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  • 1.
    Abdul Rahim, Maha
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Khan, Kashmala
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Influence of Crown-Implant Ratio and Implant Inclination on Marginal Bone Loss around Dental Implants Supporting Single Crowns in the Posterior Region: A Retrospective Clinical Study.2023In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 12, no 9, article id 3219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this present record-based retrospective study was to investigate the influence of the crown-implant ratio (CIR) and implant inclination in relation to the occlusal plane on the marginal bone loss (MBL) around dental implants supporting single crowns in the posterior region of the jaws. All the cases of implant-supported single crowns in the premolar and molar regions were initially considered for inclusion. Only implants not lost, with baseline radiographs taken within 12 months after implant placement and with a minimum of 36 months of radiological follow-up, were considered for the analysis of MBL. Univariate linear regression models were used to compare MBL over time between 12 clinical covariates, after which a linear mixed-effects model was built. After the exclusion of 49 cases, a total of 316 implant-supported single crowns in 234 patients were included. The results from the statistical models suggested that implant inclination and anatomical- and clinical CIR (the main related factors investigated in the study) were not statistically significantly related to MBL over time. Age (older people), tooth region (premolar), and bruxism (bruxers) had a statistically significant influence on MBL over time.

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  • 2.
    Alenezi, Ali
    et al.
    Department of Prosthodontics, College of Dentistry, Qassim University, Buraydah 52571, Saudi Arabia.
    Alsweed, Mohammad
    Private Practice, Qassim Region, Buraydah 52571, Saudi Arabia.
    Alsidrani, Saleh
    Private Practice, Qassim Region, Buraydah 52571, Saudi Arabia.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Long-Term Survival and Complication Rates of Porcelain Laminate Veneers in Clinical Studies: A Systematic Review2021In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 10, no 5, article id 1074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presented study aimed to assess the survival rate of porcelain laminate veneers (PLV) based on a systematic review of the literature. An electronic search was last updated in February 2021. Eligibility criteria included clinical series of patients rehabilitated with PLVs published in the last 25 years, with a minimum follow-up of 3 years. Survival analysis methods were applied. Twenty-five studies were included, with 6500 PLVs. The 10-year estimated cumulative survival rate (CSR) of PLVs was 95.5%. The 10-year CSR of PLVs when fracture, debonding, occurrence of secondary caries, and need of endodontic treatment were considered as isolated reasons for failure were 96.3%, 99.2%, 99.3%, and 99.0%, respectively. PLVs without incisal coverage had a higher failure rate than PLVs with incisal coverage. Non-feldspathic PLVs performed better than feldspathic PLVs. As a conclusion, the 10-year CSR of PLVs was 95.5%, when fracture, debonding, occurrence of secondary caries, and need of endodontic treatment were considered as reasons for restoration failure. Fracture seems to be most common complication of PLVs, followed by debonding, with both more commonly happening within the first years after PLV cementation. PLVs with incisal coverage and non-feldspathic PLVs presented lower failure rates than PLVs without incisal coverage and feldspathic PLVs.

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  • 3.
    Ali, Amir
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Al Attar, Ammar
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Frequency of Smoking and Marginal Bone Loss around Dental Implants: A Retrospective Matched-Control Study2023In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 12, no 4, article id 1386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This dental record-based retrospective study aimed to compare the marginal bone loss (MBL) around dental implants in a group of smokers in relation to a matched group of non-smokers, with a special focus on five different frequencies of daily smoking (non-smokers, and frequency of 1-5, 6-10, 11-15, and 20 cig./day). Only implants with a minimum of 36 months of radiological follow-up were considered. Univariate linear regression models were used to compare MBL over time between 12 clinical covariates, after which a linear mixed-effects model was built. After matching of the patients, the study included 340 implants in 104 smokers, and 337 implants in 100 non-smokers. The results suggested that smoking degree (greater MBL for higher degrees of smoking), bruxism (greater MBL for bruxers), jaw (greater MBL in maxilla), prosthesis fixation (greater MBL for screw-retained prosthesis), and implant diameter (greater MBL for 3.75-4.10 mm) had a significant influence on MBL over time. There appears to be a positive correlation between the degree of smoking and the degree of MBL, meaning, the higher the degree of smoking, the greater the MBL. However, the difference is not apparent for different degrees of smoking when this is high, namely above 10 cigarettes per day.

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  • 4.
    Ayukawa, Yasunori
    et al.
    Section of Implant and Rehabilitative Dentistry, Division of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8282, Japan.
    Oshiro, Wakana
    Section of Implant and Rehabilitative Dentistry, Division of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8282, Japan.
    Atsuta, Ikiru
    Division of Advanced Dental Devices and Therapeutics, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8282, Japan.
    Furuhashi, Akihiro
    Section of Implant and Rehabilitative Dentistry, Division of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8282, Japan.
    Kondo, Ryosuke
    Section of Implant and Rehabilitative Dentistry, Division of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8282, Japan.
    Jinno, Yohei
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Koyano, Kiyoshi
    Section of Implant and Rehabilitative Dentistry, Division of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8282, Japan.
    Long Term Retention of Gingival Sealing around Titanium Implants with CaCl2 Hydrothermal Treatment: A Rodent Study2019In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 10, article id 1560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We previously reported that CaCl2 hydrothermal-treated (Ca-HT) titanium (Ti) implants induced a tight sealing at the interface between the implant and peri-implant epithelium (PIE) after implantation. However, it is not clear how long this improved epithelium sealing can be maintained. We subsequently investigated whether the positive effect of Ca-HT to promote sealing between the PIE and implant was sustained longer term. Maxillary molars were extracted from rats and replaced with either Ca-HT implants (Ca-HT group), distilled water-HT implants (DW-HT group) or non-treated implants (control group). After 16 weeks, the majority of implants in the Ca-HT group remained at the maxillary with no apical extension of the PIE. Conversely, half the number of control implants was lost following down-growth of the PIE. The effect of Ca-HT on migration and proliferation of rat oral epithelial cells (OECs) was also investigated. In OECs cultured on Ca-HT Ti plates, protein expression in relation to cell migration decreased, and proliferation was higher than other groups. Surface analysis indicated HT enhanced the formation of surface TiO2 layer without altering surface topography. Consequently, Ca-HT of Ti reduced PIE down-growth via tight epithelial attachment to the surface, which may enhance implant capability for a longer time post-implantation.

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  • 5. Berman, Anne H
    et al.
    Andersson, Claes
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Gajecki, Mikael
    Rosendahl, Ingvar
    Sinadinovic, Kristina
    Blankers, Matthijs
    Smartphone Apps Targeting Hazardous Drinking Patterns among University Students Show Differential Subgroup Effects over 20 Weeks: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Trial.2019In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 11, article id 1807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overconsumption of alcohol, from hazardous to excessive, heavy, and harmful levels, is common among university students. Consenting Swedish students were assigned to one of two smartphone apps offering feedback on estimated blood alcohol concentration (eBAC; Promillekoll/PartyPlanner) or assessment only (n = 2166; 1:1:1 ratio). App participants with excessive drinking according to public health criteria (>9/>14 drinks/week for women/men, respectively) at a 7 week follow-up were additionally assigned to the skills-based TeleCoach app or waitlist (n = 186; 1:1 ratio). All participants were followed at 14 and 20 weeks. At 7 weeks, Promillekoll users showed higher risk of excessive drinking (odds ratio (OR) = 1.83; p

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  • 6.
    Botermans, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lidén, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Machado, V. C.
    Slice Diagnóstico Volumétrico por Imagem, Belo Horizonte 30140-110, Brazil.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Immediate implant placement in the maxillary aesthetic zone: A cone beam computed tomography study2021In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 10, no 24, article id 5853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the factors that could be associated with the risk of labial cortical bone wall perforation with immediate implant placement (IIP) in the maxillary aesthetic zone, in a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) virtual study. CBCT exams from 126 qualified subjects (756 teeth) were included. Implants were virtually positioned in two different positions: in the long axis of the tooth (prosthetically-driven position) and in an ideal position in relation to adjacent anatomical structures (bone-driven position). Two different implant diameters were planned for each tooth position, namely, 3.75 and 4.3 mm for central incisors and canines, and 3.0 and 3.3 mm for lateral incisors. The incidence of perforation was nearly 80% and 5% for prostheticallyand bone-driven position, respectively. Factors associated with a higher risk of cortical bone wall perforation (bone-driven position), according to logistic regression analysis, were women, wider implants, Sagittal Root Position class IV, and decrease of the labial concavity angle. Perforation of the labial cortical bone wall can be greatly minimized when the implant is placed in a bone-driven position compared to a prosthetically-driven position. It is important to preoperatively evaluate the morphological features of the implant site for risk assessment and to individualize the treatment plan. 

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  • 7.
    Bracci, Alessandro
    et al.
    Univ Padua, Sch Dent, Dept Neurosci, I-35128 Padua, Italy..
    Lobbezoo, Frank
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Ctr Dent Amsterdam ACTA, Dept Orofacial Pain & Dysfunct, NL-1081 LA Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, NL-1081 LA Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Colonna, Anna
    Univ Siena, Sch Dent, Dept Biomed Technol, I-53100 Siena, Italy..
    Nykanen, Laura
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Dis, Helsinki 00100, Finland..
    Pollis, Matteo
    Univ Siena, Sch Dent, Dept Biomed Technol, I-53100 Siena, Italy..
    Ahlberg, Jari
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Dis, Helsinki 00100, Finland..
    Manfredini, Daniele
    Univ Siena, Sch Dent, Dept Biomed Technol, I-53100 Siena, Italy..
    Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives on Awake Bruxism Assessment: Expert Consensus Recommendations2022In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 11, no 17, article id 5083Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Awake bruxism (AB) is differentiated from sleep bruxism (SB) by the differences in etiology, comorbidities, and consequences related to the different spectrum of muscle activities exerted in relation to the different circadian manifestations. Furthermore, less literature data are available on AB than on SB. The introduction of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) strategies has allowed for collecting valuable data on the frequency of the different activities reported by an individual in his/her natural environment. This strategy has been further improved with the recent use of smartphone technologies. Recent studies have described an average frequency of AB behaviors, within the range of 23-40% for otherwise healthy young adults. An association between AB and some psychological traits has emerged, and the findings have indicated that patients with musculoskeletal symptoms (e.g., temporomandibular joint and/or muscle pain, muscle stiffness, and fatigue) report higher AB frequencies. Preliminary data suggest that muscle bracing and teeth contact are the most commonly reported behaviors, while teeth clenching is much less frequently reported than commonly believed previously. Report of teeth grinding during wakefulness is almost absent. This paper has critically reviewed the currently available approaches for the assessment of AB. In addition, some future perspectives and suggestions for further research have been provided.

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  • 8.
    Choi, Jung-Yoo
    et al.
    Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 03080, Korea.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Biomaterials, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 40530 Gothenburg.
    Jeon, Young-Jun
    Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 03080, Korea.
    Yeo, In-Sung Luke
    Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongro-gu, Seoul 03080, Korea.
    Osteogenic Cell Behavior on Titanium Surfaces in Hard Tissue2019In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 5, article id 604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is challenging to remove dental implants once they have been inserted into the bone because it is hard to visualize the actual process of bone formation after implant installation, not to mention the cellular events that occur therein. During bone formation, contact osteogenesis occurs on roughened implant surfaces, while distance osteogenesis occurs on smooth implant surfaces. In the literature, there have been many in vitro model studies of bone formation on simulated dental implants using flattened titanium (Ti) discs; however, the purpose of this study was to identify the in vivo cell responses to the implant surfaces on actual, three-dimensional (3D) dental Ti implants and the surrounding bone in contact with such implants at the electron microscopic level using two different types of implant surfaces. In particular, the different parts of the implant structures were scrutinized. In this study, dental implants were installed in rabbit tibiae. The implants and bone were removed on day 10 and, subsequently, assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), immunofluorescence microscopy (IF), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), focused ion-beam (FIB) system with Cs-corrected TEM (Cs-STEM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)which were used to determine the implant surface characteristics and to identify the cells according to the different structural parts of the turned and roughened implants. The cell attachment pattern was revealed according to the different structural components of each implant surface and bone. Different cell responses to the implant surfaces and the surrounding bone were attained at an electron microscopic level in an in vivo model. These results shed light on cell behavioral patterns that occur during bone regeneration and could be a guide in the use of electron microscopy for 3D dental implants in an in vivo model.

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  • 9.
    Colonna, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Biomedical Technologies, School of Dentistry, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy.
    Bracci, Alessandro
    Department of Neurosciences, School of Dentistry, University of Padova, 35128 Padova, Italy.
    Ahlberg, Jari
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, University of Helsinki, 00100 Helsinki, Finland.
    Câmara-Souza, Mariana Barbosa
    Ingá University Center, Maringá 87035-510, Brazil.
    Bucci, Rosaria
    Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive Sciences and Oral Sciences, Section of Orthodontics and Temporomandibular Disorders, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80138 Naples, Italy.
    Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues
    Bauru School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05508-000, Brazil.
    Dias, Ricardo
    Institute of Oral Implantology and Prosthodontics, Dentistry Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, 3004-531 Coimbra, Portugal.
    Emodi-Perlmam, Alona
    Department of Oral Rehabilitation, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel.
    Favero, Riccardo
    Department of Biomedical Technologies, School of Dentistry, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy;Department of Neurosciences, School of Dentistry, University of Padova, 35128 Padova, Italy.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Michelotti, Ambrosina
    Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive Sciences and Oral Sciences, Section of Orthodontics and Temporomandibular Disorders, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80138 Naples, Italy.
    Nykänen, Laura
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, University of Helsinki, 00100 Helsinki, Finland.
    Stanisic, Nikola
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Winocur, Efraim
    Department of Oral Rehabilitation, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel.
    Lobbezoo, Frank
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Manfredini, Daniele
    Department of Biomedical Technologies, School of Dentistry, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy.
    Ecological Momentary Assessment of Awake Bruxism Behaviors: A Scoping Review of Findings from Smartphone-Based Studies in Healthy Young Adults2023In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 12, no 5, article id 1904Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The recent introduction of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) smartphone-based strategies has allowed achieving some interesting data on the frequency of different awake bruxism (AB) behaviors reported by an individual in the natural environment. Objective: The present paper aims to review the literature on the reported frequency of AB based on data gathered via smartphone EMA technology. Methods: On September 2022, a systematic search in the Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar databases was performed to identify all peer-reviewed English-language studies assessing awake bruxism behaviors using a smartphone-based Ecological Momentary Assessment. The selected articles were assessed independently by two authors according to a structured reading of the articles’ format (PICO). Results: A literature search, for which the search terms “Awake Bruxism” and “Ecological Momentary Assessment” were used, identified 15 articles. Of them, eight fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The results of seven studies using the same smartphone-based app reported a frequency of AB behaviors in the range between 28.3 and 40% over one week, while another investigation adopted a different smartphone-based EMA approach via WhatsApp using a web-based survey program and reported an AB frequency of 58.6%. Most included studies were based on convenience samples with limited age range, highlighting the need for more studies on other population samples. Conclusions: Despite the methodological limits, the results of the reviewed studies provide a standpoint for comparison for future studies on the epidemiology of awake bruxism behaviors.

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  • 10.
    de Vries, Charlotte
    et al.
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ruacho, Guillermo
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden; Public Dental Services, Folktandvården Stockholms Län AB, 113 82 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kindstedt, Elin
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden; Section for Molecular Periodontology, Department of Odontology, Umeå University, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden; Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Potempa, Barbara Aleksandra
    Department of Oral Immunology & Infectious Diseases, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA; Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, 30-387 Krakow, Poland.
    Potempa, Jan
    Department of Oral Immunology & Infectious Diseases, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA; Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, 30-387 Krakow, Poland.
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Division of Oral Diseases, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Section for Molecular Periodontology, Department of Odontology, Umeå University, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Karin
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Are Increased in Patients with Severe Periodontitis, and Associate with Presence of Specific Autoantibodies and Myocardial Infarction2022In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 1008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is accumulating data suggesting that periodontitis is associated with increased risk of systemic and autoimmune diseases, including cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and there is an unmet need to identify these individuals early. With the periodontal bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) as one of the key drivers of periodontitis, we set out to investigate whether antibodies to Pg virulence factor arginine gingipain (Rgp) could serve as a biomarker for periodontitis patients at increased risk of autoimmunity and systemic disease. We measured serum anti-Rgp IgG in three study populations: PAROKRANK (779 individuals with myocardial infarction (MI); 719 controls), where 557 had periodontitis, and 312 were positive for autoantibodies associated with RA/SLE; the PerioGene North pilot (41 periodontitis; 39 controls); and an SLE case/control study (101 SLE; 100 controls). Anti-Rgp IgG levels were increased in severe periodontitis compared to controls (p < 0.0001), in individuals positive for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (p = 0.04) and anti-dsDNA antibodies (p = 0.035), compared to autoantibody-negative individuals; and in MI patients versus matched controls (p = 0.035). Our data support longitudinal studies addressing the role of anti-Rgp antibodies as biomarkers for periodontitis patients at increased risk of developing autoimmunity linked to RA and SLE, and mechanisms underpinning these associations.

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  • 11. Duddeck, Dirk U
    et al.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Larsson, Christel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Beuer, Florian
    On the Cleanliness of Different Oral Implant Systems: A Pilot Study.2019In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (1) Background: This paper aimed to compare the cleanliness of clinically well-documented implant systems with implants providing very similar designs. The hypothesis was that three well-established implant systems from Dentsply Implants, Straumann, and Nobel Biocare were not only produced with a higher level of surface cleanliness but also provided significantly more comprehensive published clinical documentation than their correspondent look-alike implants from Cumdente, Bioconcept, and Biodenta, which show similar geometry and surface structure. (2) Methods: Implants were analyzed using SEM imaging and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the elemental composition of potential impurities. A search for clinical trials was carried out in the PubMed database and by reaching out to the corresponding manufacturer. (3) Results: In comparison to their corresponding look-alikes, all implants of the original manufacturers showed-within the scope of this analysis-a surface free of foreign materials and reliable clinical documentation, while the SEM analysis revealed significant impurities on all look-alike implants such as organic residues and unintended metal particles of iron or aluminum. Other than case reports, the look-alike implant manufacturers provided no reports of clinical documentation. (4) Conclusions: In contrast to the original implants of market-leading manufacturers, the analyzed look-alike implants showed significant impurities, underlining the need for periodic reviews of sterile packaged medical devices and their clinical documentation.

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  • 12.
    Eriksson, Kaja
    et al.
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, 14104 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Fei, Guozhong
    Center for Rheumatology, Academic Specialist Center, Stockholm Health Services, 10235 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundmark, Anna
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, 14104 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Benchimol, Daniel
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, 14104 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lee, Linkiat
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, 14104 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hu, Yue O. O.
    Science for Life Laboratory School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 17121 Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Centre for Translational Microbiome Research (CTMR), Karolinska Institutet, 17164 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kats, Anna
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, 14104 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Saevarsdottir, Saedis
    Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Catrina, Anca Irinel
    Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, 14104 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    Science for Life Laboratory School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 17121 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Karin
    Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Leif
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, 14104 Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Periodontology at Eastmaninstitutet, Stockholm County Council, 11382 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yucel-Lindberg, Tulay
    Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, 14104 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Periodontal Health and Oral Microbiota in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis2019In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 5, article id 630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the periodontal health of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in relation to oral microbiota, systemic and oral inflammatory mediators, and RA disease activity. Forty patients underwent full-mouth dental/periodontal and rheumatological examination, including collection of blood, saliva, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and subgingival plaque. Composition of plaque and saliva microbiota were analysed using 16S rRNA sequencing and levels of inflammatory mediators by multiplex-immunoassay. The majority of the patients (75%) had moderate or severe periodontitis and the rest had no/mild periodontitis. Anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) positivity was significantly more frequent in the moderate/severe periodontitis (86%) compared to the no/mild group (50%). No significance between groups was observed for RA disease duration or activity, or type of medication. Levels of sCD30/TNFRSF8, IFN-2, IL-19, IL-26, MMP-1, gp130/sIL-6R ss, and sTNF-R1 were significantly higher in serum or GCF, and April/TNFSF13 was significantly higher in serum and saliva samples in moderate/severe periodontitis. The microbial composition in plaque also differed significantly between the two groups. In conclusion, the majority of RA patients had moderate/severe periodontitis and that this severe form of the disease was significantly associated with ACPA positivity, an altered subgingival microbial profile, and increased levels of systemic and oral inflammatory mediators.

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  • 13.
    Gjelvold, Björn
    et al.
    Clinic for Prosthodontics, Centre of Dental Specialist Care, 214 27 Malmö, Sweden.
    Kisch, Jenö
    Clinic for Prosthodontics, Centre of Dental Specialist Care, 214 27 Malmö, Sweden.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Immediate Loading and Delayed Loading of Single-Tooth Implants: 5-Year Results2021In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 10, no 5, article id 1077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this prospective randomized clinical study was to compare the clinical treatment outcome for single dental implants submitted to either immediate loading (IL) or delayed loading (DL) after 5 years of follow-up. Fifty patients with a missing maxillary tooth (15-25) were randomly allocated to either the IL or DL. The treatment procedures included implant installation in healed sites, temporary screw-retained crown and replacement with a permanent single implant crown. The two groups were evaluated with regard to implant survival, marginal bone level, papillae index, pink and white esthetic score (PES, WES). At the 5-year follow-up the implant survival rate was 100% and 95.8% for IL and DL, respectively. Implant success rate was 91.7% and 83.3% for IL and DL, respectively. The mean +/- SD marginal bone loss for IL and DL was -0.50 +/- 0.73 mm and -0.54 +/- 0.65 mm, respectively. (p = 0.782). Statistically significant less marginal bone loss was found non-smokers (p = 0.021). No statistically significant differences were found for IL and DL concerning papillae index PES and WES after 5 years. This study suggests that implant-supported single crowns in the maxillary aesthetic zone can present similar results with respect to either IL or DL after 5 years.

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  • 14.
    Grant, Melissa M
    et al.
    School of Dentistry, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham and Birmingham Community Healthcare Foundation Trust, Birmingham B5 7EG, UK.
    Jönsson, Daniel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Swedish Dental Service of Skåne, 222 37 Lund, Sweden.
    Next Generation Sequencing Discoveries of the Nitrate-Responsive Oral Microbiome and Its Effect on Vascular Responses2019In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 8, article id 1110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease is a worldwide human condition which has multiple underlying contributing factors: one of these is long-term increased blood pressure-hypertension. Nitric oxide (NO) is a small nitrogenous radical species that has a number of physiological functions including vasodilation. It can be produced enzymatically through host nitric oxide synthases and by an alternative nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway from ingested inorganic nitrate. It was discovered that this route relies on the ability of the oral microbiota to reduce nitrate to nitrite and NO. Next generation sequencing has been used over the past two decades to gain deeper insight into the microbes involved, their location and the effect of their removal from the oral cavity. This review article presents this research and comments briefly on future directions.

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  • 15. Reinedahl, David
    et al.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg 405 30, Sweden.
    Ligature-Induced Experimental Peri-Implantitis: A Systematic Review2018In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 7, no 12, article id 492Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This systematic review sought to analyze different experimental peri-implantitis models, their potential to induce marginal bone resorption (MBR) and the necessity of bacteria for bone loss to occur in these models. An electronic search in PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect was undertaken. A total of 133 studies were analyzed. Most studies induced peri-implantitis with ligatures that had formed a biofilm, sometimes in combination with inoculation of specific bacteria but never in a sterile environment. Most vertical MBR resulted from new ligatures periodically packed above old ones, followed by periodically exchanged ligatures and ligatures that were not exchanged. Cotton ligatures produced the most MBR, followed by steel, “dental floss” (not further specified in the studies) and silk. The amount of MBR varied significantly between different animal types and implant surfaces. None of the analyzed ligature studies aimed to validate that bacteria are necessary for the inducement of MBR. It cannot be excluded that bone loss can be achieved by other factors of the model, such as an immunological reaction to the ligature itself or trauma from repeated ligature insertions. Because all the included trials allowed plaque accumulation on the ligatures, bone resorbing capacity due to other factors could not be excluded or evaluated here.

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  • 16. Reinedahl, David
    et al.
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg 405 30, Sweden.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Johansson, Carina B
    Hammarström Johansson, Petra
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Aseptic Ligatures Induce Marginal Peri-Implant Bone Loss-An 8-Week Trial in Rabbits2019In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical value of ligature-induced experimental peri-implantitis studies has been questioned due to the artificial nature of the model. Despite repeated claims that ligatures of silk, cotton and other materials may not induce bone resorption by themselves; a recent review showed that the tissue reaction toward them has not been investigated. Hence, the current study aimed to explore the hard and soft tissue reactions toward commonly used ligature materials. A total of 60 dental implants were inserted into the femur ( = 20) and tibia ( = 40) of 10 rabbits. The femoral implants were ligated with sterile 3-0 braided silk in one leg and sterile cotton retraction chord in the other leg. The tibial implants were ligated with silk or left as non-ligated controls. All wounds were closed in layers. After a healing time of 8 weeks, femoral (silk versus cotton) and proximal tibial (silk versus non-ligated control) implants were investigated histologically. Distal tibial (silk versus non-ligated control) implants were investigated with real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The distance from the implant-top to first bone contact point was longer for silk ligated implants compared to non-ligated controls ( = 0.007), but did not vary between cotton and silk. The ligatures triggered an immunological reaction with cell infiltrates in close contact with the ligature materials, adjacent soft tissue encapsulation and bone resorption. qPCR further demonstrated an upregulated immune response toward the silk ligatures compared to non-ligated controls. Silk and cotton ligatures provoke foreign body reactions of soft tissue encapsulation type and bone resorption around implants in the absence of plaque.

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  • 17.
    Sala, Yousef Mohamed
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lu, Hans
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Clinical Outcomes of Maxillary Sinus Floor Perforation by Dental Implants and Sinus Membrane Perforation during Sinus Augmentation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2024In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 13, no 5, article id 1253Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present systematic review was to investigate the clinical outcomes after the perforation of the maxillary sinus by dental implants, or after maxillary sinus membrane perforation during sinus lift procedure. Twenty-nine publications were included. Failure rates of implants in cases where perforation of sinus floor had happened (11 studies) was generally low, and only one case of transient sinusitis was reported. The estimated failure rate of these implants was 2.1% (SE 1.0%, p = 0.035). There were 1817 implants (73 failures) placed in augmented sinuses in which the sinus membrane was perforated and 5043 implants (274 failures) placed in sinuses with no perforated membrane, from 18 studies. The odds of implant failure difference between the groups were not significant (OR 1.347, p = 0.197). log OR of implant failure between perforated and non-perforated membrane groups did not significantly change with the follow-up time (-0.004/month; p = 0.500). In conclusion, implant failure rate is generally low either for implants penetrating in the floor of the maxillary sinus or implants placed in augmented sinuses in which the sinus membrane was perforated. The prevalence of postoperative infection/sinusitis is low, and it may depend either on the dimensions of the perforation or on the anatomical predisposition.

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  • 18.
    Stocchero, Michele
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jinno, Yohei
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Toia, Marco
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ahmad, Marianne
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Papia, Evaggelia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Yamaguchi, Satoshi
    Becktor, Jonas P
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Intraosseous Temperature Change during Installation of Dental Implants with Two Different Surfaces and Different Drilling Protocols: An In Vivo Study in Sheep2019In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 8, article id 1198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The intraosseous temperature during implant installation has never been evaluated in an in vivo controlled setup. The aims were to investigate the influence of a drilling protocol and implant surface on the intraosseous temperature during implant installation, to evaluate the influence of temperature increase on osseointegration and to calculate the heat distribution in cortical bone. METHODS: Forty Branemark implants were installed into the metatarsal bone of Finnish Dorset crossbred sheep according to two different drilling protocols (undersized/non-undersized) and two surfaces (moderately rough/turned). The intraosseous temperature was recorded, and Finite Element Model (FEM) was generated to understand the thermal behavior. Non-decalcified histology was carried out after five weeks of healing. The following osseointegration parameters were calculated: Bone-to-implant contact (BIC), Bone Area Fraction Occupancy (BAFO), and Bone Area Fraction Occupancy up to 1.5 mm (BA1.5). A multiple regression model was used to identify the influencing variables on the histomorphometric parameters. RESULTS: The temperature was affected by the drilling protocol, while no influence was demonstrated by the implant surface. BIC was positively influenced by the undersized drilling protocol and rough surface, BAFO was negatively influenced by the temperature rise, and BA1.5 was negatively influenced by the undersized drilling protocol. FEM showed that the temperature at the implant interface might exceed the limit for bone necrosis. CONCLUSION: The intraosseous temperature is greatly increased by an undersized drilling protocol but not from the implant surface. The temperature increase negatively affects the bone healing in the proximity of the implant. The undersized drilling protocol for Branemark implant systems increases the amount of bone at the interface, but it negatively impacts the bone far from the implant.

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  • 19.
    Trindade, Ricardo
    et al.
    Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Prgomet, Zdenka
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bone Immune Response to Materials, Part I: Titanium, PEEK and Copper in Comparison to Sham at 10 Days in Rabbit Tibia2018In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 7, no 12, article id 526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone anchored biomaterials have become an indispensable solution for the restoration of lost dental elements and for skeletal joint replacements. However, a thorough understanding is still lacking in terms of the biological mechanisms leading to osseointegration and its contrast, unwanted peri-implant bone loss. We have previously hypothesized on the participation of immune mechanisms in such processes, and later demonstrated enhanced bone immune activation up to 4 weeks around titanium implants. The current experimental study explored and compared in a rabbit tibia model after 10 days of healing time, the bone inflammation/immunological reaction at mRNA level towards titanium, polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and copper compared to a Sham control. Samples from the test and control sites were, after a healing period, processed for gene expression analysis (polymerase chain reaction, (qPCR)) and decalcified histology tissue analysis. All materials displayed immune activation and suppression of bone resorption, when compared to sham. The M1 (inflammatory)/M2 (reparative) -macrophage phenotype balance was correlated to the proximity and volume of bone growth at the implant vicinity, with titanium demonstrating a M2-phenotype at 10 days, whereas copper and PEEK were still dealing with a mixed M1- and M2-phenotype environment. Titanium was the only material showing adequate bone growth and proximity inside the implant threads. There was a consistent upregulation of (T-cell surface glycoprotein CD4) CD4 and downregulation of (T-cell transmembrane glycoprotein CD8) CD8, indicating a CD4-lymphocyte phenotype driven reaction around all materials at 10 days.

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  • 20.
    Trindade, Ricardo
    et al.
    Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Prgomet, Zdenka
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bone Immune Response to Materials, Part II: Copper and Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Compared to Titanium at 10 and 28 Days in Rabbit Tibia2019In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Osseointegration is likely the result of an immunologically driven bone reaction to materials such as titanium. Osseointegration has resulted in the clinical possibility to anchor oral implants in jaw bone tissue. However, the mechanisms behind bony anchorage are not fully understood and complications over a longer period of time have been reported. The current study aims at exploring possible differences between copper (Cu) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) materials that do not osseointegrate, with osseointegrating cp titanium as control. The implants were placed in rabbit tibia and selected immune markers were evaluated at 10 and 28 days of follow-up. Cu and PEEK demonstrated at both time points a higher immune activation than cp titanium. Cu demonstrated distance osteogenesis due to a maintained proinflammatory environment over time, and PEEK failed to osseointegrate due to an immunologically defined preferential adipose tissue formation on its surface. The here presented results suggest the description of two different mechanisms for failed osseointegration, both of which are correlated to the immune system.

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