Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Chronaki, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS). University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece.
    Affective bodying of mathematics, children and difference: choreographing 'sad affects' as affirmative politics in early mathematics teacher education2019In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 319-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper responds to the frequently occurring phenomena of 'sad affects' experienced by student teachers as they confront the logic of 'proper mathematics' with young children of differently abled bodies. The notion of 'proper' entails a normalizing fixity of 'what counts' as mathematics for certain children and fails to recognize mathematics as a sensual encounter amongst bodies. The study draws upon Spinoza's notion of affect to consider the body's capacity to act, and makes the case for choreographing with body-movement, rather than disclosing, the politics involved in becoming teachers. It discusses how affective bodying with mathematics, children and difference in the classroom practice can be not only deconstructed but also reconstructed in affirmative terms, choreographically, as feeling and thinking-in-movement in ways that trouble and perturb the prevailing sharing of the 'sensible' in early childhood mathematics and in teacher education.

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  • 2.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Kollosche, David
    Refusing Mathematics: A discourse theory approach on the politics of identity work2019In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 457-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although many scholars in the field of mathematics education are aware that identity discourses are highly political, research in the field usually lacks a framework theoretically and methodologically to address the political dimension of identity research. Based on Laclau and Mouffe’s discourse theory and the case of a female secondary school student at a German public school, the present paper analyses identity as a socio-political process of identity work articulated around the discourse of ‘refusing school mathematics’ in our contemporary times. Her refusal of mathematics is constituted around issues related to a series of noted classroom practices such as collective work, being together and having fun, relevance of mathematics in society and life, respect of one’s own dignity instead of becoming humiliated, and bodily activity instead of seated work. We illustrate how discourse theory allows us to see the identity work of refusing mathematics as a contingent process in a discursive field of socio-political struggle. In this process the subject moves beyond an essentialist ‘refusal’ of mathemat- ics learning towards articulating her refusal of a particular mathematics education socio-materiality that needs to become subverted and reworked into more affirmative terms.

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  • 3.
    Chronaki, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Planas, Nuria
    Language diversity in mathematics education research: a move from language as representation to politics of representation2018In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 1101-1111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss language diversity in mathematics education research by considering the move from a view of language as representation that strives to correlate concepts, ideas, codes and signs towards addressing the representation politics of language. Language as representation of mathematics has framed the discursive construction of language diversity over the years in published research in our field. We argue that the representation politics of language as grounded in cultural and postcolonial studies enables us to see the meanings attributed to language diversity as resulting from a complex circuit of culture' in the realm of global and local identity politics. Three questions help us in this endeavour: (1) What are assumed as commonly shared meanings about language diversity? (2) How do they become present in prevailing discourses about the languages of mathematics, teachers and learners? (3) How may a view of language diversity as part of the circuit of culture' disturb the normative presence of such assumptions?

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  • 4. Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Lange, Troels
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Riesbeck, Eva
    Wernberg, Anna
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Young children’s multimodal mathematical explanations2014In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 895-909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how three children provided mathematical explanations whilst playing with a set of glass jars in a Swedish preschool. Using the idea of semiotic bundles combined with the work on multimodal interactions, the different semiotic resources used individually and in combinations by the children are described. Given that the children were developing their verbal fluency, it was not surprising to find that they also included physical arrangements of the jars and actions to support their explanations. Hence, to produce their explanations of different attributes such as thin and sameness, the children drew on each other’s gestures and actions with the jars. This research has implications for how the relationship between verbal language and gestures can be viewed in regard to young children’s explanations.

  • 5.
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Back to the future?: Children living in poverty, early childhood centres and mathematics education2014In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 999-1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present call for structured mathematics programmes in preschools continues a trend from the nineteenth century, in which young children's lack of mathematical knowledge was considered to have a detrimental effect on their individual futures and those of the wider society. In this paper, an investigation of the philosophies behind several early childhood programmes shows that there is a long-standing acceptance that those not living in poverty should make decisions about the education, including the mathematics education, that children who are living in poverty should engage in. Consequently, the philosophies behind these programmes, and with them the advocated mathematics education, contribute to a homogenised view of the child. This fails to recognise the attributes that children and their communities have and situates those living in poverty as being deviant. The strong promotion in this century of structured mathematics education programmes is solidifying this homogenising process in a manner not seen in previous early childhood programmes.

  • 6.
    Roos, Helena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Bagger, Anette
    Örebro University & Dalarna University, Örebro and Falun, Sweden.
    Ethical dilemmas and professional judgment as a pathway to inclusion and equity in mathematics teaching2024In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on ethical dilemmas that arise in moments of inclusion and equity in mathematics teaching and how they might be tackled through teachers’ professional judgment. Skovsmose’s inclusive landscapes of investigation approach was used to design the study and to collect teachers’ joint reflections on moments of inclusion and equity in their teaching. Ethical dilemmas and professional judgment were the analytical foci for a qualitative thematic content analysis. Three explorative workshops were held with two teams of teachers from two schools in Sweden. The analysis identified three themes of ethical dilemma, and ways in which these were responded to by teachers’ professional judgment: (1) dilemmas of diversity and acting justly; (2) dilemmas of resources and allocating them fairly; (3) dilemmas of values and recognising diversity. We conclude that mathematics teachers’ professional judgments involve showing bravery, going outside of the norm, negotiating values and duties, listening to the students, and throughout this, engaging in collegial learning in the best interests of the learner.

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  • 7.
    Trinick, Tony
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Meaney, Tamsin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Nature, Environment and Society (NMS).
    Fairhall, Uenuku
    Kura Kaupapa Koutu, Rotorua, New Zealand..
    Teachers learning the registers of mathematics and mathematics education in another language: an exploratory study2014In: ZDM - the International Journal on Mathematics Education, ISSN 1863-9690, E-ISSN 1863-9704, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 953-965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many mathematics teachers around the world teach in a language different from the one in which they studied or completed their teacher education. Often these teachers must learn both the registers of mathematics and of mathematics education to teach in the additional language. This paper examines the factors that help teachers to learn these registers in Maori, the Indigenous language of New Zealand. Many of these teachers are second-language learners of the Maori language and attended Englishmedium schools and teacher-education programmes. After a brief discussion about the key role of language in teaching mathematics, this paper examines data from teachers at two Maori-immersion schools and a professional development facilitator. The analysis provides initial understanding of the factors that support or hinder their learning of the mathematics registers. Finally, a research agenda is suggested for further investigation of this issue.

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