Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Björkhagen Turesson, Annelie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Conceptions, Norms, and Values in the Work of Child Protective Services with Families at Risk: An Analysis of Social Workers’ Diaries2020In: Clinical social work journal, ISSN 0091-1674, E-ISSN 1573-3343, Vol. 48, p. 369-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the conceptions, norms, and values that govern the work of child protection are elusive, they are rarely discussed in the research. This study is based on diaries maintained by three social workers in relation to 15 families that were the subject of interventions by the child protective services in Sweden. All of the mothers in the 15 families had been diagnosed with mental health problems. The diaries include both significant events within the families and the social workers’ own feelings and perceptions about their work. This article discusses four themes: the Janus face of child protective services, clienthood and its conditions, child protective services and good or bad parenting, and the fathers. The results show that the families were subjected to extensive discipline. The diaries also expressed strong value judgements regarding how children should be raised. The parents’ desires and wishes were redefined by the social workers, making the parents powerless. The fathers were marginalized, which meant that an important resource within the families was lost. The parents reacted to this exercise of power in part by trying to escape it and in part by adapting to it. In summary, the desire to help was in some cases transformed into an abusive exercise of power.

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  • 2.
    Lindroth, Malin
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Carlström, Charlotta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Andersson, Catrine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Husén, Elin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Social Workers as Allies? Gender Confirming Practices and Institutional Limitations in Youth Residential Homes2024In: Clinical social work journal, ISSN 0091-1674, E-ISSN 1573-3343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows that LGBTQ+ youth are over-represented in out-of-home care and that especially transgender andnon-binary youth face challenges during their placement. These challenges stem from, among other factors, the lack ofknowledge and competence of professionals regarding the unique needs of transgender and non-binary youth. In Sweden,there are policies that aim to protect transgender and non-binary youth from discrimination and to promote their sexualand reproductive health and rights, and an increasing number of residential homes claim to have LGBTQ competencewhen competing for placements. However, it is unclear how this affects the everyday experiences of trans and non-binaryyouth at residential homes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the practices and challenges of clinical social workers at residential care homes when working with gender identity and sexual health issues among young transgender andnon-binary youth. Eight semi-structured interviews focusing on professionals’ knowledge and experiences were conductedand analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. Four themes emerged: i) Knowledge being a personal matter; ii) Heteronormativity and binarity creating consequences; iii) Handling discrimination and harassments; and iv) Creating a trustfulalliance. The results show that knowledge is a personal matter, and social work professionals seek the knowledge theyneed instead of receiving it in education or training. The contextual heteronormativity and binarity creating consequencesat the residential care home pose challenges for social workers and they have to find creative ways to support transgenderand non-binary youth and address the harassments and discrimination that these youth face. Moreover, the social workersshare their strategies regarding how they are creating a trustful alliance. Overall, they identify significant challenges todeveloping clinical social work that is affirming of transgender and non-binary youth.

  • 3.
    Petersson, Charlotte C
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Social Work Responses to Domestic Violence During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Experiences and Perspectives of Professionals at Women’s Shelters in Sweden2022In: Clinical social work journal, ISSN 0091-1674, E-ISSN 1573-3343, Vol. 50, p. 135-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how social work professionals at women’s shelters in Sweden experience, understand, and are responding to domestic violence under the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. A qualitative longitudinal research design was employed, and multiple semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 professionals at women’s shelters over a period of one year. The results are presented in three overall themes; (a) professional challenges due to increased needs, (b) professionals’ adjustments to new circumstances, and (c) professionals’ attributions regarding client barriers to help seeking. The results show diverse and changing experiences among the professionals as the pandemic progressed. Clients and professionals have shared the same collective trauma associated with the pandemic, which has affected the professionals’ understanding of and response to domestic violence. The professionals understand both clients and themselves as being more vulnerable and susceptible to risk under these new circumstances. Social work adjustments focused on maintaining contact, reducing risk and prioritizing safety, which had both positive and negative consequences for both clients and professionals. The study concludes that the professionals coped with the uncertainty they experienced during the pandemic by relying on both their previous knowledge and work experience of domestic violence and their experience of sharing trauma with clients.

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  • 4.
    Petersson, Charlotte C
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Plantin, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö University, Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies (CSS).
    Breaking with Norms of Masculinity: Men Making Sense of Their Experience of Sexual Assault2019In: Clinical social work journal, ISSN 0091-1674, E-ISSN 1573-3343, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 372-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the sexual assault of males has received growing attention both in the research literature and among the public. Much of the research has focused on documenting prevalence rates or the psychological consequences of male sexual assault. However, this article aims to understand how men, as gendered, embodied and affective subjects, make sense of their experiences of sexual assault. In-depth interviews with ten adult males who have experienced sexual assault have been analyzed using a phenomenological approach in order to learn more about their lived and gendered experience. Four themes emerged from the analysis: (a) conflicting feelings and difficult conceptualizations, (b) re-experiencing vulnerability, (c) emotional responses and resistance, and (d) disclosure and creativity. The findings suggest that the ways in which men navigate norms of masculinity shape the way they understand, process and articulate their lived experience of sexual assault. As a way of coping with the experience and of healing from a past that is still present, the study participants perform an alternative masculine identity.

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    FULLTEXT01
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