Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Ekelund, Robin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Children, Youth and Society (BUS).
    Historiska ting: att studera tingens roll i bruk av historia2018In: Kulturstudier, E-ISSN 1904-5352, no Nr 1 2018 Temanummer om historiebrug, p. 62-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the significance and role of things and materialities in uses of the past. Taking an ethnographical fieldwork, conducted within the contemporary retro cultural mod scene, and inspiration from Bruno Latour’s Actor-Network-Theory as it’s starting-point, the article reflects upon how scholars interested in uses of the past can study things and materialities as actors in temporal networks. Also, it discusses analytical points that can be gained by this approach. The article argues that ethnographical observations and interviews can be used in tandem in a fruitful way when studying things as actors in uses of the past. Using such an approach, the article illustrates how things can function as an authenticating subcultural capital as well as a cultural substance giving stability to the temporal associations that the contemporary actors strive for. At the same time, things can be regarded as in-authenticating kitsch, which leads the actors to emphasise that the temporal associations with the past actually lies “beyond” material objects. The article thus show that this theoretical interest and methodological approach can reveal things and materialities as having complex and even contradictory roles in uses of the past.

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  • 2.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Lunds universitet.
    The reconfigured body: Human–animal relations in xenotransplantation2011In: Kulturstudier, E-ISSN 1904-5352, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 142-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores issues concerning the reconfiguration of human and animal bodies in modern biotechnology. The examples are based on xenotransplantation: Transplantation of cells, tissue and organs from animals to humans. Three thematic issues that emerged from xenotransplantation research in Sweden in the 1990s and early 2000s are examined in the article. The first issue concerns how the pig was introduced as a donor animal in xenotransplantation and, at the same time, dehumanized in relation to what is human. Baboons and chimpanzees that had previously been used in xenotransplantation now became an ethically problematic choice, and were in stead humanized. The second issue concerns the introduction of transgenic and cloned pigs as commoditized objects. The biotechnological development reconfigured the pig’s cells, tissue and organs to become more human-like. The third issue concerns the risk that pigs contain retrovirus that could infect the transplanted patients. The human body became part of a network of both animal and retrovirus. Boundlessness between human and animal bodies appears in these three thematic phases and is analysed from a cultural perspective.

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  • 3.
    Lindholm, Susan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Individual and Society (IS).
    Creating a ”Latino” artist identity in-between Sweden and Latin America: a comparative approach2015In: Kulturstudier, E-ISSN 1904-5352, no 2, p. 113-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages in a close comparative reading of the creation of a “Latino” artist identity by two Swedish artists – Fredrik FreddeRico Ekelund and Rodrigo Rodde Bernal. By focusing on the theoretical concept of white Swedish masculinity, it aims to deepen the understanding of how such identities are created within and against the background of specific historical contexts and locations.

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  • 4.
    Mellander, Elias
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wiszmeg, Andréa
    University of Lund, Sweden.
    Interfering With Others: Re-configuring Ethnography as a Diffractive Practice2016In: Kulturstudier, E-ISSN 1904-5352, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 93-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay will concern itself with what we – ethnologists or ethnographers by any other name – do. Not primarily “do” in terms of activities we undertake; we interview, we observe, we write, we send emails, we have coffee, we print stacks of paper, we structure administrative chores, we go to meetings, we apply for grants, etc. Rather, we want to address the “do” in terms of what we make, or bring into the world through ethnography. What is it that we through the combination of all of our practices bring into being? What is that bringing into being dependent on? And, how does it influence the world? The first step to addressing these questions is outlining ethnography itself and how we – the authors – choose to articulate it. Articulation, as articulated by Donna Haraway is a process of signifying and of putting things together, letting them be diverse and maybe even in friction with one another and themselves. The concept connotes an on-going indeterminacy. The articulations made in research, we argue, should be allowed to be of a searching quality, as well as being relational and expressive. They should not excuse themselves, neither make greater claims than they can fulfill. They should never be conclusive. 

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    Interfering with others
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