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  • 1.
    Alenezi, Ali
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Naito, Yoshihito
    Oral Implant Center, Tokushima University Hospital, Tokushima, Japan.
    Terukina, Takayuki
    Prananingrum, Widyasri
    Jinno, Yohei
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Tagami, Tatsuaki
    Ozeki, Tetsuya
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Controlled release of Clarithromycin from PLGA microspheres enhances bone regeneration in rabbit calvaria defects2017In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 201-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the controlled release effect of Clarithromycin loaded in PLGA microspheres in a rabbit calvaria defect model. Methods: Clarithromycin-loaded PLGA microspheres (MSPs) were formulated by modified O/W single emulsion/solvent evaporation method. After characterization, in vivo animal experiment was conducted. Four critical size bone defects were created in the calvaria of New Zealand White rabbits (n=21, n=7/time point). The bone defects were randomly designated to 4 groups: Group 1: No augmentation (sham), Group 2: beta-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), Group 3: beta-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with 0.12 µg clarithromycin, and Group 4: beta-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with 6.12 µg PLGA microspheres (loaded with 0.12 µg clarithromycin). After 2, 4 and 12 weeks of healing, the levels of bone regeneration were evaluated using micro- computed tomography and histology. Results: The average size of the PLGA microspheres was 26.38 μm that showed 94% encapsulation efficacy with clarithromycin. Clarithromycin release from PLGA microspheres revealed sustained release for around 4 weeks with approximately 50% release of clarithromycin during the first week. In the histological analysis, new bone formation was evident at 2 and 4 weeks of healing in all groups and bone formation increased as a function of healing time in vivo. At 12 weeks, Group 4 showed significantly higher amount of newly formed bone compared to Group 1 (p=0,002). Moreover, during the micro CT exam, Group 4 expressed significantly higher bone formation compared to Group 1 at all time points tested (p=0.00, 0.014, and 0.002 in 2, 4, and 12 weeks, respectively). Conclusions: PLGA microspheres demonstrated initial burst release of clarithromycin followed by a sustained release profile. The in vivo findings showed that β-TCP with clarithromycin-loaded microspheres can enhance bone formation in bone defects.

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  • 2. Coelho, Paulo G.
    et al.
    Teixeira, Hellen S.
    Marin, Charles
    Witek, Lukasz
    Tovar, Nick
    Janal, Malvin N.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The in vivo effect of P-15 coating on early osseointegration2014In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 430-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate mechanically and morphologically the effect of a specific peptide sequence P-15, when incorporated into implant surfaces. Three types of implants were used for the study: Group A: commercially pure titanium implant (blasted and acid etched) + electrochemical thin calcium phosphate deposition, Group B: commercially pure titanium implant (blasted and acid etched) + electrochemical thin calcium phosphate deposition + P-15 incorporation, and as control, Group C: commercially pure titanium implant (blasted and acid etched). After a topographical characterization, transcortical osteotomies were made, and all implant groups (102 implants per group) were randomly placed bilaterally in the tibiae of adult beagle dogs (n = 24). At, 1, 2, and 4 weeks post-surgery, the animals were sacrificed and the samples were retrieved for removal torque tests, for nano indentation, and for histomorphometrical analysis. The results (mean +/- 95% CI) showed that Group B (34.4 +/- 8.7%) presented statistically higher bone-to-implant contact than the other groups (A = 23.9 +/- 7.8%; C = 21.7 +/- 8.3%) at 1 week, indicating an enhanced osteogenesis due to the peptide incorporation. The results suggested that the incorporation of P-15 to implant surfaces increased its bioactivity and the effects were notable especially in the early stages of the healing process. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 430-440, 2014.

  • 3. Eick, Sigrun
    et al.
    Gadzo, Naida
    Tacchi, Manuel
    Sculean, Anton
    Potempa, Jan
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Gingipains impair attachment of epithelial cell to dental titanium abutment surfaces2019In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 107, no 8, p. 2549-2556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigated in vitro the effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis and its cysteine proteases (gingipains) on epithelial cell adhesion to titanium-zirconium alloy surfaces. Titanium-zirconium discs with a standard machined (M) or chemically modified hydrophilic surface (modM) were coated with lamin-5 and incubated with telomerase-inactivated gingival keratinocytes (TIGK). Three P. gingivalis strains or gingipains were either added simultaneously with TIGK or after TIGK cells were already attached to the disks. Adhered TIGK cells were counted at 24 h. All P. gingivalis strains clearly inhibited adhesion of TIGK cells to M and modM surfaces. Compared with bacteria/gingipain-free TIGK cell cultures, the number of attached TIGK cells was reduced by about 80% and 60% when P. gingivalis was added simultaneously or after TIGK cells were already attached to the disks (each p < 0.01), respectively. Counts of attached cells were similarly reduced when only gingipains were used. Adhesion molecules of TIGK cells, in particular E-cadherin, were cleaved by P. gingivalis. In conclusion, P. gingivalis and gingipains interfere with the adhesion of epithelial cells to titanium-zirconium alloy surfaces by cleaving adhesion molecules, while a chemically modified hydrophilic titanium-zirconium alloy surface did not yield any protection. (c) 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res B Part B, 2019.

  • 4.
    Galli, Silvia
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Andersson, Martin
    Jinno, Yohei
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Karlsson, Johan
    He, Wenxiao
    Xue, Ying
    Mustafa, Kamal
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Magnesium release from mesoporous carriers on endosseus implants does not influence bone maturation at 6 weeks in rabbit bone2017In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 105, no 7, p. 2118-2125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The release of magnesium ions (Mg21) from titanium surfaces has been shown to boost the initial biological response of peri-implant bone and to increase the biomechanical strength of osseointegration. The objective of the present paper was to investigate if the initial improve- ment in osseointegration would influence the bone remodel- ing also during the maturation stage of bone healing. Methods: Titanium implants were coated with mesoporous titania layers and either loaded with Mg21 (test group) or left untreated (control group). The implants were inserted in the tibiae of 10 New Zealand White rabbits. Osseointegration was assessed after 6 weeks by means of biomechanical test- ing (RTQ), non-decalcified histology and histomorphometry (BIC%, BA%, NBA%). The expression of genes involved in the bone formation and remodeling was quantified using qPCR. Results: Mg21 releasing mesoporous titania coatings showed, on average, higher removal torques and histomorphometrical outcomes (RTQ: 17.2 Ncm vs. 15 Ncm; BIC: 38.8% vs. 32.1%; BA%: 71.6% vs. 64%; NBA% 62.5% vs. 54% for the tests vs the controls); however, the differences were not statistically significant. Three osteogenic markers, osteocalcin (OC), colla- gen 1 alpha 1 (COL1A1), and alkalin phosphatase (ALPL), were respectively 2-fold, 1.53-fold, and 1.13-fold up-regulated in the control group compared to the test. The expression of COL1A1 was particularly high in both groups, while the biomarkers for remodeling and inflammation showed a low expression in both groups. Significance: The results suggested that the initial enhancement in osseointegration induced by magnesium release from mesoporous titania coatings has no detrimental effects during bone maturation.

  • 5. Gil, Luiz F.
    et al.
    Suzuki, Marcelo
    Janal, Malvin N.
    Tovar, Nick
    Marin, Charles
    Granato, Rodrigo
    Bonfante, Estevam A.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Gil, Jose N.
    Coelho, Paulo G.
    Progressive plateau root form dental implant osseointegration: a human retrieval study2015In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 103, no 6, p. 1328-1332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although preclinical and sparse human histology retrieval studies have shown that the interface between implant and bone is constantly remodeling, no human retrieval database has been developed to determine the effect of functional loading time and other clinical/implant design variables on osseointegration. The present study tested the hypothesis that bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) increase over functional loading time around dental implants. Due to prosthetic retreatment reasons, 93 human implant retrievals from the same manufacturer (Bicon LLC, Boston, MA, USA) were obtained over a period of approximately 15 years. The retrieved implants were under functional loading from 120 days to approximate to 18 years and were histomorphologic/metrically evaluated. BIC/BAFO were assessed as a function of multiple independent variables: implant surface type, diameter, length, jaw (maxilla/mandible), region (anterior/posterior), and time of functional loading. The results showed that both BIC and BAFO increased over time independently of implant design/clinical variables, supporting the postulated hypothesis. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 103B: 1328-1332, 2015.

  • 6.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Singer, Jessica
    Tovar, Nick
    Marin, Charles
    Neiva, Rodrigo
    Bonfante, Estevam A.
    Janal, Malvin N
    Contamin, Hugues
    Coelho, Paulo G
    Regeneration of the cementum and periodontal ligament using local BDNF delivery in class II furcation defects2018In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 106, no 4, p. 1611-1617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Periodontal furcation defects are usually addressed by the placement of a physical barrier which may limit the regenerative potential of periodontal wounds. This study morphometrically quantified the regenerative effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in furcation defects in a non-human primate model. Grade II furcation defects (with and without induced inflammation prior to surgery) were created on the first and second molars of eight non-human primates. Defects were treated with open flap debridement and subsequently filled with either: Group A; BDNF (500 µg mL−1) in high-molecular weight-hyaluronic acid (HMW-HA), Group B; BDNF (50 µg mL−1) in HMW-HA, Group C; HMW-HA acid only, Group D; unfilled defect, or Group E; BDNF (500 µg mL−1) in saline. Periodontal wound healing was observed every 2 weeks by computed-tomography. At 11 weeks all animals were sacrificed and maxillary and mandibular block biopsies were referred for nondecalcified histology. Linear measurements of new cementum (cellular and acellular) and periodontal ligament (PDL) formation were performed. Computerized-tomography reconstruction and software quantification demonstrated successful bone fill for all groups. However, histometric assessment demonstrated significantly higher level of total periodontal regeneration for the 500 µg mL−1 BDNF HMW-HA relative to all other groups. No significant differences in cementogenesis were observed among groups. Significantly higher acellular cementum formation was observed for sites where inflammation was not induced prior to surgical procedures. While all groups experienced similar bone fill and cementogenesis, the 500 µg mL−1 BDNF HMW-HA appeared to most effectively repair PDL (minimum increase of ∼22% relative to all groups; over 200% relative to unfilled defects).

  • 7.
    Lahens, Bradley
    et al.
    Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, 10010.
    Lopez, Christopher D
    Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, 10010.
    Neiva, Rodrigo F
    Department of Periodontology, University of Florida College of Dentistry, Gainesville, Florida, 32610.
    Bowers, Michelle M
    Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, 10010.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bonfante, Estevam A
    Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, University of Sao Paulo, Bauru School of Dentistry, Bauru, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Morcos, Jonathan
    Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, 10010.
    Witek, Lukasz
    Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, 10010.
    Tovar, Nick
    Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, 10010.
    Coelho, Paulo G
    Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, New York, 10010; Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, 10016.
    The effect of osseodensification drilling for endosteal implants with different surface treatments: A study in sheep.2019In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 615-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of osseodensification drilling on the stability and osseointegration of machine-cut and acid-etched endosteal implants in low-density bone. Twelve sheep received six implants inserted into the ilium, bilaterally (n = 36 acid-etched, and n = 36 as-machined). Individual animals received three implants of each surface, placed via different surgical techniques: (1) subtractive regular-drilling (R): 2.0 mm pilot, 3.2 and 3.8 mm twist drills); (2) osseodensification clockwise-drilling (CW): Densah Bur (Versah, Jackson, MI) 2.0 mm pilot, 2.8, and 3.8 mm multifluted tapered burs; and (3) osseodensification counterclockwise-drilling (CCW) Densah Bur 2.0 mm pilot, 2.8 mm, and 3.8 mm multifluted tapered burs. Insertion torque was higher in the CCW and CW-drilling compared to the R-drilling (p < 0.001). Bone-to-implant contact (BIC) was significantly higher for CW (p = 0.024) and CCW-drilling (p = 0.006) compared to the R-drilling technique. For CCW-osseodensification-drilling, no statistical difference between the acid-etched and machine-cut implants at both time points was observed for BIC and BAFO (bone-area-fraction-occupancy). Resorbed bone and bone forming precursors, preosteoblasts, were observed at 3-weeks. At 12-weeks, new bone formation was observed in all groups extending to the trabecular region. In low-density bone, endosteal implants inserted via osseodensification-drilling presented higher stability and no osseointegration impairments compared to subtractive regular-drilling technique, regardless of evaluation time or implant surface. (c) 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater 00B: 000-000, 2018.

  • 8. Melin Svanborg, Lory
    et al.
    Andersson, Martin
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Surface characterization of commercial oral implants on the nanometer level2009In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 462-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lately, there has been a growing interest in how the presence of nanometer structures on a bone integrated implant surface influences the healing process. Recent in vitro studies have revealed an increased osteoblast response to different nanophase surfaces. Some commercial implant brands claim their implants have nanometer structures. However, at present, there are no studies where the nano topography of today's commercially available oral implants has been investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize commercial oral implants on the nanometer level and to investigate whether or not the nanometer surface roughness was correlated to the more well-known micrometer roughness on the implants. Twelve different commercial screw-shaped oral implants with various surface modifications were examined using scanning electron microscopy and a white light interferometer. The interferometer is suitable for detection of nanoscale roughness in the vertical dimension; however, limitation exists on the horizontal due to the wavelength of the light. A 1 x 1 microm Gaussian filter was found to be useful for identifying nm roughness with respect to height deviation. The results demonstrated that an implant that was smooth on the micrometer level was not necessarily smooth on the nanometer level. Different structures in the nanometer scale was found on some of the implants, indicating that to fully understand the relationship between the properties of an implant surface and its osseointegration behavior, a characterization at the nanometer scale might be relevant.

  • 9.
    Papia, Evaggelia
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Larsson, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    du Toit, Madeleine
    Malmö högskola, Library and IT Services (BIT).
    Vult von Steyern, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bonding between oxide based ceramics and adhesive cement systems: a systematic review2014In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 102, no 2, p. 395-413Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The following aims were set for this systematic literature review: (a) to make an inventory of existing methods to achieve bondable surfaces on oxide ceramics and (b) to evaluate which methods might provide sufficient bond strength. Current literature of in vitro studies regarding bond strength achieved using different surface treatments on oxide ceramics in combination with adhesive cement systems was selected from PubMed and systematically analyzed and completed with reference tracking. The total number of publications included for aim a was 127 studies, 23 of which were used for aim b. The surface treatments are divided into seven main groups: as-produced, grinding/polishing, airborne particle abrasion, surface coating, laser treatment, acid treatment, and primer treatment. There are large variations, making comparison of the studies difficult. An as-produced surface of oxide ceramic needs to be surface treated to achieve durable bond strength. Abrasive surface treatment and/or silica-coating treatment with the use of primer treatment can provide sufficient bond strength for bonding oxide ceramics. This conclusion, however, needs to be confirmed by clinical studies. There is no universal surface treatment. Consideration should be given to the specific materials to be cemented and to the adhesive cement system to be used.

  • 10.
    Papia, Evaggelia
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Zethraeus, Johan
    Ransbäck, Per-Åke
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Vult von Steyern, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Impaction-modified densely sintered yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconium dioxide: methodology, surface structure, and bond strength2012In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 100, no 3, p. 677-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of the study were to describe a novel method for producing zirconium dioxide specimens with a cementation surface that allows adhesive cementation techniques, to describe the surface structure and to evaluate the bond strength. Forty-eight pairs of specimens were fabricated and adhesively luted together. Three different surfaces were tested: impaction-modified surfaces created by using glass granules (G), impaction-modified surfaces created by using polymer granules (P) and a nonmodified control surface (C). Two bonding systems were used, Variolink(®)II (VA) or Panavia™F 2.0 (PA). During the different fabrication steps, the surfaces were examined under light microscope and analyzed with an optical interferometer. All groups were thermocycled and subjected to shear bond strength test. The groups with modified cementation surfaces showed significantly higher shear bond strength: 34.9 MPa (VA-G), 30.9 MPa (VA-P), 29.6 MPa (PA-P), and 26.1 MPa (PA-G) compared with the relevant control group: 20.5 MPa (VA-C) and 17.8 MPa (PA-C). The groups with surface modification showed a rougher surface structure and significantly fewer fractures between the cement and the zirconium dioxide surfaces compared to the control groups where all failures were adhesive. Impaction modification with an impaction medium pressed into the cementation surface of zirconium dioxide-based reconstructions can be used in combination with an additive production technique to increase bond strength. Both modification techniques described in the study result in a rougher surface structure and higher shear bond strength compared to the control groups.

  • 11.
    Pihl, Maria
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Andersson, Martin
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Osseointegration and antibacterial effect of an antimicrobial peptide releasing mesoporous titania implant2021In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 109, no 11, p. 1787-1795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical devices such as orthopedic and dental implants may get infected by bacteria, which results in treatment using antibiotics. Since antibiotic resistance is increasing in society there is a need of finding alternative strategies for infection control. One potential strategy is the use of antimicrobial peptides, AMPs. In this study, we investigated the antibiofilm effect of the AMP, RRP9W4N, using a local drug-delivery system based on mesoporous titania covered titanium implants. Biofilm formation was studied in vitro using a safranine biofilm assay and LIVE/DEAD staining. Moreover, we investigated what effect the AMP had on osseointegration of commercially available titanium implants in vivo, using a rabbit tibia model. The results showed a sustained release of AMP with equal or even better antibiofilm properties than the traditionally used antibiotic Cloxacillin. In addition, no negative effects on osseointegration in vivo was observed. These combined results demonstrate the potential of using mesoporous titania as an AMP delivery system and the potential use of the AMP RRP9W4N for infection control of osseointegrating implants.

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  • 12. Reigstad, O
    et al.
    Johansson, C
    Stenport, V
    Wennerberg, A
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Reigstad, A
    Rökkum, M
    Different patterns of bone fixation with hydroxyapatite and resorbable CaP coatings in the rabbit tibia at 6, 12, and 52 weeks2011In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 99B, no 1, p. 14-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Applying bioactive coatings on orthopedic implants can increase the fixation and long-term implant survival. In our study, we compared a resorbable electrochemically deposited calcium phosphate coating (Bonit®) to a thin (40 μm) plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, applied on grit-blasted screw-shaped Ti-6Al-4V implants in the cortical region of rabbit tibia, implanted for 6, 12, and 52 weeks. The removal torque results demonstrated stronger bone-to-implant fixation for the HA than Bonit-coated screws at 6 and 12 weeks. After 52 weeks, the fixation was in favor of the Bonit-coated screws, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Coat flaking and delamination of the HA with multinucleated giant cell activity and bone resorption observed histologically seemed to preclude any significant increase in fixation comparing the HA implants at 6 versus 12 weeks and 12 versus 52 weeks. The Bonit-coated implants exhibited increasing fixation from 6 to 12 weeks and from 12 to 52 weeks, and the coat was resorbed within 6 weeks, with minimal activity of multinucleated giant cells or bone resorption. A different fixation pattern was observed for the two coatings with a sharper but time limited increase in fixation for the HA-coated screws, and a slower but more steadily increasing fixation pattern for the Bonit-coated screws. The side effects were more serious for the HA coating and limiting the expected increase in fixation with time.

  • 13. Vandeweghe, Stefan
    et al.
    Coelho, Paulo
    Vanhove, C
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Utilizing micro-computed tomography to evaluate bone structure surrounding dental implants: a comparison with histomorphometry2013In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 101, no 7, p. 1259-1266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although histology has proven to be a reliable method to evaluate the ossoeintegration of a dental implant, it is costly, time consuming, destructive, and limited to one or few sections. Microcomputed tomography (µCT) is fast and delivers three-dimensional information, but this technique has not been widely used and validated for histomorphometric parameters yet. This study compared µCT and histomorphometry by means of evaluating their accuracy in determining the bone response to two different implant materials. In total, 32 titanium (Ti) and 16 hydroxyapatite (HA) implants were installed in 16 lop-eared rabbits. After 2 and 4 weeks, the animals were scarified, and the samples retrieved. After embedding, the samples were scanned with µCT and analyzed three-dimensionally for bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC). Thereafter, all samples were sectioned and stained for histomorphometry. For the Ti implants, the mean BIC was 25.25 and 28.86% after 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, when measured by histomorphometry, while it was 24.11 and 24.53% when measured with µCT. BA was 35.4 and 31.97% after 2 and 4 weeks for histomorphometry and 29.06 and 27.65% for µCT. For the HA implants, the mean BIC was 28.49 and 42.51% after 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, when measured by histomorphometry, while it was 33.74 and 42.19% when measured with µCT. BA was 30.59 and 47.17% after 2 and 4 weeks for histomorphometry and 37.16 and 44.95% for µCT. Direct comparison showed that only the 2 weeks BA for the titanium implants was significantly different between µCT and histology (p = 0.008). Although the technique has its limitations, µCT corresponded well with histomorphometry and should be considered as a tool to evaluate bone structure around implants.

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