Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Kopsch, Fredrik
    Palm, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    How cultural values are reflected on the housing market: direct effects and the cultural spillover2019In: International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, ISSN 1753-8270, E-ISSN 1753-8289, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 405-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse two questions. First, is there, and if so, how large is the price premium paid for a building exhibiting a cultural value? Second, are there any spillover effects of buildings with cultural values on sales prices of neighbouring houses? Design/methodology/approach: Using a unique database of all buildings in the region of Halland, Sweden, combined with transaction data, hedonic models can be estimated, with spatially lagged variables describing proximity to three classes of culturally classified building – A, B and C – corresponding to building of national interest, building of regional interest and building of local interest. In addition, the authors also estimate models with a spatial specification on the error term, in an attempt to control for omitted variables. Findings: The results indicate that cultural classification plays a role in determining the price of a property, with large effects (ranging between 36 and 60% price premiums) for the highest classification. In addition, the authors find evidence of a cultural externality, houses in the vicinity of building with high cultural value sell at a small, but statistically significant premium of 1%. Originality/value: The cultural externality may be overlooked when it comes to valuation of cultural values in society, and therefore, it is likely that warranted protection acts to preserve cultural values in buildings become less than the social optimum. This paper suggests a new measure to cultural values contrasting previous research that rely on cultural preservation. This approach should limit problems with measurement errors that may lead to biased results.

  • 2.
    Blomé, Gunnar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Lind, Hans
    Slumlords in the Swedish Welfare state: how is it possible?2012In: International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, ISSN 1753-8270, E-ISSN 1753-8289, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 196-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to try to explain how long-term mismanagement of a housing estate could arise in a country with a strong legal framework aimed at preventing such situations. Design/methodology/approach – Assuming that both tenants and landlords are rational, the paper presents a set of hypotheses that is consistent with the information available. Findings – It is argued that the tenants stayed even though the rent was higher and the quality was lower than in neighboring areas because of a combination of three factors: rents were paid by different forms of welfare payments; lack of alternatives because of queues to other areas; and because some tenants saw an advantage in the “no-question” asked policy that the slumlord followed. It is further argued that the property owner found this slum-strategy profitable either because he hoped to find a “bigger fool” to sell to and/or because the decision makers in the company had not invested their own money. Both tenants and investors were, in the end, losers, but not the company managers. Social implications – The Swedish legal framework is, to a large extent, based on the idea that tenants should take action when there are problems. For several reasons the tenants in the area did not do that and it indicates that a more active role for the local authorities is necessary. Originality/value – The paper focuses on an interesting case that most people thought could not occur and tries to explain this within a framework of rational actors.

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  • 3.
    Karpestam, Peter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Area income, construction year and mobility of renters in Sweden: two hypotheses about the impact of rent control2023In: International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, ISSN 1753-8270, E-ISSN 1753-8289, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 1-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to test two hypotheses related to the supposedly negative impact of rent controlon residential mobility: the mobility of renters is, first, negatively related to how attractive their residentialareas are and, second, relatively high for renters living in properties built after 2005.Design/methodology/approach – This paper estimates logit and multinomial logit regressions andmodels household moves. The multinomial logit regressions separate between short- and long-distance movesand between moves to rentals and to owned dwellings. This paper uses the “relative income” of the tenants’residential areas to proxy area attractiveness. This paper estimates regressions for entire Sweden and thethree largest “commuting” regions and municipalities, respectively.Findings – The full sample provides support of both hypotheses in all regressions. Hypothesis one getsstronger support for moves to other rentals than moves to owned dwellings but about equally strong supportfor short- and long-distance moves. Hypothesis one obtains strongest support in Gothenburg municipalitywhile hypothesis two obtains strongest support in the Malmö region. Also, hypothesis two obtains strongersupport for short-distance moves than long-distance moves and slightly stronger support for moves to owneddwellings than those to rented dwellings.Research limitations/implications – This paper does not estimate “how much” rent control affectsmobility, and results cannot be used to design specific rent setting policies. Results may be sensitive to howdifferent types of moves are defined.Practical implications – Efforts to reform rent setting policies in Sweden are encouraged.Originality/value – To the best of the author’s knowledge, this paper’s two hypotheses are not testedbefore in Sweden and can be tested without control groups

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