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  • 1.
    Benson, Michael
    et al.
    College of Interdisciplinary Studies, Royal Roads University, Victoria, BC V9B 5Y2, Canada.
    Boda, Chad
    Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, P.O. Box 170, SE-222 70 Lund, Sweden.
    Das, Runa R
    College of Interdisciplinary Studies, Royal Roads University, Victoria, BC V9B 5Y2, Canada.
    King, Leslie
    School of Environment and Sustainability, Royal Roads University, Victoria, BC V9B 5Y2, Canada.
    Park, Chad
    The Co-Operators Group Limited, Guelph, ON N1H 6P8, Canada.
    Sustainable Development and Canada’s Transitioning Energy Systems2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 2213-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An energy transition is unfolding in Canada and across the world. During this transition, countries are facing increasing demands for their energy systems to address economic, social, and environmental considerations, including providing affordable and reliable energy, reducing inequality, and producing fewer environmental impacts. First, we identify key themes from the academic literature related to energy transitions: the systems perspective; economic, social, and environmental considerations; collaboration and dialogue; and social innovation. Second, we focus on a case study of a critical actor in Canada’s energy transition, the Energy Futures Lab (EFL), a social innovation lab that is actively working on the energy transition in Canada. We interviewed members of the EFL design team to investigate and deepen our understanding of the key themes identified in the academic literature. Third, we discuss how our research results relate to innovation and governance in the energy transition in Canada, and we offer an Integrated Model of Sustainable Development (SD) to help manage the common affairs of the energy transition. Fourth, we offer a theoretical contribution, arguing that both the ends and the means should be considered in an energy transition. It is important to keep in mind the overarching objective, or end, of the energy transition (e.g., alignment with the sustainability principles) to create the energy system that the future requires of us. Finally, we offer a practical contribution to show that SD can help inform a collaborative approach, that promotes innovation and increases knowledge, in an effort to address complex sustainability challenges.

  • 2.
    Boda, Chad
    Lund University Center for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS).
    Community as a key word: a heuristic for action-oriented sustainability research2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1-19, article id 2775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I outline the foundations of a consistent and systematic approach to conceptualizing communities in action-oriented sustainability research. More specifically, I develop a conceptual heuristic based on key questions related to ontology, epistemology, methodology and motivation that should be useful for researchers regarding the process of initiating, clarifying and reporting on research with communities. While the use of the community concept in sustainability research is particularly prominent, variability in the possible types of social groupings combined with the concept’s long and complicated etymology in the English language means the community concept lends itself easily to ambiguous and unspecified use. This can lead to problems of both conceptual vagueness and concept-object mismatch in scientific research, which in turn can influence the applicability and efficacy of research outcomes. While problems with community conceptualization are generally recognized, the heuristic developed here contributes by providing researchers with a framework and procedure for addressing these persistent challenges. The heuristic supports the rational and systematic development of a community concept that is sensitive to concrete contextual characteristics, while maintaining roots in a consistent philosophy of scientific knowledge production.

  • 3.
    Boda, Chad S
    et al.
    Lund University Center for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS).
    Faran, Turaj
    Lund University Center for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS).
    Paradigm found? Immanent critique to tackle interdisciplinarity and normativity in science for sustainable development2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 3805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ambition of this two-part article is to argue for immanent critique as a research strategy in sustainability studies. We do this by picking up and developing two central, cross-cutting themes in sustainability research, namely interdisciplinarity and normativity. It is widely suggested that the problem-driven and solution-focused orientation in sustainability studies necessitates interdisciplinarity and an engagement with questions of normativity, each creating problems regarding how science is conducted. For interdisciplinarity, questions remain regarding by what scientific procedure rational (i.e., non-arbitrary) interdisciplinarity can be accomplished. For normativity, it is unclear whether normativity can be addressed scientifically, or only politically; in other words, can normativity be objectively incorporated in sustainability research, and if so, how? Ultimately, the paper asks and answers the following questions: when should a researcher move from one discipline to another in sustainability research and, how do we judge the validity of the normative values that are deemed necessary for sustainability? In Part I, we show the silences, gaps, vagueness and inadequacies of how these themes are currently addressed in sustainability science literature, and from this move to propose immanent critique as a potential strategy for dealing with them in a scientific manner. In Part II, we exemplify our strategy by applying it to re-construct the debate over sustainable development, by far the most prominent topical focus in sustainability science research, producing a novel systematized typology of sustainable development approaches in the process. We conclude with reflections on how this paper amounts to an initial contribution to the construction of a Lakatosian research programme in sustainability studies.

  • 4.
    Caggiani, Leonardo
    et al.
    Polytechnic University of Bari, Italy.
    Camporeale, Rosalia
    Lund University.
    Hamidi, Zahra
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Zhao, Chunli
    Lund University.
    Evaluating the Efficiency of Bike-Sharing Stations with Data Envelopment Analysis2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the efficiency evaluation of bike-sharing systems (BSSs) and develops an approach based on data envelopment analysis (DEA) to support the decisions regarding the performance evaluation of BSS stations. The proposed methodology is applied and tested for the Malmobybike BSS in Malmo, Sweden. This was done by employing spatial analyses and data about the BSS usage trends as well as taking into account transport, land use, and socioeconomic context of the case study. The results of the application demonstrate consistency with the literature and highlight meaningful associations between the station relative efficiency and the urban context. More specifically, the paper provides in-depth knowledge about the preprocessing data, selection of input and output variables, and the underlying analytical approach to be potentially applied to other cases and urban contexts. Overall, the DEA-based methodology presented in this study could assist decision-makers and planners with developing operational strategies for planning and management of BSS stations and networks.

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  • 5.
    Chaaban, Youmen
    et al.
    Qatar Univ, Coll Educ, Educ Res Ctr, Doha 2713, Qatar..
    Du, Xiangyun
    Aalborg Univ, Aalborg UNESCO Ctr PBL, Dept Planning, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Lundberg, Adrian
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah
    Qatar Univ, Coll Educ, Educ Sci Dept, Doha 2713, Qatar..
    Education Stakeholders' Viewpoints about an ESD Competency Framework: Q Methodology Research2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 3, article id 1787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers are considered key drivers of the education for sustainable development (ESD) agenda. They play a critical role in ensuring the attainment of sustainability goals, yet require early opportunities to acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes, which will enable them to foster ESD. Therefore, this study documented the development and evaluation of a framework consisting of the core competencies that pre-service teachers need to achieve ESD in Qatar. Framed by complexity theory, the competency framework was developed into a Q-sample, which was then evaluated by multiple education stakeholders, including teacher educators, professional development specialists, ministry specialists, and teachers. The results of the Q-analysis indicated six diverse viewpoints and revealed a lack of overarching consensus statements among the viewpoints. Several statements were also considered controversial as different participants revealed contrasting views in regard to their importance for pre-service teachers. Implications for practice using the competency framework as a dynamic communication and reflection blueprint for implementing ESD are discussed.

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  • 6.
    Christensen, Jonas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Ekelund, Nils
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Melin, Margareta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Widén, Pär
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    The Beautiful Risk of Collaborative and Interdisciplinary Research. A Challenging Collaborative and Critical Approachtoward Sustainable Learning Processes in Academic Profession2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we aim to identify and explore possibilities and challenges of academicinterdisciplinary capacities and ethos. The objective is that this knowledge could be used both infuture interdisciplinary research projects and in educational settings. We achieve this through selfreflectivelearning processes among a group of interdisciplinary scholars from four distinctly differentsubjects. The method used is an autoethnographic and empirical self-reflective approach to datacollection, analysis and deconstruction of professional learning processes. This also serves to establishresearch methodological trustworthiness and authenticity. The results show that interdisciplinarityis undervalued by grant-giving institutions and the academic system, in general. It also entailstime-consuming and risky research practices. However, interdisciplinary and collaborative researchcreates a more innovative and stimulating learning environment and enforces new ways of thinkingand doing, in ascertaining each individual’s knowledge and competences. We argue that a long-terminterdisciplinary and collaborative research process could enhance and raise a critical thinking andcreative consciousness among scholars, contributing to a more holistic, sustainable and socially robustlearning in research and higher education. Finally, we conclude that this academic interdisciplinarycapacity and ethos could be framed and enhanced by the notion of Challenge-Based Learning.

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  • 7.
    Dabaieh, Marwa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Maguid, Dalya
    Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt.
    El-Mahdy, Deena
    Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt.
    Circularity in the New Gravity—Re-Thinking Vernacular Architecture and Circularity2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mounting climate change crisis and the rapid urbanization of cities have pressured

    many practitioners, policymakers, and even private investors to develop new policies, processes, and methods for achieving more sustainable construction methods. Buildings are considered to be among the main contributors to harmful environmental impacts, resource consumption, and waste generation. The concept of a circular economy (CE), also referred to as “circularity”, has gained a great deal of popularity in recent years. CE, in the context of the building industry, is based on the concept of sustainable construction, which calls for reducing negative environmental impacts while providing a healthier indoor environment and closing material loops. Both vernacular architecture design strategies and circular economy principles share many of the same core concepts. This paper aims at investigating circular economy principles in relation to vernacular architecture principles in the built environment. The study demonstrates how circular principles can be achieved through the use of vernacular construction techniques and using local building materials. This paper will focus on Egypt as one of the oldest civilizations in the world, with a wide vernacular heritage, exploring how circularity is rooted in old vernacular settlements and how it can inspire contemporary circular practices.

  • 8.
    Davidsson, Paul
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Eklund, Ulrik
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Olsson, Carl Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Elis: An Open Platform for Mobile Energy Efficiency Services in Buildings2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent years have witnessed an enormous growth of mobile services for energy management in buildings. However, these solutions are often proprietary, non-interoperable, and handle only a limited function, such as lighting, ventilation, or heating. To address these issues, we have developed an open platform that is an integrated energy management solution for buildings. It includes an ecosystem of mobile services and open APIs as well as protocols for the development of new services and products. Moreover, it has an adapter layer that enables the platform to interoperate with any building management system (BMS) or individual device. Thus, the platform makes it possible for third-party developers to produce mobile energy efficiency applications that will work independently of which BMS and devices are used in the building. To validate the platform, a number of services have been implemented and evaluated in existing buildings. This has been done in cooperation with energy companies and property owners, together with the residents and other users of the buildings. The platform, which we call Elis, has been made available as open source software under an MIT license. View Full-Text

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  • 9.
    Davidsson, Paul
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Hajinasab, Banafsheh
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Holmgren, Johan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Jevinger, Åse
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Persson, Jan A.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS). Malmö högskola, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    The Fourth Wave of Digitalization and Public Transport: Opportunities and Challenges2016In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 12, article id 1248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the opportunities and challenges of the forth wave of digitalization, also referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT), with respect to public transport and how it can support sustainable development of society. Environmental, economical, and social perspectives are considered through analysis of the existing literature and explorative studies. We conclude that there are great opportunities for both transport operators and planners, as well as for the travelers. We describe and analyze a number of concrete opportunities for each of these actors. However, in order to realize these opportunities, there are also a number of challenges that needs to be addressed. There are both technical challenges, such as data collection issues, interoperability, scalability and information security, and non-technical challenges such as business models, usability, privacy issues, and deployment.

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  • 10.
    Du, Xiangyun
    et al.
    Aalborg Univ, Aalborg Ctr Problem Based Learning Engn Sci & Sus, UNESCO Dept Planning, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ, Inst Adv Study PBL, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Guerra, Aida
    Aalborg Univ, Aalborg Ctr Problem Based Learning Engn Sci & Sus, UNESCO Dept Planning, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ, Inst Adv Study PBL, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Norgaard, Bente
    Aalborg Univ, Aalborg Ctr Problem Based Learning Engn Sci & Sus, UNESCO Dept Planning, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ, Inst Adv Study PBL, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Chaaban, Youmen
    Qatar Univ, Coll Educ, Educ Res Ctr, Doha 2713, Qatar..
    Lundberg, Adrian
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL). Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Centre for Teaching and Learning (CAKL).
    Lyngdorf, Niels Erik Ruan
    Aalborg Univ, Aalborg Ctr Problem Based Learning Engn Sci & Sus, UNESCO Dept Planning, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ, Inst Adv Study PBL, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark..
    University Teachers' Change Readiness to Implement Education for Sustainable Development through Participation in a PBL-Based PD Program2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 19, article id 12079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated university teachers' perspectives on their change readiness to implement education for sustainable development (ESD) through their participation in a problem-based learning (PBL) pedagogical development (PD) program. Theoretically, the study connected a systems-thinking approach to change readiness literature and proposed a four-dimensional conceptual framework, including intrapersonal, relational, and environmental dimensions. Q methodology was adopted to collect and analyze data both qualitatively and quantitatively. Four significantly different viewpoints emerged among the 25 participants regarding what they considered most important for their change readiness towards ESD, namely (1) improvement of teaching and learning performance, (2) personal learning and conviction, (3) applying PD learning to practice, and (4) student learning engagement and professional practice. Revealing a complex and interrelated connection between the four dimensions of change readiness, these results also observed university teachers' expression of learning gains and engagement in prospective change. Nevertheless, such change readiness was mainly within their micro teaching practice environment, with little anticipation of commitment to a wider institutional scale of change. Such restrictions on their change readiness were attributed to constrained institutional conditions and supports for long-term improvement. Results of the study suggested that it is essential to facilitate both individual awareness and efforts, as well as institutional readiness for the goal of implementing ESD in higher education (HE). In this regard, both systemic and systematic professional learning activities are recommended.

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  • 11.
    Dytckov, Sergei
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Persson, Jan A.
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Lorig, Fabian
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Davidsson, Paul
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Potential Benefits of Demand Responsive Transport in Rural Areas: A Simulation Study in Lolland, Denmark2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 6, article id 3252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In rural areas with low demand, demand responsive transport (DRT) can provide an alternative to the regular public transport bus lines, which are expensive to operate in such conditions. With simulation, we explore the potential effects of introducing a DRT service that replaces existing bus lines in Lolland municipality in Denmark, assuming that the existing demand remains unchanged. We set up the DRT service in such a way that its service quality (in terms of waiting time and in-vehicle time) is comparable to the replaced buses. The results show that a DRT service can be more cost efficient than regular buses and can produce significantly less CO2 emissions when the demand level is low. Additionally, we analyse the demand density at which regular buses become more cost efficient and explore how the target service quality of a DRT service can affect operational characteristics. Overall, we argue that DRT could be a more sustainable mode of public transport in low demand areas.

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  • 12.
    Ferranti, Emma
    et al.
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Geog Earth & Environm Sci, Birmingham B15 2TT, W Midlands, England..
    Andres, Lauren
    UCL, Bartlett Sch Planning, Cent House,14 Upper Woburn Pl, London WC1H 0NN, England..
    Denoon-Stevens, Stuart Paul
    Univ Free State, Urban & Reg Planning, 205 Nelson Mandela Dr,Pk West, ZA-9301 Bloemfontein, South Africa..
    Melgaco, Lorena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmö University, Institute for Urban Research (IUR).
    Oberling, Daniel
    Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Ctr Integrated Studies Climate Change & Environm, Av Pedro Calmon 550, BR-21941901 Rio De Janeiro, RJ, Brazil..
    Quinn, Andrew
    Univ Birmingham, Birmingham Ctr Railway Res & Educ, Birmingham B15 2TT, W Midlands, England..
    Operational Challenges and Mega Sporting Events Legacy: The Case of BRT Systems in the Global South2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 4, article id 1609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the bus rapid transit (BRT) legacies of mega sporting events (MSEs) held in the Global South cities of Cape Town and Rio de Janeiro. It discusses the extent to which these transport systems have been operationally sustainable, post-MSE; in other words, their ability to be maintained at a certain rate or level and hence their ability to act as public good as planned and according to specific needs. It argues that in both cities, long-term operational challenges have emerged due to conflictual temporalities between the priorities of the MSE and the mid/long term requirements of a transport system, supplemented by a poor spatial contextualisation of BRT design. These include financial viability, providing a service with appropriate frequency and capacity, integration with other transport systems, and resilience to external shocks such as extreme weather. These findings have key academic and policy implications both by opening further areas of research towards MSEs as a tool to deliver sustainable urban transport, and provides important lessons for future MSE hosts and cities considering BRT.

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  • 13.
    Gonzalez-Perez, Alfredo
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Vatteninfo Sverige AB.
    Hagg, Kristofer
    Lund University; Sweden Water Research AB.
    Duteil, Fabrice
    TETRA Chemicals Europe AB.
    Optimizing NOM Removal: Impact of Calcium Chloride2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 11, article id 6338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the character of natural organic matter (NOM) and assessing its impact on water quality is paramount for managers of catchments and water utilities. For drinking-water producers, NOM affects disinfectant demand and the formation of by-products which can have adverse health effects. NOM content in raw waters also has an impact on water treatment processes by increasing required coagulant dosages, reducing the effectiveness of adsorption processes and fouling membrane systems. This study investigated the effects of calcium chloride (CaCl2) as a co-coagulant in Al3+ and Fe3+ assisted coagulation, flocculation and sedimentation processes for NOM-removal from raw water collected from Lake Bolmen, in southern Sweden. Jar tests were conducted at Ringsjo Water Works (WW), a surface water treatment plant (WTP), to investigate the potential reduction in primary coagulants aluminum sulphate (Al-2(SO4)(3)) and ferric chloride (FeCl3). This work shows that CaCl2 can, in certain situations, reduce the need for primary coagulants, which would reduce the environmental impact and costs associated with primary coagulant consumption.

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  • 14.
    Herranen, Jaana
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Chem, Unit Chem Teacher Educ, Helsinki 00014, Finland..
    Yavuzkaya, Merve
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Sjöström, Jesper
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Embedding Chemistry Education into Environmental and Sustainability Education: Development of a Didaktik Model Based on an Eco-Reflexive Approach2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 4, article id 1746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this theoretical paper is to develop and present a didaktik model that embeds chemistry education into Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) using an eco-reflexive approach. A didaktik model is a tool to help educators make decisions and reflect on why, what, how, and/or when to teach. The model presented here is a revised version of the Jegstad and Sinnes model from 2015. It was systematically developed based on a critical analysis of the previous ESD (Education for Sustainable Development)-based model. This process is part of what is called didactic modeling. The revised model consists of the following six categories: (i) socio-philosophical framing; (ii) sustainable schooling and living; (iii) critical views on chemistry's distinctiveness and methodological character; (iv) powerful chemical content knowledge; (v) critical views of chemistry in society; and (vi) eco-reflexivity through environmental and sustainability education. As in the model by Jegstad and Sinnes, the eco-reflexive didaktik model seeks to support chemistry educators in their sustainability-oriented educational planning and analysis, but from a more critical perspective. Based on an eco-reflexive Bildung approach, one additional category-socio-philosophical framing-was added to the revised model. This is because the previous model does not take sufficient account of worldview perspectives, cultural values, and educational philosophy. The eco-reflexive didaktik model is illustrated with boxes, and it is suggested that all categories in these boxes should be considered in holistic and eco-reflexive chemistry education. The purpose of such education is to develop students' ChemoKnowings.

  • 15. Hrelja, Robert
    et al.
    Pettersson, Fredrik
    Westerdahl, Stig
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    The Qualities Needed for a Successful Collaboration: A Contribution to the Conceptual Understanding of Collaboration for Efficient Public Transport2016In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 542Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The creation of an efficient public transport system requires collaborations between formal independent organizations. This paper examines collaborations between public and private organizations and passengers, with the aim of contributing to the conceptual understanding of collaborations on public transport. The study begins by describing previous research on collaboration in the public transport area and in other research fields analytically relevant for public transport. Accordingly, collaboration is defined as an attempt to overcome problems with collective action and to transform a situation in which the various organizations operate independently into a situation where they act in concert to achieve shared objectives. The collaboration process involves the establishment of joint rules and structures that govern the relationship and behavior of the organizations. According to this definition, collaboration is a more sophisticated form of collective action than is indicated by terms such as “co-operation” or “coordination”. Fully-functioning collaboration can be described as a form of “co-action”, as opposed to “individual action”. In co-action, formal independent organizations together reap the benefits of working together and achieve more than if they had acted alone. Co-action can be regarded as a gradual trust-building process that requires qualities such as mutual confidence, an understanding of other organizations’ motivations, and joint problem formulation.

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  • 16.
    Irastorza, Nahikari
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Skilled Migrants in the Swedish Labour Market: An Analysis of Employment, Income and Occupational Status2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 6, article id 3428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a globalised world with an increasing division of labour, the competition for highly skilled individuals-regardless of their origin-is growing, as is the value of such individuals for national economies. Yet the majority of studies analysing the economic integration of immigrants shows that those who are highly skilled also have substantial hurdles to overcome: their employment rates and salaries are lower and they face a higher education-to-occupation mismatch compared to highly skilled natives. This paper contributes to the paucity of studies on the employment patterns of highly skilled immigrants to Sweden by providing an overview of the socio-demographic characteristics, labour-market participation and occupational mobility of highly educated migrants in Sweden. Based on a statistical analysis of register data, we compare their employment rates, salaries and occupational skill level and mobility to those of immigrants with lower education and with natives. The descriptive analysis of the data shows that, while highly skilled immigrants perform better than those with a lower educational level, they never catch up with their native counterparts. Our regression analyses confirm these patterns for highly skilled migrants. Furthermore, we find that reasons for migration matter for highly skilled migrants' employment outcomes, with labour migrants having better employment rates, income and qualification-matched employment than family reunion migrants and refugees.

  • 17.
    Jevinger, Åse
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Persson, Jan A.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    Potentials of Context-Aware Travel Support during Unplanned Public Transport Disturbances2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Travel support for public transport today usually takes no or little account of the traveler’s personal needs and current context. Thereby, travelers are often suggested irrelevant travel plans, which may force them to search for information from other sources. In particular, this is a problem during unplanned disturbances. By incorporating the traveler’s context information into the travel support, travelers could be provided with individually tailored information. This would especially benefit travelers who find it more difficult than others to navigate the public transport system. Furthermore, it might raise the accessibility and general attractiveness of public transport. This paper contributes with an understanding of how information about the traveler’s context can enhance the support provided by travel planners, in the case of disturbances in public transport. In particular, the paper includes a high-level analysis of how and in which situations context information can be useful. The analysis shows how information about the traveler’s context can improve travel planners, as well as highlights some risks in relation to some identified scenarios. Several technologies for retrieving information about the physical context of the traveler are also identified. The study is based on a literature review, a workshop, and interviews with domain experts.

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  • 18.
    Liu, Ju
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Bengtsson, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Uppsala Univ, Inst Housing & Urban Res, SE-20506 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bohman, Helena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmo Univ, Dept Urban Studies, SE-20506 Malmo, Sweden..
    Staffansson Pauli, Karin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    A System Model and An Innovation Approach toward Sustainable Housing Renovation2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 1130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Housing renovation is a common concern to owners, tenants and to society at large. In addition to the high economic costs, the implementation of housing renovation usually have a long-term impact on the society and the built environment. This is a theoretical paper that develops a system model for understanding sustainable housing renovation as a system phenomenon which has multiple sustainability goals, complicated dynamic processes, diverse actors, and a sophisticated institutional environment. It identifies the key challenges of a sustainable housing renovation system, namely the conflicting sustainability goals and the conflicting stakeholder interests. To address these two challenges, the paper suggests an innovation approach in which the process of innovation (linear versus organic) and the typology of innovation (product versus process and business versus social) toward sustainable housing renovation are discussed.

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  • 19.
    Marcelino, Leonardo
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Sjöström, Jesper
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Marques, Carlos Alberto
    Socio-problematization of green chemistry: enriching systems thinking and social sustainability by education2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, article id 7123Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current research on systems thinking criticizes the additive nature of green chemistry (GC) not being supportive of systems thinking to achieve holism in its practices. This paper argues that systems thinking should comprise of the social issues, and, therefore, it studies renowned papers by GC pioneers and reviews on the field regarding how they address the social dimension of sustainability. It points out how GC has ignored social sustainability in its discourses, practices, and evaluations, leading to a reductionist interpretation of sustainability. Then, this paper presents some challenges to be overcome in order to achieve balanced sustainability. A systemic chemical thinking is advocated, considering chemistry in culture and chemistry as culture, expanding the chemistry rationality from ontological and technological dimensions into the epistemological and ethical ones. It is then discussed how chemistry education can help to promote sustainability in a broad and systemic way.

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  • 20.
    Nordén, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Avery, Helen
    South/North Perspectives on Global Learning for Sustainable Development2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 11/11Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This call for a Special Issue aims to present perspectives from all continents on what Global Learning for Sustainable Development can be today, and what it could mean for the future of our planet. When the term was originally coined ten years ago, the intention was to underline that cooperation and intelligent action is needed on a global scale, to resolve the serious environmental threats our modes of production have resulted in. Global action is also necessary to address famine, war, forced displacement or population explosion. Unfortunately, despite several international conferences and significant agreements, we can see that sustainable development is still interpreted as continuing on a path of unrestrained economic expansion. Education for sustainability in schools or universities is still very far from transforming societies or enabling transitions to sustainability. The question is therefore what can global learning mean, if our aim is not only to achieve incremental improvements, but to reverse current trends before we cross even more tipping points? How can we define truly sustainable development, while seriously considering both economic and technological implications? How can we as societies organize our learning for transitions to sustainability, within and outside existing formal education systems?

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  • 21.
    Rye, Tom
    et al.
    Molde University College.
    Hrelja, Robert
    Malmö University, Institute for Urban Research (IUR). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). K2 (The Swedish Knowledge Centre for Public Transport).
    Policies for Reducing Car Traffic and Their Problematisation: Lessons from the Mobility Strategies of British, Dutch, German and Swedish Cities2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 19, article id 8170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the paper is to explore whether particular problematisations of cars and car use lead to sets of solutions that may not deal with all problems associated with car use, and whether this leads to any internal conflicts within the chosen policies. The paper is based on a review of local transport policy documents from 13 cities in four countries using the lens of policy problematization as an analytical framework. The paper finds that the problems most typically highlighted in the strategies reviewed are poor accessibility (as a “bad” in itself, but also because it is seen to compromise economic growth); the negative impacts of tra_c on liveability of the central part of the city and therefore its ability to attract inhabitants, especially those needed to support a knowledge economy; local air and noise pollution; and road safety. The resulting visions are for urban areas less dominated by private cars, with more green and public space, in order to maximise accessibility and liveability to attract economic development; and most cities also seek to reduce car travel as a proportion of trips. However, in many cities this vision covers mainly the central city, with car use set to remain dominant in outer cities and for regional trips. In almost all cities, only one measure, parking management, is proposed as a means of cutting car use. The differing sets of measures envisaged for outer areas of cities threatens to undermine those envisaged for more central cities.

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  • 22.
    Sonesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Nordén, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    We Learnt a Lot: Challenges and Learning Experiences in a Southern African—North European Municipal Partnership on Education for Sustainable Development.2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 20, article id 8607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates a reciprocal partnership between two cities in Namibia and Sweden to deepen the understanding of challenges and learning outcomes in a project on education for sustainable development. Since 2008, two municipalities have developed a strong partnership via The Municipal Partnership Programme at the Swedish International Centre for Local Democracy. Municipal partnerships are results-oriented collaborations in joint projects on sustainability. The purpose is to describe how eight team members in the mutual South-North project, by addressing similar problems in different contexts, experienced challenges in the implementation of the project plan, solutions and learning processes. Semi-structured interviews were conducted at the end of the second project year. Transcripts and field notes were analysed using a phenomenographic approach and contextual analysis. Five main categories of description based on collective statements and three dimensions of learning were recognised in the research data. The analysis identifies strategies for critical knowledge formation and capability building to support mutual learning in South-North Municipal Partnerships. The concluding discussion spots the learning dimensions—how sharing experiences by justifying non-formal and transformational learning promotes organisations’ readiness for knowledge formation by conducting mutual global learning towards sustainable development goals.

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  • 23.
    Staffansson Pauli, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Liu, Ju
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmo Univ, Dept Urban Studies, S-20506 Malmo, Sweden..
    Bengtsson, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Malmo Univ, Dept Urban Studies, S-20506 Malmo, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Inst Housing & Urban Res, Box 514, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sustainable Strategy in Housing Renovation: Moving from a Technology-and-Engineering-Focused Model to a User-Oriented Model2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Housing renovation, in contrast to new construction projects, has to take good care of the tenants who are already living in the building. What are the theoretical and practical implications concerning the transformation from a technology-and-engineering-focused renovation approach to a more user-oriented one? What are the mechanisms of strategy change? Based on our case we argue that the mechanisms of strategy change are based on the interplay between external disturbance and internal renewal. External disturbance is the trigger of strategy change, but it does not, in itself, necessarily lead to strategy change, and particularly not for an innovative new strategy. The internal new competence is the source of changing from an old strategy to an innovative new strategy. The real estate industry needs to undergo a transformation from the rationalistic technology- and engineering-focused renovation model (TEF model) to a more inclusive approach. We suggest a user-oriented model (UO model) where user involvement is seen as integrated in the whole process of renovation.

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  • 24.
    Stjernborg, Vanessa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Accessibility for All in Public Transport and the Overlooked (Social) Dimensionm: A Case Study of Stockholm2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no Special Issue Accessibility and Transportation Equity, article id 4902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden was early to develop legislation related to accessible public transport for disabled people in 1979 and can therefore be seen as a forerunner. However, recent findings reveal widespread barriers in the Swedish public transport system and large variations between different parts of the country. This paper draws on empirical material consisting of complaints regarding accessibility left by travellers in Stockholm to a local transit company and aims to provide an overview of the character of complaints and to identify common themes through a qualitative content analysis. The results show that the most commonly reported challenge relates to boarding or getting off the vehicles, where the drivers are mostly described as the underlying reason for those difficulties. The narratives describe how some drivers misuse (or do not use) the accessibility equipment or show an abusive or attitudinal behaviour. The results support the body of literature on the meaning of continuous work with accessibility issues in public transport. Varying views on disability may have had a substantial impact on the development of our societies and on how the issues of accessibility in the public transport system have been prioritised or handled. Thus, this study highlights existing social barriers and variations in individual capacities as important factors that influence the experiences of public transport users. The study recommends an increased focus on educating drivers and staff about how to accommodate different groups of travellers. The study also recommends that transport providers consider drivers’ working conditions (i.e., with the consideration of timetables and high time-pressure). Further research on how well accessibility adaptations in public transport actually work and how the users perceive them is necessary.

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  • 25.
    Stjernborg, Vanessa
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Mattisson, Ola
    The Role of Public Transport in Society: A Case Study of General Policy Documents in Sweden2016In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to study how local governments in Sweden view the role of public transport in society, and to investigate how public transport is used in a strategic capacity. By studying general policy documents, the ambition is to gain a wider understanding of the role of public transport based on the societal context it is situated in. Documents from 15 regions and 27 municipalities have been analysed by a qualitative content analysis. Results show that public transport is regarded as an important factor towards achieving other goals and other public values, particularly those related to economic and environmental issues; and that the social dimension is not as prioritised. Rail-bound public transport is often advocated, as are collaboration between organizations and integrated land-use and transport planning. However, the studied documents showed large overall differences in how counties and municipalities address public transport issues. It should be a priority in Sweden’s main steering documents to treat public transport consistently and give it the same priority as other societal functions—not least because Sweden’s treatment of public transport is a reasonable reflection of its overall society and can influence prioritisations and considerations in counties and municipalities across the country.

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  • 26.
    Sundström, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Lundberg, Christine
    University of Stavanger.
    Ziakas, Vassilios
    Independent Researcher.
    Episodic Retail Settings: A Sustainable and Adaptive Strategy for City Centre Stores2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fact that an already damaged retail industry is being challenged by a pandemic makes the industry’s survival a matter of urban resilience. Sustainable and adaptive strategies are needed to reverse the negative development of the retail sector, and in this conceptual paper, a new perspective is suggested based on episodic retail settings. Such a perspective can increase a physical store’s attraction and may serve as a flexible operation strategy for urban retailers and give added value to urban consumers as they shape an ongoing dramatological discourse and facilitate social interaction in a way that traditional fixed-store formats are unable to compete with. By applying the scientific circle of enquiry (SCE), the authors develop an interdisciplinary perspective cutting across the sustainability, service science, and urban studies fields. On this ground, they present a set of conceptual premises and a tripartite conceptual framework delineating how to effectively design episodic retail settings that are adaptive and sustainable. The paper concludes with suggestions for research questions to further advance this field of study.

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    Episodic Retail Settings: A Sustainable and Adaptive Strategy for City Centre Stores
  • 27.
    Vincevica-Gaile, Zane
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Science, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Teppand, Tonis
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Kriipsalu, Mait
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Krievans, Maris
    Department of Geology, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Jani, Yahya
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Klavins, Maris
    Department of Environmental Science, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Setyobudi, Roy
    Department of Agriculture Science, University of Muhammadiyah Malang, Malang 65145, Indonesia.
    Grinfelde, Inga
    Scientific Laboratory of Forest and Water Resources, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia.
    Rudovica, Vita
    Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Latvia, LV-1004 Riga, Latvia.
    Tamm, Toomas
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Shanskiy, Merrit
    Chair of Soil Science, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Saaremae, Egle
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Zekker, Ivar
    Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Chair of Rural Building and Water Management, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Towards Sustainable Soil Stabilization in Peatlands: Secondary Raw Materials as an Alternative2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, p. 1-26, article id 6726Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation of construction works on weak (e.g., compressible, collapsible, expansive)soils such as peatlands often is limited by logistics of equipment and shortage of available andapplicable materials. If preloading or floating roads on geogrid reinforcement or piled embankmentscannot be implemented, then soil stabilization is needed. Sustainable soil stabilization in anenvironmentally friendly way is recommended instead of applying known conventional methodssuch as pure cementing or excavation and a single replacement of soils. Substitution of conventionalmaterial (cement) and primary raw material (lime) with secondary raw material (waste and byproductsfrom industries) corresponds to the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations,preserves resources, saves energy, and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Besides traditional materialusage, soil stabilization is achievable through various secondary raw materials (listed accordingto their groups and subgroups): 1. thermally treated waste products: 1.1. ashes from agricultureproduction; 1.2. ashes from energy production; 1.3. ashes from various manufacturing; 1.4. ashesfrom waste processing; 1.5. high carbon content pyrolysis products; 2. untreated waste and newproducts made from secondary raw materials: 2.1. waste from municipal waste biological treatmentand landfills; 2.2. waste from industries; 3. new products made from secondary raw materials:3.1. composite materials. Efficient solutions in environmental engineering may eliminate excessiveamounts of waste and support innovation in the circular economy for sustainable future.

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