Publikationer från Malmö universitet
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  • 1.
    DeBono, Daniela
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för globala politiska studier (GPS). Malmö universitet, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM). European Univ Inst, Robert Schuman Ctr Adv Studies, Global Governance Programme, Florence, Italy.
    Plastic hospitality: The empty signifier at the EU’s Mediterranean border2019Inngår i: Migration Studies, ISSN 2049-5838, E-ISSN 2049-5846, Vol. 7, nr 3, s. 340-361Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Hospitality and hospitality-laden language feature highly among people working in or around structures of first reception in Italy and Malta, two countries at the European Union’s (EU) external border. This is peculiar because hospitality rarely features at first reception, which forms part of the state’s border system. Characteristically, security issues are prioritized, and the first reception system is managed by the member state’s security agents, in collaboration with EU and international security agents. In practice, first reception refers to the processes of identification, registration, and classification that irregular migrants go through after having crossed the border without authorization and, often, without identification. Drawing on long-term and multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork in Italy and Malta, this article examines some of the uses of hospitality language by a spectrum of territorial borderworkers operating with state, non-state, security, humanitarian, and activist entities in the two countries that are the object of this study. Discourse analysis yields interesting insights into how the use of the hospitality paradigm and hospitality terminology in first reception is less about hospitality practices and more about power. It proposes that the hospitality paradigm be conceptualized as a Laclauian empty signifier, and therefore, as a locus of power.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 2.
    Elwert, Annika
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Sociol, Lund, Sweden..
    Emilsson, Henrik
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för globala politiska studier (GPS). Malmö universitet, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Irastorza, Nahikari
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för globala politiska studier (GPS). Malmö universitet, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    From state-controlled to free migration: The income effects of the 2008 Swedish labour-migration reform2023Inngår i: Migration Studies, ISSN 2049-5838, E-ISSN 2049-5846, Vol. 11, nr 4, s. 721-745Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2008, Sweden changed its labour-migration policy to facilitate more labour migration from countries outside the EU. Most state ambitions to shape labour migration, including practices such as the use of labour-market tests and the assessment of migrants' human capital, were abandoned and the responsibility to select migrants was transferred to employers. We use Swedish register data and adopt a difference-in-differences approach to assess the effects of the policy change on labour migrants' labour income, in comparison to non-EU migrants who moved to Sweden for reasons other than work. The effects of the policy change are substantial. Labour migration from outside the EU increased and its composition changed after the reform, resulting in a significant decrease in mean income. We conclude that changes in their occupational composition were the main drivers of the income drop for labour migrants. In sum, the new non-selective labour-migration policy lowered labour migrants' mean income by opening the door to unskilled labour.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Schütze, Carolin
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för globala politiska studier (GPS). School of Social Work, Lund University,.
    Attitudes matter: welfare work and migration in Sweden2019Inngår i: Migration Studies, ISSN 2049-5838, E-ISSN 2049-5846, Vol. 8, nr 3, s. 424-454Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the factors that influence Swedish welfare workers’ attitudes towards migrants and how these attitudes are associated with their encounters with migrant users. Due to increased migration over the last decade, Sweden is now considered an immigrant nation. Migrants with the right to reside in Sweden are included within the larger welfare system. This paper argues that preconceived notions about migrants can affect the welfare services that they receive. Results from an online survey with a sample of 1,319 welfare practitioners reveal that welfare workers’ attitudes play a significant role when it comes to how they perceive their encounters with migrant users. The findings demonstrate that more favourable attitudes towards migrants were predicted mainly by personal contact with migrants and that different organisational contexts result in different experiences of encounters with migrant users. Less favourable attitudes towards migrants were primarily predicted by a strong ethnic national identity. Most importantly, the findings show that welfare workers’ who have more favourable attitudes towards migrants are less likely to perceive their encounters with migrant users as difficult. This paper contributes to welfare and migration research in two ways. First, this study provides additional support for previous claims from qualitative research by supporting the assumptions that preconceived negative ideas about migrants have meaning for practical welfare work. Second, this paper integrates two streams of research—attitude formation theory and street-level bureaucracy theory— thus expanding existing assumptions about what determines welfare practices with migrants.

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