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  • 1.
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bolmsjö, Ingrid
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Bengtsson, Mariette
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Registered nurses' perceptions of their professional work in nursing homes and home-based care: A focus group study2014In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 761-767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, as well as in most industrialized countries, an increasing older population is expected to create a growing demand for health care staff. Previous studies have pointed to lack of proficient medical and nursing staff specialized in geriatric care, which poses serious threats to the care of a vulnerable population. At the same time, there are studies describing elderly care as a low-status career choice, attracting neither nurses nor student nurses. Judging from previous research it was deemed important to explore how nurses in elderly care perceive their work, thus possibly provide vital knowledge that can guide nurse educators and unit managers as a means to promote a career in elderly care. Objective: The aim of the present study was to illuminate how nurses, working in nursing homes and home-based care, perceived their professional work. Method: This was a qualitative study using focus groups. 30 registered nurses in seven focus groups were interviewed. The participants worked in nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly in rural areas and in a larger city in southern Sweden. The interviews were analyzed in line with the tradition of naturalistic inquiry. Results: Our findings illustrate how nurses working in elderly care perceived their professional work as holistic and respectful nursing with the older person at its centre. Three categories emerged during analysis: (1) establishing long-term relationships, (2) nursing beyond technical skills, and (3) balancing independence and a sense of loneliness. Conclusions: We suggest that nurse educators and nurse managers promote continuity and long term relationships with patients, as well as independence and the opportunity to provide holistic care as key aspects of elderly care. These key aspects can be used to attract and retain nurses to a much needed area as well as be used as positive examples that can influence values and attitudes towards a career in elderly care.

  • 2.
    Holm, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Jönsson, Sandra
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL). Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA).
    How are witnessed workplace bullying and bystander roles related to perceived care quality, work engagement, and turnover intentions in the healthcare sector?: A longitudinal study2023In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 138, article id 104429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundWorkplace bullying is widespread in the healthcare sector and the negative effects are well known. However, less attention has been paid to bystanders who witness bullying in the workplace. Bystanders can affect the bullying process by engaging in active, passive, or destructive behaviors. There is a need to study work-related and organizational consequences of witnessing bullying and bystander behaviors.ObjectiveThe aim was to explore how witnessed workplace bullying and bystander behaviors are associated with work-related and organizational consequences, such as perceived quality of care, work engagement, and turnover intentions, among healthcare workers over time.DesignLongitudinal design. An online questionnaire was administered twice over the course of six months.Setting(s)Employees in the healthcare sector in Sweden, such as physicians, nurses, and assistant nurses, responded to the questionnaire.Participants1144 participants provided longitudinal data.MethodsStructural equation modeling was used to explore the associations between witnessed bullying, bystander behavior, work-related and organizational factors over time.ResultsWitnessed workplace bullying (B = − 0.18, 95 % CI [− 0.23 to − 0.12]) and the bystander outsider role (B = − 0.24, 95 % CI [− 0.29 to − 0.19]) were statistically significantly related to a decrease in perceived quality of care. Work engagement was statistically significantly predicted by all three bystander roles over time; positively by the defender role (B = 0.11, 95 % CI [0.05–0.17]), and negatively by the outsider role (B = − 0.23, 95 % CI [− 0.29 to − 0.16]), and the assistant role (B = − 0.32, 95 % CI [− 0.41 to − 0.24]). The outsider role (B = 0.12, 95 % CI [0.02–0.22]), the assistant role (B = 0.17, 95 % CI [0.03–0.30]), and witnessed workplace bullying (B = 0.18, 95 % CI [0.08–0.29]), all positively predicted increased turnover intentions at a subsequent time point.ConclusionsIn addition to the direct negative impact workplace bullying has on those targeted by it, witnessing bullying and taking different bystander roles can have work-related and organizational consequences by influencing perceived care quality, employees' work engagement, and their intention to leave the organization.

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  • 3.
    Hommel, Ami
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Magnéli, Martin
    Samuelsson, Bodil
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Sjöstrand, Desirée
    Göransson, Katarina E
    Unbeck, Maria
    Exploring the incidence and nature of nursing-sensitive orthopaedic adverse events: a multicenter cohort study using global trigger tool2019In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 102, article id 103473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For decades, patient safety has been recognized as a critical global healthcare issue. However, there is a gap of knowledge of all types of adverse events sensitive to nursing care within hospitals in general and within orthopaedic care specifically. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the incidence and nature of nursing-sensitive adverse events following elective or acute hip arthroplasty at a national level. Design A retrospective multicenter cohort study. Outcome variables Nursing-sensitive adverse events, preventability, severity and length of stay. Methods All patients, 18 years or older, who had undergone an elective (degenerative joint disease) or acute (fractures) hemi or total hip arthroplasty surgery at 24 hospitals were eligible for inclusion. Retrospective reviews of weighted samples of 1998 randomly selected patient records were carried out using the Swedish version of the Global Trigger Tool. The patients were followed for readmissions up to 90 days postoperatively throughout the whole country regardless of index hospital. Results A total of 1150 nursing-sensitive adverse events were identified in 728 (36.4%) of patient records, and 943 (82.0%) of the adverse events were judged preventable in the study cohort. The adjusted cumulative incidence regarding nursing-sensitive adverse events for the study population was 18.8%. The most common nursing-sensitive adverse event types were different kinds of healthcare-associated infections (40.9%) and pressure ulcers (16.5%). Significantly higher proportions of nursing-sensitive adverse events were found among female patients compared to male, p < 0.001, and patients with acute admissions compared to elective patients, p < 0.001. Almost half (48.5%) of the adverse events were temporary and of a less severe nature. On the other hand, 592 adverse events were estimated to have contributed to 3351 extra hospital days. Conclusions This study shows the magnitude of nursing-sensitive adverse events. We found that nursing-sensitive adverse events were common, in most cases deemed preventable and were associated with different kinds of adverse events and levels of severity in orthopaedic care. Registered nurses play a vital role within the interdisciplinary team as they are the largest group of healthcare professionals, work 24/7 and spend much time at the bedside with patients. Therefore, nursing leadership at all hospital levels must assume responsibility for patient safety and authorize bedside registered nurses to deliver high-quality and sustainable care to patients.

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  • 4.
    Karatuna, Işıl
    et al.
    Marmara University.
    Jönsson, Sandra
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Malmö University, Centre for Work Life and Evaluation Studies (CTA). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Workplace bullying in the nursing profession: A cross-cultural scoping review2020In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 111, article id 103628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, nurses are at high risk of exposure to workplace bullying, and there is a growing body of literature addressing bullying in the nursing profession. Yet, our understanding of cross-cultural variations in bullying among nurses is lacking. An analysis of what is currently known about bullying in different parts of the world is critical for our understanding of cross-cultural effects of bullying among nurses.

    Objectives: We aimed to examine workplace bullying research among nurses with the focus on sources, antecedents, outcomes and coping responses from a cross-cultural perspective during the years 2001– 2019. Design: This is a scoping review of published literature on workplace bullying among nurses.

    Data sources: A literature search was conducted using the CINAHL, PubMed, PsychINFO and Web of Sci- ence databases. A total of 166 articles provided data from the following cultural clusters: Anglo, Latin Europe, Eastern Europe, Nordic Europe, Middle East, Latin America, Confucian Asia, Southern Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Procedure: Studies were identified through a database search. Relevant data were extracted using a narra- tive approach. Categories were thematically organized according to the study topics. Cultural differences regarding the variation in the perceptions of and responses to bullying were analysed in relation to the cultural dimensions: power distance, assertiveness, in-group collectivism and performance orientation. Results: Research was mostly conducted in the Anglo cluster. Antecedents and outcomes of bullying were the most often studied topics across all cultural clusters. Vertical bullying was most prevalent in higher power distance cultures, whereas horizontal bullying was either more or equally prevalent in lower power distance cultures. The risk of bullying decreased as nurses’ length of service and age increased in most of the clusters. Individual antecedents were more frequently reported in high in-group collec- tivist cultures. Organizational antecedents such as lack of bullying prevention measures, unsupportive leadership and stressful work characteristics were frequently reported across different cultural clusters. Yet, an organizational culture that tolerates bullying was most commonly addressed in Anglo, a highly performance-oriented culture. Negative outcomes of bullying were very similar across the world. Nurses used emotion-focused coping strategies more frequently almost in all clusters; yet, there were reports of problem-focused coping strategies especially in relatively higher assertiveness cultures.

    Conclusions: Analysis revealed both similarities and differences in the nurses’ reports of bullying by world region. Cultural factors were found to be important for understanding the variation in the nurses’ per- ceptions of and responses to bullying.

  • 5. Papastavrou, Evridiki
    et al.
    Acaroglu, Rengin
    Sendir, Merdiye
    Berg, Agneta
    Efstathiou, Georgios
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Kalafati, Maria
    Katajisto, Jouko
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    Lemonidou, Chryssoula
    Antunes da Luz, Maria
    Suhonen, Riitta
    The relationship between individualized care and the practice environment: an international study2015In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 121-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Previous research studies have found that the better the quality of practice environments in hospitals, the better the outcomes for nurses and patients. Practice environment may influence nurses' ability to individualize care but the detailed relationship between individualized care and the professional practice environment has not been investigated widely. Some evidence exists about the association of practice environments with the level of individualization of nursing care, but this evidence is based on single national studies. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine whether nurses' views of their professional practice environment associate with their views of the level of care individualization in seven countries. DESIGN: This study had an international, multisite, prospective, cross-sectional, exploratory survey design. SETTINGS: The study involved acute orthopedic and trauma surgical inpatient wards (n=91) in acute care hospitals (n=34) in seven countries, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, the State of Kansas, USA, Portugal, Sweden, and Turkey. PARTICIPANTS: Nurses (n=1163), registered or licensed practical, working in direct patient care, in orthopedic and trauma inpatient units in acute care hospitals in seven countries participated in the study. METHODS: Self-administered questionnaires, including two instruments, the Revised Professional Practice Environment and the Individualized Care Scale-Nurse (Individualized Care Scale-Nurse A and B) were used for data collection. Data were analyzed statistically using descriptive statistics, simultaneous multiple regression analysis, and generalized linear model. RESULTS: Two regression models were applied to assess the predictive validity of the Revised Professional Practice Environment on the Individualized Care Scale-Nurse-A and B. The results showed that elements of the professional practice environment were associated with care individualization. Internal work motivation, cultural sensitivity, control over practice, teamwork, and staff relationship with physicians were predictors of support (Individualized Care Scale-A) for and the delivery (Individualized Care Scale-B) of individualized care. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study provide evidence that environment aspect could explain variations in care individualization. These findings support the assertion that individualized care needs to be understood in a broader context than the immediate nurse-patient relationship and that careful development of the care environment may be an effective way to improve care quality and outcomes.

  • 6. Richards, David A.
    et al.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Shitty Nursing: The New Normal?2019In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 148-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we ask our profession to consider whether something is rotten at the core of modern nursing. We will use our own experiences as patients, together with published literature, to ask questions of our profession in perpetrating what one of our colleagues recently, and with great embarrassment, referred to as ‘shitty nursing’. Our intention is most certainly not to offend any readers, for this term has been used in literature for more than one hundred years to describe bad situations, including those where events or people’s behaviour are of a low standard. Our intention instead, is to challenge ourselves, the profession and you the reader by raising a measured debate which seems at present to be missing within the profession. We examine the potential idea that poor nursing care may not be the exception, but horrifyingly, may be the new normal. We are particularly concerned that patients’ fundamental care needs may be falling into an ever widening gap between assistant and registered nurses. Whilst we acknowledge the potential causes of poor nursing care, causes that are often cited by nurses themselves, we come to the conclusion that a mature profession including clinicians, educators, administrators, researchers and regulators cannot continually blame contextual factors for its failings. A mature profession with an intact contract between itself and society must shoulder some of the responsibility for its own problems. We do suggest a way forward, including a mix of reconciliation, refocus and research, underpinned by what we argue is a much needed dose of professional humility. Readers may take us to task for potentially overstating the problem, ignoring non-nursing drivers, and downplaying other significant factors. You may think that there is much in nursing to glory in. However, we make no apology for presenting our views. Our lived experiences tell us something different. As professional nurses our main aim is to ensure that our adverse experiences as patients are statistical anomalies, and our future encounters with nursing care represent all that we know to be excellent in our profession. We leave you to judge and comment.

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  • 7.
    Stolt, Minna
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Suhonen, Riitta
    Turku University Hospital and City of Turku, Welfare Division, Turku, Finland.
    The use and quality of reporting of Rasch analysis in nursing research: A methodological scoping review2022In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 132, p. 104244-104244, article id 104244Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Rasch analysis is widely used in the life sciences. Rasch analysis is a mathematical and probabilistic model based on the assumption that the probability of passing a single item is governed by a person's ability and the difficulty of the item. However, its use in nursing science remains unclear.AimTo (i) describe the use of Rasch analysis in nursing research and (ii) determine the quality of reporting in nursing studies using Rasch models.MethodsA methodological scoping review of literature was conducted. The systematic electronic literature search was initially conducted on 1 February 2020 and updated on 16 April 2021 from PubMed/Medline and CINAHL databases. The search was limited to covering the timeframe from the earliest literature available until 31 December 2020. The search terms used were Rasch, IRT, item response theory, and nursing. The search was limited to the English language and title/abstract level. The analysis included quantification and content analysis.

    Results

    In total, 388 hits were identified. Following a two-phase retrieval process, 88 articles were included in the final analysis. Rasch analysis was used to test the psychometric properties of the newly developed instrument, and validate or test a short version of the existing instrument. The reporting of Rasch analysis demonstrated large variability in quality. Rating scale functioning, internal scale validity using goodness-of-fit statistics, and unidimensionality were the most frequently reported outcomes.

    Conclusion

    The use of Rasch analysis in nursing science was found to be unsystematic. Rasch analysis could provide new possibilities for investigating measurement properties. However, robust, comprehensive, and precise reporting of the methodological choices and results of Rasch analysis is needed. Furthermore, the use of Rasch analysis in nursing science is encouraged.

    What is already known

    • Rasch analysis is a mathematical and probabilistic model based on the assumption that the probability of passing a single item is related to a person's ability and the difficulty of the item.
    • Rasch analysis is widely used in the life sciences. However, its use and quality of reporting in nursing science have yet to be explored.

    What this paper adds

    • Rasch analysis is rarely used in nursing science, although its use is increasing.
    • This review has identified deficiencies in the reporting of nursing validation studies using Rasch analysis.
    • Minimum standards for the reporting of Rasch analysis in nursing research are proposed.
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  • 8.
    Stoltz, Peter
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Pilhammar Andersson, Ewa
    Willman, Ania
    Support in nursing: an evolutionary concept analysis2007In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 1478-1489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research into the concept of support was undertaken because of supports vital importance to family carers of older persons and its recurrent use in nursing re-search. Therefore, the aim of this study was to inductively develop a definition of support. Specifically in the context area of family care of frail aged persons. The study followed the evolutionary method of concept analysis. The study was based on data from scientific publications, encyclopaedias and dictionaries. In order to secure a representative sample, highly systematic means of sampling were used. From working with the data underpinning this study, it was possible to put forward a definition of support for family carers who care for a frail aged person at home. The two major dimensions, as described under attributes, were merged into the following definition: “Support partly entails the provision of general tangibles like informational-, educational-, economical aid, goods and external services. They are prerequisites for facilitating the family carers’ competence or capacity in care. Moreover it entails necessary qualities such as individualization, adaptability, lasting temporality, room for verbalizing emotions as well as an idea of reciprocal symmet-rical exchange between involved parties.”

  • 9.
    Striberger, Rebecka
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Vascular Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Malin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Zarrouk, Moncef
    Vascular Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Vascular Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Illness perceptions in patients with peripheral arterial disease: A systematic review of qualitative studies2021In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 116, article id 103723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic diseases create their own subjective beliefs about their conditions based on their illness perceptions. In the common-sense model, illness perceptions constitute personal beliefs about illness with regard to five components: identity, timeline, cause, control/cure, and consequences. Patients' illness perceptions affect both their management of their disease and their adherence to treatment. Since patients with peripheral arterial disease need life-long treatment for secondary prevention, generating knowledge about illness perceptions in patients with peripheral arterial disease is essential.

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review and synthesise the literature on illness perceptions in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    DESIGN: A systematic review DATA SOURCES: PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO.

    REVIEW METHODS: A systematic search strategy was conducted in December 2017, with an update in July 2019. Two team members independently screened all titles and abstracts. A relevance and quality appraisal of the studies was performed. The references from the included studies were evaluated for additional studies. The data from 14 studies were extracted and synthesised using a "best-fit" approach to framework analysis. A deductive analysis was conducted using the common-sense model. The data not suitable for the framework were analysed separately using inductive conventional content analysis, yielding an additional component representing the retrospective consequences of peripheral arterial disease.

    FINDINGS: The findings showed diversity in illness perceptions in each of the five components of the framework as well as in the additional component. The findings showed participants' lack of understanding of the chronic nature of the disease, i.e., about the timeline, the identity of the symptoms and the cause of the disease. The patients' beliefs about control and cures varied from having high motivation to engage in physical activity to thinking that walking could make their situations worse. There was fear about the future, as patients perceived disease progression and decreasing control to be consequences of their illness. Living with the disease, the emphasis in the additional component, was a process for regaining control and adapting to their situations.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with peripheral arterial disease shape their own understandings of their conditions. These beliefs may influence their management of their disease and adherence to treatment. Therefore, the current study suggests that illness perceptions should be addressed when planning secondary prevention for patients with peripheral arterial disease.

  • 10. Sving, Eva
    et al.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Högberg, Hans
    Gunningberg, Lena
    Factors contributing to evidence-based pressure ulcer prevention: a cross-sectional study2014In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 717-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Implementation of evidence-based care for pressure ulcer prevention is lacking. As the hospital organization is complex, more knowledge is needed to understand how nursing care in this area can be improved. Objectives The present study investigated the associations between variables on different levels in the healthcare setting (patient, unit, hospital) and the documentation of (1) risk assessment and (2) skin assessment within 24 h of admission, the use of (3) pressure-reducing mattresses and (4) planned repositioning in bed. Design A cross-sectional study. Settings One university hospital and one general hospital. Participants Geriatric (n = 8), medical (n = 24) and surgical (n = 19) units. All adult patients (>17 years), in total 825, were included. Methods A one-day prevalence study was conducted using the methodology specified by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, together with the established methods used by the Collaborative Alliance for Nursing Outcomes. Independent variables were patient characteristics, hospital type, unit type, nurse staffing and workload. Dependent variables were documented risk and skin assessment within 24 h of admission, pressure-reducing mattresses and planned repositioning in bed. The data were analysed with Logistic regression using the Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) approach. Results Patients at risk of developing pressure ulcers (Braden < 17) had higher odds of having risk assessment documented, and of receiving pressure-reducing mattresses and planned repositioning. Patients at the general hospital were less likely to have risk and skin assessment documented and to receive pressure-reducing mattresses. On the other hand, planned repositioning was more likely to be used at the general hospital. When total hours of nursing care was lower, patients had higher odds of having pressure-reducing mattresses but were less likely to have planned repositioning. Conclusion Patient characteristics (high age and risk score) and hospital type were associated with pressure ulcer prevention. Surprisingly, nurse staffing played only a minor role. Leaders in healthcare organizations should establish routines on different levels that support evidence-based pressure ulcer prevention, and registered nurses need to assume responsibility for bedside care.

  • 11.
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Science, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Hallberg, IR
    Department of Nursing Science, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden; The Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Klevsgård, Rosemarie
    Department of Nursing Science, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, E
    Department of Nursing Science, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden; The Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Patients' experiences of living with peripheral arterial disease awaiting intervention: a qualitative study2005In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 851-862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate patients’ experiences of living with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and the influence on activities of daily living. Twenty-four patients with various degrees of PAD were interviewed. The transcribed texts were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Living with PAD meant carrying a hard-to-bear physical, social and emotional burden, and struggling for relief. The experience of burden was interpreted in the following themes representing consequences and strategies for gaining control in daily life: (I) “being limited by the burden” (II) “striving to relieve the burden” (III) “accepting and adapting to the feeling of burden”. The use of different coping strategies was crucial to achieve some relief. Pain and sleep disturbance emerged as a major feature of living with PAD, and by combining both analgesics and non-pharmacological methods some pain relief was received. To provide optimal alleviation of pain for these patients, education about pain and pain management is of great importance followed by regular evaluations of the pain and pain management. Furthermore, the study underlines the importance of preventing the progression of the vascular disease and from the individual power and knowledge support and preserve as independent life as possible.

  • 12.
    Wann-Hansson, Christine
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill
    Klevsgård, Rosemarie
    Andersson, Edith
    The long-term experience of living with peripheral arterial disease and the recovery following revascularization: a qualitative study2006In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, no Feb 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT Background: The long-term experience of living with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and the durability of improvements after revascularization are sparsely described in the literature. The primary goal of medical treatment and nursing care for PAD is to provide relief of symptoms, improve quality of life and prevent the progression of arterial disease and cardiovascular complications. A majority are elderly with a significantly increased risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular death. Which can limit mobility and functional status even in the absence of ischaemic claudication, rest pain or ulceration after a successful revascularization. Objectives: To illuminate the long-term experience of living with peripheral arterial disease and the recovery following revascularizations. Methods: Fourteen patients were interviewed 6 months and 2½ years after revascularization. The transcribed texts were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Results: The long-term experience of living with PAD meant gradually becoming aware of having a chronic disease. This was interpreted in the following themes, representing the transition from being in an acute phase of PAD to the recovery after revascularization and entering a chronic phase of PAD: (I) “becoming better but not cured”; (II) “recapturing control over life”; (III) “reappraising meaning in life”. Conclusions: Becoming aware of having a chronic disease results in a need to adapt to and accept permanent restrictions in daily life. The findings showed that revascularizations offer several benefits, however when PAD symptoms were relieved other ailments became discernable, which reflects the complex course of PAD and atherosclerotic disease. Moreover, several critical points and events such as other concurrent diseases, unrealistic hope for recovery, the complex course of PAD and atherosclerotic disease complicated the transition process towards health and well-being.

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