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  • 1.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    A History of Periodontitis Suggests a Higher Risk for Implant Loss2015Ingår i: Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, ISSN 1532-3382, E-ISSN 1532-3390, Vol. 15, nr 4, s. 185-186Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    ARTICLE TITLE AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION: Periodontitis, implant loss and peri-implantitis. A meta-analysis. Sgolastra F, Petrucci A, Severino M, Gatto R, Monaco A.Clin Oral Implants Res 2015;26(4):e8-16. REVIEWER: Bruno Ramos Chrcanovic, DDS, MSc, PhD student PURPOSE/QUESTION: To compare the risks of implant loss, implant bone loss, and peri-implantitis between subjects with and without a history of periodontal disease. SOURCE OF FUNDING: The authors reported that no external funding sources directly supported this study TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analysis of data LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 2: Limited-quality, patient-oriented evidence STRENGTH OF RECOMMENDATION GRADE: Grade B: Inconsistent or limited-quality patient-oriented evidence.

  • 2.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Lobbezoo, F.
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Durham, J.
    School of Dental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom; Newcastle Hospitals’ NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle, United Kingdom.
    Peck, C.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    THE VOICE OF THE PATIENT IN OROFACIAL PAIN MANAGEMENT: The Voice of the Patient in Orofacial Pain Management2022Ingår i: Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, ISSN 1532-3382, E-ISSN 1532-3390, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 1-7, artikel-id 101648Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As pain cannot be measured objectively, the use of patient reported outcomes (PROs), and specifically dental PROs (dPROs), is essential for adequate assessment and management of the patient with orofacial pain. For orofacial pain conditions, some of the suitable PROs are specific to dentistry and hence can be labelled dPROs, whereas others are not. There is also a need to understand which outcomes and domains are most relevant to the patient with pain complaints within the context of the biopsychosocial model. Acute pain in the orofacial area is most often related to toothache, whereas the most common chronic orofacial pain are temporomandibular disorders. Other chronic pains in the orofacial area include neuropathic pain and unknown or idiopathic pain. PROs have been fundamental in the development of both screening procedures and diagnostic criteria in temporomandibular disorders. PROs are now often a prerequisite for the most common temporomandibular disorder pain diagnoses. Furthermore, PROs form the basis for decision-making with regard to treatment, prognostics, and referrals. Future areas of development include the standardized use of PROs in the screening and diagnostics of the less common orofacial pain conditions, together with development of core outcomes sets and standardized protocols for the use of PROs in evaluation of treatment including efficacy, compliance, adherence, and side-effects. © 2021 The Author(s)

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  • 3.
    John, M. T.
    et al.
    Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, Minneapolis.
    Omara, M.
    Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Arthritis and Rehabilitation, Vienna, Austria.
    Su, N.
    Department of Social Dentistry, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam & Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Sekulic, S.
    Dental Division, Department for Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Visscher, C. M.
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Disfunction, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bekes, K.
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University Clinic of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Reissmann, D. R.
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
    Baba, K.
    Department of Prosthodontics, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Schierz, O.
    Department of Prosthodontics and Materials Science, University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Theis-Mahon, N.
    Health Sciences Libraries, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
    Fueki, K.
    Removable Partial Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.
    Stamm, T.
    Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Bondemark, Lars
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Oghli, Ibrahim
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Department of Oral Basic Sciences, Taibah University, Medina, Saudi Arabia.
    van Wijk, A.
    Department of Social Dentistry, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam & Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Centre for Oral Rehabilitation, Folktandvården Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Recommendations for use and scoring of oral health impact profile versions2022Ingår i: Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, ISSN 1532-3382, E-ISSN 1532-3390, Vol. 22, nr 1, artikel-id 101619Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: OHIP's original seven-domain structure does not fit empirical data, but a psychometrically sound and clinically more plausible structure with the four OHRQoL dimensions Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact has emerged. Consequently, use and scoring of available OHIP versions need to be revisited. Aim: We assessed how well the overall construct OHRQoL and its four dimensions were measured with several OHIP versions (20, 19, 14, and 5 items) to derive recommendations which instruments should be used and how to score them. Methods: Data came from the “Dimensions of OHRQoL Project” and used the project's learning sample (5,173 prosthodontic patients and general population subjects with 49-item OHIP data). We computed correlations among OHIP versions’ summary scores. Correlations between OHRQoL dimensions, on one hand, and OHIP versions’ domain scores or OHIP-5′s items, on the other hand, were also computed. OHIP use and scoring recommendations were derived for psychometrically solid but also practical OHRQoL assessment. Results: Summary scores of 5-, 14-, 19- and 49-item versions correlated highly (r = 0.91–0.98), suggesting similar OHRQoL construct measurement across versions. The OHRQoL dimensions Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact were best measured by the OHIP domain scores for Physical Disability, Physical Pain, Psychological Discomfort, and Handicap, respectively. Conclusion: Recommendations were derived which OHIP should be preferably used and how OHIP versions should be scored to capture the overall construct and the dimensions of OHRQoL. Psychometrically solid and practical OHRQoL assessment in all settings across all oral health conditions can be achieved with the 5-item OHIP. 

  • 4.
    John, Mike T
    et al.
    Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
    Sekulić, Stella
    Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Prosthodontics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Bekes, Katrin
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University Clinic of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Al-Harthy, Mohammad H
    Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Basic & Clinical Sciences, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia.
    Michelotti, Ambra
    Section of Orthodontics, Department of Neurosciences, University of Naples "Federico II", Naples, Italy.
    Reissmann, Daniel R
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, University Medical Center Hamburg - Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
    Nikolovska, Julijana
    Faculty of Dental Medicine, Department for Prosthodontics, University Ss. Cyril and Methodius, Skopje, Macedonia.
    Sanivarapu, Sahityaveera
    Department of Periodontics, Care Dental College, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India.
    Lawal, Folake B
    Department of Periodontology and Community Dentistry, University of Ibadan and University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Peršić Kiršić, Sanja
    Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Strajnić, Ljiljana
    Faculty of Medicine, Clinic for Dentistry of Vojvodina, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia.
    Casassus, Rodrigo
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Orofacial Pain, University of Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile.
    Baba, Kazuyoshi
    Department of Prosthodontics, Showa University Dental Hospital, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Schimmel, Martin
    Division of Gerodontology, Department of Reconstructive Dentistry and Gerodontology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Division of Gerodontology and Removable Prosthodontics, University Clinics of Dental Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Amuasi, Ama
    Department of Child Health and Orthodontics, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
    Jayasinghe, Ruwan D
    Faculty of Dental Sciences, Department of Oral Medicine and Periodontology, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
    Strujić-Porović, Sanela
    Faculty of Dentistry with Clinics, Department of Prosthodontics, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    Peck, Christopher C
    Dental School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Xie, Han
    Department of Stomatology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Haugaard Bendixen, Karina
    Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Simancas Pallares, Miguel Angel
    Division of Pediatrics and Public Health, Division of Oral & Craniofacial Health Sciences, Adams School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Perez-Franco, Eka
    Center for Headaches, Facial Pain and TMD, Punta Pacifica Medical Center, Panama City, Panama.
    Naghibi Sistani, Mohammad Mehdi
    Oral Health Research Center, Health Research Institute, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, IR, Iran.
    Valerio, Patricia
    Instituto Patricia Valério, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Letunova, Natalia
    Department of Anesthesia in Dentistry, Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, Moscow, Russia.
    M Nurelhuda, Nazik
    Faculty of Dentistry, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan.
    Bartlett, David W
    King's College London Dental Institute, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Oluwafemi, Ikeoluwa A
    Department of Oral Medicine and Periodontology, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Dghoughi, Saloua
    Faculty of Dentistry of Rabat, Oral Surgery Department, Mohammed V University in Rabat, Rabat, Morocco.
    Ferreira, Joao N A R
    Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; Faculty of Dentistry, National University of Singapore, National University Hospitals, Singapore, Singapore.
    Chantaracherd, Pathamas
    Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, Western University, Bangkok, Thailand.
    Rener-Sitar, Ksenija
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Prosthodontics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Department of Prosthodontics, University Dental Clinics, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Why Patients Visit Dentists: A Study in all World Health Organization Regions.2020Ingår i: Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, ISSN 1532-3382, E-ISSN 1532-3390, Vol. 20, nr 3, artikel-id 101459Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The dimensions of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact are the major areas where patients are impacted by oral diseases and dental interventions. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether dental patients' reasons to visit the dentist fit the 4 OHRQoL dimensions.

    METHODS: Dentists (N = 1580) from 32 countries participated in a web-based survey. For their patients with current oral health problems, dentists were asked whether these problems were related to teeth, mouth, and jaws' function, pain, appearance, or psychosocial impact or whether they do not fit the aforementioned 4 categories. Dentists were also asked about their patients who intended to prevent future oral health problems. For both patient groups, the proportions of oral health problems falling into the 4 OHRQoL dimensions were calculated.

    RESULTS: For every 100 dental patients with current oral health problems, 96 had problems related to teeth, mouth, and jaws' function, pain, appearance, or psychosocial impact. For every 100 dental patients who wanted to prevent future oral health problems, 92 wanted to prevent problems related to these 4 OHRQoL dimensions. Both numbers increased to at least 98 of 100 patients when experts analyzed dentists' explanations of why some oral health problems would not fit the four dimension. For the remaining 2 of 100 patients, none of the dentist-provided explanations suggested evidence against the OHRQoL dimensions as the concepts that capture dental patients' suffering.

    CONCLUSION: Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact capture dental patients' oral health problems worldwide. These 4 OHRQoL dimensions offer a psychometrically sound and practical framework for patient care and research, identifying what is important to dental patients.

  • 5.
    Larsson, Åke
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    The Incidence of Malignant Transformation of Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) is Low and May Perhaps Be More Closely Associated With Lichenoid Type Mucosal Lesions than With Classical OLP2004Ingår i: Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, ISSN 1532-3382, E-ISSN 1532-3390, Vol. 4, nr 4, s. 293-295Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 6.
    Lövgren, A.
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Fac Med, Dept Odontol Clin Oral Physiol, Umeå, Sweden.;Dept Odontol Clin Oral Physiol, S-90186 Umeå, Sweden..
    Ilgunas, A.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Umeå Univ, Fac Med, Dept Odontol Clin Oral Physiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    Häggman-Henrikson, B.
    Malmö universitet, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD). Umeå Univ, Fac Med, Dept Odontol Clin Oral Physiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    Elias, B.
    Umeå Univ, Fac Med, Dept Odontol Clin Oral Physiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    AL Roudini, O.
    Umeå Univ, Fac Med, Dept Odontol Clin Oral Physiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    Visscher, C. M.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Ctr Dent Amsterdam ACTA, Dept Orofacial Pain & Dysfunct, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Lobbezoo, F.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Ctr Dent Amsterdam ACTA, Dept Orofacial Pain & Dysfunct, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Wänman, A.
    Umeå Univ, Fac Med, Dept Odontol Clin Oral Physiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    Liv, P.
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, Umeå, Sweden..
    Associations between screening for functional jaw disturbances and patient reported outcomes on jaw limitations and oral behaviors2023Ingår i: Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, ISSN 1532-3382, E-ISSN 1532-3390, Vol. 23, nr 3, artikel-id 101888Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesTemporomandibular disorders (TMDs) is a collective term for pain and functional disturbances related to the jaw muscles and the temporomandibular joint. In contrast to screening for orofacial pain, knowledge is limited on the association between patient-reported outcomes and screening for joint-related functional jaw disturbances. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the association between a screening question for functional jaw disturbances, and disease-specific out-come measures for functional jaw limitations and oral behaviors.MethodsThis study included 299 individuals (201 women; 20-69 years, median 37.0) in a general population sample from Vasterbotten, Northern Sweden in 2014. A single screening question for functional jaw disturbances "Does your jaw lock or become stuck once a week or more?" was used to categorize individuals as cases or controls. Patient-reported outcomes on functional jaw disturbances were assessed with the 20-item jaw functional limitation scale (JFLS-20) and oral behaviors with the 21-item Oral Behaviors Checklist (OBC-21).ResultsThe strongest predictive probability to have a positive screening outcome was functional jaw limitations related to mobility (AUC(boot) = 0.78, 95 CI:0.71-0.86, P < .001), followed by limitations related to communication (AUC(boot) = 0.74, 95 CI:0.63-0.80, P < .001) and mastication (AUC(boot) = 0.73, 95 CI:0.66-0.81, P < .001). The frequency of oral behaviors was not significantly associated with a positive screening outcome (AUC(boot) = 0.65, 95 CI:0.55-0.72, P = .223).ConclusionsSelf-reported functional limitations, but not oral behaviors, are strongly associated with a single screening question for frequent functional jaw disturbances. This finding provides support for incorporating a question on jaw catching/locking once a week or more in screening instruments for TMDs.

  • 7. Wårdh, Inger
    et al.
    Axelsson, Susanna
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Malmö högskola, Odontologiska fakulteten (OD).
    Which evidence has an impact on dentists' willingness to change their behavior?2009Ingår i: Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, ISSN 1532-3382, E-ISSN 1532-3390, Vol. 9, nr 4, s. 197-205Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is some literature on how to find the best evidence for clinical practice but little is known about which evidence clinicians actually seek when they look for scientific support in changing behavior. The aim of this study was to explore which evidence has an impact on dentists' willingness to change their behavior by investigating the requirements for seeking and understanding new knowledge, as well as perceived barriers or motives for doing this. A postal questionnaire was analyzed according to demographic information, access to and use of a personal computer, postgraduate education activity, knowledge about evidence-based medicine and scientific terms, and seeking and grasping new and actual knowledge from 177 dentists. Fifteen of these dentists formed 3 focus groups that were interviewed about the areas in the questionnaire. First-order information, that was required in a short time, was sought by the nearest colleagues. Literature and Internet-based technology were second-order information, mainly sought by younger dentists. The people that were interviewed claimed that the real point of issue was to find new knowledge that could be transferred into practice. Many studies pointing to sometimes diverging results only seem to create confused professionals. To include some qualitative aspects in evidence-based reports could be a way of improving understanding and changing behavior in a favorable direction and perhaps also increase interest for new knowledge.

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