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  • 1. Baad-Hansen, Lene
    et al.
    Pigg, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Elmasry Ivanovic, Susanne
    Faris, Hanan
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Drangsholt, Mark
    Intraoral somatosensory abnormalities in atypical odontalgia: a multicenter study2013In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 92, no Special Issue A, article id 1710Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Benca, Laura
    et al.
    Naud, Jason M
    Pigg, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Baad-Hansen, Lene
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Drangsholt, Mark
    Comparing reliability of extraoral versus intraoral trigeminal quantitative sensory testing2013In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 92, no Special Issue A, article id 2684Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Bjørndal, Lars
    et al.
    Fransson, Helena
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bruun, Gitte
    Markvart, Merete
    Kjældgaard, Marianne
    Näsman, Peggy
    Hedenbjörk-Lager, Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Dige, Irene
    Thordrup, Marianne
    Randomized Clinical Trials on Deep Carious Lesions: 5-Year Follow-up2017In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 96, no 7, p. 747-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep caries presents a dilemma in terms of which treatment that will render an optimal prognosis by maintaining pulp vitality with absence of apical pathology. Previously, 2 randomized clinical trials were performed testing the short-term effects of stepwise carious tissue removal versus nonselective carious removal to hard dentin with or without pulp exposure. The aim of this article was to report the 5-y outcome on these previously treated patients having radiographically well-defined carious lesions extending into the pulpal quarter of the dentin but with a well-defined radiodense zone between the carious lesion and the pulp. In this long-term study, 239 of 314 (76.2%) patients were analyzed. The stepwise removal group had a significantly higher proportion of success (60.2%) at 5-y follow-up compared with the nonselective carious removal to hard dentin group (46.3%) ( P = 0.031) when pulp exposures per se were included as failures. Pulp exposure rate was significantly lower in the stepwise carious removal group (21.2% vs. 35.5%; P = 0.014). Irrespective of pulp exposure status, the difference (13.3%) was still significant when sustained pulp vitality without apical radiolucency and unbearable pain was considered (95% confidence interval, 3.1-26.3, P = 0.045). After pulp exposure, only 9% ( n = 4) of the analyzed patients were assessed as successful, indicating that the prognosis is highly dubious following conventional pulp-capping procedures (direct pulp capping or partial pulpotomy) in deep carious lesions in adults. In conclusion, the stepwise carious removal group had a significantly higher proportion of pulps with sustained vitality without apical radiolucency versus nonselective carious removal of deep carious lesions in adult teeth at 5-y follow-up (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00187837 and NCT00187850).

  • 4. Bryndahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Legrell, Per Erik
    Isberg, Annika
    Bilateral TMJ Disk Displacement Induces Mandibular Retrognathia2006In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 85, no 12, p. 1118-1123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unilateral non-reducing TMJ disk displacement has been shown to retard mandibular growth on the ipsilateral side, with facial asymmetry a sequela. We hypothesized that bilateral affliction would impair mandibular growth bilaterally, generating mandibular retrognathia. Non-reducing TMJ disk displacement was surgically created in 10 growing New Zealand White rabbits. Ten additional rabbits served as a sham-operated control group. Facial growth was followed in serial cephalograms, with tantalum implants, during a period corresponding to childhood and adolescence in man. The results verified that bilateral non-reducing TMJ disk displacement retarded mandibular growth bilaterally, the extent corresponding to mandibular retrognathia in man. Maxillary growth was also retarded, but to a lesser degree. Growth impairment fluctuated over time, the most striking retardation occurring during periods of general growth acceleration. This should be taken into consideration when orthodontic treatment, aimed at stimulating mandibular growth, is initiated in adolescent individuals with non-reducing TMJ disk displacement.

  • 5.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Diabetes and oral implant failure: a systematic review2014In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 93, no 9, p. 859-867Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate whether there are any effects of diabetes mellitus on implant failure rates, postoperative infections, and marginal bone loss. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in March 2014. The present review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies. The search strategy resulted in 14 publications. The I (2) statistic was used to express the percentage of total variation across studies due to heterogeneity. The inverse variance method was used for the random effects model when heterogeneity was detected or for the fixed effects model when heterogeneity was not detected. The estimates of an intervention for dichotomous outcomes were expressed in risk ratio and in mean difference in millimeters for continuous outcomes, both with a 95% confidence interval. There was a statistically significant difference (p = .001; mean difference = 0.20, 95% confidence interval = 0.08, 0.31) between diabetic and non-diabetic patients concerning marginal bone loss, favoring non-diabetic patients. A meta-analysis was not possible for postoperative infections. The difference between the patients (diabetic vs. non-diabetic) did not significantly affect implant failure rates (p = .65), with a risk ratio of 1.07 (95% confidence interval = 0.80, 1.44). Studies are lacking that include both patient types, with larger sample sizes, and that report the outcome data separately for each group. The results of the present meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution because of the presence of uncontrolled confounding factors in the included studies.

  • 6.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Kisch, Jenö
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Factors Influencing Early Dental Implant Failures2016In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 95, no 9, p. 995-1002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of local and systemic factors on the occurrence of dental implant failures up to the second-stage surgery (abutment connection). This retrospective study is based on 2,670 patients who received 10,096 implants and were consecutively treated with implant-supported prostheses between 1980 and 2014 at 1 specialist clinic. Several anatomic-, patient-, health-, and implant-related factors were collected. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the patients and implants. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used at the patient level as well as the implant level to evaluate the effect of explanatory variables on the failure of implants up to abutment connection. A generalized estimating equation method was used for the implant-level analysis to account for the fact that repeated observations (several implants) were available for a single patient. Overall, 642 implants (6.36%) failed, of which 176 (1.74%) in 139 patients were lost up to second-stage surgery. The distribution of implants in sites of different bone quantities and qualities was quite similar between implants lost up to and after abutment connection. Smoking and the intake of antidepressants were the statistically significant predictors in the multivariate model (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02369562).

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  • 7.
    Chrcanovic, Bruno
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Kisch, Jenö
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Response to the Letter to the Editor: “Factors Influencing Early Dental Implant Failures”2016In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 96, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Divaris, K
    et al.
    Division of Pediatric and Public Health, Adams School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.; Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Haworth, S
    Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology United, Department of Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; Bristol Dental School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Shaffer, J R
    Department of Human Genetics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics, Department of Oral and Craniofacial Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
    Anttonen, V
    Research Unit of Oral Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Beck, J D
    Division of Comprehensive Oral Health-Periodontology, Adams School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Furuichi, Y
    Division of Endodontology and Periodontology, Department of Oral Rehabilitation, Graduate School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Hokkaido, Japan.
    Holtfreter, B
    Department of Restorative Dentistry, Periodontology, Endodontology, and Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Jönsson, Daniel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Public Dental Service of Skåne, Lund, Sweden; Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kocher, T
    Department of Restorative Dentistry, Periodontology, Endodontology, and Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Levy, S M
    Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, College of Dentistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
    Magnusson, P K E
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    McNeil, D W
    Center for Oral Health Research in Appalachia, Appalachia, NY, USA; Department of Psychology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA; Department of Dental Public Health & Professional Practice, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA.
    Michaëlsson, K
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Unit of Medical Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    North, K E
    Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Palotie, U
    Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Papapanou, P N
    Division of Periodontics, Section of Oral, Diagnostic and Rehabilitation Sciences, Columbia University, College of Dental Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
    Pussinen, P J
    Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; nstitute of Dentistry, School on Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Porteous, D
    Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine, Institute of Genetics and Cancer, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Reis, K
    Institute of Genomics, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Salminen, A
    Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Schaefer, A S
    Department of Periodontology, Oral Medicine and Oral Surgery, Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Sciences, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Sudo, T
    Institute of Education, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Sun, Y Q
    Center for Oral Health Services and Research Mid-Norway (TkMidt), Trondheim, Norway; Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Suominen, A L
    Institute of Dentistry, School on Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; Public Health Evaluation and Projection Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland.
    Tamahara, T
    Department of Community Medical Supports, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
    Weinberg, S M
    Department of Human Genetics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics, Department of Oral and Craniofacial Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
    Lundberg, P
    Department of Odontology, Section of Molecular Periodontology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Marazita, M L
    Department of Human Genetics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics, Department of Oral and Craniofacial Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
    Johansson, I
    Department of Odontology, Section of Cariology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Phenotype Harmonization in the GLIDE2 Oral Health Genomics Consortium.2022In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 101, no 11, p. 1408-1416, article id 220345221109775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic risk factors play important roles in the etiology of oral, dental, and craniofacial diseases. Identifying the relevant risk loci and understanding their molecular biology could highlight new prevention and management avenues. Our current understanding of oral health genomics suggests that dental caries and periodontitis are polygenic diseases, and very large sample sizes and informative phenotypic measures are required to discover signals and adequately map associations across the human genome. In this article, we introduce the second wave of the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Dental Endpoints consortium (GLIDE2) and discuss relevant data analytics challenges, opportunities, and applications. In this phase, the consortium comprises a diverse, multiethnic sample of over 700,000 participants from 21 studies contributing clinical data on dental caries experience and periodontitis. We outline the methodological challenges of combining data from heterogeneous populations, as well as the data reduction problem in resolving detailed clinical examination records into tractable phenotypes, and describe a strategy that addresses this. Specifically, we propose a 3-tiered phenotyping approach aimed at leveraging both the large sample size in the consortium and the detailed clinical information available in some studies, wherein binary, severity-encompassing, and "precision," data-driven clinical traits are employed. As an illustration of the use of data-driven traits across multiple cohorts, we present an application of dental caries experience data harmonization in 8 participating studies (N = 55,143) using previously developed permanent dentition tooth surface-level dental caries pattern traits. We demonstrate that these clinical patterns are transferable across multiple cohorts, have similar relative contributions within each study, and thus are prime targets for genetic interrogation in the expanded and diverse multiethnic sample of GLIDE2. We anticipate that results from GLIDE2 will decisively advance the knowledge base of mechanisms at play in oral, dental, and craniofacial health and disease and further catalyze international collaboration and data and resource sharing in genomics research.

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  • 9. Edvinsson, Olivia
    et al.
    Ekelund, Johanna
    Nixdorf, Donald R
    Vase Toft, Lene
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Pigg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Double-Blind Concealment Inadequate When Administering Local Anesthetic and Non-Active Control.2018In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 97, no Special Issue B, article id 0147Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10. Ellen, Richard P
    et al.
    Loesche, Walter J
    Bratthall, Douglas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Discovering the Impact of Ronald Gibbons on Dental Research and Beyond2005In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 84, no 12, p. 1089-1092Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ericson, Dan
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Carlsson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Songpaisan, Yupin
    Ellen, Richard P
    The legacy of cariologist Douglas Bratthall, an inspired scientist2012In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 91, no 10, p. 909-913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Douglas Bratthall was an inspirational cariologist known for his playful curiosity, thoughtful inquisitiveness, incisive scholarship, and energetic leadership. He became a time, mind, and global traveler who viewed his career path as an exotic safari. This 'Discovery!' report identifies where his era's burning issues have led and how they were shaped by his contributions.

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    fulltext
  • 12.
    Fransson, Helena
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Endodontology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjørndal, L
    Section of Clinical Oral Microbiology, Cariology and Endodontics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Frisk, F
    Department of Endodontology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dawson, Victoria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Landt, Kristoffer
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Isberg, P-E
    Department of Statistics, Lund University School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    EndoReCo,
    Endodontic Research Collaboration in Scandinavia.
    Kvist, T
    Department of Endodontology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Factors Associated with Extraction following Root Canal Filling in Adults2021In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 100, no 6, p. 608-614, article id 22034520982962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Essentially, root fillings are performed to preserve natural teeth. Over time, however, some root-filled teeth will inevitably be extracted. The aim of this historical prospective cohort study in the adult Swedish population was to identify factors associated with extractions within 5 y of registration of a root filling. The cohort consisted of all those whose root fillings had been reported to the tax-funded Swedish Social Insurance Agency (SSIA) in 2009. Demographic data on the individuals registered with a root filling (sex, age, country of birth, disposable income, educational level, and marital status) were received from Statistics Sweden or the SSIA. Dental care setting, tooth type, and any registration of subsequent restorations within 6 mo were received from the SSIA. Multivariable regression analysis was used, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. In total, 216,764 individuals had been registered with at least 1 root filling. Individuals (n = 824) without complete data were excluded from the analyses. After 5 y, 9.3% of the root-filled teeth had been registered as extracted. Logistic regression analysis found significant associations for all variables except country of birth, disposable income, and educational level. The highest odds ratios for extractions were associated with the type of restoration: teeth with no registration of any restoration and teeth with a direct restoration combined with a post were 3 times more likely to undergo extraction than teeth restored with an indirect restoration combined with a post and core. Overall, high odds ratios for extractions were associated with any type of composite restoration, including composite fillings and crowns combined with or without any post. In summary, after root filling in the Swedish adult population, several individual- and tooth-specific variables were associated with extraction. The reasons for the extractions remain to be studied further.

  • 13.
    Glantz, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Heft, M. W.
    Ivar A. Mjör, 1933-20172017In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 96, no 5, p. 485-486Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Gustafsson, N
    et al.
    Ahlqvist, J
    Naslund, U
    Buhlin, K
    Gustafsson, A
    Kjellstrom, B
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ryden, L
    Levring Jaghagen, E
    Associations among periodontitis, calcified carotid artery atheromas, and risk of myocardial infarction2020In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 60-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease is a common cause of morbidity and premature mortality. Cardiovascular disease can be prevented when risk factors are identified early. Calcified carotid artery atheromas (CCAAs), detected in panoramic radiographs, and periodontitis have both been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This case-control study aimed to 1) investigate associations between periodontitis and CCAA detected in panoramic radiographs and 2) determine the risk of future myocardial infarctions due to CCAA combined with periodontitis. We evaluated 1,482 participants (738 cases and 744 controls) with periodontitis and CCAAs recruited from the PAROKRANK study (Periodontitis and Its Relation to Coronary Artery Disease). Participants were examined with panoramic radiographs, including the carotid regions. Associations between myocardial infarction and periodontitis combined with CCAA were evaluated in 696 cases and 696 age-, sex-, and residential area-matched controls. Periodontitis was evaluated radiographically (as degree of bone loss) and with a clinical periodontal disease index score (from clinical and radiographic assessments). We found associations between CCAA and clinical periodontal disease index score among cases (odds ratio [OR], 1.51; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.10; P = 0.02) and controls (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.22 to 2.38; P < 0.01), although not between CCAA and the degree of bone loss. In a multivariable model, myocardial infarction was associated with CCAA combined with periodontitis, as assessed by degree of bone loss (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.74; P = 0.01). When the cohort was stratified by sex, only men showed a significant association between myocardial infarction and CCAA combined with periodontitis. Participants with clinically diagnosed periodontitis exhibited CCAA in panoramic radiographs more often than those without periodontitis, irrespective of the presence of a recent myocardial infarction. Participants with combined periodontitis and CCAA had a higher risk of having had myocardial infarction as compared with participants with either condition alone. These findings implied that patients in dental care might benefit from dentists assessing panoramic radiographs for CCAA-particularly, patients with periodontitis who have not received any preventive measures for cardiovascular disease.

  • 15.
    Götrick, Bengt
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Åkerman, Sigvard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Torstenson, R
    Tobin, Gunnar
    Oral pilocarpine for treatment of opioid-induced oral dryness in healthy adults2004In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 83, no 5, p. 393-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pilocarpine induces a profuse flow of saliva when administered orally, but effects on drug-induced oral dryness have not been examined. The aim of this trial was to investigate if pilocarpine increases production of saliva in individuals suffering from dry mouth due to treatment with opioids. Sixtyfive individuals were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The subjects received tramadol (50 mg t.d.s.) to induce oral dryness, and were thereafter assigned to one of three groups. Secretion rate of saliva was measured before and after tramadol, and after the oral administration of pilocarpine (5 mg), placebo, or no treatment. Baseline characteristics did not differ among the groups (mean ± SEM: 0.37 ± 0.06 mL/min), and tramadol lowered the secretion at the same level in all groups (0.15 ± 0.02 mL/min). Pilocarpine increased the flow above that observed with placebo (0.66 ± 0.19 vs. 0.15 ± 0.02 mL/min). Thus, pilocarpine re-establishes the flow of saliva in the state of tramadol-induced oral dryness.

  • 16. Heikinheimo, K
    et al.
    Huhtala, J-M
    Thiel, A
    Kurppa, K J
    Heikinheimo, H
    Kovac, M
    Kragelund, C
    Warfvinge, Gunnar
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Dawson, H
    Elenius, K
    Ristimaki, A
    Baumhoer, D
    Morgan, P R
    The Mutational Profile of Unicystic Ameloblastoma.2018In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BRAF V600E is the most common mutation in conventional ameloblastoma (AM) of the mandible. In contrast, maxillary AMs appear to harbor more frequently RAS, FGFR2, or SMO mutations. Unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM) is considered a less aggressive variant of ameloblastoma, amenable to more conservative treatment, and classified as a distinct entity. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutation profile of UAM ( n = 39) and to compare it to conventional AM ( n = 39). The associations between mutation status and recurrence probability were also analyzed. In the mandible, 94% of UAMs (29/31, including 8/8 luminal, 6/8 intraluminal, and 15/15 mural subtypes) and 74% of AMs (28/38) revealed BRAF V600E mutations. Among the BRAF wild-type cases, 1 UAM showed a missense SMO mutation (p.L412F), whereas 2 NRAS (p.Q61R), 2 HRAS (p.Q61R), and 2 FGFR2 (p.C383R) activating mutations were identified in AM. Of the 3 maxillary UAMs, only 1 revealed a BRAF V600E mutation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate high frequency of activating BRAF V600E mutations in both UAM and AM of the mandible. In maxillary UAMs, the BRAF V600E mutation prevalence appears to be lower as was shown for AM previously. It could therefore be argued that UAM and AM are part of the spectrum of the same disease. AMs without BRAF V600E mutations were associated with an increased rate of local recurrence ( P = 0.0003), which might indicate that routine mutation testing also has an impact on prognosis.

  • 17.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lampa, E
    Marklund, S
    Wänman, A
    Pain and Disability in the Jaw and Neck Region following Whiplash Trauma2016In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 95, no 10, p. 1155-1160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between whiplash trauma and chronic orofacial pain is unclear, especially with regard to the time elapsed from trauma to development of orofacial pain. The aim was to analyze prevalence of jaw pain and disability, as well as the relationship between pain and disability in the jaw and neck regions in the early nonchronic stage after whiplash trauma. In this case-control study, 70 individuals (40 women, 30 men, mean age 35.5 y) who visited an emergency department with neck pain following a car accident were examined within 3 wk of trauma (group 1) and compared with 70 individuals (42 women, 28 men, mean age 33.8 y), who declined to attend a clinical examination but agreed to fill in questionnaires (group 2). The 2 case groups were compared with a matched control group of 70 individuals (42 women, 28 men, mean age 37.6 y) without a history of neck trauma. All participants completed questionnaires regarding jaw pain and dysfunction, rating pain intensity in jaw and neck regions on the Numerical Rating Scale, the Neck Disability Index, and Jaw Disability Checklist. Compared with controls, individuals with a recent whiplash trauma reported more jaw pain and dysfunction. Furthermore, there was a moderate positive correlation between jaw and neck pain ratings for group 1 (r = 0.61, P < 0.0001) and group 2 (r = 0.59, P < 0.0001). In the logistic regression analysis, cases showed higher odds ratios (range, 6.1 to 40.8) for jaw and neck pain and disability compared with controls. Taken together, the results show that individuals with a recent whiplash trauma report more jaw pain and disability compared with controls without a history of neck trauma. Furthermore, the correlation between jaw and neck pain intensity implies that intensity of neck pain in the acute stage after whiplash trauma might be a possible risk factor also for development of chronic orofacial pain.

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  • 18.
    Ilgunas, A.
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Odontology/Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Häggman-Henrikson, B.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Odontology/Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Visscher, C.M.
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Lobbezoo, F.
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Durham, J.
    School of Dental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK;Newcastle Hospitals’ NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle, UK.
    Liv, P.
    Section of Sustainable Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lövgren, A.
    Department of Odontology/Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    The Longitudinal Relationship between Jaw Catching/Locking and Pain2023In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 102, no 4, p. 383-390, article id 002203452211385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Orofacial pain and joint-related dysfunction can negatively affect daily jaw function. A common cause for limitations in jaw movements is joint-related dysfunction such as various forms of catching and locking. However, knowledge is limited regarding the development and natural course of joint-related jaw dysfunction and its relationship to the onset and course of orofacial pain. Therefore, the aim was to evaluate the incidence, prevalence, and gender differences in jaw catching/locking over time and in relation to orofacial pain in the general population. Data from 3 validated screening questions on orofacial pain and jaw catching/locking were collected from all routine dental checkups in the Public Dental Health Services in Västerbotten, Sweden, from 2010 to 2017. Logistic generalized estimating equation was used to account for repeated observations and Poisson regression for incidence analysis. In total, 180,308 individuals (aged 5–104 y) were screened in 525,707 dental checkups. In 2010, based on 37,647 individuals, the prevalence of self-reported catching/locking was higher in women than in men (3.2% vs. 1.5%; odds ratio, 2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.83–2.43), and this relationship and magnitude remained similar throughout the study period. The annual incidence rate was 1.1% in women and 0.5% in men. Women were at a higher risk than men for reporting both first onset (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.29; 95% CI, 2.11–2.49) and persistent (IRR, 2.31; 95% CI, 2.04–2.63) catching/locking. For the onset subcohort (n = 135,801), an independent onset of orofacial pain or jaw catching/locking exclusively was reported by 84.1%, whereas a concurrent onset was reported by 13.4%. Our findings of higher incidence, prevalence, and persistence in women than in men indicate that the gender differences seen for orofacial pain are evident also for jaw catching/locking. The findings also suggest independent onset of self-reported catching/locking and orofacial pain, which reinforces the pathophysiological differences between these conditions.

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  • 19. Iordanidou Mojir, Katerina
    et al.
    Pigg, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Reliability and validity of punctuate pain thresholds and self-reported pain2013In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 92, no Special Issue A, article id 2679Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Coelho, Paulo G
    Bryington, Matthew
    Baldassarri, Marta
    Tovar, Nick
    Currie, Fredrik
    Hayashi, Mariko
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Janal, Malvin N
    Andersson, Martin
    Ono, Daisuke
    Vandeweghe, Stefan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nano Hydroxyapatite-coated Implants Improve Bone Nanomechanical Properties2012In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 91, no 12, p. 1172-1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanostructure modification of dental implants has long been sought as a means to improve osseointegration through enhanced biomimicry of host structures. Several methods have been proposed and demonstrated for creating nanotopographic features; here we describe a nanoscale hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated implant surface and hypothesize that it will hasten osseointegration and improve its quality relative to that of non-coated implants. Twenty threaded titanium alloy implants, half prepared with a stable HA nanoparticle surface and half grit-blasted, acid-etched, and heat-treated (HT), were inserted into rabbit femurs. Pre-operatively, the implants were morphologically and topographically characterized. After 3 weeks of healing, the samples were retrieved for histomorphometry. The nanomechanical properties of the surrounding bone were evaluated by nanoindentation. While both implants revealed similar bone-to-implant contact, the nanoindentation demonstrated that the tissue quality was significantly enhanced around the HA-coated implants, validating the postulated hypothesis.

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  • 21.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Xue, Y
    Hayashi, M
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Schwartz-Filho, HO
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Andersson, M
    Mustafa, K
    Wennerberg, A
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Genetic Responses to Nanostructured Calcium-phosphate-coated Implants2011In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 90, no 12, p. 1422-1427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanostructured calcium phosphate (CaP) has been histologically and biomechanically proven to enhance osseointegration of implants; however, conventional techniques were not sufficiently sensitive to capture its biological effects fully. Here, we compared the conventional removal torque (RTQ) evaluation and gene expression in tissues around nanostructured CaP-coated implants, using real-time RT-PCR, with those of uncoated implants, in a rabbit model. At 2 wks, RTQ values were significantly higher, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression was significantly higher, and runt-related transcription factor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α expressions were significantly lower in the coated than in the uncoated implants. This indicates that inflammatory responses were suppressed and osteoprogenitor activity increased around the CaP-coated surface. At 4 wks, although RTQ values did not significantly differ between the 2 groups, ALP and osteocalcin (OCN) were significantly up-regulated in the coated group, indicating progressive mineralization of the bone around the implant. Moreover, an osteoclast marker, adenosine triphosphatase, which indicates acidification of the resorption lacunae, was significantly higher for the coated implants, suggesting gradual resorption of the CaP coating. This study reveals detailed genetic responses to nanostructured CaP-coated implants and provides evidence that the effect of nanotopography is significant during the osseointegration cascade.

  • 22.
    Lindh, Liselott
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Glantz, Per-Olof
    Concentration dependence of adsorption from whole saliva at solid/liquid interfaces1998In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 77, no Special issue B, p. 779-779Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Lobbezoo, F
    et al.
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Aarab, G
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Kapos, F P
    Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development, Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Seattle, WA, United States.
    Dayo, A F
    Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Huang, Z
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Koutris, M
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Peres, M A
    National Dental Research Institute Singapore, National Dental Centre Singapore, Singapore; Oral Health ACP, Health Services and Systems Research Programme, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.
    Thymi, M
    Department of Orofacial Pain and Dysfunction, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The Global Need for Easy and Valid Assessment Tools for Orofacial Pain2022In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 101, no 13, p. 1549-1553, article id 220345221110443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization recently adopted a historic resolution (WHA74.5) on the urgent need for global oral health improvement. This resolution is particularly relevant in the perspective of the high prevalence of untreated oral diseases. However, one important aspect has been mentioned only in passing, namely that poor oral health often leads to orofacial pain, which is the most common reason for emergency dental visits worldwide. Therefore, an evidence-based decision-making process on oral health should include data related to orofacial pain complaints. To that end, the availability of reliable and valid assessment tools of orofacial pain and related treatment outcomes is essential. INfORM (International Network for Orofacial Pain and Related Disorders Methodology) of the International Association for Dental Research has been one of the driving forces behind the development and implementation of comprehensive sets of tools for such assessments. However, as a prerequisite for the desired global implementation, reliable and valid tools that are also brief, easy to translate, and culturally adaptable need to be further developed and tested. Some of the groundwork to facilitate this process has already been carried out. In addition, a working group within INfORM has developed a short clinical assessment tool for orofacial pain diagnostics that is near completion and will soon be ready for dissemination. Ultimately, reliable and valid orofacial pain assessment is a necessary step toward the development and implementation of appropriate "best buy" interventions that address this major driver of need for oral health care worldwide.

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  • 24.
    Lundgren, T
    et al.
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Parhar, R S
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Renvert, S
    University of Kristianstad.
    Tatakis, D N
    The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
    Impaired cytotoxicity in Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome.2005In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 414-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS), palmoplantar hyperkeratosis with periodontitis, has been genetically characterized. However, suspected associated immune dysfunctions remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to evaluate peripheral blood lymphocyte levels and natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity in PLS. Twenty patients and 20 healthy controls were examined. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry for surface markers. NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 cells was determined by means of a 51Cr release assay. White blood cell differential and proportions of B-, T-, T-helper, T-suppressor, and NK cells revealed only sporadic borderline variations from control values. In contrast, NK cell cytotoxicity was consistently and severely depressed (32-53% of control values) in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this newly described impairment of NK cell cytotoxic function is the first consistent immune dysfunction reported in PLS. This suggests that the impaired NK cell cytotoxicity might contribute to the pathogenesis of PLS-associated periodontitis.

  • 25. Nilsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Drangsholt, Mark
    Headache and Co-morbid Pains Associated with TMD Pain in Adolescents2013In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 92, no 9, p. 802-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case-control study evaluated the association of headache and other co-morbid pain with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain in adolescents and explored the temporal co-variance of headache and TMD pain. In a population-based sample of 12- to 19-year-olds, 350 patients with self-reported TMD pain and 350 healthy age- and sex-matched individuals were mailed questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, 95% CI, and OR analyses-logistic regression models with TMD pain as the outcome variable and adjusted for age and gender-were used for the analysis of individuals' responses. Headache, whether defined as once a week or more (OR = 6.6) or as moderate or severe (categorical), was significantly related to TMD pain. Severe headache (vs. mild) showed stronger associations with TMD (OR = 10.1) than between moderate and mild headache (OR = 5.5). Neck (OR = 4.0) and back (OR = 2.6) pain was also significantly related to TMD pain. When participants were grouped according to headache onset and TMD pain, the highest association between headache and TMD pain was found in the subgroup "Headache onset before TMD pain" (OR 9.4). In conclusion, headache appears to be independently and highly associated with TMD pain in adolescents. Neck pain and somatic complaints were also significantly associated with TMD pain. Headache seems to precede TMD pain in many adolescents with pain.

  • 26.
    Pigg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Baad-Hansen, Lene
    Elmasry Ivanovic, Susanne
    Faris, Hanan
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Svensson, Peter
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Drangsholt, Mark
    Reliability of intraoral QST in patients with atypical odontalgia2013In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 92, no Special Issue A, article id 2671Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Pigg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Björnsson, Olof
    Kopp, Sigvard
    Alstergren, Per
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular joint arthritis2014In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 93, no Special Issue B, article id 110Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Pigg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Abul-Kasim, Kasim
    Maly, Pavel
    Petersson, Arne
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    MRI findings in patients with atypical odontalgia (AO)2012In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 91, no Special Issue B, article id 304Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Pigg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Petersson, Kerstin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Petersson, Arne
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    CBCT provides additional diagnostic information in patients with atypical odontalgia2011In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 90, no Special Issue A, article id 3083Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30. Pillai, Rajath
    et al.
    Pigg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    List, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Svensson, Peter
    Baad-Hansen, Lene
    Somatosensory Function, Pain, and Unpleasantness in Trigeminal Nerve Damage Models2018In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 97, no Special Issue B, article id 0725Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Sharma, Sonia
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ohrbach, R
    Fillingim, R B
    Greenspan, J D
    Slade, G
    Pain Sensitivity Modifies Risk of Injury-Related Temporomandibular Disorder2020In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 99, no 5, p. 530-536, article id 22034520913247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluates contributions of jaw injury and experimental pain sensitivity to risk of developing painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Data were from the Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment (OPPERA) nested case-control study of incident painful TMD. Injury and subsequent onset of painful TMD were monitored prospectively for ≤5 y in a community-based sample of 409 US adults who did not have TMD when enrolled. At baseline, thermal-pressure and pinprick pain sensitivity, as potential effect modifiers, were measured using quantitative sensory testing. During follow-up, jaw injury from any of 9 types of potentially traumatic events was determined using quarterly (3-monthly) health update questionnaires. Study examiners classified incident painful TMD, yielding 233 incident cases and 176 matched controls. Logistic regression models, estimated incidence odds ratios (IORs), and 95% confidence limits (CLs) were used for the association between injury and subsequent onset of painful TMD. During follow-up, 38.2% of incident cases and 13.1% of controls reported 1 or more injuries that were 4 times as likely to be intrinsic (i.e., sustained mouth opening or yawning) as extrinsic (e.g., dental visits, whiplash). Injuries due to extrinsic events (IOR = 7.6; 95% CL, 1.6-36.2), sustained opening (IOR = 5.4; 95% CL, 2.4-12.2), and yawning (IOR = 3.4; 95% CL, 1.6-7.3) were associated with increased TMD incidence. Both a single injury (IOR = 6.0; 95% CL, 2.9-12.4) and multiple injuries (IOR = 9.4; 95% CL, 3.4,25.6) predicted greater incidence of painful TMD than events perceived as noninjurious (IOR = 1.9; 95% CL, 1.1-3.4). Injury-associated risk of painful TMD was elevated in people with high sensitivity to heat pain (IOR = 7.4; 95% CL, 3.1-18.0) compared to people with low sensitivity to heat pain (IOR = 3.9; 95% CL, 1.7-8.4). Jaw injury was strongly associated with elevated painful TMD risk, and the risk was amplified in subjects who had enhanced sensitivity to heat pain at enrollment. Commonly occurring but seemingly innocuous events, such as yawning injury, should not be overlooked when judging prognostic importance of jaw injury.

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  • 32.
    Sotres, Javier
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    Lindh, Liselott
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    NanoWear of Salivary Films vs. Substratum Wettability2012In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 91, no 10, p. 973-978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pellicle serves as a multifunctional protective layer, providing, e.g., lubrication and remineralization and also acting as a diffusion barrier. In addition, since the formation of the pellicle precedes the adhesion of micro-organisms, it is also important as a conditioning film. We present a novel approach to study the influence of the water wettability of solid surfaces on the strength of adsorbed salivary films. It is based on studying the wear resistance of the films with an atomic force microscope operated in the friction force spectroscopy mode. This methodology provides the strength of the films in terms of the forces needed for breaking and removing them. Our results indicate that these forces are highly dependent on the water wettability of the underlying substrata, decreasing with increasing hydrophobicity. Thus, this study provides valuable information for the design of materials exposed in the oral cavity, i.e., materials that will minimize plaque formation and be easy to clean.

  • 33. Vase, Lene
    et al.
    Baad-Hansen, Lene
    Pigg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    How May Placebo Mechanisms Influence Orofacial Neuropathic Pain?2019In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 98, no 8, p. 861-869Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conceptualization of placebo has changed from inactive pills to a detailed understanding of how patients' perception of receiving a treatment influences pain processing and overall treatment outcome. Large placebo effects were recently demonstrated in chronic neuropathic pain, thereby opening the question of whether placebo effects also apply to orofacial neuropathic pain. In this article, we review the new definitions, magnitude, and social, psychological, neurobiologic, and genetic mechanisms of placebo effects in pain, especially neuropathic pain, to illustrate that placebo effects are not simply response bias but psychoneurobiological phenomena that can be measured at many levels of the neuroaxis. We use this knowledge to carefully illustrate how patients' perceptions of the treatment, the relationship with the health care provider, and the expectations and emotions toward a treatment can influence test and treatment outcome and potentially skew the results if they are not taken into consideration. Orofacial neuropathic pain is a new research area, and we review the status on definition, diagnosis, mechanisms, and pharmacologic treatment of neuropathic pain after trigeminal nerve injury, as this condition may be especially influenced by placebo factors. Finally, we have a detailed discussion of how knowledge of placebo mechanisms may help improve the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain, and we illustrate pitfalls and opportunities of applying this knowledge to the test of dental treatments.

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