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  • 1.
    Axelsson, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Which nursing students are more ready for interprofessional learning? A cross-sectional study2019In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 79, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has been argued that the significance of personality in relation to students' readiness for interprofessional collaboration is an area where more research is needed. Nursing students in particular seem to be unsure about their role in the interprofessional team. Objective: To explore associations between nursing students' readiness for interprofessional learning and personality traits with regard to biological sex, and previous work experience from health care. Design: A cross-sectional questionnaire study. Setting: Nursing students in year one and three enrolled in a three-year undergraduate bachelor in nursing programme. Participants: Nursing students (n = 284) in semester two and six. Methods: The participants completed the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale and the Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Openness to experience Five Factor Inventory-3. The data were statistically analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-tests, correlations and linear regressions. Results: Four of the five investigated personality traits – Extraversion, Openness to experiences, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness - were associated with nursing students' readiness for interprofessional learning. Moreover, nursing students in semester six were more ready for interprofessional learning regarding Negative professional identity and Roles and responsibilities than students in semester two. Female students were more ready for Teamwork and collaboration than male students. Conclusions: Nursing students being more outgoing, open-minded, agreeable or conscientious seem to be more ready for interprofessional learning. Consequently, personality is of significance for nursing students' readiness for interprofessional learning.

  • 2.
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    The nursing and medical students´motivation to attain knowledge2009In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to gather information regarding what students consider important for their motivation to attain knowledge, in order to shape courses that foster this motivation. Method: A qualitative design comprising focus groups including 31 nursing and medical students for interviews, semi-structured questions, and content analysis was utilized. Result: The students thought it was important to coordinate more superficial knowledge with learning in depth, and to apply the theoretical knowledge in practise. Self-motivation, committed teachers and discussions with other students were considered to be important for learning. The difference between the groups was that the nurses were focused on their assessments because of lack of time, while the medical students were more learning for life. Their greatest problem was to know what of all knowledge they needed to learn and should focus on. Conclusion: The motivation must come from the students themselves, but dedicated teachers giving performance feed-back, discussions in different forms and choices of learning and assessment methods enhance enthusiasm and learning. By providing an educational environment that resonates with the students’ needs, teachers may be successful in their teaching.

  • 3.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The uniqueness of elderly care: Registered nurses' experience as preceptors during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 569-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expected shortage of registered nurses with an advanced degree as specialists in geriatric care or gerontology is imminent. Previous studies report that clinical practice where student nurses are supervised by registered nurses has a direct impact on how students perceive nursing as a profession and future career choice. Considering the anticipated need for well-educated and specialised nurses it is therefore, relevant as well as necessary to describe clinical learning with a focus on preceptorship in geriatric nursing care. This paper is a report of a study describing registered nurses’ experience of precepting undergraduate student nurses during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care. A qualitative design, based on seven focus group interviews, was employed with 30 registered nurses with preceptor experience from nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly. Our findings present three precepting strategies that are unique to elderly care: preparing students for end of life care, facilitating a respectful approach to the older person and promoting creativity and independent work. The findings are discussed using a socio-cultural perspective and illustrate how communities of elderly practice can be valuable learning environments.

  • 4.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment in nursing homes: A questionnaire study using the CLES+T evaluation scale2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 1130-1134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One major challenge facing the health care systems worldwide is the growing demand for registered nurses able to provide qualified nursing care for a vulnerable population. Positive learning experiences during clinical practice influence not only learning outcomes, but also how students reason in relation to future career choices. Objectives: To investigate student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment during clinical practice in nursing homes, and to compare perceptions among student nurses with or without priorwork experience as health care assistants in elderly care. Design: A cross-sectional study was designed, utilising the Swedish version of the CLES + T evaluation scale. Methods: 260 student nurses (response rate 76%)who had completed a five week long clinical placement in nursing homes returned the questionnaire during the data collection period in 2011–2012. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Mann–Whitney U-test was used to examine differences in relation to students with or without prior experience of elderly care. Results: Overall, the clinical learning environment was evaluated in a predominantly positive way. The subdimension Supervisory relationship displayed the highest mean value, and the lowest score was calculated for the sub-dimension Leadership style of the ward manager. Statistical significant differences between sub-groups were displayed for four out of 34 items. Conclusion: The supervisory relationship had the greatest impact on how student nurses experienced the clinical learning environment in nursing homes. It is therefore, of utmost importance that collaborative activities, between educational and nursing home settings, supporting the work of preceptors are established and maintained.

  • 5.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Who wants to work with older people? Swedish student nurses’ willingness to work in elderly care: a questionnaire study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 7, p. 849-853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The ageing population is a globally recognised challenge for the health care service. The growing number of older people will probably lead to increased demands for registered and specialised nurses working in nursing homes and home-based care. Clinical practice is of great importance not only to clinical learning processes, but also how student nurses perceive a particular field of nursing. Objectives: To compare perceptions of the clinical learning environment in nursing homes among students considering a career in aged care or not, and to examine the difference in age, gender and previous working experience as health care assistants in elderly care between the two groups. Design: This was a cross-sectional study. Data were obtained by means of the Swedish version of the Clinical Learning Environment and Nurse Teacher evaluation scale. Methods: Consecutive sampling was performed over three semesters commencing in September 2011 through to December 2012. The survey was conducted with 183 student nurses after completion of a compulsory five week long clinical practice in a nursing home. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to examine differences in relation to two groups namely student nurses who did or did not consider to work in elderly care. A chi-square test of independence was performed to examine the difference in age, gender and previous working experience between the two groups. Results: The analysis leaned towards an overall positive evaluation of the clinical learning environment with more positive values for students considering a career. There were no significant differences between younger students (18-23) and older students (24-50) regarding willingness to work in elderly care or not. Neither was any significant difference displayed between students, based on gender nor for previous work experience. Conclusion: Age, gender and previous work experiences as health care assistants did not impact on students willingness to work in elderly care or not. Therefore, future studies need to acknowledge the complexity of why student nurses choose a particular pathway in nursing by longitudinal studies following cohorts of students during the course of the nursing programme.

  • 6.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Pilhammar Andersson, Ewa
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    "This is nursing": nursing roles as mediated by precepting nurses during clinical practice2010In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 763-767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In nursing education, it has been argued that professional socialization is facilitated by clinical experiences where students work together with precepting nurses. However, few studies found have focused on how nurses think and act as preceptors, hence providing a base for professional socialization to occur. Therefore; this study aimed to describe how preceptors mediated nursing as a profession to undergraduate nursing students during clinical practice. This was an ethnographic study guided by symbolic interactionism. A purposeful sampling of 13 precepting nurses was observed during the field work period. In addition, 16 staff nurses, purposively selected, and experienced in precepting, participated in focus group interviews. All text from field notes and interviews were read as a whole and analyzed following the ethnographic approach. Findings illustrated how nursing was mediated as the medical-technical, the administrative, and the caring role. Preceptors aimed for professionalism in their students by teaching the students to reflect on what they can do independently as nurses. Preceptors strived to verbalise their practical knowledge to make theory explicit and contextualize to student nurses. This knowledge can guide implementation of preceptor programmes focusing on the meaning and implications of professionalism.

  • 7.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Stenberg, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Chan, Bessie
    Ho, Sukki
    Lai, Timothy
    Wong, Arkers
    Chan, E Angela
    Nursing as universal and recognisable: Nursing students' perceptions of learning outcomes from intercultural peer learning webinars: A qualitative study2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 57, p. 54-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing students need to be prepared for the increasingly culturally diverse health care. Therefore, providing students with international perspectives remains the mission of higher education. However, given the logistic and financial constraints, not all students will be able to travel overseas for their international experiences. A feasible alternative to study abroad is internationalisation-at-home where intercultural dimensions are incorporated into curriculum, without students leaving their home universities. This paper presents findings from a collaboration between nursing programmes in Sweden and Hong Kong. The aim of the project was to explore how undergraduate nursing students' perceived achieved learning outcomes after participating in a web-based intercultural peer-learning intervention. Methods: A qualitative and interpretative design was adopted to capture undergraduate nursing students' experiences of internationalisation at home via webinars. We used convenience sampling and recruited ten undergraduate nursing students from each university. The students were assigned a generic patient case that they discussed and reflected on during three webinars. Data were collected by students´ reflective journals and focus group interviews. Analysis of data followed the principles for thematic networks. Results: In exploring how undergraduate nursing students' perceived learning outcomes after participating in a web-based intercultural peerlearning intervention the global theme, nursing as universal and recognisable, emerged from the data. Recognition of the global theme aroused from two organisational themes; mirroring nursing through an intercultural lens and reflecting on personal action and the action of others. Conclusions: Developing an understanding of nursing as universal and recognisable has implications for nursing students as it supports not only a willingness to work abroad, but also preparedness to care for a diverse population. Therefore, the use of web-based learning activities allow new effective approaches to internationalisation at home programmes and needs to be further developed and implemented in nursing

  • 8.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Pilhammar, Ewa
    Teaching during clinical practice: Strategies and Techniques used by Preceptors in Nursing Education2009In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 521-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preceptor is a nurse who teaches and supports the student and is seen as pivotal to student learning within the clinical setting. Earlier studies have shown that preceptors’ pedagogical competence is significant for facilitating learning during clinical practice. However, studies describing pedagogical competence, especially in terms of teaching strategies, seem to be scarce. The aim of this study was to describe which strategies and techniques preceptors use to teach undergraduate nursing students during clinical practice. The study had an ethnographic approach; methods used were participant observations and focus group interviews with nurses who were experienced in precepting undergraduate nursing students.Findings illustrated how preceptors used different strategies and techniques in a continuous process of adjusting, performing and evaluating precepting. Increased knowledge on how the preceptors actually teach student nurses during clinical practice will help facilitate educational programmes for preceptors,which will enhance their pedagogical skills and competences.

  • 9.
    Chaboyer, W
    et al.
    Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, Griffith University Gold Coast Campus, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Bundall, Qld. 9726, Australia.
    Willman, Ania
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Johnsson, P
    Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, Griffith University Gold Coast Campus, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Bundall, Qld. 9726, Australia.
    Stockhausen, L
    Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, Griffith University Gold Coast Campus, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Bundall, Qld. 9726, Australia.
    Embedding Evidence-based Practice in a Nursing Curriculum - A benchmarking Project2004In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 216-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of a new nursing curriculum in one Australian university provided the opportunity for academic staff to consider the best ways to integrate the requirements of evidence-based practice (EBP) into nursing education and culminated in the development and conduct of a specific benchmarking project. Data collection for the project included the use of university documents, observations and informal discussions with staff. An analysis of this information resulted in the emergence of five categories that were grouped into two major categories, namely infrastructure and processes. Within the major category of infrastructure, two minor categories, namely evidence-based nursing (EBN) Unit and EBN champions emerged. The major category of processes included three minor categories, namely integrating a research thread, immediate introduction to EBP and planning with local services. The outcome of the benchmarking project also offers a template for other health disciplines to adopt when trying to embed and value EBP in their department and curricula.

  • 10. Chan, E Angela
    et al.
    Lai, Timothy
    Wong, Arkers
    Ho, Suki
    Chan, Bessie
    Stenberg, Marie
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Nursing Students' Intercultural Learning via Internationalization at Home: A Qualitative Descriptive Study2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 52, p. 34-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We attempted to map out the processes of intercultural communication, interaction, and reflection by examining the intercultural learning that took place among nursing students. Through an understanding of the process of their intercultural learning, the Hong Kong and Swedish students revealed their identity not only as nurses but more so as learners. Their intercultural learning started with a superficial and fact-based exchange and evolved into reflection and mindfulness. Students at both ends reported increased knowledge about both their own and the other's culture. They were also able to translate some of their understanding through intercultural communication into their nursing practices. Throughout the process, the aspects that facilitated their intercultural learning were a relaxed and open attitude, an eagerness to learn, sensitivity, and flexibility. Those qualities,whichmade for effective intercultural communication, are aligned with those that are valued in nursing. The students' appreciation of the value and appropriateness of the Skype technology in facilitating the development of intercultural competence without the need to leave home indicates the potential of this kind of telecollaboration.

  • 11. Gebru, Kerstin
    et al.
    Willman, Ania
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Education to promote culturally competent nursing care- A content analysis of student responses2009In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe and analyse the outcome of a 3-year study program from a student perspective for the purpose of promoting culturally congruent nursing care. Students were asked to complete questionnaires that included cases with open-ended questions at the beginning and end of the 3-year program. Two nursing situations were described and the students had to imagine how they would act in such cases. Ninety-two students completed the two questionnaires and the result of a manifest content analysis of their answers is presented. Four categories were formulated from the content analysis; an inviting attitude, a non-inviting attitude, a knowledge-driven attitude and a non-knowledge-driven attitude. An inviting attitude meant that the students found different strategies for approaching the patient and his/her spouse or parent. A non-inviting attitude implied that the students became frustrated with the situation and had more difficulty finding solutions that would enhance the relationship. A knowledge-driven attitude meant that the students described how they found it important to base nursing actions on knowledge of the patient. A non-knowledge-driven attitude meant that the students’ responses indicated that they did not consider knowledge to be the foundation of their nursing actions. The study demonstrates marked changes in the students’ approaches to culturally sensitive issues at the end of the education program.

  • 12.
    Leung, Doris
    et al.
    School of Nursing Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Chan, Engle Angela
    School of Nursing Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Wong, Arkers K. C
    School of Nursing Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Reisenhofer, Sonia
    College of Science, Health & Engineering, La Trobe University, Australia.
    Stenberg, Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Chan, Pui Szea
    School of Nursing Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Lai, K.H.
    School of Nursing Hong Kong Polytechnic Universuty.
    Cruz, Enrique
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Australia.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Advancing pedagogy of undergraduate nursing students' cultural awarenessthrough internationalization webinars: A qualitative study2020In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 93, article id 104514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today's world, nurses increasingly care for individuals from different cultures. Because culturally sensitivecare can improve patient satisfaction in care, nurses need to develop cultural competence in their practice. Todevelop cultural competence, one option is to build cultural awareness by exposing students to nursing practicesin other cultures through online internationalization-at-home activities. However, little is known about theprocess of cultural awareness development through internationalization activities. Therefore, this qualitativestudy aimed to identify the development process of cultural awareness in nursing students, who participated in aseries of internationalization-at-home activities. A total of 31 nursing students from Australia, Hong Kong, andSweden volunteered to participate in student-led learning groups. Groups consisted of two to four students fromeach university, who engaged in four weekly webinars and online reflections about nursing practice based on acase scenario. Data were collected from participants' ongoing reflective journal entries, and after the webinarsended, from three focus groups. A semi-structured interview guide was used to understand how the internationalization-at-home activities impacted their cultural awareness and knowledge of nursing. Data wereanalyzed using interpretive description. Following four levels of thematic analysis (i.e., comprehension,synthesis, theorizing, reconceptualization), we identified four themes in the development of cultural awareness:1) nurturing reciprocity through comparisons of nursing culture; 2) discovering common ethical values of thenursing profession; 3) developing cultural awareness in nursing ideology and practice; and 4) transformingunderstanding of nursing in the context of their healthcare systems. By the end of the internationalizationactivities, students appeared to have developed relational skills to facilitate their own inner dialogue aboutethical ideals of “self” and “other” in the context of being part of the global nursing community. Future researchshould develop and assess teaching strategies that can further facilitate the four themes in cultural awarenessdevelopment.

  • 13.
    Leung, Doris Y
    et al.
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bish, Melanie
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Chan, Pui Sze
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Chan, E Angela
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Using internationalization-at-home activities to enhance the cultural awareness of health and social science research students: A mixed-method study2021In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 100, article id 104851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite healthcare scholars valuing diversity, current cultural awareness training does not address mechanisms that drive societal patterns, that generates cultural insensitivity and reinforces stereotypes of minority groups. The influence of culture on thinking is an important issue because of potential ethnocentric biases on the design, data collection, analysis, and dissemination of research.

    OBJECTIVES: Using internationalization-at-home activities to explore the mechanisms that enhance the development of cultural awareness in postgraduate health and social science research students.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: A pragmatic critical realist study, qualitatively dominant, using mixed-methods to integrate and analyze qualitative and quantitative data. Data were collected pre- and post-internationalization-at-home activities. Qualitative data were collected from online discussion forums and focus groups, and quantitative data were collected from a pre-test and post-test measure of cultural awareness.

    SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen research students in postgraduate health and social science programs from three universities (Australia, Hong Kong, and Sweden) participated in five formal internationalization-at-home webinars and informal international group activities.

    RESULTS: Participants reported four mechanisms counteracting structures (i.e., ethnocentric biases) toward the emergence of cultural awareness: 1. awareness of cultural issues motivating people toward achieving a common goal; 2. reflexivity within psychological safety; 3. deliberations that challenge the veracity of individual assumptions; 4. courage coupled with curiosity. When some or all the mechanisms occurred, properties of enhanced cultural awareness emerged, as confirmed by the quantitative data.

    CONCLUSIONS: Cultural awareness training should emphasize social relations to allow cultural safety to develop for postgraduate health and social science research students. Without skills revealing unconsciously held ethical values, this study argues that postgraduate health and social science students may inadvertently reconstitute and reinforce in their research the discrimination of underserved groups.

  • 14.
    Ljungbeck, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Sjögren Forss, Katarina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Finnbogadottir, Hafrún
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Content in nurse practitioner education - A scoping review.2021In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 98, article id 104650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Globally, the role of nurse practitioner is evolving to meet increased healthcare demands. Nevertheless, there are factors hindering the development of this role, one of which involves differences in nurse practitioner education worldwide. Therefore, the objective of the present study is to identify what is known in the research field on the content of nurse practitioner educational programmes.

    DESIGN AND DATA SOURCES: The literature scoping review follows a six-stage methodological framework including: i) formulate research questions, ii) identify relevant studies, iii) select studies, iv) chart data, v) collate, summarize and report the results, vi) consultations. Data bases searched included CINAHL, PubMed and ERIC and were followed by manual searching of reference list in the included papers. Of the 1553 papers identified, 16 met the aim of this study.

    REVIEW METHODS: To answer the research questions 'what is the content of curricula in nurse practitioner education?' a deductive content analysis was used.

    RESULTS: Two main categories emerged. The first was related to the professional nurse practitioner role and includes research and nursing theories, leadership and collaboration, and organizational, political, economic, regulatory and legislative issues. The second is related to becoming an autonomous practitioner and includes health promotion and disease prevention, and other medically oriented content.

    CONCLUSIONS: The content identified is consistent with the core competencies that nurse practitioners are expected to have after graduation, which have been described by the International Council of Nurses and by other researchers. Given the lack of recent research in nurse practitioner education, the results of the present study advance knowledge in this research field. Additionally, this study may be of practical value in developing new nurse practitioner educational programmes.

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  • 15. Markström, Urban
    et al.
    Lundvik Gyllensten, Amanda
    Bejerholm, Ulrika
    Björkman, Tommy
    Brunt, David
    Hansson, Lars
    Leufstadius, Christel
    Sandlund, Mikael
    Svensson, Bengt
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Health and Welfare Studies (HV). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Östman, Margareta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Health and Welfare Studies (HV). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Eklund, Mona
    Attitudes towards mental illness among health care students at Swedish universities: a follow-up study after completed clinical placement2009In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 660-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to examine the changes in attitudes towards mental illness after theoretical education and clinical placement among students from university programmes preparing for different kinds of health professions. Three different questionnaires were used, measuring the level of familiarity with mental illness and attitudes towards mental illness in general and towards specific mental illnesses. The data were collected on two occasions, before the theoretical course and after the completed clinical placement. The result showed that the attitudes toward mental illness in general had changed in a less stigmatising direction after the clinical placement. On the other hand, attitudes toward specific mental illnesses did not show any major changes. A conclusion is that the clinical placement included in the university programmes to some extent could affect attitudes in a de-stigmatizing direction, possibly because of the interaction with persons suffering from mental illness and experienced supervisors.

  • 16.
    Nygren, Frida
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Preceptors' conceptions of a peer learning model: A phenomenographic study2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 49, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During the past few years nurses precepting undergraduate nursing students have been put under greater pressure because of increased number of students admitted to the universities combinedwith a shortage of clinical placements. One solution is the preceptor model peer learning where two students are tutored by the same preceptor simultaneously. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the variation of registered nurses' conceptions of preceptorship in a peer learning model for undergraduate nursing students. Design: The study used a qualitative descriptive design and a phenomenographic approach. Settings: The interviews took place at somatic and psychiatric units at two different hospitals in southern Sweden. Participants: Twelve informants participated who had worked as registered nurses between 1–17 years and acted as peer learning preceptors between 2 month and 6 years. Methods: Each nurse was interviewed individually using a semi structured interview guide. Follow up questions were used to make the informants develop and deepen their answers. Results: Four different descriptive categories emerged in the study: 1) Preceptorship in peer learning generates development and new perspectives 2) Preceptorship in peer learning enables student reflection and independence 3) Preceptorship in peer learning engenders insufficiency and stress 4) Preceptorship in peer learning requires education and support. Conclusions: The result of this study showed that preceptors conceived that peer learning enabled them to take a step backwhich gave thema new role and perspectives. The consequencewas that the students could be more independent which saved time for some of the preceptors. However, some preceptors perceived insufficiency and stress while working with two students. It is also important to educate both students and preceptors to optimise the use of peer learning.

  • 17. Tuvesson, Hanna
    et al.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The challenge of giving written thesis feedback to nursing students2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 1343-1345Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing effective written feedback on nursing student's assignments can be a challenging task for any assessor. Additionally, as the student groups tend to become larger, written feedback is likely to gain an overall more prominent position than verbal feedback. Lack of formal training or regular discussion in the teaching faculty about the skill set needed to provide written feedback could negatively affect the students' learning abilities. In this brief paper, we discuss written feedback practices, whilst using the Bachelor of Science in Nursing thesis as an example. Our aim is to highlight the importance of an informed understanding of the impact written feedback can have on students. Creating awareness about this can facilitate the development of more strategic and successful written feedback strategies. We end by offering examples of some relatively simple strategies for improving this practice.

  • 18.
    Webster, Katherine E F
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Building therapeutic connections with the acutely ill through standardised patient simulation in nurse education an evaluation study2020In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 84, article id 104261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Phenomenological empathy and sense of coherence are two researched communication approaches used to improve therapeutic connections with patients in a variety of nurse related settings. The aim of this study is to evaluate students' feedback concerning how this event has enabled that understanding, development and refinement of skill-sets in PE and SoC when managing the acutely ill during simulation. Methods: 114 third year bachelor degree-nursing students were given the opportunity to complete an evaluation, developed for the specific purpose of this study. The evaluation contained six closed questions on a four point Likert-scale and three open questions, handed out upon completion of the standardised patient simulation of the acutely ill. Comments written in response to the open questions were analysed using manifest content analysis and closed questions using SPSS to produce descriptive frequencies. Results: 100 students completed the evaluation. Student nurses', regardless of previous experience or age, indicated the need for more education and practice in phenomenological empathy and sense of coherence to enhance their ability to build therapeutic connections with the acutely ill. Conclusions: Teaching phenomenological empathy and sense of coherence, as an integral part of standardised patient simulation is necessary to motivate student nurses ability to build therapeutic relationships with the acutely ill to enhance person centred care.

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