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  • 1.
    Caramaschi, Sara
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy.
    Papini, Gabriele B.
    Department of Patient Care & Monitoring, Philips Research, 5656 AE Eindhoven, The Netherlands;Department of Electrical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Caiani, Enrico G.
    Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy;Istituto Auxologico Italiano, IRCCS, S. Luca Hospital, 20149 Milan, Italy.
    Device Orientation Independent Human Activity Recognition Model for Patient Monitoring Based on Triaxial Acceleration2023Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 13, nr 7, s. 4175-4175Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Tracking a person’s activities is relevant in a variety of contexts, from health and group-specific assessments, such as elderly care, to fitness tracking and human–computer interaction. In a clinical context, sensor-based activity tracking could help monitor patients’ progress or deterioration during their hospitalization time. However, during routine hospital care, devices could face displacements in their position and orientation caused by incorrect device application, patients’ physical peculiarities, or patients’ day-to-day free movement. These aspects can significantly reduce algorithms’ performances. In this work, we investigated how shifts in orientation could impact Human Activity Recognition (HAR) classification. To reach this purpose, we propose an HAR model based on a single three-axis accelerometer that can be located anywhere on the participant’s trunk, capable of recognizing activities from multiple movement patterns, and, thanks to data augmentation, can deal with device displacement. Developed models were trained and validated using acceleration measurements acquired in fifteen participants, and tested on twenty-four participants, of which twenty were from a different study protocol for external validation. The obtained results highlight the impact of changes in device orientation on a HAR algorithm and the potential of simple wearable sensor data augmentation for tackling this challenge. When applying small rotations (<20 degrees), the error of the baseline non-augmented model steeply increased. On the contrary, even when considering rotations ranging from 0 to 180 along the frontal axis, our model reached a f1-score of 0.85±0.110.85±0.11 against a baseline model f1-score equal to 0.49±0.120.49±0.12.

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  • 2.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Janicke, Birgit
    Alm, Kersti
    Dizeyi, Nishtman
    Persson, Jenny L.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Discrimination between Breast Cancer Cells and White Blood Cells by Non-Invasive Measurements: Implications for a Novel In Vitro-Based Circulating Tumor Cell Model Using Digital Holographic Cytometry2020Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 10, nr 14, artikel-id 4854Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide. Metastasis is the main reason for death in breast cancer, and today, there is a lack of methods to detect and isolate circulating tumor cells (CTCs), mainly due to their heterogeneity and rarity. There are some systems that are designed to detect rare epithelial cancer cells in whole blood based on the most common marker used today, the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). It has been shown that aggressive breast cancer metastases are of non-epithelial origin and are therefore not always detected using EpCAM as a marker. In the present study, we used an in vitro-based circulating tumor cell model comprising a collection of six breast cancer cell lines and white blood cell lines. We used digital holographic cytometry (DHC) to characterize and distinguish between the different cell types by area, volume and thickness. Here, we present significant differences in cell size-related parameters observed when comparing white blood cells and breast cancer cells by using DHC. In conclusion, DHC can be a powerful diagnostic tool for the characterization of CTCs in the blood.

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  • 3.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Leida Mölder, Anna
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Quantitative Phase Imaging for Label-Free Analysis of Cancer Cells-Focus on Digital Holographic Microscopy2018Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 8, nr 7, artikel-id 1027Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand complex biological processes, scientists must gain insight into the function of individual living cells. In contrast to the imaging of fixed cells, where a single snapshot of the cell’s life is retrieved, live-cell imaging allows investigation of the dynamic processes underlying the function and morphology of cells. Label-free imaging of living cells is advantageous since it is used without fluorescent probes and maintains an appropriate environment for cellular behavior, otherwise leading to phototoxicity and photo bleaching. Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) is an ideal method for studying live cell dynamics by providing data from noninvasive monitoring over arbitrary time scales. The effect of drugs on migration, proliferation, and apoptosis of cancer cells are emerging fields suitable for QPI analysis. In this review, we provide a current insight into QPI applied to cancer research.

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  • 4.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Zhang, Yuecheng
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Göransson, Tommy
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV).
    Dizeyi, Nishtman
    Lund University.
    Persson, Jenny L.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Umeå University.
    Johansson, Emil
    Umeå University.
    Caraballo, Remi
    Umeå University.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University.
    Shinde, Sudhirkumar
    World Peace University, India.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sialic Acid as a Biomarker Studied in Breast Cancer Cell Lines In Vitro Using Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Polymers2021Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 11, nr 7, artikel-id 3256Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sialylations are post-translational modifications of proteins and lipids that play important roles in many cellular events, including cell-cell interactions, proliferation, and migration. Tumor cells express high levels of sialic acid (SA), which are often associated with the increased invasive potential in clinical tumors, correlating with poor prognosis. To overcome the lack of natural SA-receptors, such as antibodies and lectins with high enough specificity and sensitivity, we have used molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), or "plastic antibodies", as nanoprobes. Because high expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in primary tumors is often associated with proliferation and a more aggressive phenotype, the expression of EpCAM and CD44 was initially analyzed. The SA-MIPs were used for the detection of SA on the cell surface of breast cancer cells. Lectins that specifically bind to the a-2,3 SA and a-2,6 SA variants were used for analysis of SA expression, with both flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Here we show a correlation of EpCAM and SA expression when using the SA-MIPs for detection of SA. We also demonstrate the binding pattern of the SA-MIPs on the breast cancer cell lines using confocal microscopy. Pre-incubation of the SA-MIPs with SA-derivatives as inhibitors could reduce the binding of the SA-MIPs to the tumor cells, indicating the specificity of the SA-MIPs. In conclusion, the SA-MIPs may be a new powerful tool in the diagnostic analysis of breast cancer cells.

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  • 5.
    Feith, Marek
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Dept Physiol, Brno 62500, Czech Republic.
    Vicar, Tomas
    Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Dept Physiol, Brno 62500, Czech Republic.;Brno Univ Technol, Fac Elect Engn & Commun, Dept Biomed Engn, Brno 61600, Czech Republic..
    Gumulec, Jaromir
    Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Dept Physiol, Brno 62500, Czech Republic.;Masaryk Univ, Dept Pathophysiol, Fac Med, Brno 62500, Czech Republic.;Mendel Univ Brno, Dept Chem & Biochem, Zemedelska 1, CZ-61300 Brno, Czech Republic..
    Raudenska, Martina
    Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Dept Physiol, Brno 62500, Czech Republic.;Masaryk Univ, Dept Pathophysiol, Fac Med, Brno 62500, Czech Republic.;Mendel Univ Brno, Dept Chem & Biochem, Zemedelska 1, CZ-61300 Brno, Czech Republic..
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Masarik, Michal
    Masaryk Univ, Dept Pathophysiol, Fac Med, Brno 62500, Czech Republic.;Mendel Univ Brno, Dept Chem & Biochem, Zemedelska 1, CZ-61300 Brno, Czech Republic.;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med 1, BIOCEV, Prumyslova 595, Vestec 25250, Czech Republic..
    Balvan, Jan
    Masaryk Univ, Dept Pathophysiol, Fac Med, Brno 62500, Czech Republic..
    Quantitative Phase Dynamics of Cancer Cell Populations Affected by Blue Light2020Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 10, nr 7, s. 1-13, artikel-id 2597Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased exposition to blue light may induce many changes in cell behavior and significantly affect the critical characteristics of cells. Here we show that multimodal holographic microscopy (MHM) within advanced image analysis is capable of correctly distinguishing between changes in cell motility, cell dry mass, cell density, and cell death induced by blue light. We focused on the effect of blue light with a wavelength of 485 nm on morphological and dynamical parameters of four cell lines, malignant PC-3, A2780, G361 cell lines, and the benign PNT1A cell line. We used MHM with blue light doses 24 mJ/cm(2), 208 mJ/cm(2) and two kinds of expositions (500 and 1000 ms) to acquire real-time quantitative phase information about cellular parameters. It has been shown that specific doses of the blue light significantly influence cell motility, cell dry mass and cell density. These changes were often specific for the malignant status of tested cells. Blue light dose 208 mJ/cm(2) x 1000 ms affected malignant cell motility but did not change the motility of benign cell line PNT1A. This light dose also significantly decreased proliferation activity in all tested cell lines but was not so deleterious for benign cell line PNT1A as for malignant cells. Light dose 208 mJ/cm(2) x 1000 ms oppositely affected cell mass in A2780 and PC-3 cells and induced different types of cell death in A2780 and G361 cell lines. Cells obtained the least damage on lower doses of light with shorter time of exposition.

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  • 6.
    Fontanella, Chiara Giulia
    et al.
    Univ Padua, Ctr Mech Biol Mat, I-35131 Padua, Italy.;Univ Padua, Dept Ind Engn, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    Carniel, Emanuele Luigi
    Univ Padua, Ctr Mech Biol Mat, I-35131 Padua, Italy.;Univ Padua, Dept Ind Engn, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    Parpaiola, Andrea
    Univ Pavia, Dept Clin Surg Diagnost & Paediat Sci, I-27100 Pavia, Italy..
    Toia, Marco
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Natali, Arturo Nicola
    Univ Padua, Ctr Mech Biol Mat, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    Interaction Phenomena between Dental Implants and Bone Tissue in Case of Misfit: A Pilot Study2023Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 13, nr 10, artikel-id 6004Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The biomechanical response of cortical and trabecular bone tissues represents a fundamental aspect for the interpretation of the functional response of dental implants. In the case of misfit, the interaction phenomena occurring within the surgical and the subsequent healing phases must be interpreted primarily in the light of the response of bone tissue. This is influenced by the specific loadings induced, characterized by intensity and variable trends. The pilot study reported, which intentionally refers to a simple case of a two-implants frame, is addressed to define the method to approach the biomechanical investigation of the problem and to attest the necessity to integrate clinical competences with biomechanical analysis for interpreting different aspects of osseointegration. The action induced in cortical and trabecular bone regions depending on the implant frame conformation, the surgical procedure adopted, the varying condition at the bone-implant interface and the evolutionary trend of healing are the principal aspects to be considered to evaluate the osseointegration process. The biomechanical reliability of the specific implant frame is investigated in terms of bone-implant interaction by means of numerical models. This approach can offer valid information and support clinical practice under the fundamental condition that bone biomechanical behavior is properly characterized and represented in the model, in spite of the complex formulation to be adopted.

  • 7.
    Hasterok, Sylwia
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gustafsson, Anna
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Applications of Tumor Cells in an In Vitro 3D Environment2023Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 13, nr 18, s. 10349-10349Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Spherical, multicellular aggregates of tumor cells, or three-dimensional (3D) tumor models, can be grown from established cell lines or dissociated cells from tissues in a serum-free medium containing appropriate growth factors. Air–liquid interfaces (ALIs) represent a 3D approach that mimics and supports the differentiation of respiratory tract and skin 3D models in vitro. Many 3D tumor cell models are cultured in conjunction with supporting cell types, such as fibroblasts, endothelial cells, or immune cells. To further mimic the in vivo situation, several extracellular matrix models are utilized to support tumor cell growth. Scaffolds used for 3D tumor cell culture growth include both natural and synthetic hydrogels. Three-dimensional cell culture experiments in vitro provide more accurate data on cell-to-cell interactions, tumor characteristics, drug discovery, metabolic profiling, stem cell research, and diseases. Moreover, 3D models are important for obtaining reliable precision data on therapeutic candidates in human clinical trials before predicting drug cytotoxicity. This review focuses on the recent literature on three different tissue types of 3D tumor models, i.e., tumors from a colorectal site, prostate, and skin. We will discuss the establishment of 3D tumor cell cultures in vitro and the requirement for additional growth support.

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  • 8. Liu, Shu
    et al.
    Shao, Jie
    Kong, Tianjiao
    Malekian, Reza
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT). Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP).
    ECG Arrhythmia Classification using High Order Spectrum and 2D Graph Fourier Transform2020Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 10, nr 14, artikel-id 4741Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart diseases are in the front rank among several kinds of life threats, due to its high incidence and mortality. Regarded as a powerful tool in the diagnosis of the cardiac disorder and arrhythmia detection, analysis of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals has become the focus of numerous researches. In this study, a feature extraction method based on the bispectrum and 2D graph Fourier transform (GFT) was developed. High-order matrix founded on bispectrum are extended into structured datasets and transformed into the eigenvalue spectrum domain by GFT, so that features can be extracted from statistical quantities of eigenvalues. Spectral features have been computed to construct the feature vector. Support vector machine based on the radial basis function kernel (SVM-RBF) was used to classify different arrhythmia heartbeats downloaded from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Beth Israel Hospital (MIT-BIH) Arrhythmia Database, according to the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) standard. Based on the cross-validation method, the experimental results depicted that our proposed model, the combination of bispectrum and 2D-GFT, achieved a high classification accuracy of 96.2%.

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  • 9.
    Patel, Megha
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV).
    Feith, Marek
    Masaryk Univ, Fac Med, Dept Physiol, Brno 62500, Czech Republic..
    Janicke, Birgit
    Phase Holog Imaging AB, S-22363 Lund, Sweden..
    Alm, Kersti
    Phase Holog Imaging AB, S-22363 Lund, Sweden..
    El-Schich, Zahra
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Evaluation of the Impact of Imprinted Polymer Particles on Morphology and Motility of Breast Cancer Cells by Using Digital Holographic Cytometry2020Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 10, nr 3, artikel-id 750Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer type worldwide and breast cancer metastasis accounts for the majority of breast cancer-related deaths. Tumour cells produce increased levels of sialic acid (SA) that terminates the monosaccharide on glycan chains of the glycosylated proteins. SA can contribute to cellular recognition, cancer invasiveness and increase the metastatic potential of cancer cells. SA-templated molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been proposed as promising reporters for specific targeting of cancer cells when deployed in nanoparticle format. The sialic acid-molecularly imprinted polymers (SA-MIPs), which use SA for the generation of binding sites through which the nanoparticles can target and stain breast cancer cells, opens new strategies for efficient diagnostic tools. This study aims at monitoring the effects of SA-MIPs on morphology and motility of the epithelial type MCF-7 and the highly metastatic MDAMB231 breast cancer cell lines, using digital holographic cytometry (DHC). DHC is a label-free technique that is used in cell morphology studies of e.g., cell volume, area and thickness as well as in motility studies. Here, we show that MCF-7 cells move slower than MDAMB231 cells. We also show that SA-MIPs have an effect on cell morphology, motility and viability of both cell lines. In conclusion, by using DH microscopy, we could detect SA-MIPs impact on different breast cancer cells regarding morphology and motility.

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  • 10.
    Persson, Jan A.
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT).
    Bugeja, Joseph
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT).
    Davidsson, Paul
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT).
    Holmberg, Johan
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT).
    Kebande, Victor R.
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT).
    Mihailescu, Radu-Casian
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT).
    Sarkheyli-Hägele, Arezoo
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT).
    Tegen, Agnes
    Malmö universitet, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för teknik och samhälle (TS), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DVMT).
    The Concept of Interactive Dynamic Intelligent Virtual Sensors (IDIVS): Bridging the Gap between Sensors, Services, and Users through Machine Learning2023Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 13, nr 11, artikel-id 6516Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns the novel concept of an Interactive Dynamic Intelligent Virtual Sensor (IDIVS), which extends virtual/soft sensors towards making use of user input through interactive learning (IML) and transfer learning. In research, many studies can be found on using machine learning in this domain, but not much on using IML. This paper contributes by highlighting how this can be done and the associated positive potential effects and challenges. An IDIVS provides a sensor-like output and achieves the output through the data fusion of sensor values or from the output values of other IDIVSs. We focus on settings where people are present in different roles: from basic service users in the environment being sensed to interactive service users supporting the learning of the IDIVS, as well as configurators of the IDIVS and explicit IDIVS teachers. The IDIVS aims at managing situations where sensors may disappear and reappear and be of heterogeneous types. We refer to and recap the major findings from related experiments and validation in complementing work. Further, we point at several application areas: smart building, smart mobility, smart learning, and smart health. The information properties and capabilities needed in the IDIVS, with extensions towards information security, are introduced and discussed.

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  • 11.
    Sjöberg, Thomas
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Rurack, Knut
    BAM Fed Inst Mat Res & Testing, D-12205 Berlin, Germany..
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Colorectal Cancer Cell Spheroids Co-Cultured with Molecularly Imprinted Fluorescent Particles Targeting Sialic Acid Show Preserved Cell Viability2023Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 13, nr 9, artikel-id 5330Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In vitro cultured 3D models of CRC have been demonstrated to hold considerable worth in drug discovery, drug resistance analysis, and in studying cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions that occur in the tumor microenvironment. The 3D models resemble the in vivo physiological microenvironment by replicating the cell type composition and tissue architecture. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been investigated for use instead of antibodies against small non-immunogenic structures, such as sialic acid (SA). Glyco-conjugates including SA are present on all cells, and often deregulated on cancer cells. Here, we present a novel approach for targeting and detecting colorectal cancer cells (CRC) by using in vitro cultured HT29 3D spheroids co-cultured in vitro with either fluorescent MIPs targeting SA, SA-MIPs, or the two lectins targeting SA, MAL I, and SNA. Both formaldehyde-fixed and viable HT29 3D spheroids with or without SA-MIPs were imaged in 3D by confocal microscopy. The results revealed a preserved cell morphology and viability of the HT29 3D spheroids co-cultured in vitro with SA-MIPs. However, the lectins MAL I and SNA targeting the a-2,3 or a-2,6 SA glycosidic linkages, respectively, affected the cell viability when co-cultured with the viable HT29 3D spheroids, and no living cells could be detected. Here, we have shown that the SA-MIPs could be used as a safe and low-cost diagnostic tool for targeting and detecting cancer cells in a physiologically relevant 3D cancer model in vitro.

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  • 12.
    Sternbæk, Louise
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Phase Holographic Imaging AB, SE-223 63 Lund, Sweden.
    Kimani, Martha
    Chemical and Optical Sensing Division, Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM), DE-12489 Berlin, Germany.
    Gawlitza, Kornelia
    Chemical and Optical Sensing Division, Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM), DE-12489 Berlin, Germany.
    Rurack, Knut
    Chemical and Optical Sensing Division, Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM), DE-12489 Berlin, Germany.
    Janicke, Birgit
    Phase Holographic Imaging AB, SE-223 63 Lund, Sweden.
    Alm, Kersti
    Phase Holographic Imaging AB, SE-223 63 Lund, Sweden.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV). Malmö universitet, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Eriksson, Håkan
    Malmö universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa och samhälle (HS), Institutionen för biomedicinsk vetenskap (BMV).
    Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Exhibit Low Cytotoxic and Inflammatory Properties in Macrophages In Vitro2022Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 12, s. 1-16, artikel-id 6091Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) against sialic acid (SA) have been developed as a detection tool to target cancer cells. Before proceeding to in vivo studies, a better knowledge of the overall effects of MIPs on the innate immune system is needed. The aim of this study thus was to exemplarily assess whether SA-MIPs lead to inflammatory and/or cytotoxic responses when administered to phagocytosing cells in the innate immune system. The response of monocytic/macrophage cell lines to two different reference particles, Alhydrogel and PLGA, was compared to their response to SA-MIPs. In vitro culture showed a cellular association of SA-MIPs and Alhydrogel, as analyzed by flow cytometry. The reference particle Alhydrogel induced secretion of IL-1β from the monocytic cell line THP-1, whereas almost no secretion was provoked for SA-MIPs. A reduced number of both THP-1 and RAW 264.7 cells were observed after incubation with SA-MIPs and this was not caused by cytotoxicity. Digital holographic cytometry showed that SA-MIP treatment affected cell division, with much fewer cells dividing. Thus, the reduced number of cells after SA-MIP treatment was not linked to SA-MIPs cytotoxicity. In conclusion, SA-MIPs have a low degree of inflammatory properties, are not cytotoxic, and can be applicable for future in vivo studies.

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  • 13.
    Stocchero, Michele
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). University of Padova, Italy.
    Sivolella, Stefano
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Brunello, Giulia
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Zoppello, Arianna
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Cavallin, Francesco
    Independent Statistician.
    Biasetto, Lisa
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Bone Temperature Variation Using a 3D-Printed Surgical Guide with Internal Irrigation2021Ingår i: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 11, nr 6, artikel-id 2588Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone overheating is a possible cause of implants early failure. When a surgical guide is used, the risk of heat injury is greater due to the reduced efficacy of the irrigation. The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the effect of an additional built-in irrigation on bone temperature variation during implant osteotomy. Twelve bovine ribs were used. Cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) was performed and a 3D-printed surgical guide with additional built-in irrigation tubes was produced for each rib. A total of 48 osteotomies were prepared, to compare the supplementary internal irrigation system (Group A) with external irrigation alone (Group B), no irrigation (Group C) and with free-hand surgery with external irrigation (Group D). Temperature was measured by three thermocouples placed at depths of 1.5, 7, and 12 mm. The largest temperature variation at each thermocouple showed median values of 3.0 degrees C, 1.9 degrees C, and 2.3 degrees C in Group 1; 2.3 degrees C, 1.7 degrees C, and 0.9 degrees C in Group 2; 3.2 degrees C, 1.6 degrees C, and 2.0 degrees C in Group 3; 2.0 degrees C, 2.0 degrees C, and 1.3 degrees C in Group 4, respectively. No differences were found among the four groups. In general, the highest temperature increase was observed with the use of the first drill (cortical perforator). Post-experimental CBCT revealed the presence of radiopaque material clogging the aperture of the internal irrigation channels. Additional internal irrigation was not found to significantly contribute to decrease bone temperature in this ex vivo setting.

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