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  • 1.
    Carlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Dejin-Karlsson, Elisabeth
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Udén, Giggi
    Håkansson, Anders
    Compliance with child accident precautions by child health nurses2006In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 2, no 10, p. 149-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which parents follow advice from child health nurses about child accident prevention. The study was performed in one of the 10 districts in the city of Malmö, Sweden. Parents to 90, 10-month old children in southern Sweden participated. These parents completed a questionnaire that prompted responses related to parents' background and socio-economic factors as well as questions about any precautions they have taken to decrease hazards to children in their home. Odds ratios, confidence intervals and multiple logistic regression analysis was performed. The results indicated that lower educated parents (i.e. those with 12 years' education or less) and foreign-born parents complied with a significantly lower level. These results support the need to increase efforts in child accident prevention work. It is important for child health nurses to concentrate their efforts on foreign parents and on less educated parents. Information should be relayed regularly to these parents in a motivational way, in order to decrease risks of child accidents at home.

  • 2.
    Mathias, Edlin Glane
    et al.
    Department of Child Health Nursing, Manipal College of Nursing, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, India.
    Shivanda Pai, Mamatha
    Department of Child Health Nursing, Manipal College of Nursing, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, India.
    Guddattu, Vasudeva
    Department of Data Science, Prasanna School of Public Health, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, India.
    Bramhagen, Ann-Cathrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Non-pharmacological interventions to reduce anxiety among children undergoing surgery: A systematic review2023In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 466-487Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A hospitalized child experiences anxiety more frequently as compared to non-hospitalized children. Surgery can be emotionally distressing for children, and subsequently their parents and caregivers, this distress can cause profound adverse impacts on children. We aimed to identify the effect of non-pharmacological interventions on children’s (1–18 years) anxiety undergoing surgery. The following databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Proquest, Web" of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were systematically searched for full-text articles. The review included 15 randomized controlled trials. The risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. The interventions included in the study were preoperative education, puppet play, therapeutic play, distraction activities, parental presence, and clown therapy. The review presents a narrative reporting of the findings. This review identifies that non-pharmacological interventions are effective in reducing anxiety among children undergoing surgery. There are a limited number of studies from developing countries. Further research is required to underpin the use of these interventions with children before surgery. 

  • 3. Runeson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Ethical dilemmas before and during anaesthetic induction of young children, as described by nurse anaesthetists2010In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 345-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on physicians', nurses' and enrolled nurses' experiences of ethical dilemmas have been conducted in many healthcare fields. The aim of this study was to elucidate ethical dilemmas before and during the induction of anaesthesia of children aged three to six years as described by nurse anaesthetists (NAs). Two group interviews with NAs were conducted where they were asked to describe ethically problematic situations. Three situations were chosen from a total of 15: administration of anaesthesia to an already sleeping child, lack of information given to a child, and a child is anaesthetized against his/her will. Conceivable and reasonable alternative options were identified and consequences of the different actions were presented. Finally the conflicts of value were discussed and commented on. The cases describe when a child's rights are given less weight and the child has little opportunity to participate in the decision making. However, parents and NAs acted in the best interest of the child. Analysing and reflecting on situations involving ethical dilemmas would enhance NAs critical thinking and guide NAs in their decision making when providing anaesthesia care.

  • 4. Råsmark-Hammar, Görel
    et al.
    Ozolins, Andrejs
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Rudebeck, Carl-Edvard
    Body image in adolescents with cerebral palsy2009In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to describe important features of body image in adolescents with motor disabilities and compare them against similar features in able-bodied peers. Relational aspects of body image were given preference in a questionnaire distributed to 35 adolescents with cerebral palsy and 98 adolescents with no known disabilities. Similarities were shown, but also significant differences, indicating a less favourable body image in adolescents with cerebral palsy. It is paramount for young people who are constantly reminded of physical restrictions to experience body vitality. Professionals need to consider the importance of how they interact with young people when seeking to promote a positive body image.

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