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  • 1.
    Alam, Sultan
    et al.
    Univ Malakand, Dept Chem, Chakdara Dir Lower 18800, Pakistan..
    Ullah, Barkat
    Univ Malakand, Dept Chem, Chakdara Dir Lower 18800, Pakistan..
    Khan, Muhammad Sufaid
    Univ Malakand, Dept Chem, Chakdara Dir Lower 18800, Pakistan..
    Rahman, Najeeb ur
    Univ Malakand, Dept Chem, Chakdara Dir Lower 18800, Pakistan..
    Khan, Luqman
    Univ Malakand, Dept Chem, Chakdara Dir Lower 18800, Pakistan.;Univ Peshawar, Natl Ctr Excellence Phys Chem NCE, Peshawar 25000, Pakistan..
    Shah, Luqman Ali
    National Center of Excellence in Physical Chemistry (NCE), University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000, Pakistan.
    Zekker, Ivar
    Univ Tartu, Inst Chem, 14a Ravila St, EE-50411 Tartu, Estonia..
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Forestry & Rural Engn, 5 Kreutzwaldi St, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia..
    Kallistova, Anna
    Russian Acad Sci, Winogradsky Inst Microbiol, Biotechnol Res Ctr, Leninsky Prospect,33,Build 2, Moscow 119071, Russia..
    Pimenov, Nikolai
    Russian Acad Sci, Winogradsky Inst Microbiol, Biotechnol Res Ctr, Leninsky Prospect,33,Build 2, Moscow 119071, Russia..
    Yandri, Erkata
    East Jakarta Timur, Darma Persadha Univ, Grad Sch Renewable Energy, Jl Taman Malaka, Jakarta 13450, Indonesia..
    Hendroko Setyobudi, Roy
    Univ Muhammadiyah Malang, Dept Agr Sci, Malang 65145, Indonesia..
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Zahoor, Muhammad
    Univ Malakand, Dept Biochem, Chakdara Dir Lower 18800, Pakistan..
    Adsorption Kinetics and Isotherm Study of Basic Red 5 on Synthesized Silica Monolith Particles2021In: Water, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 13, no 20, article id 2803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Silica monolith particles (SMP) were prepared from Tetra-Methyl-Ortho-Silicate (TMOS) and characterized by Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and surface area analyzer. FTIR analysis showed the Si-O stretching confirming SMP formation. SEM analysis provided information about the mean diameter of SMP (1-5 mu m). EDX confirmed the presence of silicon and oxygen in the SMP. Moreover, the calculated surface area for SMP was found to be around 367 m(2)/g, whereas BJH pore size distributed particles were 87.15 along with the total pore volume and pore radius of 0.073 cm(3)/g and 16.627 & ANGS;, respectively. Besides, the removal efficiency was found to be about 96%. Various kinetic equations were used to calculate the adsorption parameters. Overall, the results show that the most appropriate model for the kinetics data was the pseudo-second order kinetics model while the mechanism of adsorption was best explained by the Langmuir isotherm. The highest removal of Basic Red 5 dye after 120 min at 298 K was 576 mg/g. Moreover, the thermodynamics parameters (Enthalpy, Gibb's energy, and Entropy) were also estimated. The & UDelta;H & DEG; (0.995 kJ/mol) value depicted the endothermic nature of the process. The non-spontaneous aspect of the process was evident from the & UDelta;G & DEG; values which were 60.431, 328.93, and 339.5 kJ/mol at 293, 303, and 313 K, respectively. From the high removal efficiency value, it can be concluded that the prepared adsorbent can be a potential adsorbent in the reclamation of dyes from wastewater.</p>

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  • 2.
    Burlakovs, J.
    et al.
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Vincevica-Gaile, Z.
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Bisters, V.
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Hogland, W.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Kriipsalu, M.
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia.
    Zekker, I.
    Tartu University, Estonia.
    Setyobudi, R. H.
    University of Muhammadiyah Malang, Indonesia.
    Jani, Y.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Anne, O.
    Klaipeda University, Lithuania.
    Application of anaerobic digestion for biogas and methane production from fresh beach-cast biomass2022In: 3rd EAGE Global Energy Transition, GET 2022, European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE , 2022, p. 61-65Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research, biogas production potential from beach wrack collected in Riga Gulf (Ragaciems, Jaunķemeri, Bigauņciems) and in coastline of Sweden (Kalmar) was studied using an anaerobic digestion method. Selected beach wrack masses laying ashore and containing macroalgal biomass of common macroalgae types specific to the Baltic Sea were mixed for consolidated samples. Anoxic fermentation of untreated beach wrack was carried out in 16 bioreactors applying a single filling mode at 38 °C. The study revealed that by utilizing beach wrack accumulated ashore as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion methane can be utilized if pretreatment and conditioning of the samples are performed. The study was continued for selected brown algae containing biomass tested with three dewatering pretreatment methods: a) keeping in tap water for 24 hours; b) washing with running fresh water for one hour, and c) drying to relatively constant weight. The resulting methane outcome was compared with the data corresponding to raw brown algae. The study confirmed that washing of macroalgal biomass applied as pretreatment prior to anaerobic fermentation avoids inhibition of salts and promotes biomethane production.

  • 3.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Science, University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Jani, Yahya
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Grinfelde, I.
    Department of Environmental Engineering and Water Management, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Latvia; Scientific Laboratory of Forest and Water Resources, Latvia.
    Pilecka, J.
    Department of Environmental Engineering and Water Management, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Latvia; Scientific Laboratory of Forest and Water Resources, Latvia.
    Valujeva, K.
    Department of Environmental Engineering and Water Management, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Latvia; Scientific Laboratory of Forest and Water Resources, Latvia.
    Geophysical aspects of abandoned landfill geomorphological and material properties macro-characterization2020In: 20th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM 2020, STEF92 Technology , 2020, Vol. 20, p. 551-558, article id 1.2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landfills (dumps) are places where the end of the life cycle of products can be found - useful material is dumped away from the sight creating contaminant flows around. Another problem is huge unexplored potential of resources recycling - we have limited knowledge also on useful elements and materials that are buried. The solution to overcome the limitations that provide remote sensing and traditional geodesy, proximal sensing techniques could be used. “Near surface geophysics” with operation at or just below the soil surface, significantly may contribute to give answers that traditionally are solved only after excavation. Geophysical methods are various, those can be active (i.e. create its own signal) or passive (i.e. register an existing signal); invasive (by inserting devices into the soil) or non-destructive. Some of these methods are static (e.g. a sequence of inserted electrodes), others can be used in a mobile way (e.g. pulled by a quad-bike). In general, their depth of exploration can vary from a few decimetres to some tens of metres. Thus in range of wide geophysical methodology spectrum almost all methods might be of use for unknown dump exploration depending on circumstances. In this paper, the aim is to macro-characterize anthropogenic geomorphological forms for contouring of old buried dumps by use of magnetometry, and geoelectric research methods to provide knowledge on approximate content of the dump. Protonmagnetometer was used in Eastern Latvia to determine unseen on surface dumpsite, buried in forest; induced polarisation and electric resistivity research was done in Southern Sweden for the macro-content analysis of dump hills composed of glass industry residuals and construction waste mixture. Geophysical surveying was performed to support site investigation with respect to landfill-related environmental problems, to enhance the opportunity for contouring of location of material mass and initially evaluate its physical properties. Results have shown good potential of geophysical surveying to spatially characterize landfill masses (location and dimensions) and to identify the internal structure of a landfill site, which already provides valuable information to estimate the landfill mining (material recovery) potential of landfills.

  • 4.
    Ferrans, Laura
    et al.
    Linnaeus University.
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University.
    Chemical extraction of trace elements from dredged sediments into a circular economy perspective: Case study on Malmfjärden Bay, south-eastern Sweden2021In: Resources, Environment and Sustainability, ISSN 2666-9161, Vol. 6, article id 100039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Worldwide, sediments are dredged from water bodies to guarantee proper water levels and remediate aquatic ecosystems. Dredged sediments contain metals that could interfere with recycling if the concentrations overpass permissible limits. Washing of elements from sediments represents a technique to decrease the concentration of metals, and it could introduce a new source of elements. The current study aimed to employ ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylenediamine-disuccinic acid (EDDS) and investigate the effect of operational parameters (concentration and pH) on the chemical extraction of metals from dredged sediments. Core sediments were extracted from sampling stations around Malmfjärden bay, Sweden. The results suggested that lead, zinc and copper were the elements with higher extraction rates, followed by arsenic and nickel. Chromium was poorly extracted. EDTA was more efficient than EDDS in dissolving the elements. Moreover, acidic conditions offered higher extraction rates for As using both chelators and for Pb employing EDTA. The 0.05 M concentration presented a higher mean extraction rate than 0.01 M for Cu, Cr and Ni for EDTA and EDDS. The findings in this study suggest that sediment washing is a promising technique to decrease metal concentrations in sediments and enhancing the feasibility to use the material for beneficial uses.

  • 5.
    Ismail, M
    et al.
    Women University Swabi, Pakistan.
    Alam, S
    University of Malakand, Pakistan.
    Khan, M
    University of Malakand, Pakistan.
    Shah, L
    University of Peshawar, Pakistan.
    Shah, S. M.
    University of Swabi, Pakistan.
    Wahab, M
    Women University Swabi, Pakistan.
    Rukh, G
    Women University Swabi, Pakistan.
    Rahman, N
    University of Malakand, Pakistan.
    Rehman, N
    Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University, Pakistan.
    Amin, N
    Abdul Wali Khan University, Pakistan.
    Burlakovs, J
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia.
    Kallistova, A
    Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology, Leninsky Pro-Spect, Russia.
    Pimenov, N
    Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology, Leninsky Pro-Spect, Russia.
    Gaile, Z
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Zahoor, M
    University of Malakand, Pakistan.
    Zekker, I
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Levels and Potential Health Hazards of Chlorinated Pesticidesin Surface Water Samples of Charsadda Area of Pakistan Using SPME-GC-ECD Technique2021In: Water S.A., ISSN 0378-4738, E-ISSN 1816-7950, Vol. 13, p. 1-14, article id 2468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we determined the levels of chlorinated pesticide residues in surfacewater samples collected from the Charsadda district (KPK, Pakistan). SPME-GC-ECD with COMBIPAL CTC autosampler was used for extraction and analysis of 20 organochlorine pesticides in thecollected water samples. For maximum efficiency of the SPME procedure, several parameters werestudied, including the extraction and desorption time of the fiber, solution pH, agitation of samples,and stirring speed, etc. This method showed good liner response, with R2 values in the range of0.9887 to 0.9999 for all pesticides. This method also provided good percent recoveries at 1 µg L−1(87.5to 106.0%) and at 2 µg L−1(88.5 to 109.2%). Lower limits of detection for all 20 chlorinated pesticideswere found to be lower than their maximum permissible contamination levels. Approximately 50%of the surface water samples collected from the Charsadda district were found to be contaminatedwith the pesticides γ-BHC, heptachlor, aldrin and dieldrin, with maximum concentrations of 0.023,0.108, 0.014 and 0.013 µg L−1, respectively. For adults and children, the cancer risk from water dueto contamination by various pesticides ranged from 0 to 33.29 × 10−6. The non-carcinogenic riskfrom each pollutant in the water samples of the Charsadda district was found to be in the order ofheptachlor > aldrin > dieldrin > γ-BHC. However, the pesticides α-BHC, β-BHC, heptachlor epoxide,chlordane, endrin, 4,40-DDD, endrin ketone, 4,40-DDT, endosulfan sulfate and methoxychlor werenot detected in any of the surface water samples of investigated in the present study.

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  • 6.
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Division of Sustainable Environment and Construction, School of Business Society and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Adsorption: A Cost-Effective Wastewater Treatment Technology for Removal of Conventional and Emerging Organic Contaminants2022In: Cost-efficient Wastewater Treatment Technologies: Engineered Systems / [ed] Mahmoud Nasr, Abdelazim M. Negm, Springer, 2022, p. 17-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a vital component for sustaining life on the earth because it is interacted with all metabolic activities of all living beings (human, plants, and others). The decomposition of organic pollutants, in general, causes oxygen deficiency in water bodies that can lead to severe damages in the ecosystem. Therefore, cost-effective innovative methods for the purification of wastewater is always needed. One of the most important methods that has gathered attention is adsorption. This method has witnessed continuous development in the case of the selected materials as adsorbents. Low cost as well as the production of new nano-materials have been used for the decontamination of water. In this chapter, a general overview based on the information available in the literature was produced to highlight the importance of adsorption as a method for the purification of water from conventional and emerging organic compounds.

  • 7.
    Khan, Asif
    et al.
    AWKUM, Dept Chem, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa 23200, Pakistan..
    Naeem, Muhammad
    AWKUM, Dept Chem, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa 23200, Pakistan..
    Zekker, Ivar
    Univ Tartu, Inst Chem, Ravilal 4a, EE-50411 Tartu, Estonia..
    Arian, Muhammad Balal
    Univ Karachi, Dept Chem, Sindh 75270, Pakistan..
    Michalski, Greg
    Purdue Univ, Dept Chem, W Lafayette, IN 47907 USA..
    Zeeshan, Sayed
    AWKUM, Dept Chem, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa 23200, Pakistan..
    ul Haq, Hameed
    AWKUM, Dept Chem, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa 23200, Pakistan..
    Ikram, Muhammad
    AWKUM, Dept Chem, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa 23200, Pakistan..
    Khan, Abbas
    AWKUM, Dept Chem, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa 23200, Pakistan..
    Subhan, Fazle
    AWKUM, Dept Chem, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa 23200, Pakistan..
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Vincevica-Gaile, Zane
    Univ Latvia, Dept Environm Sci, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia..
    Zahoor, Muhammad
    Univ Malakand, Dept Biochem, Chakdara 18800, Pakistan..
    Khan, Idrees
    Bacha Khan Univ, Dept Chem, Khyber Palchtankhwa 24420, Pakistan..
    Shah, Muhammad Ishaq Ali
    AWKUM, Dept Chem, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa 23200, Pakistan..
    Multivariate statistical analysis of heavy metals and physico-chemical parameters in the groundwater of Karak District, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan2021In: Proceedings of the Estonian Academy of Sciences, ISSN 1736-6046, E-ISSN 1736-7530, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 297-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Groundwater heavy metal pollution is a major concern all around the world. For the assessment of heavy metals and physico-chemical characteristics. groundwater samples were collected from different locations of the Karak District, Pakistan. With the help of the global information system device (GIS), groundwater samples were collected and studied from 47 locations. The present study focused on the water table (WT), water source depth (WSD), pH, electrical conductivity (EC), dissolved oxygen (DO), total dissolved solids (TDS), lead (Pb(II)), silver (Ag(I)), iron (Fe(II)) and chromium (Cr(VI)) parameters. Heavy metals were analyzed by the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The Pearson's matrix of correlation showed relationships between several parameters, such as the EC and the TDS which had close interactions between all the three different groundwater samples (collected by hand pump (HP), bore holes (BH) and tube wells (TW)). The strong correlation was detected in all the sources of water between the TDS and the EC, the regression coefficient (r) of which was 1. In the hierarchical clustering (by dendrograms) the HP samples show two clusters: Cluster 1 contains seven parameters and Cluster 2 has four parameters. The BH samples have two clusters: Cluster 1 contains three parameters and Cluster 2 has eight parameters. The TW dendrogram also shows two clusters: Cluster 1 contains six parameters while Cluster 2 has five parameters.

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  • 8.
    Limpraptono, F. Y.
    et al.
    Department of Electrical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Malang, Jl. Raya Karanglo, Km. 2, Malang 65143, Indonesia.
    Nurcahyo, E.
    Department of Electrical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Malang, Jl. Raya Karanglo, Km. 2, Malang 65143, Indonesia.
    Ashari, M. I.
    Department of Electrical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Malang, Jl. Raya Karanglo, Km. 2, Malang 65143, Indonesia.
    Yandri, E.
    Graduate School of Renewable Energy, Darma Persada University, Jl. Radin Inten 2, Pondok Kelapa, East Jakarta 13450, Indonesia.
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Design of power monitoring and electrical control systems to support energy conservation2021In: Proceedings of the Pakistan Academy of Sciences: Part A, ISSN 2518-4245, Vol. 58, no S, p. 1-8, article id ES-726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing demand for electrical energy and the decreasing supply of fossil fuels in recent years have increased the cost of electrical energy. So that the culture of saving electrical energy is a habit that must be cultivated in the community. On the other hand, energy-saving behavior cannot be realized massively without a support system that can control energy use. With these concerns, it is necessary to develop a method that encourages a culture of saving electrical energy. This paper proposes a system that supports active energy efficiency methods that can support an energy-efficient culture. This system is an electric power monitoring system that is integrated with a smart electrical panel that continuously monitors the use of electrical energy and can control electrical loads automatically, record electricity usage, provide comprehensive reports and analyze energy usage. The method used to carry out this research is research and development. This research has produced a prototype of electrical power control and monitoring system that has a smart panel based on a raspberry PI 3 and PZEM-004t power energy meter. The monitoring system performs and executes automatic control of electrical loads. The system can also provide reports in the form of data monitoring in daily, weekly, monthly or annual period. From the test results, it can be concluded that the system can work well. This research is expected to contribute to providing a system that can support government efforts in saving energy. © Pakistan Academy of Sciences.

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  • 9.
    Mutafela, Richard Nasilele
    et al.
    Sweco Sverige AB, Environm & Planning Div, Pk Gatan 2, S-55315 Jonkoping, Sweden.;Linnaeus Univ, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Ye, Fei
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci, Dept Appl Phys, Funct Mat Grp, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Dutta, Joydeep
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci, Dept Appl Phys, Funct Mat Grp, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;King Abdulaziz Univ, Ctr Nanotechnol, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia..
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus Univ, Fac Hlth & Life Sci, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Sustainable extraction of hazardous metals from crystal glass waste using biodegradable chelating agents2022In: Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management, ISSN 1438-4957, E-ISSN 1611-8227, Vol. 24, p. 692-701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extraction of hazardous metals from dumped crystal glass waste was investigated for site decontamination and resource recovery. Mechanically activated glass waste was leached with biodegradable chelating agents of ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), where the concentration and reaction time were determined by using Box-Wilson experimental design. Hazardous metals of lead (Pb), arsenic (As), antimony (Sb) and cadmium (Cd) with concentrations higher than regulatory limits were extracted wherein the extraction yield was found to vary Pb > Sb > As > Cd. Extraction was influenced more by type and concentration of chelator rather than by reaction time. A maximum of 64% of Pb could be extracted by EDDS while 42% using NTA. It is found that increase of chelator concentrations from 0.05 M to 1 M did not show improved metal extraction and the extraction improved with reaction time until 13 h. This study provides sustainable alternative for treating hazardous glass waste by mechanical activation followed by extraction using biodegradable chelator, instead of acid leaching.

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  • 10.
    Rahman, Najeeb
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Malakand, Chakdara Dir Lower, Chakdara 18800, Pakistan.
    Ullah, Ihsan
    Department of Chemistry, University of Malakand, Chakdara Dir Lower, Chakdara 18800, Pakistan.
    Alam, Sultan
    Department of Chemistry, University of Malakand, Chakdara Dir Lower, Chakdara 18800, Pakistan.
    Khan, Muhammad
    Department of Chemistry, University of Malakand, Chakdara Dir Lower, Chakdara 18800, Pakistan.
    Shah, Luqman
    National Centre of Excellence in Physical Chemistry University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000, Pakistan.
    Zekker, Ivar
    Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, 14a Ravila St., 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Institute of Forestry and Rural Engineering, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 5 Kreutzwaldi St., 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Kallistova, Anna
    Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology, Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect, 33, Building 2, 119071 Moscow, Russia.
    Pimenov, Nikolai
    Winogradsky Institute of Microbiology, Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect, 33, Building 2, 119071 Moscow, Russia.
    Vincevica-Gaile, Zane
    Department of Environmental Science, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Zahoor, Mohammad
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Malakand, Chakdara Dir Lower, Chakdara 18800, Pakistan.
    Activated Ailanthus altissima Sawdust as Adsorbent for Removal of Acid Yellow 29 from Wastewater: Kinetics Approach2021In: Water, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 15, no 13, p. 1-13, article id 2136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, Ailanthus altissima sawdust was chemically activated and characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Energy Dispersive X rays (EDX), and surface area analyzer. The sawdust was used as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye; Acid Yellow 29 (AY 29) from wastewater. Different kinetic and equilibrium models were used to calculate the adsorption parameters. Among the applied models, the more suitable model was Freundlich with maximum adsorption capacities of 9.464, 12.798, and 11.46 mg/g at 20 °C, 30 °C, and 40 °C respectively while R2 values close to 1. Moreover, the kinetic data was best fitted in pseudo second order kinetic model with high R2 values approaching to 1. Furthermore, adsorption thermodynamics parameters such as free energy, enthalpy, and entropy were calculated and the adsorption process was found to be exothermic with a value of ∆H° = −9.981 KJ mol−1, spontaneous that was concluded from ΔG° values which were negative (−0.275, −3.422, and −6.171 KJ mol−1 at 20, 30, and 40 °C respectively). A positive entropy change ∆S° with a value of 0.0363 KJ mol−1 indicated the increase disorder during adsorption process. It was concluded that the activated sawdust could be used as a suitable adsorbent for the removal of waste material, especially dyes from polluted waters.

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  • 11.
    Rudovica, Vita
    et al.
    Univ Latvia, Dept Analyt Chem, Riga, Latvia..
    Rotter, Ana
    Natl Inst Biol, Marine Biol Stn Piran, Piran, Slovenia..
    Gaudencio, Susana P.
    NOVA Univ Lisbon, NOVA Sch Sci & Technol, Associate Lab I4HB Inst Hlth & Bioecon, Dept Chem,UCIBIO Appl Mol Biosci Unit, Caparica, Portugal..
    Novoveska, Lucie
    Scottish Assoc Marine Sci, Oban, Argyll, Scotland..
    Akguel, Fusun
    Burdur Mehmet Akif Ersoy Univ, Fac Sci & Arts, Dept Mol Biol & Genet, Burdur, Turkey..
    Akslen-Hoel, Linn Kristin
    Moreforsking AS, Lesund, Norway..
    Alexandrino, Diogo A. M.
    Univ Porto, Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res, Matosinhos, Portugal..
    Anne, Olga
    Klaipeda Univ, Dept Engn, Klaipeda, Lithuania..
    Arbidans, Lauris
    Univ Latvia, Dept Analyt Chem, Riga, Latvia..
    Atanassova, Miroslava
    Moreforsking AS, Lesund, Norway..
    Beldowska, Magdalena
    Univ Gdansk, Inst Oceanog, Gdynia, Poland..
    Beldowski, Jacek
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Oceanol, Sopot, Poland..
    Bhatnagar, Amit
    LUT Univ, LUT Sch Engn Sci, Dept Separat Sci, Mikkeli, Finland..
    Bikovens, Oskars
    Latvian State Inst Wood Chem, Riga, Latvia..
    Bisters, Valdis
    Univ Latvia, Dept Environm Sci, Riga, Latvia..
    Carvalho, Maria F.
    Univ Porto, Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res, Matosinhos, Portugal.;Univ Porto, Inst Biomed Sci Abel Salazar, Porto, Portugal..
    Catala, Teresa S.
    Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Inst Chem & Biol Marine Environm ICBM, ICBM MPI Bridging Grp Marine Geochem, Oldenburg, Germany..
    Dubnika, Arita
    Riga Tech Univ, Fac Mat Sci & Appl Chem, Rudolfs Cimdins Riga Biomat Innovat & Dev Ctr, Inst Gen Chem Engn, Riga, Latvia.;Riga Tech Univ, Baltic Biomat Ctr Excellence, Riga, Latvia..
    Erdogan, Aysegul
    Ege Univ Applicat & Res Ctr Testing & Anal EGE MA, Izmir, Turkey..
    Ferrans, Laura
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Haznedaroglu, Berat Z.
    Bogazici Univ, Inst Environm Sci, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Setyobudi, Roy Hendroko
    Univ Muhammadiyah Malang, Waste Lab, Malang, Indonesia..
    Graca, Bozena
    Univ Gdansk, Inst Oceanog, Gdynia, Poland..
    Grinfelde, Inga
    Latvia Univ Life Sci & Technol, Lab Forest & Water Resources, Jelgava, Latvia..
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Ioannou, Efstathia
    Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Dept Pharm, Sect Pharmacognosy & Chem Nat Prod, Athens, Greece..
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Katarzyte, Marija
    Klaipeda Univ, Marine Res Inst, Klaipeda, Lithuania..
    Kikionis, Stefanos
    Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Dept Pharm, Sect Pharmacognosy & Chem Nat Prod, Athens, Greece..
    Klun, Katja
    Natl Inst Biol, Marine Biol Stn Piran, Piran, Slovenia..
    Kotta, Jonne
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Marine Inst, Tallinn, Estonia..
    Kriipsalu, Mait
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Chair Rural Bldg & Water Management, Tartu, Estonia..
    Labidi, Jalel
    Univ Basque Country, Dept Chem & Environm Engn, Donostia San Sebastian, Spain..
    Bilela, Lada Lukic
    Univ Sarajevo, Fac Sci, Dept Biol, Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herceg..
    Martinez-Sanz, Marta
    CEI UAM CSIC, CIAL CSIC UAM, Inst Food Sci Res, Madrid, Spain..
    Oliveira, Juliana
    NOVA Univ Lisbon, NOVA Sch Sci & Technol, Associate Lab I4HB Inst Hlth & Bioecon, Dept Chem,UCIBIO Appl Mol Biosci Unit, Caparica, Portugal..
    Ozola-Davidane, Ruta
    Univ Latvia, Dept Environm Sci, Riga, Latvia..
    Pilecka-Ulcugaceva, Jovita
    Latvia Univ Life Sci & Technol, Lab Forest & Water Resources, Jelgava, Latvia..
    Pospiskova, Kristyna
    CAS, Dept Nanobiotechnol, Biol Ctr, ISB, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.;Palacky Univ, Reg Ctr Adv Technol & Mat, Czech Adv Technol & Res Inst, Olomouc, Czech Republic..
    Rebours, Celine
    Moreforsking AS, Lesund, Norway..
    Roussis, Vassilios
    Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Dept Pharm, Sect Pharmacognosy & Chem Nat Prod, Athens, Greece..
    Lopez-Rubio, Amparo
    IATA CSIC, Inst Agrochem & Food Technol, Valencia, Spain..
    Safarik, Ivo
    CAS, Dept Nanobiotechnol, Biol Ctr, ISB, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.;Palacky Univ, Reg Ctr Adv Technol & Mat, Czech Adv Technol & Res Inst, Olomouc, Czech Republic..
    Schmieder, Frank
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Stankevica, Karina
    Univ Latvia, Dept Environm Sci, Riga, Latvia..
    Tamm, Toomas
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Chair Rural Bldg & Water Management, Tartu, Estonia..
    Tasdemir, Deniz
    GEOMAR Ctr Marine Biotechnol, GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res, Res Unit Marine Nat Prod Chem, Kiel, Germany.;Univ Kiel, Fac Math & Nat Sci, Kiel, Germany..
    Torres, Cristiana
    NOVA Univ Lisbon, NOVA Sch Sci & Technol, Associate Lab I4HB Inst Hlth & Bioecon, Dept Chem,UCIBIO Appl Mol Biosci Unit, Caparica, Portugal..
    Varese, Giovanna Cristina
    Univ Torino, Mycotheca Univ Taurinensis, Dept Life Sci & Syst Biol, Turin, Italy..
    Vincevica-Gaile, Zane
    Univ Latvia, Dept Environm Sci, Riga, Latvia..
    Zekker, Ivar
    Univ Tartu, Inst Chem, Tartu, Estonia..
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Univ Latvia, Dept Environm Sci, Riga, Latvia..
    Valorization of Marine Waste: Use of Industrial By-Products and Beach Wrack Towards the Production of High Added-Value Products2021In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 8, article id 723333Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomass is defined as organic matter from living organisms represented in all kingdoms. It is recognized to be an excellent source of proteins, polysaccharides and lipids and, as such, embodies a tailored feedstock for new products and processes to apply in green industries. The industrial processes focused on the valorization of terrestrial biomass are well established, but marine sources still represent an untapped resource. Oceans and seas occupy over 70% of the Earth's surface and are used intensively in worldwide economies through the fishery industry, as logistical routes, for mining ores and exploitation of fossil fuels, among others. All these activities produce waste. The other source of unused biomass derives from the beach wrack or washed-ashore organic material, especially in highly eutrophicated marine ecosystems. The development of high-added-value products from these side streams has been given priority in recent years due to the detection of a broad range of biopolymers, multiple nutrients and functional compounds that could find applications for human consumption or use in livestock/pet food, pharmaceutical and other industries. This review comprises a broad thematic approach in marine waste valorization, addressing the main achievements in marine biotechnology for advancing the circular economy, ranging from bioremediation applications for pollution treatment to energy and valorization for biomedical applications. It also includes a broad overview of the valorization of side streams in three selected case study areas: Norway, Scotland, and the Baltic Sea.</p>

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  • 12.
    Suwati, Suwati
    et al.
    Department of Agriculture Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Muhammadiyah Mataram, Jl. K. H. Ahmad Dahlan No.1 Pagesangan, Mataram, 83115, Nusa Tenggara Barat, Indonesia.
    Romansyah, Erni
    Department of Agriculture Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Muhammadiyah Mataram, Jl. K. H. Ahmad Dahlan No.1 Pagesangan, Mataram, 83115, Nusa Tenggara Barat, Indonesia.
    Syarifudin, Syarifudin
    Department of Agriculture Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Muhammadiyah Mataram, Jl. K. H. Ahmad Dahlan No.1 Pagesangan, Mataram, 83115, Nusa Tenggara Barat, Indonesia.
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Purnomo, Agus Heri
    Research Center for Marine and Fisheries Socio-economics, Mina Bahari 1Building, Jl. Pasir Putih 1, Ancol, 14430, Jakarta, Indonesia.
    Damat, Damat
    Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Muhammadiyah Malang, Jl. Raya Tlogomas No. 246, Malang, 65144, East Java, Indonesia.
    Yandri, Erkata
    Graduate School of Renewable Energy, Darma Persada University, Jl. Radin Inten 2, Pondok Kelapa, 13450, East Jakarta, Indonesia; Center of Renewable Energy Studies, Darma Persada University, East Jakarta, 13450, Indonesia.
    Comparison between Natural and Cabinet Drying on Weight Loss of Seaweed Euchuema cottonii Weber-van Bosse2021In: Sarhad Journal of Agriculture, ISSN 1016-4383, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Indonesia, seaweed has a critical role in improving the welfare of coastal communities. As asource of nutrition, seaweed consists of carbohydrate, protein, fat, fiber and ash, vitamin, and beta-carotene.Right drying methods are needed to preserve the quality of dried seaweed. This study aims to compare thetrend of weight reduction in seaweed during drying by natural and cabinet methods. The methods wereused experimentally in the field and laboratory. And the data were analyzed using simple linear regressionto formulate a trend of reduction in the weight of seaweed while drying. The results showed that the weightreduction in seaweed by the natural method can be illustrated by the simple regression linear equation Y =-2.385 3x + 943.65 with R² = 0.985 9, which means a reduction in weight of seaweed i.e. 2.385 3 g min–1during 340 min. While cabinet dryer method can be illustrated by Y = -0.858 8x + 913.55 with R² = 0.9315, which means a reduction in seaweed weight i.e, 0.858 8 g min–1 during 340 min. The reduction of seaweedweight per minute by the natural drying method is higher than the cabinet drying method. Still, the cabinetdrying method is more stable because it does not depend on the weather during the drying process.

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  • 13.
    Vincevica-Gaile, Zane
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Science, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Teppand, Tonis
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Kriipsalu, Mait
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Krievans, Maris
    Department of Geology, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Klavins, Maris
    Department of Environmental Science, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Setyobudi, Roy
    Department of Agriculture Science, University of Muhammadiyah Malang, Malang 65145, Indonesia.
    Grinfelde, Inga
    Scientific Laboratory of Forest and Water Resources, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia.
    Rudovica, Vita
    Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Tamm, Toomas
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Shanskiy, Merrit
    Chair of Soil Science, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Saaremae, Egle
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Zekker, Ivar
    Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Towards Sustainable Soil Stabilization in Peatlands: Secondary Raw Materials as an Alternative2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, p. 1-26, article id 6726Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation of construction works on weak (e.g., compressible, collapsible, expansive)soils such as peatlands often is limited by logistics of equipment and shortage of available andapplicable materials. If preloading or floating roads on geogrid reinforcement or piled embankmentscannot be implemented, then soil stabilization is needed. Sustainable soil stabilization in anenvironmentally friendly way is recommended instead of applying known conventional methodssuch as pure cementing or excavation and a single replacement of soils. Substitution of conventionalmaterial (cement) and primary raw material (lime) with secondary raw material (waste and byproductsfrom industries) corresponds to the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations,preserves resources, saves energy, and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Besides traditional materialusage, soil stabilization is achievable through various secondary raw materials (listed accordingto their groups and subgroups): 1. thermally treated waste products: 1.1. ashes from agricultureproduction; 1.2. ashes from energy production; 1.3. ashes from various manufacturing; 1.4. ashesfrom waste processing; 1.5. high carbon content pyrolysis products; 2. untreated waste and newproducts made from secondary raw materials: 2.1. waste from municipal waste biological treatmentand landfills; 2.2. waste from industries; 3. new products made from secondary raw materials:3.1. composite materials. Efficient solutions in environmental engineering may eliminate excessiveamounts of waste and support innovation in the circular economy for sustainable future.

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