Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Bo
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US). Uppsala Univ, Inst Housing & Urban Res, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bohman, Helena
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Tenant Voice - As Strong as It Gets: Exit, Voice and Loyalty in Housing Renovation2021In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 365-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article applies Hirschman's model of exit, voice and loyalty to a Swedish case of housing renovation in a building with comparatively well-off tenants. Hirschman's framework is particularly well suited for understanding the housing market with its heterogeneity and high transaction and attachment costs, and accordingly strong loyalty and voice. Our study indicates that the exit-voice-loyalty framework is a useful tool for analysing renovation processes, since these trigger both voice and exit behaviour. We argue that renovations can be considered as critical junctures to an existing tenant-landlord relation, thereby exposing power relations on the housing market. In the case studied, tenants were not able to affect the scope of the renovation directly, but tenant voice did affect the process as well as the outcome in other respects. The capable tenant group makes this a "most likely case" for testing the limits of tenant influence in housing renovation processes.

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  • 2.
    Grander, Martin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Off the Beaten Track? Selectivity, Discretion and Path-Shaping in Swedish Public Housing2019In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 385-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By its universal approach, Swedish public housing has traditionally been an instrument to contribute to the national policy aim of “good housing for all”. However, the universal approach is under pressure. Demands on competitiveness and a businesslike return on investment means public housing companies are increasingly striving for profit in their everyday business. This paper analyses this development with the strategic-relational approach (SRA) and argues that a new economic imaginary has emerged, which limits the companies’ perceived possibilities to retain the universal approach. However, spatio-temporal variations are evident and the findings give evidence to ample actorial discretion for companies to negotiate the economic imaginary in the current political-economic landscape. Thus, the potential to retain the undertaking of “good housing for all” still exists, but it is unevenly actualized. How this discretion is used may be decisive for the future of the universal character of public housing in Sweden.

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  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Jennie
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Spatial, Financial and Ideological Trajectories of Public Housing in Malmö, Sweden2021In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 95-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public housing has been one of the primary tools mobilized in Sweden historically to fulfil citizens' right to housing. However, the nominally universal character of public housing in the Swedish context has increasingly been circumvented through processes of segregation, residualisation, gentrification and displacement. Furthermore, previous housing research points to the neoliberal shift of Sweden's housing politics since the early 1990s, encompassing the deregulation of public housing at the national level. Focusing on the example of public housing, this paper argues for a multiscalar and nuanced understanding of housing neoliberalisation in Sweden, by investigating the change of public housing locally. The political landscape of public housing in different localities has been transformed as a result of interacting trajectories of spatial restructuring, financialisation and ideological reconstruction. The paper examines this conjunctural transformation empirically through a case study of public housing in the city of Malmö.

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  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Jennie
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Listerborn, Carina
    Malmö University, Institute for Urban Research (IUR). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Molina, Irene
    Institute for Housing and Urban Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Struggling for Housing Justice: New Theoretical and Methodological Approaches2024In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, p. 1-10Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How can struggles for housing justice act as a lens to expand housingresearchers’ understanding of the rental crisis and of the systems thatunderpin this crisis? By presenting papers from Sweden, Spain,Greece, the UK, and Australia this special issue contributes withknowledge on how housing struggles can inform new theoreticaland methodological approaches within the field of housing studies.In turn, the SI presents three tenets that together form a frameworkfor housing scholars: institutionalization as politics, tenants as poli-tical actors, and learning housing justice. We argue that it is crucialfor housing scholars to recenter on struggles for housing justice intheir readings of contemporary housing systems.

  • 5.
    Sørvoll, Jadar
    et al.
    Norwegian Social Research (NOVA), OsloMet–Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    Bengtsson, Bo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Mechanisms of Solidarity in Collaborative Housing: The Case of Co-operative Housing in Denmark 1980–20172020In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 65-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we discuss the role of solidarity in collaborative housing in relation to the trajectory and discourse of the Danish idea of co-operative housing (andelstanken). Our analytical perspective draws on the concept of social mechanisms and a framework suggested by the social scientist Steinar Stjernø. We argue that collaborative housing based on individual (home) ownership of shares and user-rights to apartments are susceptible to the mechanism of “conflicting interests between different categories on the housing market”. Moreover, we suggest that this mechanism has a tendency to further the economic interests of residents, at the expense of the external solidarity with groups looking to access affordable housing. Our argument is supported by theoretical reflection, the historical trajectory of co-operative housing in Scandinavia and empirical analysis of the Danish case.

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