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  • 1. Annersten, Magdalena
    et al.
    Willman, Ania
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    is: a literature review2005In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 122-130Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Persons using daily subcutaneous injections to administer medicine perform them in different ways and thereby increase the risk of skin complications related to the injection. It is often part of nurses’ role to administer medicine and educate the patient in injection technique. Course literature in nursing education, commercial patient education pamphlets, and instructional leaflets do not give consistent advice regarding subcutaneous injection technique. Aim: The aim of this review was to identify the scientific foundation for the technical performance of subcutaneous injections. The question to be answered was: How should a subcutaneous injection be administered to achieve the right dose in the right place with minimum complications? Method: The review included a search in three databases, a screening process at abstract level, followed by a quality assessment of included articles. The quality assessment was done independently by two people and followed specific protocols. Result: A total of 38 articles were assessed for quality and covered information on dose, location, and complications of subcutaneous injection. The assessed studies are heterogeneous in design and describe different aspects of the subcutaneous injection technique. Therefore, the scientific foundation for technical performance is weak. However, several studies indicate that the amount of subcutaneous fat and appropriate needle length are of high importance for the drug to reach the target tissue. Conclusion: More research regarding effective subcutaneous injection technique needs to be done.

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  • 2.
    Bahtsevani, Christel
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Health and Welfare Studies (HV). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Khalaf, Azzam
    Willman, Ania
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Health and Welfare Studies (HV). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Evaluating psychiatric nurses' awareness of evidence-based nursing publications2005In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 196-207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Eiman Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Pilhammar, Ewa
    Khalaf, Azzam
    Willman, Ania
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Health and Welfare Studies (HV).
    Registered Nurses' Adherence to Clinical Guidelines Regarding Peripheral Venous Catheters: A Structured Observational Study2008In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 148-159Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Perlqvist, Agnetha
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Searching for Evidence Regarding Using Preoperative Disinfection Showers to Prevent Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review2011In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 143-152Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Postoperative surgical site infections (SSI) are the third most common health care associated infection. Even though several studies have pointed out the benefits of disinfection showers prior to surgery in order to reduce SSI, it remains unclear how to optimize this disinfection procedure. Aim: To find evidence for how many times preoperative disinfection showers should be performed in order to reduce bacterial colonies and minimize the risk of SSI. Method: A comprehensive literature search of multiple databases published during 1986-2008, supplemented by a manual search of the references in all relevant articles. Protocols were used in quality assessment and the data synthesis is descriptive in a narrative form. Results: The 10 studies included had different designs, interventions, and samples, which makes it difficult to compare them. Moreover, the quality of the reviewed studies varied and only four had a high level of evidence. Therefore, the results failed to give an unambiguous answer about the optimal number of preoperative showers, so only assumptions can be made. It is quite obvious, however, that preoperative disinfection showers with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) are effective from a microbiological point of view since eight of the reviewed studies showed a sharply reduced skin flora after using CHG. Conclusions: Currently, clear evidence for how many times preoperative disinfection showers should be performed to minimize the risk of SSI is missing. This highlights the need for further research that focuses on the number of preoperative disinfection showers in relation to SSI, in order to obtain optimal effect. Until then, it would be wise to follow previously made recommendation of three to five preoperative showers. Moreover, in order to have the intended effect of preoperative disinfection, it is important that health care professionals have the knowledge to guide patients with information and clear instructions about disinfection shower procedures.

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  • 5. Richards, David A
    et al.
    Coulthard, Vania
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The state of European nursing research: dead, alive, or chronically diseased? A systematic literature review2014In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 147-55Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reviews of nursing research have suggested that most is descriptive; with no more than 15% providing strong evidence for practice. No studies have examined this from the perspective of nursing research conducted in Europe. Objective: The aim of this study was to review reports of European clinical nursing research in the top 20 nursing journals in 2010 to establish a baseline of nursing research activity in the year immediately prior to the launch of a European Science Foundation network to increase the proportion of intervention research in Europe. Methods: We identified eligible reports that were then data‐extracted by two independent reviewers. Disagreements were resolved through pair discussion and independent arbitration. We appraised and synthesized topics, methods, and the extent to which studies were programmatic. We synthesized data as proportions of study reports meeting our a priori categorization criteria. Results: We identified 1995 published reports and included 223 from 21 European countries, of which 193 (86.6%) reported studies of primary research only, 30 (13.5%) secondary research, and three (1.4%) a mix of primary and secondary. Methodological description was often poor, misleading, or even absent. One hundred (44.8%) articles reported observational studies, 87 (39.0%) qualitative studies. We found 26 (11.7%) articles reporting experimental studies, 10 (4.5%) of which were randomized controlled trials. We found 29 (13.0%) reports located within a larger program of research. Seventy‐six (34.1%) articles reported studies of nursing interventions. Linking Evidence to Action: European research in nursing reported in the leading nursing journals remains descriptive and poorly described. Only a third of research reports concerned nursing interventions, and a tiny proportion were part of a programmatic endeavor. Researchers in nursing must become better educated and skilled in developing, testing, evaluating, and reporting complex nursing interventions. Editors of nursing journals should insist on systematic reporting of research designs and methods in published articles.

  • 6. Richards, David A
    et al.
    Hanssen, Tove Aminda
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The Second Triennial Systematic Literature Review of European Nursing Research: Impact on Patient Outcomes and Implications for Evidence-Based Practice2018In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 333-343Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: European research in nursing has been criticized as overwhelmingly descriptive, wasteful and with little relevance to clinical practice. This second triennial review follows our previous review of articles published in 2010, to determine whether the situation has changed. Objective: To identify, appraise, and synthesize reports of European nursing research published during 2013 in the top 20 nursing research journals. Methods: Systematic review with descriptive results synthesis. Results: We identified 2,220 reports, of which 254, from 19 European countries, were eligible for analysis; 215 (84.7%) were primary research, 36 (14.2%) secondary research, and three (1.2%) mixed primary and secondary. Forty‐eight (18.9%) of studies were experimental: 24 (9.4%) randomized controlled trials, 11 (4.3%) experiments without randomization, and 13 (5.1%) experiments without control group. A total of 106 (41.7%) articles were observational: 85 (33.5%) qualitative research. The majority (158; 62.2%) were from outpatient and secondary care hospital settings. One hundred and sixty‐five (65.0%) articles reported nursing intervention studies: 77 (30.3%) independent interventions, 77 (30.3%) interdependent, and 11 (4.3%) dependent. This represents a slight increase in experimental studies compared with our previous review (18.9% vs. 11.7%). The quality of reporting remained very poor. Linking Evidence to Action: European research in nursing remains overwhelmingly descriptive. We call on nursing researchers globally to raise the level of evidence and, therefore, the quality of care and patient outcomes. We urge them to replicate our study in their regions, diagnose reasons for the lack of appropriate research, identify solutions, and implement a deliberate, targeted, and systematic global effort to increase the number of experimental, high quality, and relevant studies into nursing interventions. We also call on journal editors to mandate an improvement in the standards of research reporting in nursing journals.

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  • 7.
    Stenberg, Marie
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Health Care Professionals' Attitudes and Compliance to Clinical Practice Guidelines to Prevent Falls and Fall Injuries2011In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 87-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT Background: Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) aimed at preventing falls and fall injuries have been shown to be effective in acute care hospitals. However, although CPGs are systematically developed and evidence-based tools, there has been a problem with their implementation in clinical practice. Aim: To describe influences on health care professionals' attitudes to CPGs for preventing falls and fall injuries. Methods: A qualitative approach was chosen and five focus group discussions were conducted, which included physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists. The transcribed texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. Findings: Two main categories emerged: experiencing a course of events and influence of social factors. Experiencing a course of event included incidence of falls and fall injuries followed by negative consequences, which revealed benefits of using a CPG. Influence of social factors for implementation and compliance with the CPG was described as community obligations and organizational and individual resources. Conclusions: The findings confirm the complex process of implementation and compliance of CPGs for fall prevention. A relation between experiences of high incidence of falls with negative consequences and a positive attitude and compliance to CPGs appeared. To assure compliance and a positive attitude requires an obvious benefit of the CPG in reducing falls. Factors to overcome barriers to implementation and compliance seem to be a supportive leadership, systematic evaluations of the CPG outcome, and the facilitator role.

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