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  • 1.
    Alftberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för socialt arbete (SA). Lund University.
    Bengtsen, Peter
    Lund University.
    The Sci-Fi Brain: Narratives in Neuroscience and Popular Culture2018Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 11-30Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The connection between neuroscience, popular media and lay perceptions of thebrain involves the framing of complex scientific processes and results throughfamiliar cultural narratives and metaphors. Such narratives are often built onthe premise that neuroscience, with the help of powerful new technologies,will finally solve the mysteries of brain and mind, consciousness and morality.At the same time, popular culture—especially the science fiction genre—tendsto focus on worst case scenarios of the implementation of technology. Thisarticle explores cultural narratives of what the brain is and how it functions intwo different contexts—among neuroscientists and within popular culture. Inparticular, narratives about technology and the malleable brain as well as thenotion of the mad scientist are studied. The article explores how these narrativesare presented and used in popular culture and how neuroscientists relate to thenarratives when describing their work. There is a contrast, but also a blurring ofboundaries, between actual research carried out and the fictional portrayals ofscientists constructing, or altering, fully functional brains. To some extent, thenarratives serve as a background for the public’s understanding of, and attitudetowards, neuroscience—something that must be taken into consideration whendealing with the therapeutic treatment of patients. The narratives of neurosciencein popular culture are to a certain degree shaped by actual scientific practices andfindings, but neuroscience is also influenced by laypeople’s perceptions, whichoften have their roots in the narratives of popular culture.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Alftberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Introduction: Self-care Translated into Practice2012Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 4, nr 3, s. 415-424Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall expectation placed upon individuals to take responsibility for their own life, has in cultural studies been described in terms of neo-liberalism and defined as an internationally prevailing ideological paradigm (Dean 1999; Smart 2003; Gilbert 2008). In this thematic section of Culture Unbound there are many examples of how, if and when these ideas affect people’s everyday life. The discussions revolve around living with long-term sickness, the organization of healthcare, and questions concerning well-being. This is a special issue that analyses how cultural ideas about self-care and self-care management take practical form, looking for those social practices that are uncertain and ambiguous (Reckwitz 2002). In this introduction, we as theme-editors present the predominant themes that are discussed in more depth in the individual articles. In view of how personal strategies for living and life planning are open to continual revision and how those strategies increasingly emphasize the relationship between identity and the biological (Kaufman 2010), we seek to explore how this is translated into practice. Self-care and its technologies take place in everyday life, and will be examined using an ethnographic approach.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Provincial Globalization: The Local Struggle of Place-making2010Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 2, s. 193-215Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the global presence in the local processes of place-making in a rural area in Sweden. As a result of increased competition--fueled by a reorganization of global capitalism--between places, symbolic strategies (i.e. place marketing and place branding) have become a central dimension of both urban and rural governance. As a consequent, places–while still being sites for the residents’ day-to-day life–are being turned into commodities in the market of potential investors and tourists to a great extent. Subsequently, this paper deals with how this global agenda affects a rural municipality in the Swedish countryside suffering from depopulation. The paper confirms earlier statements (Woods, 2007) that globalization processes should not be considered as external forces reshaping and homogenizing rural villages; rather, globalization processes are locally negotiated. This, however, does not mean globalization has no impact on rural places. In these negotiation processes global and local virtues are intertwined but not evenly. In some municipal strategies, the impact of global discourses is more explicit, for example, policy-makers accept and incorporate strategies of place branding and policy networks while they neglect other aspects of a relatively standardized “place marketing tool kit”. Furthermore, the study shows that rural residents, also, consider the village and its global future carefully but differently from the policy-makers. The residents dislike expressions of urbanity and advocate a general small-scaleness as a strategy for the future.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Jansson, André
    Rural Media Spaces: Communication Geography on New Terrain2010Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 2, nr Thematic Section: Rural Media Spaces, s. 121-130Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Bengtsen, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    The Unbound Brain: A Thematic Introduction2018Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 4-10Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The brain has long been an object of curiosity and fascination. Partly as a result of technological advances, issues related to the brain have become ubiquitous points of discussion in our culture. Along with neurological disease and neuroscience, it is frequently featured in Hollywood block buster movies, self-help books, popular science documentaries and fictional TV-series. Once cast as grey and stable matter, the brain is now commonly represented as a glowing and colourful entity through the use of new imaging technologies. Further, it is often likened to a complex and adaptable machine that can be enhanced continuously through dedication and deliberate effort. In this special issue of Culture Unbound, scholars from a number of disciplines within the humanities and social sciences address the pervasiveness and influence of neuroscience and representations of the brain in everyday contexts. A common thread in the articles is the idea that knowledge and narratives about, and visualisations of, the brain change practices and processes in daily life. In addition, the articles, in different ways, explore the brain as something that is perceived and portrayed as constantly transforming; an unbound brain.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Bjärstorp, Sara
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för konst, kultur och kommunikation (K3).
    Live-action role-playing and the affordances of social media2023Inngår i: Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 66-87Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Live-action role-playing (larp) is characterized by participants’ physical and mental immersion in a storyworld, played out in a specific location during a fixed period of time. Most of the immersion is realized during the live event itself, where a collective story is acted out in physical space in real time. However, contemporary larping also usually entails significant interaction and communication between players, and between players and organisers, before and after the event itself, through digital media. In this article, we explore the social media afterlife of one of the most significant Nordic larp events in recent years, Fortune and Felicity (2017). Using an affordance framework, we discuss what happens to the “liveness” of the larp when it is extended into social media. Through the affordances of persistence, visibility, editability and associability, we analyse material from the Facebook group connected to Fortune and Felicity, used by players and organisers to prepare for the larp and, afterwards, to continue the gameplay and to de-brief. In social media, the continuum of time and space, which is characteristic of the larp event itself, is changed into asynchronous and physically separate player action. Thus, the affordances of social media, we argue, enable player interaction and collaborative storytelling in ways that change the narrative, interactive and immersive dynamics of the larp.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Claesson, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för Urbana Studier (US). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutet för studier i Malmös historia (IMH).
    Brunnström, Pål
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutionen för Urbana Studier (US). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för kultur och samhälle (KS), Institutet för studier i Malmös historia (IMH).
    Introduction: Narrating the City and Spaces of Contestation2019Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 11, nr 1, s. 1-8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    While nation states have a disputed status in a globalised world, cities are often regarded as sovereign and global actors. Along with de-nationalising processes of increased privatisation, supranational governing and networks of transnational corporations, city administrations have developed new capabilities of orientation and governing in a global context (Sassen 2006). Inequality, poverty and segregation are some of the pressing issues that city administrations are grappling with – issues of local challenge with global relevance and repercussions, and vice versa. We wonder, if city administrations also address cultural issues that traditionally were of national concern, as fostering and narrating a sense of identity and belonging? If so, we think this shift needs to be further inquired, as we know that narrating and uses of history are not innocent practices. Rather, these are activities which consciously and unconsciously can push developments and futures in specific directions (Sandercock 2003). Further, narrating and history-writing have a spatial dimension and a performative force which may manifest in the physical environment, making changes, or sustaining status quo (De Certeau 1988, Hayden 1997 and Massey 2005). A critical engagement in the making and use of history in urban space is needed to disclose power relations and constructions of categories, such as gender identities (Scott 2011), and to problematize bias perspectives on cultural heritage and an “authorised heritage discourse” (Smith 2006). Processes of narrating the city in urban development and regeneration are often processes where not only urban history, but also urban futures, are negotiated in a very concrete and physical sense.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 8.
    Ekelund, Robin
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för samhälle, kultur och identitet (SKI).
    Retrospective Sanctuaries: Investigating Conflicts in Retrospective Facebook Groups2022Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 14, nr 2, s. 61-82Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates conflicts in retrospective Facebook groups, i.e., groups created with a particular interest and focus on the past, to analyse how members of these groups understand the past and how they negotiate, resist and challenge each other’s notions of the past. The data comes from a netnographic fieldwork within six such retrospective groups. Theoretical inspiration is drawn from Actor-Network-Theory (Harrison 2013, Latour 2005). The analysis thusly focuses on human (the members of the groups) as well as non-human actors (the operative logic of Facebook) and study how these produce associations between the past and the present. An overall result of the study is that the retrospective Facebook groups are not characterised by conflict. Instead, they are produced as places of sanctuary, where associations with the past becomes a basis for a nostalgic feel-good culture. However, the analysis also shows that the sanctuaries build on the production of a discontinuity and a conflict between the past and the present. Using Boym’s concept of ruinophilia, as well as Bauman’s concept of retrotopia, the article discusses how the conflicted discontinuity between the past and the present produces an us-and-them relationship where group members can come together in a nostalgic as well as a critical care for the world as it (in their perspectives) was supposed to be. The analysis also illustrates how members’ use of sources and references becomes a mere stylistic performance of authority, as the operative logic of Facebook not only enables but also constrains group interactions, reducing the members’ possibilities of having profound interactions and negotiations based on their memories and notions of the past. The article hereby contributes to the emerging research on digital memories in general, and memory work on Facebook in particular.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Ekelund, Robin
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för barndom, utbildning och samhälle (BUS).
    Young Feminist Men Finding their Way: On young Swedish Men’s Experiences of and Orientations in Feminist Settings2020Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 12, nr 3, s. 506-526Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Men and feminism is a contentious topic. In theoretical discussions as well as in previous studies, men and feminism have been described as an oxymoron, that being a man and a feminist is a border land position and that it entails experiences of so-called gender vertigo or gender limbo. Still, there are men who identify themselves as feminists and engage in feminist settings, parties and organizations. In this article, I aim to explore how masculinity is constructed and shaped within feminism. The article is based on qualitative interviews with nine young feminist men in Sweden. Using Sara Ahmed’s queer phenomenology and the concepts of disorientation and reorientation, I analyse how the interviewees experience themselves as men and feminists and how they navigate within their feminist settings. The analysis illustrates that in contrast to previous research, the interviewees articulate an assuredness in their position as men and feminists. However, being a man and a feminist is still a somewhat disorienting position that promotes reflexive journeys through which the interviewees seek to elaborate a sensitive, perceptive and “softer” masculinity. Feminism can be seen as a way of doing masculinity, and the ways in which the interviewees (re)orient themselves in their feminist settings can be understood as processes of masculinity construction. These reorientations position the interviewees in the background of their feminist settings, where they carry out what I call political housekeeping and men-feminism. From this position, they also adopt a perspective of a theoretical as well as temporal distance and articulate themselves as actors in the history of feminism. Thus, the article highlights that feminist men can seek out a masculinity that is positioned in the background yet still experience themselves as subjects in the feminist struggle.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för socialt arbete (SA).
    A Man in Crisis or Crisis of Men?: Masculinity and Societal Challenge in the 1970s in Sweden2020Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 12, nr 3, s. 550-568Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Individual crisis’, as a psychological term, was introduced in a Swedish context in the late 1960s. In this article, ‘individual crisis’ is analysed as a concept in order to understand how masculinity and emotion came to matter in Sweden in the 1970s—not least to bring about gender equality in Swedish welfare society. With ‘individual crisis’ as the empirical starting point for pinpointing the way men were to create a new identity and how new psychological knowledge circulated in society, it is possible to analyse which masculinity ideals and norms existed at the time. The focus of this article is on self-help and debate books that drove the discussion in the 1970s.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    Lunds universitet.
    Crisis and Caring for Inner Selves: Psychiatric Crisis as a Social Classification in Sweden in the 1970s2012Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 4, nr 3, s. 499-512Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to contribute to the understanding concerning the introduction of crisis psychotherapy in the 1970s in psychiatric clinics in Sweden. The article discusses how this psychotherapy became central in the work of the clinics in supporting patients to well-being and inner growth. The ambition was that patients in an acute crisis-situation would be offered care immediately, aiming at a short and intensive contact with the professionals to avoid hospitalization and long-term sick leave. These ideas were by no means new; in the 1960s, a Western debate had emerged in which the hospitalization in psychiatric clinics had received criticism. In Sweden, the psychiatrist Johan Cullberg was a key actor during the 1970s in the introduction of the psychiatric crisis perspectives. Here, his publication ’The psychic trauma’ from 1971 is analysed. The publication inspired psychiatric clinics to introduce crisis psychotherapy in three different pilot projects. The projects were presented in articles in the Swedish Medical Journal. These articles have also been analysed here. Self-care is highlighted through this material as a concept to be analysed. The question is discussed as to how the concept of the psychiatric crisis initiated and institutionalized a new form of social classification in which the patients were to take more responsibility for their own inner growth.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Lindh, Karolina
    Lund University.
    The Hamburgers in the Fridge: An Interview with Professor Nikolas Rose about Interdisciplinary Collaboration, Neuroscience and Critical Friendship2018Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 115-122Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    During 2016 and 2017 the Cultural Studies Group of Neuroscience at the Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences at Lund University in Sweden organised a seminar series titled the ‘Seminar on Neuroscience, Culture and Society’. Professor Nikolas Rose was one of the invited guest speakers; he is a researcher who strongly influences cultural reflections on neuroscience (Rose 2007, Abi-Rached & Rose 2010, Rose & Abi-Rached 2013). He visited us on the 22nd of March 2017 and during his visit Kristofer Hansson and Karolina Lindh took the opportunity to interview Professor Rose to hear more about his thoughts and experiences of interdisciplinary collaboration between neuroscience researchers and researchers in the social sciences and humanities.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Hansson, Kristofer
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Suneson, Ellen
    Lunds universitet.
    Vulnerable Normality: Popular Neuroimaging and the Discursive Logic of the (Dis)able(d) Brain2018Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 49-64Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyse popular neuroimaging of (dis)able(d) brains as a cultural phenomenon, as well as to explore how there has been, during the last decades, a subtle but important change in the way “normal” brains are depicted in popular science. Popular neuroimaging is introduced and used as an empirical basis to analyse what Fiona Kumari Campbell sees as a critique against ableism. The empirical material consists of two British popular science documentaries (both produced by the BBC) on the topic of the brain: Human Brain (1983), and Brain Story (2004). The article argues that the position of normality and able-bodiedness has changed as the development of brain scanning techniques has emerged. In particular, there seems to have been a change in how the brain is visualized and talked about. New frameworks for understanding normality, disability and vulnerability have appeared. Furthermore, we claim that this shift needs to be studied from a theoretical perspective that analyses the discursive logic of the (dis)able(d) brain where an indistinctness transpires and creates a form of vulnerable normality.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Lozic, Vanja
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Avdelningen för Pedagogik.
    (Re)shaping history in Bosnian and Herzegovinian museums2015Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 7, s. 307-329Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The current article explores how political changes in the past 130 years have shaped and reshaped three major museums in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). The overall aim is to describe structural processes of national museum building in BiH and the ways the museological representation of history is connected to state and nation making and to political transitions and crises. The analysed museums are the National Museum of BiH, the History Museum of BiH, and the Museum of the Republic of Srpska. The source material analysed consists of the directories and the titles of exhibitions; secondary material, which describes previous exhibitions; and virtual museum tours.

    The article illustrates that during the Austrian-Hungarian Empire, which established the National Museum in 1888, the museum played an important part in the representation of Bosnian identity (bosnjastvo). After World War II, in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, all three analysed museums were summoned to interpret the past in accordance with the guidelines of the communist regime. Since the 1990s, a highly ethnicized process of identity building and of the musealization of heritage, and history permeates all three museums analysed here. When it comes to the central exhibition-themes following the 1990s war, one could conclude that whereas the National Museum and the History Museum highlight the recent creation of an independent BiH and ostracize BIH-Serbs, the Museum of the Republic of Srpska asserts the ostensible distinctiveness of the Republic of Srpska and excludes the narratives about BiH as a unified and independent nation-state. If an agreement about the future of BiH and its history is to be reached, a step towards multi-vocal historical narratives has to be made from both sides.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 15.
    Manikowska, Ewa
    et al.
    Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.
    Pasternak, Gil
    De Montfort University Leicester, England, United Kingdom.
    Thor Tureby, Malin
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för samhälle, kultur och identitet (SKI).
    Digital Heritage in Cultural Conflicts: An Introduction2022Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 14, nr 2, s. 1-10Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Digital Heritage in Cultural Conflicts: An Introduction
  • 16.
    Sjögren, Hanna
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för barndom, utbildning och samhälle (BUS).
    Longing for the Past:: An Analysis of Discursive Formations in the Greta Thunberg Message2020Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 12, nr 3Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies discursive formations of climate change in texts by thecontemporary climate activist movement’s most famous character, Greta Thunberg.This study critically analyses the Greta Thunberg message and discusses the kindof worlds her message evokes. In doing so, the author discusses what is beingincluded in and omitted from contemporary public understandings of climatechange. Three themes are identified and analysed in the Greta Thunberg message:science as truth; for the sake of the human child; and the apocalyptic futures andthe evocation of the past. It is argued that the Greta Thunberg message makessense because of how it resonates with a worldview related to the promises ofmodernity. Furthermore, one way of understanding the popularity of Thunberg’smessage is that it evokes dreams of a world that once was. It is suggested that theGreta Thunberg message evokes longing for the past, rather than the possibility ofexisting in an already changing climate.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Thor Tureby, Malin
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för lärande och samhälle (LS), Institutionen för samhälle, kultur och identitet (SKI).
    Johansson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University.
    Migrant Life Stories as Digital Heritage2022Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 14, nr 2, s. 202-224Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the ambitions of international and national policy makers to digitalize the cultural heritage sector, a growing research field that deals with digitalization and cultural heritage has emerged. However, it has been argued that too much focus has been placed on technology and information policy issues and that research on how to achieve administrative effectiveness and preservation has taken precedence over studies of different actors’ engagement, participation and access to cultural heritage. Previous studies have also tended to problematize the “hows” rather than the “whys” of processes associated with digital heritage and digitalization. In addition, research has shown that collections documenting minorities and marginalized groups have been excluded from national strategies concerning the digitalization of cultural heritage. Therefore, the aim of this article is to investigate why and under what conditions digital heritage about and with migrants has been initiated, created and curated. We study the motives and the roles of different stakeholders in the digitization and patrimonialization processes of one collection containing life stories from migrants. Furthermore, in the article we understand stakeholders not only as decision makers, owners or managers, but also as any person or organization that feels affected by whatever happens to the object or piece defined as heritage. Consequently, a central element in the methodology of this research was the interviews conducted with crucial actors in relation to their engagements with the studied collection. During the interviews, we paid specific attention to the different motives of the involved stakeholders and why it was important to them that the collection was created and digitized.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Migrant Life Stories as Digital Heritage
  • 18.
    Wiszmeg, Andréa
    et al.
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lundin, Susanne
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Torkelson, Eva
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hagen, Niclas
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Cecilia
    CNS Gene Therapy, Lund University, Sweden.
    Difficult Questions and Ambivalent Answers on Genetic Testing2012Inngår i: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 4, nr 3, s. 463-480Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A qualitative pilot study on the attitudes of some citizens in southern Sweden toward predictive genetic testing – and a quantitative nation wide opinion poll targeting the same issues, was initiated by the Cultural Scientific Research Team of BAGADILICO. The latter is an international biomedical research environment on neurological disease at Lund University. The data of the two studies crystallized through analysis into themes around which the informants’ personal negotiations of opinions and emotions in relation to the topic centred: Concept of Risk,’Relations and Moral Multi-layers, Worry, Agency and Autonomy, Authority, and Rationality versus Emotion. The studies indicate that even groups of people that beforehand are non-engaged in the issue, harbour complex and ambivalent emotions and opinions toward questions like this. A certain kind of situation bound pragmatism that with difficulty could be shown by quantitative methods alone emerges. This confirms our belief that methodological consideration of combining quantitative and qualitative methods is crucial for gaining a more complex representation of attitudes, as well as for problematizing the idea of a unified public open to inquiry.

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