Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Adelmann, Kent
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    The art of listening in an educational perspective: listening reception in the mother tongue2012In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 513-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to contribute to the theory and practice of listening reception as one of the four language arts in Swedish as a school subject. The object of inquiry is The Art of Listening (Adelmann 2009) as a Swedish example from a Scandinavian context, compared to mainstream listening research in the USA. The problem explored is: How can we, as researchers and teachers, handle some of the problems within international listening research and adapt listening research to a Scandinavian context. Results of the study show that The Art of Listening is mainly influenced by listening research in the USA, but also offer an alternative theoretical framework for listening by the Russian scholar Mikhail M. Bakhtin (1895–1975). The main conclusion is that with an educational approach and an alternative theoretical framework it is possible to work with an expanding and including perspective in listening research and listening education. Keywords: listening, listening process, listening skills, listening strategies, listening reception, listening response, dialogue, talk in interaction, conversation, speech

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  • 2.
    Aspelin, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Culture-Languages-Media (KSM).
    What really matters is between: Understanding the focal point of education from an inter-human perspective2010In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the focal point of education is simultaneously defined as: i) the place where the most important educational activity is taking place; and ii) the place where the main interest of educational theory (and educational practice) should be located. The article aims to discuss the idea that the focal point is located somewhere between the teacher and the student. This idea is introduced by references to Gert Biesta’s inter-subjective theory and to some more or less classical conceptions which distinguish between two main aspects of sociality. Further, and as a more specific aim, the article discusses Martin Buber’s contribution to understanding the focal point of education. Buber contributes by emphasising “the interhuman” as a primary dimension in relation to “the social”. From Buber’s perspective, what really matters in education exists in an ontological and relational event. In the last section of the article it is suggested that exploration of the focal point should not stick to just one form of relationship. The interhuman event is, taken by itself, supposed to be primary, but the focal point cannot be fully understood without a penetrative picture of its social context.

  • 3.
    Christensen, Jonas
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Proposed Enhancement of Bronfenbrenner’s Development Ecology Model2010In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 101-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How academic disciplines are constituted and the related professional development must be viewed within their wider social, political and economic aspects. When studying the organisation, transformation and spheres of influence of professions, the Development Ecology model provides a tool for understanding the encounter between societal, organisational and individual dimensions, a continual meeting point where phenomena and actors occur on different levels, including those of the organisation and society at large. However, the theory of development ecology may be questioned for how it looks at the individual’s role in relation to other actors in order to define and understand the forces underlying the professional development and constitution of academic disciplines. Factors relating to both the inside of the individual and social ties between individuals and in relation to global factors need to be discussed.

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  • 4.
    Economou, Catarina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM).
    Hajer, Maaike
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM). University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
    Integrating Syrian refugee teachers into Swedish educational labour market: reflections on a fast track design2019In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 385-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In autumn 2016, Malmö University started two “fast track” trajectories for teachers with refugee backgrounds. The participants were offered an education of 26 weeks as an introduction to the Swedish school system, consisting of content courses, professional Swedish and workplace learning. The aim of this small explorative study was to get an impression of the participants’ views and understanding of the role of becoming a teacher in Swedish schools, realising the characteristics of pedagogy aimed for in the curriculum, specifically the interaction patterns and student participation in learning processes. Main research questions addressed participants’ expectations of differences and challenges in the Swedish school context as compared to their experiences in Syrian contexts. A combination was chosen of focus groups interviews with a small number of teachers and students on their views and experiences with pupils’ involvement in classroom communication as well as quantitative data gathering. The quantitative survey measured teachers’ acquisition and participation-oriented views on learning. Open-ended reflection on learning questions was also given to the students. Results showed significant development towards more participation-oriented beliefs on learning. Interview data and written statements reveal varied differences between the Swedish context and the participants’ experiences from schools in Syria.

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  • 5.
    Hofverberg, Hanna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Sigurdson, Erik
    Umeå Univ, Dept Creat Studies, Umeå, Sweden..
    Who controls the learning environments?: A critical inquiry of national policy of school architecture in Sweden2023In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe and other parts of the world, many new schools are to be built. In Sweden, for instance, some 1000 new schools are to be built between year 2020-2025. As a response to this need of new school buildings, there are policies emerging. One example is the Swedish National Board of Housing, Building and Planning (SNBHP), who published policy by presenting a digital collection good examples. In this paper we are zooming in on the learning environments in the policy and examining the meaning that is made of the learning environments. With the aid of the practical epistemological analysis (PEA), four the learning environments are identified: 1) general and flexible learning environment; 2) stimulating learning environment with spatial diversity; 3) an exciting learning environment that encourages creativity; and 4) an open learning environment. How these learning environments come about is further analysed with the concept of material classification, which helps identify some of the implications on teaching and learning and how the pedagogical vocabulary and material classification condition behaviours. This is further discussed in terms of what happens when"good learning environments" are made into policy.

  • 6.
    Ideland, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Childhood, Education and Society (BUS).
    Serder, Margareta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Natural Science, Mathematics and Society (NMS).
    Edu-business within the Triple Helix. Value production through assetization of educational research2023In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 336-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing demands on evidence-based teaching, combined with increasing business involve-ment, constitute a transformation of education in which research and research collaborations have become commodities and selling points for companies. This article, building on interviews with 30 Swedish edupreneurs, explores how the discursive trope of the Triple Helix organises collaborations between the business sector, research, and school. In what ways do people in edu-business use research and research collaborations and what kinds of values do they expect to produce through different practices? The study identifies five approaches to research - philanthropists, influencers, ambassadors, brokers, and engineers - and describe the edupreneurs' manifold ways of using, relating to, and translating research into sellable products. Using the theoretical lens of assetization, we show how different values are produced: (1) economic - strengthening the company's brand; (2) pedagogical - changing teaching practices; (3) political - lobbying for policy change and changing public conversations; (4) academic - defining useful research and funding research, and (5) social - building networks. We conclude that the striving for Triple Helix collaborations preserves the entrepreneurial right to define useful research and providing legitimacy through the power of research, an important asset on the edu-market.

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  • 7.
    Magnusson, Petra
    et al.
    Faculty of teacher education, Department of Humanities, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Malmström, Martin
    The Joint Faculties of Humanities and Theology, Department of Educational Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Practice-near school research in Sweden: tendencies and teachers’ roles2023In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 367-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Education Act from 2010 states that education in Sweden ought to be based on scientific knowledge and proven experience. The aim of this study is to explore practice-near school research published by Swedish researchers in the wake of the Education Act with the focus on the participation of teachers in research. As a background, the international and national roots of practice-near school research in Sweden are described. The study is focused on research projects in compulsory and upper secondary school, school years 1–12. 92 articles in 19 journals were detected through a literature search and purposive sampling. Based on the articles, a framework of aspects with categories was developed and the reported studies were analysed accordingly. The findings indicate a multifaceted research field; studies based on a variety of theories and methods and with different roles for teachers. The different categories for teacher’s participation in research and how teacher roles were described in the articles did not give a clear picture on what teachers’ roles could imply for the teachers involved. The article concludes with a discussion of the recent policy initiatives of practice-near school research in Sweden.

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  • 8.
    Sayers, Judy
    et al.
    University of Leeds.
    Petersson, Jöran
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Rosenqvist, Eva
    Stockholms universitet.
    Andrews, Paul
    Stockholms universitet.
    Swedish parents’ perspectives on homework: manifestations of principled pragmatism2023In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 66-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivated by earlier research highlighting Swedish teachers’ beliefs that the setting of homework compromises deep-seated principles of educational equity, this paper presents an exploratory study of Swedish parents’ perspectives on homework in their year-one children’s learning. Twenty-five parents, drawn from three demographically different schools in the Stockholm region, participated in semi-structured interviews. The interviews, broadly focused on how parents support their children’s learning and including questions about homework in general and mathematics homework in particular, were transcribed and data subjected to a constant comparison analytical process. This yielded four broad themes, highlighting considerable variation in how parents perceive the relationship between homework and educational equity. First, all parents spoke appreciatively of their children receiving reading homework and, in so doing, indicated a collective construal that reading homework is neither homework nor a threat to equity. Second, four parents, despite their enthusiasm for reading homework, opposed the setting of any homework due to its potential compromise of family life. Third, seven parents indicated that they would appreciate mathematics homework where it were not a threat to equity. Finally, fourteen parents, despite acknowledging homework’s potential compromise to equity, were unequivocally in favour of mathematics homework being set to their children.

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  • 9.
    Svensson, Anette
    Jönköping University, Språk-, litteratur- och mediedidaktik.
    The media habits of young people in Sweden: The use of fictional texts in a school and a recreational context2014In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 337-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a questionnaire study of the media habits of Swedish youth aged 17–18. It examines the time they spend on using fictional texts through various media forms as well as in relation to mode (production/consumption), context (spare time/school), and gender (male/female). It further analyses these media habits and, using media ecology theory, discusses their effects on the learning process. The study shows that the participants spend more time using fictional texts, predominantly through audio-visual media forms, in their leisure time than in school, that they consume more fictional texts than they produce, and that the female participants spend more time producing fictional texts than the male participants – a result that is coloured by the amount of time they spend blogging, tweeting and writing diaries. The effects of such life-writings on teaching and learning processes, as well as on school performances are also discussed.

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  • 10.
    Wennås Brante, Eva
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    Walldén, Robert
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM). Malmö University, Disciplinary literacy and inclusive teaching.
    "Internet? That's an app you can download": First-graders use linguistic resources to describe internet and digital information2023In: Education Inquiry, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given young children's frequent use of the internet and the expectations formulated in policy documents such as the Swedish national curriculum, teachers need to promote critical awareness about information found online, even in the earliest years of schooling. Responding to the need for more information about how first-graders understand the internet, we report on findings from focus group interviews concerning what students in Grade 1 think the internet is and what kind of experiences and linguistic resources they draw upon to express their understanding. Based on thematic and systemic-functional linguistic analysis, the results show that the children mostly express an understanding of the internet as something concrete, such as an app, as something encapsulated in apps or hardware and, more generally, as an enabler for the use of different apps. Students connections to using YouTube and games are prevalent, and their understanding of the internet is shaped by experiences of screen interactions when using these apps. On rare occasions, students hesitantly tried to formulate abstract perspectives concerning what the internet is or what it means. Possible directions for promoting and researching a more abstract understanding in pedagogical practice are discussed.

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1 - 10 of 10
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