Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Bevelander, Pieter
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS). Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Hutcheson, Derek S.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Voting Behavior of Immigrants and Their Children in Sweden2022In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, ISSN 1556-2948, E-ISSN 1556-2956, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 427-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We still know remarkably little about the voting behavior of immigrant populations, and in particular, the children of immigrants – who grow up in the same society as their contemporaries, but may be subject to different patterns of socialization. This article uses verified voting behavior in Swedish municipal elections to offer at least two new perspectives on these questions. First, we are able to separate out the impacts of family socialization, general societal socialization, and citizenship acquisition on electoral participation. Second, we are also able to add to our knowledge of the differences in political participation levels between different groups of foreign-background voters.

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  • 2.
    Björngren Cuadra, Carin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Encounters With Irregular Migrants in Social Work: “Collateral Damage” and Reframing of Recognizability in Swedish Public Social Services2015In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, ISSN 1556-2948, E-ISSN 1556-2956, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 302-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to explore experiences and considerations of social workers regarding irregular migrants, understood as being prone to be “collateral damage.” It is revealed that some social workers approve assistance exceeding that which can find support in the national legislation. They are hereby addressing the normative conditions for recognition and installing new frames for apprehending irregular migrants. This process is referred to as a reframing of recognizability. By exceeding the limits of “belonging,” social workers question their profession's national link as well as the inability of a nationally anchored understanding of social work to deal with irregular migrants.

  • 3. Boccagni, Paolo
    et al.
    Righard, Erica
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Introduction to the special issue: social work and migration in Europe: a dialogue across boundaries2015In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, ISSN 1556-2948, E-ISSN 1556-2956, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 221-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introduction, we argue for the need to better understand so- cial work with migrants and to enhance its research bases against a background of increasing mobility and ethnic diversification across Europe. While much has been written on the influence of international migration on national welfare regimes and on specific forms of social welfare provision, the ways in which mi- gration affects mainstream social work practices are relatively understudied—even less so in a comparative perspective, looking at social interventions as well as to the organizations and cultures of social services, without neglecting the broader policy arrangements in which social work practice is embedded. The political and pre- scriptive bases of social workers’ remit vis-a`-vis immigrant clients, the ways of framing and categorizing the latter, and the impli- cations for social workers’ training, supervision, and research are discussed. The main value added of the five contributions to this Special Issue of JIRS is highlighted at last.

  • 4.
    Dahlstedt, Inge
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Bevelander, Pieter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    General Versus Vocational Education and Employment Integration of Immigrants in Sweden2010In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, ISSN 1556-2948, E-ISSN 1556-2956, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 158-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the effect of human capital on the employment acquisition of foreign-born men and women in Sweden. Besides categorizing different levels of education, a distinction is made between type of education, general and vocational, and where education is obtained, home or host country. The data used is based on register data for the year 2003 held by Statistics Sweden. The population under consideration is the total population subdivided by the following countries of birth: Sweden, Former Yugoslavia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Poland, Romania, Chile, Germany, Iraq, Iran, and Lebanon. The analysis shows that foreign-born individuals have a higher probability of employment with a vocational and host country education as opposed to a general and home country education.

  • 5.
    Hemmaty, Mona
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).
    The Cruel Optimism of Work Permits: Vulnerabilities and Deportability Among Rejected Asylum-Seekers and International Students Pursuing Track Changes in Sweden2024In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, ISSN 1556-2948, E-ISSN 1556-2956, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article suggests that recent transformation of the Swedish migration regime has exposed different categories of migrants working in Sweden to deportability, despite the promises that work permits offer. Firstly, I outline the policy context in which deportability works as a cohesive order (Könönen, Citation2018, p. 59). Secondly, I explore how migrants who go through track changes balance prolonging their stay on the basis of work with the risk of deportation. Here, deportability captures how having a work permit both open doors and at the same time produces vulnerabilities attached to being dependent upon individual employers in the current employer-driven system.

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    fulltext
  • 6.
    Nagayoshi, Kikuko
    et al.
    Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Osanami Törngren, Sayaka
    Malmö University, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Takenoshita, Hirohisa
    Department of Political Science, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan.
    What does Intermarriage Say about Immigrant Integration in Japan?: The Maintenance of a National and Gender Hierarchy through Marriage Norms2023In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, ISSN 1556-2948, E-ISSN 1556-2956, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 171-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Righard, Erica
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA). Malmö högskola, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM).
    Boccagni, Paolo
    Mapping the theoretical foundations of the social work-migration nexus2015In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, ISSN 1556-2948, E-ISSN 1556-2956, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 229-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article revisits the social work–migration nexus by investigating the implications of the debate on mobility and transnationalism. The conceptual boundary between migration as single-directed movement and as an extended and multidirected process has been much discussed across the social sciences but not yet fully in social work. However, the dialectic of sedentarism versus mobility makes for a key challenge to the arrangements and the tacit assumptions of this field of research and practice. Building on an innovative analytical framework and on a variety of examples, we highlight the friction between sedentarism and mobility as central to social work with immigrants and their families.

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