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  • 1.
    Andersson, Pia
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Ingalill R
    Centre for Caring Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Renvert, Stefan
    Kristianstad University, Department of Health Sciences, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Comparison of oral health status on admission and at discharge in a group of geriatric rehabilitation patients2003In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 221-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to compare oral health status on a geriatric rehabilitation ward among patients who were assessed using the Revised Oral Assessment Guide (ROAG) on admission and at discharge; and to investigate in what respect the oral health procedures (OHP) suggested in ROAG were applied when oral health problems were detected.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Registered nurses on the ward performed oral health assessments using ROAG with 107 patients on admission and at discharge. When oral health problems were detected measures to be taken were suggested using ROAG.

    RESULTS: Oral health problems were common among the patients on admission (86%), as well as at discharge (51%). The frequency of the problems was significantly lower at discharge compared to admission. The OHP that were recommended in ROAG were completely followed when saliva flow-related problems were detected. Regarding other oral health problems, measures other than the recommended ones were often performed.

    CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that the oral health was better at the end of the hospital stay compared to admission.

  • 2.
    Bertl, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Med Univ Vienna, Sch Dent, Div Oral Surg, Vienna, Austria.
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Oral Health & Cancer Patients: In need of preventive dentistry interventions2017In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 205-206Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bruckmann, Corinna
    et al.
    University Clinic of Dentistry Medical University Vienna, Austria.
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Diabetes: why should the dental team bother?2018In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 481-481Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Diogo Löfgren, Christina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Isberg, Per-Erik
    Lund Univ, Dept Stat, Lund, Sweden.
    Christersson, Cecilia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Screening for Oral Dryness in Relation to Salivary Flow Rate Addresses the Need for Functional Tests of Saliva2010In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 243-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to assess the occurrence of reported subjective oral dryness in relation to objective sialometric values in a randomly selected group and a dental care seeking group. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire assessing subjective oral dryness was sent out to a randomly selected sample of 200 individuals. The dental care seeking group was recruited from among patients attending the Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University. A total of 200 patients were asked to participate in the present study. In total, of 312 individuals (78%) who completed the survey, 157 agreed to participate in the complementary clinical examination that included measures of salivary flow rate. Results: The reported subjective oral dryness was 20% and 28.6% for the randomly selected group and the dental care seeking group, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between the two study populations with regard to percentage of reported subjective oral dryness, and stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates (P > 0.05). In the dental care seeking group, individuals reporting subjective oral dryness presented ‘a small degree of abrasion in the dentine in the incisor region’ to a greater extent (P < 0.05). No statistically significant association between subjective oral dryness and unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates was found in either of the studied populations (P > 0.05). Individuals identified with subjective or objective oral dryness presented to a greater extent a history of oral rehabilitation compared to individuals who showed no indication of oral dryness. Conclusions: No association between sialometric measures and subjective report of oral dryness was found in the present study.

  • 5.
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Minimally invasive dentistry2003In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 91-92Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    What is Minimally Invasive Dentistry?2004In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 2, no Suppl 1, p. 287-292Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Minimally Invasive Dentistry is the application of "a systematic respect for the original tissue." This implies that the dental profession recognizes that an artifact is of less biological value than the original healthy tissue. Minimally invasive dentistry is a concept that can embrace all aspects of the profession. The common delineator is tissue preservation, preferably by preventing disease from occurring and intercepting its progress, but also removing and replacing with as little tissue loss as possible. It does not suggest that we make small fillings to restore incipient lesions or surgically remove impacted third molars without symptoms as routine procedures. The introduction of predictable adhesive technologies has led to a giant leap in interest in minimally invasive dentistry. The concept bridges the traditional gap between prevention and surgical procedures, which is just what dentistry needs today. The evidence-base for survival of restorations clearly indicates that restoring teeth is a temporary palliative measure that is doomed to fail if the disease that caused the condition is not addressed properly. Today, the means, motives and opportunities for minimally invasive dentistry are at hand, but incentives are definitely lacking. Patients and third parties seem to be convinced that the only things that count are replacements. Namely, they are prepared to pay for a filling but not for a procedure that can help avoid having one.

  • 7.
    Ericson, Dan
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Kidd, E
    McComb, D
    Mjör, I
    Noack, M
    Minimally invasive dentistry: concepts and techniques in cariology2003In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 59-72Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept ‘Minimally Invasive Dentistry’ can be defined as maximal preservation of healthy dental structures. Within cariology, this concept includes the use of all available information and techniques ranging from accurate diagnosis of caries, caries risk assessment and prevention, to technical procedures in repairing restorations. Dentists are currently spending more than half their time replacing old restorations. The main reasons for restoration failures are secondary caries and fractures, factors that are generally not addressed in the technical process of replacing a restoration. Prevailing concepts on minimally invasive dentistry seem to be ‘product or technique-motivated’, challenging one technique or product with another, rather than focusing on a general concept. New knowledge of caries progression rates has also led to substantial modification of restorative intervention thresholds and further handling of the disease. New diagnostic tools for caries lesion detection, caries risk assessment and focused preventive treatments have decreased the need for early restorative interventions. In parallel to this, new techniques for cutting teeth and removing decay have evolved. This paper focuses on describing minimally invasive dentistry in cariology from a conceptual perspective, relating to clinical caries diagnosis, restorative intervention thresholds and operative procedures, with special reference to survival of tunnel and slot restorations and to repair vs. replacement of defective restorations.

  • 8.
    Furundzic, Kristina
    et al.
    SkSne County Public Dental Service, MalmO, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Joy
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Skåne County Public Dental Service, Trelleborg, Sweden.
    Sandström, Boel
    Department of Health, Bleklnge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Why Do Adolescents Use Fluoride Toothpaste?: A Qualitative Interview Investigation2020In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 441-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Fluoride toothpastes are effective in caries prevention. In legislation, regular fluoride toothpaste is a cosmetic product; adolescents use it for aesthetic purposes. In dentistry, fluoride toothpaste is considered a caries preventive drug recommended to patients for that reason. Knowledge is lacking concerning what motivates adolescents to use fluoride toothpaste. Dental professionals need to understand how to motivate a risk-group for caries development to use fluoride toothpaste frequently in order to effectively motivate patients to prevent tooth decay. The purpose of this study was to investigate what motivates adolescents to use fluoride toothpaste. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted at a high school in southern Sweden. The final sample consisted of 16 adolescents age 16 to 19. This study employed a qualitative design using semi-structured interviews. The data were analysed using manifest content analysis with an occasional inductive approach. Results: Reasons for why adolescents use fluoride toothpaste were found in four different categories: oral health, economy, upbringing and habit, social influences. Conclusion: There are reasons to believe that dental professionals might have missed important arguments for why adolescents use fluoride toothpaste. The participants mentioned oral health and aesthetics as important reasons for using fluoride toothpaste, as well as other more surprising factors such as financial reasons and social environment. There are thus more arguments for using fluoride toothpaste that adolescents value than the ones we believe dental professionals use.

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  • 9. Hedenbjörk Lager, Anders
    et al.
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Aciduric Bacterial Communities at Three Levels in Dentin Caries2013In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 359-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Dentin caries constitute a complex ecosystem with a diverse microbiota adapted to fluctuations in nutrient concentration and acidity. However, knowledge about the acid tolerant microbiota at different levels in the lesion is rather poor. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the acid tolerant microflora at different levels in established dentin caries lesions using solid pH-selective media. Materials and Methods: Primary dentin caries lesions were sampled with a bur at three levels (superficial, centre and the clinically caries-free floor of the lesion) in 10 patients. Samples were incubated on pH-neutral and pH-selective (pH 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5) agars. Numbers of colony-forming units (cfu) were determined and colonies were subsequently characterised morphologically and isolated. Results: The total number of bacteria in the carious lesions, recovered using blood agar (BA), ranged from 5.88 x 103 to 5.85 x 105 (median 2.64 x 105; range 5.80 x 105) and numbers of recovered bacteria decreased with decreasing agar pH. Fewer bacteria were found in the clinically caries-free dentin (P = 0.042), but the mean number of cfu (BA) was still 5.88 x 103 in those samples. Conclusion: Each of the 10 investigated dentin caries lesions harboured a unique microbial flora, indicating that various combinations of aciduric bacteria can colonise, survive in and probably propagate dentin caries. Solid pH-selective agars can be used successfully to select acid-tolerant microorganisms in dentin caries lesions. This could be used to describe this subset of the total microbiome from a phenotypic point of view, an objective that cannot be accomplished using molecular methods.

  • 10.
    Kloukos, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Univ Bern, Sch Dent Med, Dept Orthodont & Dentofacial Orthoped, Bern, Switzerland.;251 Hellen Air Force & VA Gen Hosp, Dept Orthodont & Dentofacial Orthoped, Athens, Greece..
    Kakali, Lydia
    251 Hellen Air Force & VA Gen Hosp, Dept Orthodont & Dentofacial Orthoped, Athens, Greece..
    Koukos, George
    251 Hellen Air Force & VA Gen Hosp, Dept Periodontol, Athens, Greece..
    Sculean, Anton
    Univ Bern, Sch Dent Med, Dept Periodontol, Bern, Switzerland..
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Katsaros, Christos
    Univ Bern, Sch Dent Med, Dept Orthodont & Dentofacial Orthoped, Bern, Switzerland..
    Gingival Thickness Assessment at Mandibular Incisors of Orthodontic Patients with Ultrasound and Cone-beam CT: A Cross-sectional Study2021In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 263-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To use and evaluate two methods for measuring gingival thickness (GT) at mandibular incisors of orthodontic patients and compare their performance in assessing periodontal anatomy through soft tissue thickness. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 40 consecutive adult orthodontic patients. GT was measured just before bracket placement at both central mandibular incisors, mid-facially on the buccal aspect, 2 mm apically to the free gingival margin with two methods: clinically with an ultrasound device (USD) and radiographically with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Results: CBCT measurements were consistently higher than USD measurements, with the difference ranging from 0.13 mm to 0.21 mm. No statistically significant difference was noted between the repeated CBCT measurements at the right central incisor (bias = 0.05 mm; 95% CI =-0.01, 0.11; p = 0.104). Although the respective results for the left incisor statistically indicated that the measurements were not exactly replicated, the magnitude of the point estimate was small and not clinically significant (bias = 0.06 mm; 95% CI = 0.01, 0.11; p = 0.014). Small differences between CBCT measurements made by the 2 examiners at the left central incisor (bias = 0.06 mm; 95% CI = 0.01, 0.11; p = 0.014) were detected. However, this difference was minor and also not clinically significant. The respective analysis on the right incisor showed no statistically significant difference (bias = 0.05 mm; 95% CI =-0.01, 0.11; p = 0.246). Conclusions: Based on reproducibility, CBCT imaging for gingival thickness assessment proved to be as reliable as ultrasound determination. However, CBCT consistently yielded higher values, albeit at a marginal level, than did the ultrasound device.

  • 11.
    Mattheos, Nikos
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Periodontology and Fixed Prosthodontics, Dental Faculty, Bern University, Switzerland.
    Attström, Rolf
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Periodontology and Fixed Prosthodontics, Dental Faculty, Bern University, Switzerland.
    Fundak, Angela
    Oral B Laboratories, Gillette International, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Knutsson, Kerstin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Padrutt, Susan
    CEFOPS - School of Dental Hygiene, Geneve, Switzerland.
    Polychronopoulou, Argy
    Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Dental Faculty, University of Athens, Greece.
    Scoonheim-Klein, Meta
    Department of Periodontology, ACTA, Netherlands.
    Saxer, Ulrich Peter
    Prophylaxe Zentrum Zürich, Switzerland.
    Assessing behavioural change support abilities of the oral healthcare team2006In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 71-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Competent behavioural change intervention can be learned, practised and developed. Therefore, the teaching and assessment of this ability should be within the scope of both the undergraduate and post-graduate curriculum. Assessment should target knowledge base and skills in the areas of counselling, communication and behaviour. Assessment of the knowledge base should ideally be conducted in a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, centrally based manner in the pre-clinical curriculum. Assessment of skills in the areas of communication, counselling and behaviour change is a wider aim that should be integral throughout the curriculum. In continuing education (CE) environments, an initial 'screening' assessment would help educators to adjust the course to the participants' background and needs. Furthermore, three major assessment schemes are proposed: (1) assessment of knowledge and skills, (2) evaluation of the whole course by the participants, and (3) assessment of the implementation process, four to six months after completion.

  • 12.
    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Götrick, Bengt
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Hallström, Hadar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Knutsson, Kerstin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Assessment of Prognosis and Periodontal Treatment Goals Among General Dental Practitioners and Dental Hygienists2016In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 433-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate general dental practitioners' (GDPs) and dental hygienists' (DHs) assessment of prognosis, suggested treatment goals, and estimated number of treatment sessions in patients with varying severity of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven GDPs and fifty DHs in a Swedish county participated in a questionnaire study, based on three patient cases: a patient with generalised bone loss but no clinical signs of inflammation (well-maintained); a patient with clinical signs of inflammation and generalised bone loss (periodontitis); and a patient with clinical signs of inflammation but no bone loss (gingivitis). In open-ended questions, the clinicians assessed the prognosis in case of no treatment and proposed treatment goals. Furthermore, based on given fixed-alternative options, they estimated the number of treatment sessions needed for successful management of the condition. Results: Based on a response rate of 94%, the majority of clinicians expected a worsening of the periodontal condition in all three patients (well-maintained: 80%; periodontitis: 94%; gingivitis: 60%). The most common treatment goal in all 3 cases was to improve oral health awareness. The majority of clinicians estimated that the periodontitis case needed slightly more treatment sessions (mean: 3.04, 95% CI: 2.83-3.24) compared to the gingivitis (mean: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.75-2.11) or well-maintained patient case (mean: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.60-2.07). Conclusions: The majority of included clinicians did not perform an individualised risk assessment and did not individually match the number of appointments to the actual periodontal treatment needs of the patient. This may result in overtreatment in some cases and in undertreatment in others, and possibly in suboptimal use of resources.

  • 13.
    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bertl, Kristina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Division of Oral Surgery, School of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Sensengasse 2a, Vienna, A-1090, Austria.
    Götrick, Bengt
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Diagnostic Judgement and Treatment Decisions in Periodontology by Periodontists and General Dental Practitioners in Sweden: A Questionnaire-based Study2019In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 329-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate if periodontists are coherent in their judgement and treatment decisions of patients with different periodontal conditions, and to compare them with general dental practitioners' (GDPs) findings. Materials and Methods: Eighty-six periodontists participated in a questionnaire study based on four patient cases: (a) generalised bone loss but minimal signs of inflammation (well-maintained); (b) generalised bone loss and signs of inflammation (periodontitis); (c) negligible bone loss and minimal signs of inflammation (healthy); and (d) negligible bone loss but with signs of inflammation (gingivitis). Periodontists had the option to judge each patient as healthy or diseased, propose a diagnosis, evaluate treatment needs, propose a treatment plan and assess the prognosis. Comparison between periodontists considered: (a) level of experience and (b) judgement of each patient case as healthy or diseased. Periodontists were additionally compared to a previous sample of GDPs (n = 74). Results: Periodontists' response rate was 77%. The diagnostic judgement of the four patient cases showed rather large variation both among periodontists and GDPs. Periodontists' intention to treat and prognostic assessment depended on their judgement of each patient, as healthy or diseased (p < 0.05). GDPs intended to treat three out of four patient cases (except periodontitis case) more often and were more pessimistic in their prognostic assessment of patients with negligible bone loss (p < 0.05), comparing to periodontists. Conclusions: Both periodontists and GDPs are defining periodontal health and disease differently, which affects treatment decisions and prognostic assessment. There is a need to define periodontal health and disease more precisely, in order to improve coherence in judgement.

  • 14.
    Rafat, Sonja
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Alfred Nobels Alle 8,Plan 7, SE-14152 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Tessma, Mesfin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth LIME, Solna, Sweden.
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Alfred Nobels Alle 8,Plan 7, SE-14152 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Borg, Stefan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Solna, Sweden.
    De Palma, Patricia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Alfred Nobels Alle 8,Plan 7, SE-14152 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Oral Health Among Swedish Patients with Substance Use Disorders: A Comparative, Cross-Sectional Study2020In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 229-237, article id PMID 32618447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explored the oral health of individuals with substance use disorders and examined the relationship between oral health and type and number of years of substance use disorder. Materials and Methods: This comparative cross-sectional study comprised patients with one of four groups of substance use disorders - alcohol, cannabis, central nervous system stimulants (CNSS), and opiates. All participants underwent a dental examination and were included in the study based on their clinical findings. Results: Of 95 participants, 79 (83%) were male and 37 (39%) were homeless. Statistically significant difference between the groups was observed in 6-12-mm periodontal pocket depths (p <0.05), as were differences in oral mucosal changes (p <0.001). Statistically significantly lower proportions were observed in the cannabis group for Mob G:0 and Mob G:1 and Furcation G:1 compared to the CNSS and opiate groups; the proportion of Furcation G:0 was significantly lower in the alcohol group compared to the cannabis group. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed statistically significant between-group differences in age, number of years of substance use disorder, number of teeth. and decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT). When controlling for age and gender, substance type was found to be a statistically significant predictor of number of teeth (B = -4.4: 95% CI: -8.1 to -0.38; p = 0.03) and DMFT (B = 2.1; 95% CI: 0.86 to 3.3; p = 0.001). Conclusions: These results indicate poor oral health among individuals with substance use disorders. It seems that oral health problems are lower among abusers of cannabis than of CNSS, alcohol and opiates.

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  • 15.
    Sjödin, Torgny
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Biosurface AB, Malmö, Sweden.
    Movert, Rolf
    Biosurface AB, Malmö, Sweden.
    Åström, Mikael
    StatCons, Malmö, Sweden.
    Reduced Use of Antibiotics and Nasal Decongestants During Treatment with a Mouthwash Containing Delmopinol.2023In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 347-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the use of concomitant medication in combination with a mouthwash of delmopinol HCl 0.2% based on data from 8 phase III efficacy studies on the mouthwash.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical data obtained from 8 previously performed phase III studies, carried out to document the clinical efficacy of a mouthwash of delmopinol HCl 0.2% with respect plaque and gingivitis, were used to analyse the use of concomitant medication. In these 8 randomised double-blind clinical phase III studies the patients were - in addition to their normal oral hygiene measures - treated for 2-6 months with mouthwashes containing delmopinol HCl 0.2%, delmopinol HCl 0.1%, chlorhexidine digluconate 0.2% or placebo. The number of visits in each study was three. Each time the patients visited the dentist for efficacy determinations, other data were also recorded. One of these was whether the patient had used any other medication during the study. In this paper, the number of treatments of different types of concomitant medication (antibiotics, nasal decongestants and others) was used as a basis for statistical comparisons between the different test groups.

    RESULTS: For antibiotics (all indications), a 27% lower number of treatments was obtained in the delmopinol 0.2% group in comparison with the placebo group, and a 41% decrease was observed for treatments with antibiotics for respiratory infections. For nasal decongestants, the number of treatments was 53% lower in the delmopinol 0.2% group.

    CONCLUSIONS: The delmopinol HCl 0.2% solution in patients with gingivitis provided a statistically significant reduction of concomitant use of antibiotics and nasal decongestants.

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  • 16. Tayanin, Gisela Ladda
    et al.
    Hänsel Petersson, Gunnel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bratthall, Douglas
    Caries risk profiles of 12-13-year-old children in Laos and Sweden2005In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To analyse caries risk factors of 12-13-year-old children living in Laos, using the computer program Cariogram to illustrate the caries risk profile. In addition, to compare the results with a study performed in Sweden. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred Laotian and 392 Swedish children were included. Interviews were performed to obtain information on diet intake and fluoride use. Saliva was analysed for mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and secretion rate/buffering capacity. Oral hygiene was assessed using the Silness and Löe criteria. Caries prevalence was recorded according to WHO. The data were entered into the Cariogram to determine each child's caries risk, expressed as 'the chance of avoiding caries'. The children were divided into five risk groups. RESULTS: Mean DMFT level of the Laotian children was 4.61 +/- 2.95 and 1.38 +/- 1.97 in the Swedish group. For the risk factors plaque amount, frequency of food intake, saliva secretion rate, buffering capacity and fluoride, the Laotian children had significantly less favourable values compared to the Swedes. Only 6% of Laotian children belonged to the Cariogram low risk group versus 40% of the Swedish children. The mean DMFT for the five Cariogram groups was (from low to high risk) 0.00, 3.00, 3.56, 5.66, 6.11 for the Lao children and 0.31, 1.39, 2.56, 3.03, 2.91 for the Swedish ones. The mean chance of avoiding caries was 37.3% for the Laotians and 69.2% for the Swedish children (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: According to the 'opinion' of the Cariogram, the Laotian children demonstrated significantly higher caries risk than Swedish children.

  • 17.
    Wallengren, Marie Louise
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Hedström, Kristin
    Zbroszyk, Katarzyna
    Hamberg, Kristina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Human Leucocyte Antigen Profile and Transmission of Mutans Streptococci in Mother-Child Pairs2015In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 449-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate possible association between the transmission of mutans streptococci and sharing the immune system component Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) class II in mother-child pairs. Material and Methods: Plaque samples from 43 mother-child pairs were cultivated and screened for mutans streptococci. In 14 pairs where both mother and child harboured the bacteria, the strains were genotyped by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA and samples were run on PAGE gels. Analysis of genetic identity between mother and child strains was performed with help of software and Dice similarity index. The distribution of HLA of serogroup DR4 (HLA DR4) was studied in relation to maternal transmission and mutans streptococci colonisation in children. The study hypothesis was that in pairs where both mother and child were HLA DR4 positive, transmission of mutans streptococci was more likely. Results: No correlation between the presence of HLA DR4 in mother and child and maternal transmission of mutans streptococci was established. However, the results showed no linkage between mutans streptococci colonisation and HLA DR 4. Of 15 children with mutans streptococci, 12 were HLA DR4 positive. Conclusion: The result suggests that presence of HLA DR4 could be a predisposing factor for colonisation with mutans streptococci in children.

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