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  • 1. Bolejko, Anetta
    et al.
    Brodersen, John
    Zackrisson, Sophia
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Hagell, Peter
    Psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the Consequences of Screening: Breast Cancer questionnaire2014In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 70, no 10, p. 2373-2388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To evaluate the psychometric properties of a questionnaire addressing psychosocial consequences of false-positive mammographic screening. BACKGROUND: The Consequences of Screening--Breast Cancer and Lung Cancer questionnaires target psychosocial consequences of false-positive cancer screening. The Consequences of Screening--Breast Cancer questionnaire and ten items not considered lung cancer specific from the Lung Cancer questionnaire have been adapted for use in mammographic screening in Sweden, but remain psychometrically untested. DESIGN: Instrument development paper with psychometric cross-sectional and test-retest design. METHODS: Twelve scales of a Swedish questionnaire version were tested by the Rasch model and traditional psychometric methods. Women with false-positive (Group I, n = 640) and negative (Group II, n = 802) screening mammography responded to the study questionnaire and the Nottingham Health Profile during 2009-2011. RESULTS: Iterative analyses resulted in nine scales demonstrating Rasch model fit, but all scales exhibited poor targeting with relatively large floor effects. Corrected item-total correlations exceeded the recommended criterion. Score differences between Groups I and II and correlations with Nottingham Health Profile sections followed an expected pattern. Cronbach's α and test-retest reliability was acceptable for group-level assessments for ten and seven scales, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Five scales (Sense of dejection, Anxiety, Behavioural, Sleep and Existential values) of the Swedish questionnaire version demonstrated the best psychometric properties. Other scales should be used more cautiously. Although filling an important gap, causes of concern were identified across scales. The questionnaire should therefore be considered for group-level assessments rather than for measurement of individual degrees of psychosocial consequences.

  • 2.
    Campbell, Ann-Mari
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Pilhammar Andersson, Ewa
    Night duty as an opportunity for learning2008In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 3, no 62(3), p. 346-353Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Precepting and symbolic interactionism: a theoretical look at preceptorship during clinical practice2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 457-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To present a discussion of precepting through the use of symbolic interactionism as exemplified by findings from an ethnographic study. Background. It is a well-known fact that clinical practice, where students are supervised by precepting nurses, is an important part of nursing education. Several previous studies have stressed the vital role preceptors have for the development of student nurses’ clinical competence. Despite this, few of these findings are discussed from a theoretical standpoint to further explain and illustrate the complexity of preceptorship. Data sources. This article builds on findings from an ethnographic study undertaken between November 2006–May 2007 and again between March–September 2009. Full details of the empirical findings have been reported elsewhere. Discussion. Precepting can be understood as a trusting relationship between preceptor and student interacting and sharing nursing activities. The participants’ actions will influence and shape the meaning and understanding of these activities. Implications for nursing. Precepting is a complex and advanced role for nurses that they need to be properly prepared for. Thus, preceptor preparation needs to be organized in collaboration between healthcare organizations and universities. It is suggested that preceptor preparation programmes should focus on reflection, critical thinking and communication skills. Conclusion. Symbolic interactionism can serve as a potential theory that will expand the understanding of and give new perspectives of nursing practice. It would therefore be encouraging to see further testing of suitable theories to interpret empirical findings and create opportunities for practice improvement.

  • 4.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Pilhammar Andersson, Ewa
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Time to precept: supportive and limiting conditions for precepting nurses2010In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 2, no 66, p. 432-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper is a report of a study describing conditions for precepting in a Swedish clinical context from the perspective of precepting nurses. BACKGROUND: Clinical practice is a complex part of nursing education, and registered nurses who are acting as preceptors for nursing students face a number of challenges that need to be addressed during the precepting process. METHOD: An ethnographic approach guided by symbolic interactionism was used. Data were collected by participant observation and focus group interviews over a ten-month period in 2006-2007. Participants were selected by purposive sampling of 13 staff nurses who were preceptors during the field work period. In addition, 16 staff nurses, experienced in precepting, were purposively selected for four focus groups. FINDINGS: Precepting was found to be a complex function for nurses, influenced by conditions that could be both supportive and limiting in nature. Three themes described these conditions: organization, comprising clinical responsibilities and routines; collaboration, focusing on professional relations and interactions; and the personal perspective, comprising preceptors' experiences, need for feed back and notions of benefits. Time as a limiting condition reappeared through all categories. CONCLUSION: It is important to raise the issue of time and its impact on the precepting process. Precepting needs to be further discussed in terms of an integrated nursing competence prioritized by all stakeholders involved in clinical practice. Therefore; efforts should be made to plan nurses' clinical work so that allocated time for precepting can be facilitated.

  • 5.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Stenberg, Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Lai, Timothy
    Reisenhofer, Sonia
    Chan, Bessie
    Cruz, Eric
    Leung, Doris
    Wong, Arkers
    Chan, E Angela
    Nursing students’ perceptions of peer learning through student-led cross cultural webinars: A qualitative study2019In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 75, no 7, p. 1518-1526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To explore nursing students’ perception of peer learning during cross‐cultural learning activities through student‐led webinars. Design: An exploratory qualitative study. Methods: Thematic analysis of data collected from reflective journals and focusgroup interviews of participating nursing students across three international universities in Australia, Hong Kong, and Sweden during autumn 2017. Results: Three themes were identified: peer learning as creation of friendship; peer learning from interactions that went beyond what was originally intended; and peer learning as empowered learning. Conclusion: Combining peer learning as an educational approach with cross‐cultural and student‐led webinars provided new perspectives. On‐line learning across global boundaries, based on a sound educational model, creates new opportunities for internationalization without straining individual and institutional financial resources

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  • 6.
    Finnbogadóttir, Hafrún
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Thies-Lagergren, Li
    Breastfeeding in the context of domestic violence: a cross sectional study2017In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 12, p. 3209-3219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To determine the differences in breastfeeding among women who did and did not experience domestic violence during pregnancy and postpartum in a Swedish context. In addition, to identify possible differences regarding breastfeeding between groups with or without a history of violence. Further, determine the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and symptoms of depression. Background: History of violence may increase the risk of depression and a decrease in, or cessation of, breastfeeding. Design: The study has a cross-sectional design. Methods: Data were collected prospectively from March 2012 - May 2015. A cohort of 731 mothers answered a questionnaire from a larger project (1.5 years postpartum). Results: Breastfeeding was reported by 93.7% of participants. Women exposed to domestic violence during pregnancy and/or postpartum (4.5%) were just as likely to breastfeed as women who had not reported exposure to domestic violence. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with or without a history of violence regarding exclusive breastfeeding. Women reporting several symptoms of depression breastfed exclusively to a lesser extent compared with women who had a few symptoms of depression. Conclusion: Domestic violence did not influence breastfeeding prevalence or duration. Breastfeeding did not differ in women with or without a history of violence. Symptoms of depression influenced duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Beyond recognizing women who are exposed to violence, it is important to identify and to support pregnant women and new mothers with symptoms of depression as their health and the health of their infants depends on the mothers’ mental well-being.

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  • 7.
    Hylén, Mia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Akerman, Eva
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Alm-Roijer, Carin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Patients´ experiences of pain in the intensive care - The delicate balance of control.2020In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 76, no 10, p. 2660-2669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To explore the patients´ experiences of pain when being cared for in the intensive care.

    DESIGN: An exploratory, qualitative design was chosen.

    METHOD: Interviews were performed with patients (October 2015-March 2017) within a week of post-intensive care (N = 16). Thematic analysis was used as method for analysis.

    RESULTS: The findings generated two themes - a lack of control and to struggle for control. Pain was described as overwhelming, both in body and mind and generating the experience of a lack of control, with feelings of incapacitation, isolation, and having their needs unmet. Feeling in control of the pain and thus in control of the situation was experienced as a constant struggle. Well-planned care, finding ways to handle the pain and good communication were all helpful in this struggle.

    CONCLUSION: The participants recalled their experience of pain in the ICU and control seems to be crucial for how pain is experienced. They experienced a lack of control due to not only the pain but also the treatment, which can be avoided by the nurse continuously evaluating and individualising the care. Balanced care, meeting the patients' needs and good communication helps the patient feel more in control when experiencing pain.

    IMPACT: The experience of pain is dependent on control for the intensive care patient. The nurse may help them gain control and thereby handle the experience of pain through including the patient, striving for better communication and implementing individualised care that continuously assesses and treats pain.

  • 8.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    General health and state anxiety in patients recovering from colorectal cancer surgery2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 328-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe and compare general health and state anxiety before surgery and up to 6 months after surgery in patients with colorectal cancer undergoing elective rectal resection, abdominoperineal resection or colonic resection in an enhanced recovery context. BACKGROUND: Little is known about patient-reported health and anxiety after colorectal cancer surgery in an enhanced recovery context. DESIGN: A prospective cohort study. METHODS: Data were collected from October 2011-February 2013. The questionnaires - EuroQol 5-Dimensions 3-Levels and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - were answered before surgery, at discharge and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Data were analysed using inferential statistics to describe differences between groups of patients (Kruskal-Wallis test) and between assessments within groups (Friedman's anova). RESULTS: Patients (N = 105), divided into three groups based on surgical procedure, showed a high health index and a low state anxiety in all assessments without differences between the groups. Patients considered for abdominoperineal resection rated their pre-operative health as significantly higher than patients after rectal and colonic resections did. Within groups, patients recovering from abdominoperineal resection and rectal resection deteriorated significantly in health index 1 month after surgery. However, after 6 months they had improved again. After colonic resection, patients improved significantly in self-rated health and anxiety 1 month after surgery with no further discernible improvement after 6 months. CONCLUSION: The study showed that patients generally had a high level of health and a low level of anxiety throughout the study period. Only a few differences occurred between assessments within groups.

  • 9.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jangland, Eva
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Nursing Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engström, My
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Surgery Sahlgrenska, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Malmström, Marlene
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Surgery and Gastroenterology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö/Lund, Sweden.
    Drott, Jenny
    Division of Nursing Science, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Work conditions influencing professional development of specialist nurses in surgical care explored using the Job Demand-Resources theory: A qualitative study2023In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 79, no 7, p. 2610-2621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to explore the work conditions that influence the opportunities for professional development of specialist nurses in surgical care.

    DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design was used.

    METHODS: With a purposeful sampling procedure, 14 specialist nurses in surgical care were included. Four focus-group interviews were conducted during November to December 2021 and deductively analysed using the Job Demand-Resource theory as a guiding framework. Reporting adheres to COREQ guidelines.

    FINDINGS: Work conditions that were identified as job demands and that inhibited nurses' opportunities for professional development were mainly found at an organizational and leadership level. Primarily, those conditions included role ambiguity and time constraints caused by uncompensated nursing shortages that restricted the nurses from exercising their role. Such conditions could also discourage other nurses from further education. Job demands were seen as largely compensated for by work conditions identified as job resources and located mainly at an individual level, for example finding the work interesting and multifaceted. Most prominent was the participants' inner motivation to work with surgical patients and to continue to develop themselves and other nurses professionally.

    CONCLUSIONS: A prerequisite for professional development is that the specialist role is clearly defined in collaboration with representatives from the nursing profession and universities. Hence, hospital organizations need to reflect on how to utilize the competence. Also, it is important that nurse leaders promote the specialist nurses' motivation by supporting them in the exercise of their role.

    IMPACT: Findings from this study revealed work conditions that need to be acknowledged during hospital organizations' endeavours to maintain and enhance nursing competence.

    PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Patient or public contribution was not applicable since the study focused on specialist nurses' working conditions.

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  • 10. Lindberg, Catharina
    et al.
    Fagerström, Cecilia
    Sivberg, Bengt
    Willman, Ania
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Concept analysis: patient autonomy in a caring context2014In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 10, no 70, p. 2208-2221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of patient autonomy. Many problems regarding patient autonomy in healthcare contexts derive from the patient´s dependent condition as well as the traditional authoritarian position of healthcare professionals. Existing knowledge and experince reveal a lack of consensus among nurses regarding the meaning of this ethical concept. This is a concept analysis with data sources: MedLine, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library and PsycINFO, searched 2005-June 2013 using the search blocks 'autonomy', 'patient', and 'nursing/caring'. A total of 41 articles were retrieved. The Evolutionary Method of Concept Analysis by Rodgers was used to identify and construct the meaning of the concept of patient autonomy in a caring context. Five attributes were identified, thus creating the following descriptive definition: 'Patient autonomy is a gradual, time-changing process of (re-)constructing autonomy through the interplay of to be seen as a person, the capacity to act and the obligation to take responsibility for one's actions'. Patient vulnerability was shown to be the antecedent of patient autonomy and arises due to an impairment of a person's physical and/or mental state. The consequences of patient autonomy were discussed in relation to preserving control and freedom. Conclusion: Patient autonomy in a caring context does not need to be the same before, during and after a care episod. A tentative model has been constructed, thus extending the understanding of this critical concept in a caring context.

  • 11.
    Lindholm, Maud
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Dejin-Karlsson, Elisabeth
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Östergren, PO
    Udén, Giggi
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Nurse managers' professional networks, psychosocial resources and self-rated health2003In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 42, no 5 Jun2003, p. 506-515Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Nässtrom, Lena
    et al.
    Luttik, Marie Louise
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Strömberg, Anna
    Exploring partners' perspectives on participation in heart failure home care: a mixed-method design2017In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 1208-1219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To describe the partners' perspectives on participation in the care for patients with heart failure receiving home care. Background. Partners are often involved in care of patients with heart failure and have an important role in improving patients' well-being and self-care. Partners have described both negative and positive experiences of involvement, but knowledge of how partners of patients with heart failure view participation in care when the patient receives home care is lacking. Design. A convergent parallel mixed-method design was used, including data from interviews and questionnaires. Methods. A purposeful sample of 15 partners was used. Data collection lasted between February 2010 - December 2011. Interviews were analysed with content analysis and data from questionnaires (participation, caregiving, health-related quality of life, depressive symptoms) were analysed statistically. Finally, results were merged, interpreted and labelled as comparable and convergent or as being inconsistent. Results. Partners were satisfied with most aspects of participation, information and contact. Qualitative findings revealed four different aspects of participation: adapting to the caring needs and illness trajectory, coping with caregiving demands, interacting with healthcare providers and need for knowledge to comprehend the health situation. Results showed confirmatory results that were convergent and expanded knowledge that gave a broader understanding of partner participation in this context. Conclusion. The results revealed different levels of partner participation. Heart failure home care included good opportunities for both participation and contact during home visits, necessary to meet partners' ongoing need for information to comprehend the situation.

  • 13. Suhonen, Riitta
    et al.
    Papastavrou, E
    Efstathiou, G
    Lemonidou, C
    Kalafati, M
    da Luz, MD
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Berg, Agneta
    Acaroglu, Rengin
    Sendir, M
    Kanan, N
    Sousa, VD
    Katajisto, J
    Välimäki, M
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    Nurses' perceptions of individualized care: an international comparison2011In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 67, no 9, p. 1895-1907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  This paper is a report of a study of internationally-based differences in nurses’ perceptions of individualized care in orthopaedic surgical in-patient wards. Background.  Individualized care is valued in healthcare policy, practice and ethical statements as an indicator of care quality. However, nurses’ assessments of individualized care are limited and comparative cross-cultural studies on individualized nursing care are lacking. Methods.  A descriptive comparative survey was used to sample orthopaedic surgical nurses (n = 1163) working in 91 inpatient wards in 34 acute hospitals in Finland, Cyprus, Greece, Portugal, Sweden, Turkey and the United States of America. Data were collected between March and November 2009 using the Individualized Care Scale-Nurse and analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results.  Nurses in different countries perceived that they supported patients’ individuality generally and provided individualized care during nursing activities. Although the highest scores were in support of patients’ individuality in the clinical situation both through nursing provision and nurses’ perceptions of individuality, there were between-country differences within these scores. Generally, the Greek and American nurses gave the highest scores and the Turkish, Cypriot and Portuguese nurses the lowest. Conclusions.  Between-country differences found may be attributed to differing roles of nurses, care processes, healthcare systems and/or the ways nursing care is defined and organized. As this was the first time the Individualized Care Scale-Nurse was used in an international context, the results are formative and indicate the need to continue studies in this area.

  • 14.
    Taube, Elin
    et al.
    Center for Primary Health Care Research; Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö; Faculty of Medicine; Lund University; Malmö Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Ulf
    Center for Primary Health Care Research; Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö; Faculty of Medicine; Lund University; Malmö Sweden.
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Center for Primary Health Care Research; Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö; Faculty of Medicine; Lund University; Malmö Sweden.
    Kristensson, Jimmie
    Department of Health Sciences; Faculty of Medicine; Lund University; Sweden.
    Being in a Bubble: the experience of loneliness among frail older people2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 631-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the experience of loneliness among frail older people living at home.BackgroundLoneliness is a threat to the physical and psychological well-being with serious consequences if left unattended. There are associations between frailty and poor psychological well-being, implying that frail older people who experience loneliness are vulnerable.

    Design: Qualitative content analysis, focusing on both latent and manifest content.MethodFrail older people (65+ years), living at home and who have experienced various levels in intensity of loneliness, were purposively selected from a larger interventional study (N = 12). For this study, ‘frail’ means being dependent in activities of daily life and having repeated contacts with healthcare services. Data were collected between December 2009–August 2011. Semi-structured interviews were performed, audio recorded and transcribed verbatim.

    Findings: The analysis resulted in the overall theme ‘Being in a Bubble’, which illustrates an experience of living in an ongoing world, but excluded because of the participants' social surroundings and the impossibility to regain losses. The theme ‘Barriers’ was interpreted as facing physical, psychological and social barriers for overcoming loneliness. The theme ‘Hopelessness’ reveals the experience when not succeeding in overcoming these barriers, including seeing loneliness as a constant state. A positive co-existing dimension of loneliness, offering independence, was reflected in the theme ‘Freedom’.

    Conclusion: The findings suggest that future strategies for intervening should target the frail older persons' individual barriers and promoting the positive co-existing dimension of loneliness. When caring, a person centred approach, encompassing knowledge regarding physical and psychological aspects, including loneliness, is recommended.

  • 15.
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Hallberg, IR
    Risberg, B
    Lundell, A
    Klevsgård, Rosemarie
    Health-related quality of life after revascularization for peripheral arterial occlusive disease: long-term follow-up2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 227-235Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Wennick, Anne
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Hallström, Inger
    Lund University.
    Families' lived experience one year after a child was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes2007In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 3, no 60, p. 299-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a report of a study to elucidate families' lived experience of diabetes one year after a child was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. BACKGROUND: The incidence of type 1 diabetes is rapidly increasing worldwide, with a shift towards younger age groups. This illness is treated by means of an intensive management regimen that often disrupts the child's usual activities and requires disease-focused behaviours from the child and his or her family. However, research elucidating families' lived experience from the perspective of all its members is sparse. METHOD: A hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in 2004, based on interviews one year after diagnosis with 11 consecutively chosen Swedish-speaking family members with children aged between 9 and 14 years. FINDINGS: The families described their one year of lived experience as living an ordinary yet different life. They experienced their lives to be neither particularly difficult nor as easy as they had been before the child was diagnosed with diabetes. Related themes were 'feeling acceptance yet frustration', 'being healthy yet invisibly ill', 'feeling independent yet supervised' and 'feeling confident yet insecure'. CONCLUSION: It may be helpful if healthcare professionals make use of the knowledge and experience of families living with the illness to meet their specific needs, especially when the affected child is experiencing fluctuating blood sugar levels. Thus, health-promoting collaboration should be tailor-made for every individual and proceed from each family's everyday life.

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