Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Singleton, Benedict
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Trails and tribulations: Lifestyle migration as nature-based integration in Northern Sweden2022In: More than ‘Nature’: Research on Infrastructure and Settlements in the North / [ed] Doris Friedrich; Markus Hirnsperger; Stefan Bauer, Vienna: LIT Verlag, 2022, p. 167-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Garcia, Nicolas Acosta
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Boyd, Eric
    Univ Durham, Dept Anthropol, Durham, England..
    Gillette, Maris Boyd
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Rask, Nanna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Saldert, Hannah
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Singleton, Benedict Esmond
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Disagreeing well in an unparadigmatic field: a response to Bodin (2021)2023In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 1049-1052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent opinion article, sustainability researcher orjan Bodin claims that a shift leftward in sustainability science has rendered certain topics and research methods taboo, thus inhibiting the field's ability to contribute to achieving Agenda 2030. In this response, we problematise Bodin's framing of sustainability science, arguing he has misrepresented the field as "normal" rather than acknowledging its unparadigmatic character. It is precisely the unparadigmatic character of sustainability sciences (plural emphasised) that allows the field to begin addressing the wicked problems of our time. The question is then how to "disagree well" and assure quality in this unparadigmatic field.

  • 3.
    Gillette, Maris Boyd
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Shebitz, Daniela
    Kean Univ, Sch Environm & Sustainabil Sci, Union, NJ USA..
    Singleton, Benedict
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Doing Conservation Differently: Toward a Diverse Conservations Inventory2023In: Ethnobiology Letters, ISSN 2159-8126, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many scientists and environmental activists argue that the scale and scope of contemporary conservation must increase dramatically if we are to halt biodiversity declines and sustain a healthy planet. Yet conservation as currently practiced has faced significant critique for its reliance on reductionist science, advocacy of "fortress"-like preservation measures that disproportionately harm marginalized communities, and integration into the global capitalist system that is the root cause of environmental degradation. The contributions to this special issue, developed from a panel at the Anthropology and Conservation conference co-hosted by the Royal Anthropological Institute and the Society of Ethnobiology in October 2021, collectively argue for what we, borrowing from Gibson-Graham's diverse economies framework, call "doing conservation differently." By bringing marginalized, hidden, and alternative conservation activities to light, researchers can contribute, in the spirit of Gibson-Graham's work, to making these diverse conservations more real and credible as objects of policy and activism. This special issue contributes to inventorying the diverse conservations that already exist, which opens new spaces for ethical intervention and collective action.

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  • 4.
    Gillette, Maris Boyd
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Singleton, Benedict
    University of Gothenburg.
    Inevitable epistemological conflict: Reflections on a disagreement over the relationship between science and indigenous and local knowledge2022In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 1904-1905Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Singleton, Benedict E.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Department for Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swedish bureaucratic biodiversity: Analysing municipal worker discourse with the theory of sociocultural viability2023In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities are important sites for societal transitions towards sustainability, which is increasingly recognised around the issue of biodiversity conservation and protection. However, cities are often characterised by the need to develop and grow. Furthermore, efforts to promote sustainable development have been criticised as failing to address the fundamental causes of environmental destruction. In this article, based on interviews with bureaucrats and documentary analysis, I explore urban planning and biodiversity protection at four Swedish municipalities. Biodiversity protection has been an official goal in Sweden for 30 years. As such, my research aim is to explore how Swedish bureaucrats represent efforts to balance imperatives to develop cities and protect biodiversity. Taking an institutional approach, I identify what information is included and excluded. In assessing municipal discourse, I utilise the theory of sociocultural viability, which provides an analytical typology of four worldviews. I identify that within respondents' discourse, biodiversity primarily emerges as a product of a hierarchical view of reality, as a measurable object; an indicator; a characteristic; and as a provider that is both engineerable and replaceable. This was despite numerous respondents articulating an egalitarian desire for more holistic interpretations of biodiversity in urban planning, appreciative of its inherent worth. This suggests that biodiversity has largely been integrated into extant hierarchical conceptualisations of public administration. According to cultural theory, addressing wicked policy problems effectively requires insight from several of the typology's worldviews. As such, current practice may reiterate dominant contemporary views on nature rather than innovation towards a radically different society.

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  • 6.
    Singleton, Benedict E.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö Univ, Dept Global Polit Studies, Malmö, Sweden..
    Viewpoint: Two more lamps. Augmenting urban planning for biodiversity2023In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 141, article id 104501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parris et al.'s seven lamps (principles) of planning for biodiversity in the city (2018) provides a framework for achieving two objectives. Firstly, to alter the normative basis on which urban planning is predicated by integrating a concern for nonhuman inhabitants. Secondly, it argues for the greater enrolment of ecologists and the field of ecology within environmental planning. It seeks to encourage a paradigm-shift to reorient society on a more sustainable path by demonstrating that planning for more-than-human cities does not require a conceptual leap, rather it resonates with extant planning concerns. It thus takes a pragmatic approach to radical change. However, I argue that this framework as originally stated insufficiently considers the diversity of society or the field of ecology and entails an anthropocentric worldview. This undermines the lamps framework's radical agenda. I argue that this issue could be ameliorated by developing two further principles, Justice and Contact. Integrating these concerns into the lamps framework will strengthen its ability to contribute to efforts to transition society into a sustainable state.

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  • 7.
    Singleton, Benedict E.
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Gillette, Maris Boyd
    Univ Gothenburg, Sch Global Studies, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mutiny on the Boundary?: Examining ILK-Based Conservation Collaborations through the Lens of Rubbish Theory2023In: Ethnobiology Letters, ISSN 2159-8126, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many conservation researchers and practitioners argue that knowledges traditionally conceptualized as nonacademic are useful for guiding environmental decision-making and stewardship. As demonstrated by the articles in this special issue, bringing Indigenous and local knowledges to bear on environmental conservation requires forging new relationships and, de facto, new political arrangements. In this article, we seek to clarify what is at stake in such efforts to change (or maintain) what counts as knowledge by applying rubbish theory to the volume's case studies. Redrawing the boundaries of what counts as conservation knowledge in engagements between academic researchers and practitioners trained to "do conservation" according to western science traditions, on the one hand, and Indigenous peoples and local communities who possess knowledge generated in non-academic contexts, on the other, effects demarcations of expertise and so challenges existing social hierarchies. Unsurprisingly, tension emerges about how far such changes should go. By increasing awareness of the relationship between (re)defining knowledge and (re)configuring social and political hierarchies, we hope to make it easier for participants to manage such collaborations.

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  • 8.
    Singleton, Benedict
    et al.
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg.
    Gillette, Maris Boyd
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg.
    Burman, Anders
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg.
    Blanes, Ruy
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg.
    Uncomfortable Knowledge: Toward a Pedagogy of Reflexivity2022In: Teaching Anthropology, E-ISSN 2053-9843, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 73-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflexivity is a hallmark of good ethnography and many consider it a defining characteristic of anthropology. It is thus surprising that anthropologists have not paid more attention to how we teach students to be reflexive. Many of us learn reflexivity by making mistakes in the field, yet discussions of anthropological faux pas and their potential contributions to reflexive learning are typically limited to informal settings and occluded or heavily curated within our research outputs. In this article we employ analytic tools from the theory of sociocultural viability, in particular the notions of clumsiness, elegance, and uncomfortable knowledge, to contribute to developing a more explicit pedagogy of reflexivity. Since reading ethnographies plays a major role in how we teach anthropology, we argue that anthropologists should do more in their publications to highlight how awkward moments can deepen reflexivity. To advance this agenda, we provide cases of uncomfortable knowledge drawn from our own field experiences, highlighting how the social, emotional and embodied awkwardness of each situation contributed to acquiring reflexive insights. This article is thus a call to initiate prospective researchers earlier into the messy backstage of anthropological research, including by clarifying how the embodied and affective aspects of our interactions offer potential for deepening reflexive knowledge. In the hopes of facilitating the development of our pedagogies of reflexivity, we conclude the text with four recommendations that we feel will encourage reflexive learning from awkward fieldwork encounters.

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