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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Henrikson, Thor
    Nilner, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Sunzel, Bo
    Bondemark, Lars
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    TMD before and after correction of dentofacial deformities by orthodontic and orthognathic treatment2013In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 752-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The aims of the study were to investigate the alteration of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) after correction of dentofacial deformities by orthodontic treatment in conjunction with orthognathic surgery; and to compare the frequency of TMD in patients with dentofacial deformities with an age and gender matched control group. TMD were evaluated in 121 consecutive patients (treatment group), referred for orthognathic surgery, by a questionnaire and a clinical examination. 18 months after treatment, 81% of the patients completed a follow-up examination. The control group comprised 56 age and gender matched subjects, of whom 68% presented for follow-up examination. TMD were diagnosed according to research diagnostic criteria for TMD. At baseline examination, the treatment group had a higher frequency of myofascial pain (P=.035) and arthralgia (P=.040) than the control group. At follow-up, the frequencies of myofascial pain, arthralgia and disc displacement had decreased in the treatment group (P=.050, P=.004, P=.041, respectively). The frequency of TMD was comparable in the two groups at follow-up. Patients with dentofacial deformities, corrected by orthodontic treatment in conjunction with orthognathic surgery, seem to have a positive treatment outcome in respect of TMD pain

  • 2.
    Al-Bishri, Awwad
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Barghash, Ziad
    Rosenquist, Jan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Sunzel, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Neurosensory disturbance after sagittal split and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy: as reported in questionnaires and patients' records2005In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 247-251Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This retrospective study aimed at evaluating the long-term incidence of neurosensory disturbance (NSD) after sagittal split osteotomy (SSO) and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO). Furthermore, a comparison was made between the results obtained by questionnaires and information in the patient records in the evaluation of nerve function. Finally, the degree of discomfort caused by the NSD was evaluated. One hundred and twentynine patients, who underwent IVRO (79 patients) and SSO (50 patients), were included. Questionnaires were mailed to the patients at least one year after the operation. The records of all patients, who returned the questionnaires, were reviewed. The results of NSD obtained by questionnaires and records differed indicating a disagreement between the judgement of the surgeon and the patient's opinion. Long lasting NSD was underestimated by the surgeon as compared to the patient's subjective symptom. Long lasting NSD was reported in 7.5% (questionnaire), 3.8% (record) after IVRO and in 11.6% (questionnaire) and 8.1% (record) after SSO.

  • 3. Al-Moraissi, Essam
    et al.
    El-Sharkawy, Tarek
    El-Ghareeb, Tarek
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Three-dimensional versus standard miniplate fixation in the management of mandibular angle fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis2014In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 708-716Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to test whether there is a significant difference in the clinical outcomes between standard and three-dimensional (3D) miniplate fixation in the management of mandibular angle fractures (MAFs). An electronic search without date and language restrictions was performed in October 2013. Inclusion criteria were studies in humans including randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, and retrospective studies, with the aim of comparing the two techniques. Six studies were included. The meta-analyses revealed statistically significant differences for the incidence of hardware failure and postoperative trismus. There were no significant differences in the incidence of postoperative infection, malocclusion, wound dehiscence, non-union/malunion, or paresthesia. The cumulative odds ratio was 0.42, meaning that the use of 3D miniplates in the fixation of MAFs decreases the risk of the event (postoperative complication) by 58%. The results of this meta-analysis showed lower postoperative complication rates with the use of 3D miniplate fixation in comparison with the use of standard miniplate fixation in the management of MAFs.

  • 4. Andersson, J
    et al.
    Hallmer, F
    Eriksson, Lars
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Unilateral mandibular condylar fractures: a 31-year follow-up of non-surgical treatment2007In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 310-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the University Hospital of Malmö, Sweden, standardized trauma charts were used for registration of all jaw fractures from 1972 to 1976. During the year 2005 the aim was to interview all patients treated non-surgically for unilateral mandibular condylar fractures during this period. In total, 49 patients with unilateral condylar fractures were treated non-surgically in 1972–1976. Of these, 23 patients were available for follow-up, 17 were dead, 7 were not found and 2 did not answer letters or phone calls. The follow-up was a telephone interview according to a standardized questionnaire concerning occurrence of pain and headache, function of the jaw and joint sounds. Information from original records, radiographic reports and the standardized trauma charts revealed fracture site, type of fracture and intermaxillary fixation if any. Eighty-seven percent of the patients reported no pain from the jaws, 83% had no problems chewing and 91% reported no impact of the fracture on daily activities. Neck and shoulder symptoms were reported by 39% and back pain by 30%. The 31-year results of non-surgical treatment of unilateral non-dislocated and minor dislocated condylar fractures seem favourable concerning function, occurrence of pain and impact on daily life.

  • 5.
    Bougas, Kostas
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Vandeweghe, Stefan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Hayashi, Mariko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bryington, Matthew
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Kozai, Yusuke
    Schwartz-Filho, Humberto O
    Tovar, Nick
    Adolfsson, Erik
    Ono, Daisuke
    Coelho, Paulo G
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bone apposition to laminin-1 coated implants: histologic and 3D evaluation2013In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 677-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laminin-1 has been reported as one of the factors responsible for the nucleation of calcium phosphates and, in vitro, has been reported to selectively recruit osteoprogenitors. This article focused on its in vivo effects, and evaluated the effect of laminin-1 local application on osseointegration. Polished cylindrical hydroxyapatite implants were coated with laminin-1 (test) and the bone responses in the rabbit tibiae after 2 and 4 weeks were evaluated and compared to the non-coated implants (control). Before the samples were processed for histological sectioning, they were three-dimensionally analysed with micro computed tomography (μCT). Both evaluation methods were analysed with regards to bone area around the implant and bone to implant contact. From the histologic observation, new bone formation around the laminin-1 coated implant at 2 weeks seemed to have increased the amount of supporting bone around the implant, however, at 4 weeks, the two groups presented no notable differences. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional morphometric evaluation revealed that both histologic and three-dimensional analysis showed some tendency in favour of the test group implants, however there was no statistical significance between the test and control group results.

  • 6. Bryndahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Warfvinge, Gunnar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Isberg, Annika
    Cartilage changes link retrognathic mandibular growth to TMJ disc displacement in a rabbit model2011In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 621-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent experimental research demonstrated that non-reducing temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement in growing rabbits impaired mandibular growth. TMJ disc displacement is also shown to induce histological changes of the condylar cartilage. The authors hypothesized that the severity of these changes would correlate to the magnitude of mandibular growth. Bilateral non-reducing TMJ disc displacement was surgically created in 10 growing New Zealand White rabbits. Ten additional rabbits constituted a sham operated control group. Aided by tantalum implants, growth was cephalometrically determined for each mandibular side during a period equivalent to childhood and adolescence in man. At the end of the growth period, histologically classified cartilage features were correlated with the assessed ipsilateral mandibular growth. Non-reducing displacement of the TMJ disc during the growth period induced histological reactions of the condylar cartilage in the rabbit model. The severity of cartilage changes was inversely correlated to the magnitude and the direction of mandibular growth, which resulted in a retrognathic growth pattern.

  • 7.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Locking versus non-locking plate fixation in the management of mandibular fractures: a meta-analysis2014In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 1243-1250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to test whether there is a significant difference in the clinical outcomes between locking and non-locking plate fixation in the management of mandibular fractures. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in December 2013. Eligible studies were clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy identified 10 publications. The I(2) statistic was used to express the percentage of the total variation across studies due to heterogeneity. The inverse variance method was used for the random-effects model in the case of heterogeneity being detected, or the fixed-effects model in the case of heterogeneity not being detected. The estimates of an intervention were expressed as the risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval. Eight studies were judged to be at high risk of bias, whereas two studies were considered at moderate risk of bias. There was no statistically significant effect on the outcome of postoperative infection (P=0.17), malocclusion (P=0.15), hardware failure (P=0.77), hardware removal (P=0.95), wound dehiscence (P=0.98), or paraesthesia (P=0.20) in favour of locking plate fixation. The test for overall effect showed that the difference between the procedures did not significantly affect the incidence of postoperative complications (P=0.21), with RR 0.79 (95% CI 0.54-1.14).

  • 8.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Surgical versus non-surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures: a meta-analysis2015In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 158-179Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to test whether there is a significant difference in the clinical outcomes between surgical and non-surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures. An electronic search was undertaken in February 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy resulted in 36 publications. The estimates of an intervention were expressed as the risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) in millimetres. A statistically significant effect was observed for the outcome of post-treatment malocclusion (RR 0.46, P<0.00001), lateral deviation during maximum inter-incisal opening (RR 0.56, P=0.0001, dichotomous; MD -0.75, P=0.002, continuous), protrusion (MD 0.68, P=0.01), and laterotrusion (MD 0.53, P=0.03) favouring surgical treatment, and for infection (RR 3.43, P=0.03) favouring non-surgical treatment. There was no statistically significant effect on temporomandibular joint pain (RR 0.81, P=0.46) or noise (RR 1.44, P=0.24), or maximum inter-incisal opening (MD 2.24, P=0.14). The test for overall effect showed that the difference between the procedures significantly affected the incidence of post-treatment complications, favouring surgical treatment, when all dichotomous and continuous outcomes were analysed (RR 0.70, P=0.006 and MD 1.17, P=0.0006, respectively).

  • 9.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Immediately loaded non-submerged versus delayed loaded submerged dental implants: a meta-analysis2015In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 493-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rate, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated with immediately loaded non-submerged dental implants or delayed loaded submerged implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in March 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy resulted in 28 publications. The inverse variance method was used for a random- or fixed-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity. The estimates of an intervention were expressed as the risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) in millimetres. Twenty-three studies were judged to be at high risk of bias, one at moderate risk of bias, and four studies were considered at low risk of bias. The difference between procedures (submerged vs. non-submerged implants) significantly affected the implant failure rate (P = 0.02), with a RR of 1.78 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-2.83). There was no apparent significant effect of non-submerged dental implants on the occurrence of postoperative infection (P = 0.29; RR 2.13, CI 0.52-8.65) or on marginal bone loss (P = 0.77; MD -0.03, 95% CI -0.23 to 0.17).

  • 10.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Cavalieri Gomes, Carolina
    Santiago Gomez, Ricardo
    Desmoplastic ameloblastoma: a systematic review of the cases reported in the literature2020In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 709-716Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to integrate the available data published on desmoplastic ameloblastoma (DA) into a comprehensive analysis of its clinical/radiographic features. As it is not clear if the hybrid ameloblastoma has a unique biological behavior, the clinical/radiographic features of conventional DA with the hybrid variant were compared. An electronic search was undertaken in May/2019. Eligibility criteria included publications having enough clinical/radiographic/histological information to confirm the diagnosis. 128 publications reporting 285 DAs were included (246 central non-hybrid, 33 central hybrid, 6 peripheral). There was a statistically significant difference between non-hybrid and hybrid cases concerning lesion location, radiographic limits and size. In contrast to non-hybrid tumors that showed similar distribution in mandible and maxilla, a highly predominant mandible location was observed in the hybrid tumors. Also, non-hybrid lesions more often showed ill-defined radiographic margins, and were larger tumors than hybrid DAs. Enucleation with an additional therapy (either curettage or peripheral osteotomy) or resection led to a lower recurrence risk in comparison to curettage or enucleation without additional therapy. Location of the lesion and type of treatment are related to tumor recurrence. There are important differences in location and radiographic limits between hybrid and non-hybrid DAs, which support their classification as distinct lesions.

  • 11.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kisch, Jenö
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Is the intake of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure?2017In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 782-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the association between the intake of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the risk of dental implant failure. Patients were included if they were taking SSRIs only and no other medication, did not present any other systemic condition or compromising habits (bruxism, smoking, snuff), and complied with the use of prophylactic antibiotics for implant surgery. The multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) method and multilevel mixed-effects parametric survival analysis were used to test the association between SSRI exposure (predictor variable) and the risk of implant failure (outcome variable), adjusting for several potential confounders (other variables). The total number of implants with information available and meeting the necessary eligibility criteria was 931 (35 failures). These were placed in 300 patients. The implant failure rate was 12.5% for SSRI users and 3.3% for non-users (P = 0.007). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed a statistically significant difference in the cumulative survival rate (P < 0.001). The multivariate GEE model did not show a statistically significant association between SSRI intake and implant failure (P = 0.530), nor did the multilevel model (P = 0.125). It is suggested that the intake of SSRIs may not be associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure.

  • 12.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Guimarães, L M
    Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
    Gomes, C C
    Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
    Gomez, R S
    Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
    Cherubism: a systematic literature review of clinical and molecular aspects2021In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 43-53, article id S0901-5027(20)30213-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this review was to integrate the clinical, radiological, microscopic, and molecular data of published cherubism cases, in addition to therapeutic approaches, to provide more concise information about the disease. An electronic search was undertaken in September 2019. Eligibility criteria included publications having enough clinical, radiological, and histological information to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 260 publications reporting 513 cherubism cases were included. Familial history was observed in 310/458 cases (67.7%). SH3BP2 mutations were reported in 101/108 cases (93.5%) and mainly occurred at protein residues 415, 418, 419, and 420. Retrospective clinical grading was possible in 175 cases. Advanced clinical grading was associated with tooth agenesis, but not with other clinical, radiological, and genetic features. Specific amino acid substitutions of SH3BP2 mutations were not associated with the clinical grading of the disease. 'Wait and see' was the most common therapeutic approach. In a small number of cases, drugs were used in the treatment, with variable response. In conclusion, there is no clear correlation between the genotype and the phenotype of the disease, but additional genomic and gene expression regulation information is necessary for a better understanding of cherubism.

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  • 13.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kisch, Jenö
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Dental implants in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome: a case series and a systematic review2019In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1250-1259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the clinical outcome of dental implants in a series of patients with Sjögren’s syndrome (SS), as well as review of the literature. The study consisted of two parts: report of a case series and a systematic review. Results of the clinical series: 19 patients received 107 implants, followed for a mean of 125 months. Two patients lost 3 implants (failure rate 2.80%, 3/107). At the last follow-up, there was a mean±SD marginal bone loss (MBL) of -2.190±1.384 mm. Estimation of 4.39 mm of MBL after 30 years. Results of the review: 19 studies, including the present clinical series, with 712 implants in 186 patients (failure rate 4.11%, 29/705; failed at a mean time of 12.9±31.7 months), followed up for a mean of 72.5 months. The probability of failure was 2.8% (95% CI 1.6%, 4.1%). Primary SS had lower implant failure rate (2.54%, 3/118) than secondary SS patients (6.52%, 12/184). As a conclusion, dental implants should be considered by dentists as a viable treatment option in patients with SS, as the failure rate is fairly low. The SS patients may, however, present a higher MBL around implants than in the general population.

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  • 14.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Santiago Gomez, Ricardo
    Gorham-Stout disease with involvement of the jaws: a systematic review2019In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 1015-1021Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to systematically review all published cases of Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) involving the jaws, identify the clinic-radiological and histopathological features associated with the persistence of the lesions, and the best treatment options available. An electronic search was undertaken in November/2018. Eligibility criteria included publications having enough information to confirm the diagnosis. Eighty-six publications reporting 89 cases were included. Features observed: symptomatic (51.1%), swelling (34.1%), pathological fracture (31.8%), history of previous trauma (32.1%), high levels of alkaline phosphatase (24.3%), predominance of vascular tissue (72.4%). Nearly 1/4 of the patients were only followed up and no treatment was implemented. Most of treatments consisted of some type of surgery with/without additional therapies (42.0%), drugs (20.5%), and radiotherapy (14.8%). Half of the cases were found to persist after some treatment modality and five patients died. Among the different variables investigated, only the fact of crossing the midline showed association with the persistence of the lesion. There is still a lot to understand about GSD, a rare condition with no clear consensus on the etiopathology, unpredictable clinical course, and no standard treatment. The high percentage of cases that persist after treatment are found to be associated only with the lesion crossing the midline.

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  • 15.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Santiago Gomez, Ricardo
    Idiopathic bone cavity of the jaws: an updated analysis of the cases reported in the literature2019In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 886-894Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present systematic review was to compare the clinic-radiological features of solitary with multiple idiopathic bone cavity (IBC) reported in the jaws. We also aimed to identify possible features that may have some influence on the frequency of persistence of IBC following treatment. An electronic search was undertaken in August/2018. Eligibility criteria included publications having enough clinical/radiological/histological information to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 284 publications reporting 1253 IBCs were included. Multiple IBCs affect older patients and more frequently women in comparison to solitary IBCs. While trauma is more commonly found in solitary IBC, scalloping around teeth, bone expansion and persistence of the cavity following treatment were more significantly associated with multiple lesions. The most relevant factors that are suggested to influence the persistence of the cavity are ‘surgical access only’ in comparison to ‘curettage’, presence of scalloping around teeth, patients with multiple IBCs, and increase in size of the lesion. Solitary and multiple IBC differ in some clinical and radiological aspects and show distinct rates of persistence following treatment. Curettage is the treatment of choice for IBC compared to surgical access only.

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  • 16.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Santiago Gomez, Ricardo
    Juvenile ossifying fibroma of the jaws and paranasal sinuses: a systematic review of the cases reported in the literature2020In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 28-37Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to compare clinical and radiological features of the two juvenile ossifying fibroma (JOF) variants, trabecular (JTOF) and juvenile psammomatoid ossifying fibroma (JPOF). An electronic search was undertaken in March 2019. Eligibility criteria included publications having sufficient clinical, radiological, and histological information to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 185 publications and 491 cases were included. Most JOFs, including both variants, showed bone expansion, were painless, presented no cortical perforation and no secondary aneurysmal bone cyst, did not cause tooth root resorption, and had a mixed unilocular radiodensity appearance and well-defined limits on radiological examination. Patients with JPOF were on average older than those with JTOF. Enucleation and curettage was associated with a considerably high recurrence rate, regardless of the anatomical location or variant type of the lesion. Enucleation followed by either curettage or peripheral osteotomy showed lower recurrence rates than enucleation only. When resection was performed, only one case of JTOF presented recurrence. In conclusion, JOF lesions presented high rates of recurrence after treatment by curettage and enucleation only. Although surgical resection of JOFs resulted in the virtual absence of recurrence, enucleation followed by peripheral osteotomy/curettage should be the treatment of choice for both JOF variants to avoid the disfigurement usually associated with surgical resection.

  • 17.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Santiago Gomez, Ricardo
    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy of the jaws: an analysis of diagnostic features and treatment2019In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 1-9Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to integrate the available published data on melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy (MNTI) of the jaws into a comprehensive analysis of its clinical/radiological features, with emphasis on the predictive factors associated with recurrence. Eligibility criteria included publications with sufficient clinical/radiological/histological information to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 288 publications reporting 429 MNTI cases were included. MNTIs were slightly more prevalent in males and markedly more prevalent in the maxilla. Most of the lesions were asymptomatic, presenting cortical bone perforation and tooth displacement. Nine lesions were malignant, with metastasis in five cases. Enucleation was the predominant treatment (67.2%), followed by marginal (18.4%) and segmental resection (6.1%). Eighty-one of 356 lesions (22.8%) recurred. Recurrence rates were 61.5% for curettage, 25.3% for enucleation alone, 16.2% for enucleation + curettage, 20.0% for enucleation + peripheral osteotomy, 11.3% for marginal resection, 10.0% for segmental resection, 30.0% for chemotherapy, and 33.3% for radiotherapy. Enucleation and resection presented significantly lower recurrence rates in comparison to curettage. Curettage appears not to be the best form of treatment, due to its high recurrence rate. As resection (either marginal or segmental) is associated with higher morbidity, enucleation with or without complementary treatment (curettage or peripheral osteotomy) would appear to be the most indicated therapy.

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  • 18.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Santiago Gomez, Ricardo
    Response to Letter to the Editor: "Gorham-Stout disease with involvement of the jaws: a systematic review"2020In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 546-546Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    de Carvalho, M F
    et al.
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Vieira, J N M
    Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
    Figueiredo, R
    Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
    Reher, P
    School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    das Graças Afonso Miranda Chaves, M
    Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Validity of computed tomography in diagnosing midfacial fractures.2021In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 471-476, article id S0901-5027(20)30335-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity, accuracy, and reliability of two-dimensional computed tomography (2D-CT) scans (axial, coronal, sagittal planes) and three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) reconstructions in diagnosing midfacial fractures in relation to actual fractures identified clinically and during surgery (gold standard). The imaging diagnosis was performed by a radiologist and an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Sixty-two patients with a total of 429 midfacial fractures were included. Frontal sinus and nose fractures were easily diagnosed. For the three CT planes, there was a statistically significant difference between the CT examination and the gold standard for five to seven of the nine bones evaluated, while for 3D-CT, a difference was observed only for fractures of the orbital floor. The inter-observer agreement between the oral and maxillofacial surgeon and the radiologist was 75.5%. In conclusion, in this study 3D-CT reconstructions showed significantly the best sensitivity, accuracy, and reliability for the diagnosis of midfacial fractures. The sagittal reconstructions were the least diagnostic of the 2D-CT images. For areas where the parameters studied showed less agreement and hence a more difficult diagnosis, we recommend a combination of 3D and 2D-CT images to improve diagnostic accuracy.

  • 20. de Carvalho Machado, Vinícius
    et al.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bortolotto Felippe, Milena
    Manhães Júnior, Luiz Roberto Coutinho
    Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri de
    Assessment of accessory canals of the canalis sinuosus: a study of 1000 cone beam computed tomography examinations2016In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 45, no 12, p. 1586-1591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to verify the presence, spatial location, and calibre of the accessory canals (AC) of the canalis sinuosus by cone beam computed tomography, and their relationship to the anterior maxilla. This retrospective analysis included the scans of 1000 subjects. Parameters registered were sex, age, number of AC, presence or absence of AC with a diameter <1.0 mm, AC diameter (only for AC with a diameter >1.0 mm), and AC location in relation to the adjacent teeth. Males showed a statistically higher frequency of AC than females. The difference in age distribution was not statistically significant. Twenty percent of all AC presented a diameter of a least 1.0 mm. The end of the AC trajectory was most frequently located palatal to the anterior maxillary teeth. All relationships analyzed here were very weak (age vs. number of AC, age vs. AC diameter, number of AC vs. sex). Overall, the results of this study showed that AC of the canalis sinuosus are a common anatomical structure in the anterior maxilla, regardless of age and sex.

  • 21. Fröjd, Victoria
    et al.
    Franke-Stenport, Victoria
    Meirelles, Luiz
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Increased bone contact to a calcium incorporated oxidized commercially pure titanium implant; an in vivo study in rabbit2008In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 561-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone response to an oxidized titanium implant (Ox) and a calcium-incorporated oxidized titanium implant (Ca). A blasted titanium implant (Bl) was used as control. The implants were topographically characterized using an optical interferometer and placed: one in each distal femoral metaphysis and two in each proximal tibial metaphysis in rabbits. The rabbits were killed 12 weeks after implant insertion, and the implants and their surrounding tissues were removed en bloc for histomorphometrical evaluations. Topographical evaluation revealed three different surfaces: average height deviation (S(a), microm) values for Ca:Ox:Bl implants were 0.3:0.6:0.9, developed surface area ratios (%) 17:44:31, number of summits per microm(2) 208:136:118, and core fluid retention index values 1.33:1.33:1.38. The mean percentages of bone contact to the implants placed in the tibia (Ca:Ox:Bl) were 47:30:34 and to the implants placed in the femur (Ca:Ox) 32:20. The mean percentages of surrounding bone area for the implants placed in the tibia were 40:47:37 and for the implants placed in the femur 43:46. A significant increase in bone contact was found for smooth (S(a) <0.5 microm) but more densely peaked calcium-incorporated oxidized implants when compared to slightly rougher (S(a)=0.5-1.0 microm) oxidized or blasted implants.

  • 22.
    Hallmer, Fredrik
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Anderud, Jonas
    Sunzel, Bo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Güner, Nuray
    Andersson, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jaw fractures diagnosed and treated at Malmö University Hospital: a comparison of three decades2010In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 446-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to report the distribution, frequency and aetiology of jaw fractures in patients treated at the University Hospital, Malmö, 1993-2003 and to compare two previous studies from 1952-1962 and 1975-1985. In 1993-2003, 461 patients, 137 women (mean age 42 years; range 15-82) and 324 men (mean age 28 years; range 17-59) were diagnosed and treated. Women were significantly older than men (P<0.001). The most frequent cause of jaw fractures was falls in women (45%). In men, interpersonal violence (46%) was most common followed by road traffic accidents (RTAs) (24%) mostly involving bicycles (14%). The frequency of falls in women and men was significantly different (P<0.001) as was the difference between violence in men and women (P<0.001). The proportion of fractures caused by RTAs was significantly higher in 1952-1962 than in 1993-2003 (P<0.001). There was a significant increase in the proportion of fractures caused by violence between the two studies (P=0.007). In 1993-2003 the proportion of fractures in women due to falls was significantly higher than in 1952-1962 (P=0.006). Violence has replaced RTAs as the main cause for jaw fractures in men; for women falling is the commonest cause.

  • 23.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Tovar, N.
    Anchieta, R. B.
    Machado, L. S.
    Marin, C.
    Teixeira, H. S.
    Coelho, P. G.
    The combined effects of undersized drilling and implant macrogeometry on bone healing around dental implants: an experimental study2014In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 1269-1275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effect of undersized preparations with two different implant macrogeometries. There were four experimental groups: group 1, conical implant with an undersized osteotomy of 3.2 mm; group 2, conical implant with an undersized osteotomy of 3.5 mm; group 3, cylindrical implant with an undersized osteotomy of 3.2 mm; group 4, cylindrical implant with an undersized osteotomy of 3.5 mm. Implants were placed in one side of the sheep mandible (n = 6). After 3 weeks, the same procedure was conducted on the other side; 3 weeks later, euthanasia was performed. All implants were 4 mm x 10 mm Insertion torque was recorded for all implants during implantation. Retrieved samples were subjected to histological sectioning and histomorphometry. Implants of groups 1 and 2 presented significantly higher insertion torque than those of groups 3 and 4 (P < 0.001). No differences in bone-to-implant contact or bone area fraction occupied were observed between the groups at 3 weeks (P > 0.24, and P > respectively), whereas significant differences were observed at 6 weeks between groups 1 and 2, and between groups 3 and 4 (P < 0.01). Undersized drilling affected the biological establishment of bone formation around both dental implant macrogeometries.

  • 24.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Tovar, N.
    Marin, C.
    Teixeira, H. S.
    Anchieta, R. B.
    Silveira, L. M.
    Janal, M. N.
    Shibli, J. A.
    Coelho, P. G.
    The impact of a modified cutting flute implant design on osseointegration2014In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 883-888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information concerning the effects of the implant cutting flute design on initial stability and its influence on osseointegration in vivo is limited. This study evaluated the early effects of implants with a specific cutting flute design placed in the sheep mandible. Forty-eight dental implants with two different macrogeometries (24 with a specific cutting flute design Blossom group; 24 with a self-tapping design - DT group) were inserted into the mandibular bodies of six sheep; the maximum insertion torque was recorded. Samples were retrieved and processed for histomorphometric analysis after 3 and 6 weeks. The mean insertion torque was lower for Blossom implants (P < 0.001). No differences in histomorphometric results were observed between the groups. At 3 weeks, P = 0.58 for bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and P = 0.52 for bone area fraction occupied (BAFO); at 6 weeks, P = 0.55 for BIC and P = 0.45 for BAFO. While no histomorphometric differences were observed, ground sections showed different healing patterns between the implants, with better peri-implant bone organization around those with the specific cutting flute design (Blossom group). Implants with the modified cutting flute design had a significantly reduced insertion torque compared to the DT implants with a traditional cutting thread, and resulted in a different healing pattern.

  • 25. Kharazmi, Mohammad
    et al.
    Carlsson, Kristina
    Björnstad, Lillemor
    Petersson, Arne
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Warfvinge, Gunnar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Mandibular osteomyelitis associated with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria2011In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 1441-1444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A case of osteomyelitis in a 71-year-old woman with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is reported. Osteomyelitis of the jaw is a well known condition of the oral and maxillofacial region that may cause severe morbidity. It is well documented that vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell anaemia, a hemolytic blood disorder, can make the jaw bone susceptible to osteomyelitis. The authors report a case proposing an association between PNH and osteomyelitis of the mandible.

  • 26. Malmström, J
    et al.
    Anderud, Jonas
    Abrahamsson, P
    Wälivaara, D-Å
    Isaksson, S G
    Adolfsson, E
    Guided bone regeneration using individualized ceramic sheets.2016In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 1246-52, article id S0901-5027(16)30103-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) describes the use of membranes to regenerate bony defects. A membrane for GBR needs to be biocompatible, cell-occlusive, non-toxic, and mouldable, and possess space-maintaining properties including stability. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe a new method of GBR using individualized ceramic sheets to perfect bone regeneration prior to implant placement; bone regeneration was assessed using traditional histology and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric changes in the bone and soft tissue. Three patients were included. After full-thickness flap reflection, the individualized ceramic sheets were fixed. The sites were left to heal for 7 months. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 7 months postoperative using cone beam computed tomography and 3D optical equipment. Samples of the regenerated bone and soft tissue were collected and analyzed. The bone regenerated in the entire interior volume of all sheets. Bone biopsies revealed newly formed trabecular bone with a lamellar structure. Soft tissue biopsies showed connective tissue with no signs of an inflammatory response. This was considered to be newly formed periosteum. Thus ceramic individualized sheets can be used to regenerate large volumes of bone in both vertical and horizontal directions independent of the bone defect and with good biological acceptance of the material.

  • 27.
    Melin Svanborg, Lory
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Hoffman, Maria
    Andersson, Martin
    Currie, Fredrik
    Kjellin, Per
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The effect of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals on early bone formation surrounding dental implants2011In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 308-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The knowledge of how nanostructures might affect early bone healing and osseointegration is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate if nanometer thick coatings of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals applied on a moderately rough surface might enhance early bone healing on screw-shaped dental implants and to evaluate if the thickness of the coat influences healing. Sandblasted and acid etched titanium implants coated with two different thicknesses of hydroxyapatite (test implants) and sandblasted and acid etched titanium implants (control implants), were inserted in rabbit tibia. After a healing time of 2, 4 and 9 weeks, a removal torque analysis and a histological evaluation were performed. The results from the removal torque analysis showed a tendency for higher values for the double coated hydroxyapatite after 4 weeks and for both the coated surfaces after 9 weeks of healing. The histological evaluations indicated slightly more new bone formation with the coated implants compared with the control; the differences did not reach statistical significance. The present study could not support the importance of nanometer thick coatings of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals in early bone healing, at least not when applied on a blasted and etched surface and placed in a cortical bone.

  • 28.
    Pekkari, C
    et al.
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Oral Diagnostics and Rehabilitation, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Eastman Institute, Folktandvården Stockholm AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lund, B
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Oral Diagnostics and Rehabilitation, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Medical Unit of Plastic Surgery and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Davidson, T
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Naimi-Akbar, Aron
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Oral Diagnostics and Rehabilitation, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Eastman Institute, Folktandvården Stockholm AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marcusson, A
    Maxillofacial Unit in Linköping, and Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Weiner, C K
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Oral Diagnostics and Rehabilitation, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Gävle Hospital, Folktandvården Gävleborg, Gävleborg, Sweden.
    Cost analysis of orthognathic surgery: outpatient care versus inpatient care.2024In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, article id S0901-5027(24)00053-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With limited healthcare resources, it is important to provide the right level and form of care. The aim of this study was to determine whether selected single-jaw orthognathic surgery in outpatient care (OPC) generates lower healthcare costs than in inpatient care (IPC). The costs of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME), Le Fort I osteotomy (LFI), and bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) were calculated for 165 patients, 107 treated in OPC and 58 in IPC. Additionally, costs for revisits, emergency visits, emergency phone calls, re-operations, and plate removal during the first 12 months postoperatively were recorded. The total mean costs of the different operations including revisits, emergency visits, and phone calls were 34.2-48.8% lower in OPC than in IPC at 12 months postoperatively. Operation costs were lower for LFI in OPC (P = 0.009) and for SARME in IPC (P = 0.007). Anaesthesia costs were lower for LFI (P < 0.001) and BSSO (P < 0.001) in OPC, and there were fewer revisits (P = 0.001) and lower costs (P = 0.002) after LFI in OPC compared to IPC. This study showed that selected single-jaw orthognathic surgeries in outpatient care are associated with lower healthcare costs compared to inpatient care.

  • 29.
    Pekkari, C
    et al.
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Oral Diagnostics and Rehabilitation, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Eastmaninstitutet, Folktandvården Stockholm AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Weiner, C K
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Oral Diagnostics and Rehabilitation, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Eastmaninstitutet, Folktandvården Stockholm AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marcusson, A
    Maxillofacial Unit in Linköping, and Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Davidson, T
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Naimi-Akbar, A
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Oral Diagnostics and Rehabilitation, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Eastmaninstitutet, Folktandvården Stockholm AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lund, B
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Oral Diagnostics and Rehabilitation, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden; Medical Unit for Reconstructive Plastic and Craniofacial Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patient safety with orthognathic surgery in an outpatient setting2023In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 806-812, article id S0901-5027(22)00468-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Orthognathic surgery is traditionally performed in inpatient care. The question is whether patient safety is maintained when orthognathic surgery is performed in outpatient care. This retrospective cohort study was conducted to investigate patient safety in selected single-jaw orthognathic surgeries performed in outpatient care compared to inpatient care. Postoperative infection, postoperative bleeding, postoperative pain, plate removal, and re-operation, as well as emergency visits/phone calls and postoperative admission during the first 12 months after surgery were recorded. Predictor variables were sex, age, smoking, general disease, antibiotics, operation type, and operation time. Of the 165 patients included, 58 were treated in inpatient care and 107 in outpatient care. No significant difference was found between the groups regarding postoperative bleeding, pain, plate removal, re-operation, or emergency visits/phone calls. Ninety-four percent of outpatients (n = 101) were able to leave the hospital on the day of surgery as planned. There was an increased risk of postoperative infection in the outpatient care group (odds ratio 2.46, P = 0.049). Selected single-jaw orthognathic surgery can be performed in the outpatient setting, with maintained patient safety. The reason for the increased risk of postoperative infection among patients operated in outpatient care should be investigated in further studies.

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  • 30. Sahlström, LE
    et al.
    Ekberg, EwaCarin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Petersson, Arne
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lavage treatment of painful jaw movements at disc displacement without reduction: a randomized controlled trial in a short-term perspective2013In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 356-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared the short-term efficacy of two treatments (local anesthetics (A) and local anesthetics and lavage (AL)) in patients with permanently displaced discs and temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain. 45 patients participated in the single-blind randomized controlled trial. All patients had received: a Research Diagnostic Criteria/TMD diagnosis of disc displacement without reduction; and magnetic resonance imaging confirmation of non-reducing disc displacement. Participants were randomized to treatment with A or AL and were assessed at baseline and at 1 and 3 month follow-ups. The primary outcome measure defining success was reduction in pain intensity of at least 30% during jaw movement. At the 3 month follow-up, the success rate was 76% for A and 55% for AL. Both groups reported similar pain relief with no significant difference between the groups. Similar trends were observed for outcome measures in the physical functioning, emotional functioning, and global improvement domains with no significant difference between the groups. Use of lavage to supplement extra-articular local anesthetic treatment of painful jaw movements at non-reducing discs does not appear to improve TMD pain and mouth opening capacity in the short term

  • 31. Tovar, N.
    et al.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Gangolli, R.
    Perez, L.
    Manne, L.
    Yoo, D.
    Lorenzoni, F.
    Witek, L.
    Coelhol, P. G.
    Evaluation of bone response to various anorganic bovine bone xenografts: an experimental calvaria defect study2014In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 251-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This in vivo study investigated the in vivo performance of two newly developed synthetic bone substitutes and compared them to commercially available xenografts (Bio-Oss, Geistlich Pharma AG, Switzerland; OsteoGraf, Dentsply, USA). The materials were tested in a rabbit calvaria model, and the bone forming properties were observed at 4 and 8 weeks after implantation by means of histomorphometry and micro computed tomography (micro-CT). Defects without any graft material were used as negative controls. Micro-CT showed that all materials tested presented new bone formation that filled the defects at both time points, whereas the negative control presented less bone formation, with soft tissue infiltration into the defects. Comparable bone fill percentages were observed for histomorphometric and micro-CT results. Even though no statistically significant difference was found quantitatively between all of the bone graft substitute groups, a higher mean decrease in graft material filling the defects, along with higher remodelling activity, was evident for the experimental materials compared to the commercially available xenografts at 8 weeks. The results indicate that the experimental materials possess high degradability, along with osteoconduction comparable to commercially available xenografts.

  • 32. Van Lierde, KM
    et al.
    Browaeys, H
    Corthals, P
    Matthys, C
    Mussche, P
    Van Kerckhove, E
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Impact of fixed implant prosthetics using the 'all-on-four' treatment concept on speech intelligibility, articulation and oromyofunctional behaviour2012In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 1550-1557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this case control study is to determine the impact of screw-retained fixed cross-arch prostheses, supported by four osseointegrated implants, on articulation and oromyofunctional behaviour. Objective (acoustic analysis) and subjective assessment techniques were used to determine the overall intelligibility, phonetic characteristics and oromyofunctional behaviour at an average period of 7.3 months after placement of the fixed implant prosthesis in 15 patients and 9 age-matched controls with intact dentition and without prosthetic appliances. Overall satisfaction with the prosthesis was 87%, but 53% of the subjects mentioned an impact on speech. 87% of the subjects presented with one or more distortions of the consonants. The most common distortions were distortions of the sound /s/ (sigmatismus simplex, 40% and sigmatismus stridens, 33%), simplex /z/ (27%), insufficient frication of /f/ (20%), /[symbol in text]/ (20%), addental production of /d/ (20%), /t/ (20%) or /s/ sound (13%) and devoiced /d/ (7%). In the control group, no articulation disorders were noted. Oromyofunctional behaviour in both groups was normal. To what extent motor-oriented speech therapy (with focus on tongue function) immediately after periodontal treatment (after wound healing) would decrease the persistent phonetic distortions is a subject for further research.

  • 33.
    Öberg, Sven
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Johansson, C
    Rosenquist, Jan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bone formation after implantation of autolysed antigen extracted allogeneic bone in ovariectomized rabbits.2003In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 628-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the bone formation response to AAA bone in healthy and oestrogen deficient animals. Seventeen young healthy New Zealand female rabbits were used. Nine rabbits were subjected to ovariectomy and the remaining eight were sham-operated. Four weeks after ovariectomy standardized round cavities, 5mm in diameter, were made medially in the cortical part of each proximal tibia. To half of the cavities autolysed antigen-extracted al-logeneic AAA bone granules were added. After another 8 weeks the animals were sacrificed and sections of the tibial experimental areas were obtained. These were studied in light microscopy and the bone and non-bone areas were measured with computer support.The study showed that the addition of a bone inductive substance such as AAA bone enhances bone formation also in oestrogen deficient animals.

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