Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Garrison, Jim
    School of Education, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia.
    Embodying Meaning: Qualities, Feelings, Selective Attention, and Habits2016In: Quest (National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education), ISSN 0033-6297, E-ISSN 1543-2750, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 207-222Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences Örebro University, Sweden.
    Garrison, Jim
    Learning Sciences & TechVirginia TechBlacksburg, VA, USA.
    Östman, Leif
    Teacher Education, Uppsala University.
    Empirical Philosophical Investigations in Education and Embodied Experience2018Book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet.
    A Transactional Understanding of Movement Learning2020In: Learning Movements: New Perspectives of Movement Education / [ed] Larsson, Håkan, Routledge , 2020, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Risberg, Jonas
    Uppsala University.
    Embodying Teaching: A Body Pedagogic Study of a Teacher’s Movement Rhythm in the ‘Sloyd’ Classroom2018In: Interchange, ISSN 0826-4805, E-ISSN 1573-1790, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 179-204Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Risberg, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet.
    Movement Learning and Pupils’ Artistic Expression: Analysing Situated Artistic Relations in Physical Education2021In: Learning Movements: New Perspectives of Movement Education, Routledge , 2021, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    School of Health, Örebro University, Orebro.
    Risberg, Jonas
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    The walking rhythm of physical education teaching: an in-path analysis2019In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 402-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: While studies of teaching frequently preserve an interest in teacher–pupil encounters that take place in certain spots, this article shows how teachers’ can be understood as in-path instructors, which is significant for student-based learning. This complements studies that have mainly focused on teachers instructional work taking place at certain spots.

    Purpose: The purpose is to describe how a PE teacher’s rhythmic labouring of the diverse settings in the gym creates a learning environment. By examining emplacement (spatial) and empacement (temporal) as important aspects of how learning environments are constituted, this article contributes a framework for studying and analysing a teacher’s work from a moving vantage point.

    Conclusions: Based on a video ethnographic approach and using a wearable camera attached to the teacher’s chest, the analysis of a station-wise lesson show how the teacher frequently covers a large part of the room and creates a web of educational challenges and possibilities. These brief encounters are identified as important tools that support each pupil’s rhythm and engagement in the learning activities and maintain the corporate rhythm of a class. Furthermore, by analysing the teacher’s temporal and spatial walking technique, which helps the pupils to transit between and accomplish practical exercises, the article highlights how the teacher’s ability to support pupils’ progression partly builds on a regional knowledge that is cultivated by the array of encounters

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  • 7.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    School of Health Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Garrison, Jim
    School of Education, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
    Physical education teaching as a caring act—techniques of bodily touch and the paradox of caring2016In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 591-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we investigate ‘no touch policies’ as a practical teacher concern that includes the body as a location, a source and a means in educational activity. We argue that to understand issues regarding physical touch within school practice we must conceive it as deeply associated with specific teaching techniques. Thus, the didactical challenge is not found in argumentations about the pro and cons of physical touch, but through analysis of how teachers handle student interaction and teaching intentions.

    We consider teaching as a caring profession. Caring, as a practical teacher concern, requires wisdom regarding the right time to use bodily touch and to refrain from such use. This wisdom involves the ability to discern people’s needs, desires, interests and purposes in particular situations and act appropriately. From a body pedagogical perspective we approach intergenerational touch not only as a discursive and power-related question but as an essential tension in the intersection of the; ambiguity attendant to any intentional act such as teaching, the conflict between the ethics of care and the ethics of justice, and finally, the paradox of caring.

    We draw on interviews with PE-teachers in Swedish primary, secondary and upper-secondary schools and analyses of a collection of techniques of bodily touch that are established and practiced with specific pedagogical purposes. The results shows PE teacher’s competence in handling different functions of intergenerational touch in relation to three different techniques of bodily touch; (1) Security touch, which is characterized by intentions to handle the fragile; (2) Denoting touch, which is characterized by intentions to handle learning content and (3) Relational touch, which is characterized by caring intentions. Each of these is of importance for the teachers in carrying out their call to teach and each of these relies on professional assessments whether or not it meets its intended purpose.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, 75002, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Östman, Leif
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, 75002, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A Transactional Way of Analysing the Learning of ‘Tacit Knowledge’2015In: Interchange, ISSN 0826-4805, E-ISSN 1573-1790, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 271-287Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    I am sailing—towards a transactional analysis of ‘body techniques’2013In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 722-740Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Caldeborg, Annica
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Joacim
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV). School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden and Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Physical contact in physical education, sports coaching and the preschool: a scoping review2023In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 326-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical contact between adults and children in educational setting has been a well debated subject in research over the past 20 years. Although physical contact is often regarded as an important pedagogical tool, it has given rise to an increased awareness amongst sports coaches, physical education and preschool teachers about the possible negative consequences of its use in these settings. The aim of this article is to map the current literature on physical contact in physical education, sports coaching and the preschool and identify research gaps by means of a scoping review, i.e. after 20 years of research in the field of intergenerational touch what can be said to be known in the field and what possible gaps are there in the research? The research questions are: (i) Which journals, countries, settings, theories and methods are represented in the research field? (ii) Which central themes and knowledge gaps can be identified? The results show that the research field has expanded significantly in the last 20 years, both in terms of the number of published articles, the number of countries represented in the research and the number of journals in which articles on the topic have been published. The central themes identified in the articles included in the review cover the following topics: fears related to physical contact, resistance, cultural differences, the functions and needs of physical contact and the professional identity of sports coaches, physical education and preschool teachers. It is concluded that studies that could lead the research field forward would ideally focus on intersectionality, or how practitioners’ fears of physical contact impact their pedagogical work with students.

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  • 11.
    Goodyear, Victoria
    et al.
    School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
    Andersson, Joacim
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    #Skinny girls: young girls’ learning processes and health-related social media2022In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides in-depth knowledge into young girls’ learning processes in relation to physical activity, diet/nutrition and body image. Data were generated from interviews with 49 girls (age 13–15) in England. The practical epistemological analysis technique was used to explore young people as both producers and consumers, or prosumers, of content and knowledge. The data illustrate that adolescent girls navigate two interrelated health-related paradoxes within publicly private spaces: (i) skinny fat and (ii) naturally fake. Skinny fat refers to how participation in social media represents a continuous struggle of becoming skinny, but at the same time not trying too hard to become too skinny. Naturally fake refers to how having a ‘natural’ look is highly valued, but equally, it is acceptable to be ‘fake’. Overall, adolescent girls are competent users of social media, who are able to navigate the complexity of the medium and its contents. At the same time, the adolescent girls sometimes found themselves, unintentionally, exposed to risks (e.g. bullying or body dysmorphia), particularly when social media was experienced publicly in a temporal order, connected to the past or present, and without control of potential future effects and impacts. Relevant adults should acknowledge young people’s vast competence of life on social media and further empower young people to self-regulate their learning through social media, and in ways that help them to learn from experiences about their health and bodies to shape future actions. 

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  • 12.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Andersson, Joacim
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Health as Experience: Exploring Health in Daily Life Drawing From the Work of Aaron Antonovsky and John Dewey2020In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1004-1018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has pursued salutogenic and narrative approaches to deal with questions about how everyday settings are constitutive for different health practices. Healthy behavior is not a distinguishable action, but a chain of activities, often embedded in other social practices. In this article, we have endeavored to describe such a chain of activities guided by the salutogenic claim of exploring the good living argued by McCuaig and Quennerstedt. We use biographical material written by Karl Ove Knausgaard who has created a life story entitled My Struggle. The novel is selected upon an approach influenced by Brinkmann who stresses that literature can be seen as a qualitative social inquiry in which the novelist is an expert in transforming personal life experiences into common human expressions of life. The study illustrates how research with a broader notion of health can convey experiences of health, thereby complementing (and sometimes challenging) public health evidence. 

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1 - 12 of 12
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