30.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2019In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 4, p. 1p. i-iArticle in journal (Other academic)
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  • 31.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2019In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 3, p. 1p. i-iArticle in journal (Other academic)
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  • 32.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editor2019In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 2, p. 1p. i-iArticle in journal (Other academic)
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  • 33.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    On the Adequacy of constructionist approach to modality2016In: Constructions and Frames, ISSN 1876-1933, E-ISSN 1876-1941, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 40-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When speakers are confronted with modal expressions in their native language, specifically those that contain a modal verb, they are able to interpret these expressions epistemic or non-epistemic, for example. But what enables the speakers to interpret these modal expressions instantly and accurately despite the inevitably complex explanation any linguistic theory needs evil to account for this? Modality, modals and modal interpretations are among those universal tension points where the explanatory value of any theoretical construct is sorely tested. This paper raises some questions about the adequacy of applying Construction Grammar (Goldberg 1995, 2006) as a method of analysis of expressions containing modal verbs.In particular, the following issues are discussed: (i)the necessity to postulate a great number of constructions to account for a modal utterance, (ii) the theoretically unrestricted scope of a construction and (iii) the ever-present problem of indeterminate modal utterances.

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  • 34.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Aull, Laura
    Leijen, Djuddah
    Moxley, Joe
    Affective Language in Student Peer Reviews: Exploring Data from Three Institutional Contexts2018In: Journal of Academic Writing, E-ISSN 2225-8973, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 28-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although peer review is a common practice in writing classrooms, there are still few studies that analyze written patterns in students’ peer reviews across multiple institutional contexts. Based on a sample of approximately 50,000 peer reviews written by students at the University of South Florida (USF), Malmö University (MAU), and the University of Tartu (UT), this study examines how students formulate criticism and praise, negotiate power relations, and express authority and expertise in reviewing their peers’ writing. The study specifically focuses on features of affective language, including adjectives, expressions of suggestion, boosters and hedges, cognitive verbs, personal pronouns, and adversative transitions. The results show that across all three contexts, the peer reviews contain a blend of foci, including descriptions and evaluations of peer texts, directives or suggestions for revisions, responses to the writer or the text, and indications of reader interpretations. Across all three contexts, peer reviews also contain more positively glossed responses than negatively glossed responses. By contrast, certain features of affective language pattern idiosyncratically in different contexts; these distinctions can be explained variously according to writer experience, nativeness, and institutional context. The findings carry implications for continued research and for instructional guidance for student peer review.

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  • 35.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Eriksson, Andreas
    Wiktorsson, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Language and Linguistics (SPS).
    Bick, Eckhard
    Olsson, Leif-Jöran
    Building interdisciplinary bridges: MUCH: The Malmö University-Chalmers Corpus of Academic Writing as a Process2016In: New Approaches to English Linguistics: Building bridges / [ed] Olga Timofeeva, Anne-Christine Gardner, Alpo Honkapohja, Sarah Chevalier, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, p. 197-211Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a corpus of writing as a process (MUCH), comprising English as a Foreign Language (EFL) student texts. The corpus will contain a large number of richly annotated papers in several versions from students of different performance levels. It will also include peer and instructor feedback, as well as tools for visualising the revision process, and for analysing the writing process and the peer and instructor feedback. MUCH will make it possible to study how texts develop and change in the course of the writing process and how feedback impacts the process.

  • 36.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Kauppinen, Asko
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Finnegan, Damian
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Reflective Writing on an ESL Writing Course: Accessing Metacognition to Inform Curriculum Design and Assessment2021In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, Vol. 1, p. 38-56, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that student reflective writing is a valuable window into student learning, particularly student metacognition; however, our knowledge of the challenges of accessing metacognition to inform curriculum design and assessment practices in the ESL (English as a Second Language) context is less robust. This paper reports two qualitative studies of student reflective writing on an ESL writing course within a teacher education programme. The studies investigate how student metacognition manifests itself in reflective papers and how mapping student metacognition can inform evidence-based curriculum design and assessment. The data comes from several iterations of an ESL writing course and is analysed using directed and conventional content analyses. Our results expose a complex relation between metacognition, curriculum design and assessment practices: 1) unless scaffolded by the curriculum design to use precise terminology, students resort to expressing their understanding of the course content in terms of everyday, vernacular language and 2) student reflective writing not only provides a more nuanced picture of their learning than the final course grades but is invaluable for developing scaffolding and assessment practices. Based on our results, we recommend integrating structured reflection as part of the regular curricula to gauge ESL student metacognition and monitor more precisely their uptake of course content.

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  • 37.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Leijen, Djuddah
    University of Tartu.
    Letter from the Editors2021In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 1, p. 4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Educare is published in collaboration with NB!Write, The Nordic and Baltic Writing in Higher Education Network, who aim to consolidate and disseminate writing research and pedagogy and forge new collaborations in the region. Therefore, in this issue of Educare, the Reader will find contributions investigating how writing and the teaching of writing are embedded and supported in different international, national, local and institutional models. The issue consists of three research articles, three position papers and an interview. The focus is on the recent initiatives in the Nordic and Baltic region, but other European contexts of relevance to the regional writing initiatives are also represented. More specifically, the contributing authors explicitly situate writing issues in particular institutional contexts, explore writing support and development of student writing and instructor competency and articulate strategies to make this work sustainable.

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  • 38.
    Wärnsby, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Sundmark, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Letter from the Editors2020In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, no 3, p. 3p. i-iiiArticle in journal (Other academic)
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