Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gonzalez-Martinez, Juan Francisco
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Kakar, Erum
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Erkselius, Stefan
    Rehnberg, Nicola
    Sotres, Javier
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    The role of cross-linking in the scratch resistance of organic coatings: An investigation using Atomic Force Microscopy2019In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 418-419, p. 151-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how the composition of organic coatings influences their ability to resist surface damage during use remains a challenge. A relevant potential influence is that of cross-linking density. This parameter is frequently used for tailoring the mechanical properties of organic coatings and it manifests itself in terms of scratch resistance. However, the mechanisms that influence scratch resistance are not fully understood. From a thermodynamic perspective, wear of coatings is related to their ability to dissipate friction energy. Hence, it would be reasonable to assume that cross-linking influences the scratch resistance of coatings by influencing their viscoelasticity, as this is one of the parameters that define energy dissipation during shear. This hypothesis was investigated by studying two similar waterborne polyurethane coatings that have different cross-linking properties. The multiple abilities of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were used to characterize the coatings’ scratch resistance, frictional properties, stiffness, adhesiveness and viscoelasticity. Significantly, it was found that monitoring the thermal noise of AFM cantilevers in contact with the coatings was sensitive enough to quantify the effects of cross-linking on their viscoelasticity. Based on this work, cross-linking is proposed to enhance scratch resistance by elastically storing, and eventually releasing, part of the mechanical energy that was transferred to the coatings during shear.

  • 2. Holmberg, Kenneth
    et al.
    Ronkainen, Helena
    Laukkanen, Anssi
    Wallin, Kim
    Hogmark, Sture
    Jacobson, Staffan
    Wiklund, Urban
    Souza, Roberto M
    Ståhle, Per
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Residual stresses in TiN, DLC and MoS2 coated surfaces with regard to their tribological fracture behaviour2009In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 267, no 12, p. 2142-2156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin hard coatings on components and tools are used increasingly due to the rapid development in deposition techniques, tribological performance and application skills. The residual stresses in a coated surface are crucial for its tribological performance. Compressive residual stresses in PVD deposited TiN and DLC coatings were measured to be in the range of 0.03–4 GPa on steel substrate and 0.1–1.3 GPa on silicon. MoS2 coatings had tensional stresses in the range of 0.8–1.3 on steel and 0.16 GPa compressive stresses on silicon. The fracture pattern of coatings deposited on steel substrate were analysed both in bend testing and scratch testing. A micro-scale finite element method (FEM) modelling and stress simulation of a 2 μm TiN-coated steel surface was carried out and showed a reduction of the generated tensile buckling stresses in front of the sliding tip when compressive residual stresses of 1 GPa were included in the model. However, this reduction is not similarly observed in the scratch groove behind the tip, possibly due to sliding contact-induced stress relaxation. Scratch and bending tests allowed calculation of the fracture toughness of the three coated surfaces, based on both empirical crack pattern observations and FEM stress calculation, which resulted in highest values for TiN coating followed by MoS2 and DLC coatings, being KC = 4–11, about 2, and 1–2 MPa m1/2, respectively. Higher compressive residual stresses in the coating and higher elastic modulus of the coating correlated to increased fracture toughness of the coated surface.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf