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  • 1.
    Alftberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Idvall, Markus
    Stockholm Univ, Ethnol, Dept Ethnol Hist Relig & Gender Studies, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    "Just a Bunch of Cells": The Affordance of Neurons in Neuroscientific Reasoning2020In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 50, p. 221-234Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 2.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Lunds universitet.
    Analysis of a Childfree Life: Tove Ingebjørg Fjell, Å si nei til meningen med livet? En kulturvitenskapelig analyse av barnfrihet. Tapir Akademisk Forlag, Trondheim 2008. 110 pp. Ill. ISBN 978-82-519-2352-1.2010In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 40, p. 151-152Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the preface to the book “Saying No to the Meaning of Life? A Culture Analysis of Childfree Life”, Tove Ingebjørg Fjell points out why she became interested in studying women who had decided not to become mothers. In her previous work she had studied reproduction and interviewed women who were involuntarily childless. Many of them told her that they did not understand why other women could choose not to have children of their own. This made Fjell interested in women who had decided not to have children. In her new book she has now focused on the childfree life in general and, more specifically, Norwegian women’s experience of choosing a childfree life. This very interesting topic can say something about contemporary views of both heteronormativity and the cultural meaning of having children.

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  • 3.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Lunds universitet.
    Cultural Analysis of the Brain: Michael Andersen, A Question of Location – Lifewith Fatigue after Stroke. Det Humanistiske Fakultet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2014.187 pp. Diss.2016In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 46, p. 152-154Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The brain has received little attention in ethnology. Yet it is the brain that in many ways both shapes our actual lives, and today, through neuroscience, shapes the way we look at ourselves. Knowledge produced by neuroscientists is to a large extent shaping our understanding of the Self. In simple terms we could say that we have gone from seeing the man with a Soul to seeing the man with a Brain. This is knowledge in constant transformation, which should be of ethnological interest as regards how knowledge is produced and reproduced in people’s everyday lives. It can be neuroscientists’ work in the laboratory or living with, for example, Parkinson’s disease, a degenerative disorder that results from the death of dopamine-generating cells in the midbrain. But the reverse perspective is also of interest for the cultural analysis of the brain. Even if the brain is absent in our everyday lives and we don’t need to think on or with the brain, it is part of our bodies’ being-in-the-world. This becomes clear when a person gets a brain disease and the symptoms become something that defines the features of our being. From this perspective the brain becomes a thing that an individual starts relating to, but also something that the individual no longer can control. For a person with Parkinson’s disease the brain is the uncontrollable factor that rapidly changes the perception of the everyday life of eating, walking and dressing oneself. The experiences of the brain, the everyday with an illness and the neuroscientific knowledge will together create and affect what we can call beingin-the-world. Ethnology should be more progressive when it comes to research questions that relate to these field because it is rapidly changing.

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  • 4.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Lunds universitet.
    Encounters with Sound Environments: Olle Stenbäck, Den ofrivilliga lyssnaren. Möten med butiksmusik. Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg 2016. 190 pp. Ill. English summary. Diss. ISBN 978-91-97535380.2017In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 47, p. 205-206Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Everyday life creates a variety of involuntarily listening for many of us. It can be the fan system in the office or school, the cars driving by outside our window, the old dishwasher in our kitchen, or the in-store music in the city. Many times we do not notice the sound, instead it is perceived as a background sound that blends into the place we are a part of. It is only when the fan stops or we close the window that we feel relief at how nice silence feels in our bodies. In Olle Stenbäck’s dissertation Den ofrivillige lyssnaren (“The involuntary listener: Encounters with in-store music”) this kind of involuntarily listening serves as the methodological input for how to understand and critically investigate what can be called sound environments and individual listening in a cultural context. Stenbäck thereby follows a growing ethnological interest in studying sound and sound environments as a methodological opening to different cultural processes. 

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  • 5.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Lunds universitet.
    RCT Ethnography: Jonas Winther, Making It Work: Trial Work between Scientific Elegance and Everyday Life Workability. Københavns Universitet, Det Humanistiske Fakultet, Copenhagen 2017. 240 pp. Ill. Diss.2019In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 49, p. 212-214Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnology has evolved into a science that can supply important knowledge to various forms of medical research and development projects. This know-how largely consists in the adaptation of the methods and analytical tools used in ethnology so that they can be applied to the development of new medical fields. Through ethnographic work – mainly observations and interviews – ethnologists can bring out perspectives that reveal different dimensions than those found by medical methods. But it is also a matter of a great many other skills, such as the ability to perform a cultural analysis or the way of presenting the ethnological results. There are also some skills that are important but not always highlighted in academic contexts, such as the social abilities of many ethnologists to participate in challenging fields. Jonas Winther’s compilation thesis is a good example of how ethnology can be embedded in a health intervention trial and incorporate ethnological knowledge in such a project. 

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  • 6.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Lunds universitet.
    The Medical Marketplace in Norway: Bente Gullveig Alver, Tove Ingebjørg Fjell & Teemu Ryymin, Vitenskap og varme hender. Den medisinske markedsplassen i Norge fra 1800 til i dag. Scandinavian Academic Press, Oslo 2013. 321 pp. ISBN 978-82-304-0073-9.2015In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 45, p. 217-219Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 1950s alternative medicine in Norway vanished, more or less, and it was only in the 1970s that it became more visible again. The post-war period was a time when the Norwegian welfare state was built, and alternative medicine was identified as something that did not belong to this modern society. Alternative medicine became something that was associated with the obsolete, the deviant “Other”, which should be relegated to the past. Instead modern medicine, social security systems, health policy visions and new hospitals emerged and moulded what could be defined as modern society. This dialectic relation between alternative medicine and modern medicine – or scientific medicine – is from a historical perspective a very fruitful input to understand not only medicine, but also cultural perspectives on the formation of modern society. The relation between scientific medicine and alternative medicine is always in transformation. This is an analysis that the culture researchers Bente Gullveig Alver and Tove Ingebjørg Fjell, together with the historian Teemu Ryymin, perform in their book Vitenskap og varme hender: Den medisinske markedsplassen i Norge fra 1800 til i dag. They start in the numerous medical markets at the beginning of the nineteenth century.

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  • 7.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Lunds universitet.
    The Rockefeller Foundation and the Danish Welfare State: Henriette Buus, Indretning og efterretning. Rockefeller Foundations indflydelse på den danske velfærdsstat 1920–1970. Museum Tusculanum Press, Copenhagen 2008. 384 pp. Ill. ISBN 978-87-635-0582-62010In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 40, p. 107-109Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ethnologist Henriette Buus focuses in this book on the influence that the Rockefeller Foundation had on the Danish welfare state. The welfare society began to take shape in the inter-war period around the Western world, and the RockefellerFoundation, based in the USA, was central for this formation. From the beginning of the 1920s the Foundation supported many different activities in Denmark that later became crucial for how the welfare society developed. More specifically, Buus is interested in how the Rockefeller Foundation influenced the expansion of the welfare society in Denmark, with a focus on preventive health care and social research. She does this by analysing both the establishment of the Health Visitor Institution (Sundhedsplejerskeinstitutionen) and the establishment of empirical inductive sociology at the Institute of History and Socio-Economics (Institutet for Historie og Samfundsøkonomi) in Copenhagen. These two institutions are analysed with material that stretches from the 1920s to the 1970s.

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  • 8.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Lunds universitet.
    The Urge to Count: Trangen til å telle: Objektivering, måling og standardiseringsom samfunnspraksis. Tord Larsen andEmil A. Røyrvik (eds.). Scandinavian AcademicPress, Oslo 2017. 314 pp. ISBN 978-82-304-0213-9.2019In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 49, p. 252-254Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The edited volume “The Urge to Count: Objectives, Measurement and Standardization as Social Practice” presents a cultural phenomenon of our time, namely our urge to see the world in numbers. We could say that we live today in an indicator culture, that we not only quantify, measure and standardize, but also use these numbers in performative and generative technologies. Working life is one of those contexts where we today have quantifiable target formulations that guide a form of self-control.

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  • 9.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Lunds universitet.
    What is “Culture”?: Kultursociologi og kulturanalyse. Pernille Tanggaard Andersen & Michael Hviid Jacobsen (eds.). Hans Reitzels Forlag, Copenhagen 2017. 604 pp. ISBN 978-87-41260570.2018In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 48, p. 224-225Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume has the aim of presenting cultural sociology and cultural analysis in a Danish context, and most of the empirical examples are from contemporary Denmark. From a broad theoretical and empirical perspective the book takes the question “What is ‘culture’?” seriously. Even though, as we know, culture is in itself a difficult word to use, and there are many explanations of what it is and therefore no consensus, the two sociologists Pernille Tanggaard Andersen and Michael Hviid Jacobsen present in the introduction a short background to how the word is dealt with in the volume. Briefly, culture is seen as something transformative and something that we have “a certain freedom to choose or refuse” (p. 31). It is also a term that is operated in three different ways: (1) the descriptive culture term, (2) the complex culture term and (3) culture as praxis. There are definitions that go from seeing culture as something that can be demarcated, to seeing culture as something that people do and studying the different elements of action.

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  • 10.
    Ideland, Malin
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Nature-Environment-Society (NMS).
    Sick Children. How Medial and Personal Experiences are Woven Together2007In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 37, no 2007, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the end of the 1990ths came alarming reports that the vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) could cause autism. The discovery about the connection was told in mass media all over the world and in Europe the vaccination frequency decreased with several percent. In some areas less than 90% of the children were vaccinated, a limit that calls “herd immunity”. In interviews with parents, who either have hesitated to vaccinate or have not vaccinated, have several causes for their view been uplifted. One important reason is that you want to keep nature going. Another reason is the meeting with sick children. These meetings might have been through mass media or in real life, and they have had consequences for personal choices. This article discuss why these children have been so important and how medial and real children become integrated in people’s handling of risks – for example the choice between the risk of your child getting measles and the risk of the vaccine’s side-effects. At another level the article discusses how medial and personal experiences are woven together and together shape a foundation for people’s opinions and decisions. Mass media work as a filter for what stories about biotechnology that are told. The filter is built on our cultural norms and values. And as a filter it has influence on people’s thoughts since it tells certain stories, but not others. But the media stories are put together with the private life situation and the personal outlook of life. Consumption of media’s stories about biotechnology is at the same time a kind of production of private stories about biotechnology. Experiences from media and life merge and create new stories.

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  • 11.
    Povrzanovic Frykman, Maja
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Connecting places: enduring the distance: transnationalism as bodily experience2001In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, no 31, p. 45-66Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 12.
    Povrzanovic Frykman, Maja
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Humbracht, Michael
    Lund University.
    Making Palpable Connections: Objects in Migrants’ Transnational Lives2013In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, no 43, p. 47-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on ethnographic fieldwork among migrants from different countries in Sweden in 2011, this article argues for the importance of looking at material aspects of migrants’ everyday life in transnational contexts. It delineates how objects are intertwined with memories and practical uses. They are palpable connections, carried across borders from “here” to “there” and back because they appeal to people’s acquired taste, and reconfirm social ties in space and time. The sense of continuity they contribute to, and the related sense of normalcy, can explain the non-existence of nostalgia and alienation that are part and parcel of a different analytical construction, that of migrants as displaced persons.

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  • 13.
    Povrzanovic Frykman, Maja
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Rethinking Democracy (REDEM).
    Narveslius, Eleonora
    Lund University.
    Törnquist-Plewa, Barbara
    Lund University.
    Postmigrant talks: Experiences of language use in Swedish academia2023In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 53, p. 114-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors take on a problem that many departments in Sweden, not least in the humanities, are dealing with right now: language. They show how social status in academia is decoupled from linguistic integration, at least if we understand status in terms of academic titles. Feelings of insufficiency and incompleteness are, however, prevalent, even among those whose Swedish proficiency is objectively very high. The authors underline the value of language, how competence in English, Swedish, and other languages is crucial for academics’ possibilities to work and build careers.

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    Postmigrant talks: Experiences of language use in Swedish academia
  • 14.
    Svensson, Daniel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Sport Sciences (IDV).
    Girls’ Races and Gender Equality: Review of I tjejers spår – för framtids segrar. Om tjejlopp och villkor för tjejers motionsidrottande (Karin S. Lindelöf & Annie Woube)2020In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 50, p. 299-301Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Why are there keep-fit races specifically for women? How were they established and why are they so popular? Are girls’ races good or bad if the goal is greater equality in sport? With this book, Karin S. Lindelöf and Annie Woube (both ethnologists working at the Centre for Gender Studies, Uppsala University) shed new light on girls’ races and their participants.

    The history of sport shows how women have been excluded from major keep-fit events for paternalistic, sexist, and downright idiotic reasons. The pictures of Kathrine Switzer, who was forced to defend herself against an attack by a functionary to be able to finish the Boston Marathon in 1967, are iconic. In Sweden we have several examples of women who defied the ban on participating in the Vasaloppet ski race. Girls’ races (tjejlopp) should be understood in the light of this historical heritage – they are a response to exclusion mechanisms that were at first highly concrete, but they have additionally had a more subtle impact on the culture of keep-fit sporting events. Here, as in sport in general, men have often been the norm. In the girls’ races, it is the other way around. As Lindelöf and Woube ably demonstrate, this entails both a liberating element and a limiting image of women doing sports.

  • 15.
    Wiszmeg, Andréa
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Cells in suspense: Unboxing the negotiations of a large-scale cell transplantation trial2016In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 46, p. 104-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout scientific work and research,many processes and procedures are maderoutine, mundane and then taken forgranted. So are some underlying assump-tions – not only about the state of the nat-ural world, but about what its different ac-tors are supposed or expected to be orwork like. These assumptions are not onlydescriptive, but prescriptive. If we pro-ceed from the notion that expectations andbeliefs are written into our everyday prac-tices and made opaque even to their prac-titioners, it becomes an urgent issue tofind tools to better scrutinize and evaluatethem. This is, I argue, a matter of ethics.How such assumptions are written intopractices is perhaps as available as ever, inthe instructions, documents and processesof evidence-based science. When somepremises and practices are locked to eachother, others are excluded. The aim of thisarticle is to explore the dynamics of thisprocess in a biomedical research practice,with regard to how it affects what are con-sidered ethical issues and how they arehandled.Based on ethnographic fieldwork, I willinvestigate what happened when staff in alarge-scale and multi-site cell transplanta-tion trial in Parkinson’s research had toscrutinize their procedures. I want to un-derstand what subsequent negotiationsneeded to be done in order to progress; or,more specifically, what deliberationsabout perspectives, procedures and ethicalissues of the project were required to seethe trial through. The focus is on what thestaff described as causing the major delaysthat they faced, and temporality is subse-quently conceptualized as an importantfactor in the homogenization and repro-ducibility of science. I discuss how thenecessary changes and negotiations relateto the aims and standards presented by therationale of evidence-based science, andthe implications they have for researchpractice of future trials and for researchethics.I argue that investigations such as thisare crucial to better understand how ethi-cal dilemmas are not primarily abstractdeliberations addressed in policy docu-ments, but embedded in everyday prac-tice. I will also address the importance ofethnographic practices to this end.In the following, the content and theconditions of the trial will be presented incontext.

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