Malmö University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 63
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Aghazadeh, Ahmad
    et al.
    Rutger Persson, G
    Renvert, Stefan
    A single-centre randomized controlled clinical trial on the adjunct treatment of intra-bony defects with autogenous bone or a xenograft: results after 12 months.2012In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 666-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Limited evidence exists on the efficacy of regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Subjects receiving antibiotics and surgical debridement were randomly assigned to placement of autogenous bone (AB) or bovine-derived xenograft (BDX) and with placement of a collagen membrane. The primary outcome was evidence of radiographic bone fill and the secondary outcomes included reductions of probing depth (PD) bleeding on probing (BOP) and suppuration.

    RESULTS: Twenty-two subjects were included in the AB and 23 subjects in the BDX group. Statistical analysis failed to demonstrate differences for 38/39 variables assessed at baseline. At 12 months, significant better results were obtained in the BDX group for bone levels (p < 0.001), BOP (p = 0.004), PI (p = 0.003) and suppuration (p < 0.01). When adjusting for number of implants treated per subject, a successful treatment outcome PD ≤ 5.0 mm, no pus, no bone loss and BOP at 1/4 or less sites the likelihood of defect fill was higher in the BDX group (LR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.0-10.6, p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Bovine xenograft provided more radiographic bone fill than AB. The success for both surgical regenerative procedures was limited. Decreases in PD, BOP, and suppuration were observed.

  • 2.
    Bertl, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Burisch, Johan
    Gastrounit, Medical Division, Copenhagen University Hospital ‐ Amager and Hvidovre Hvidovre Denmark;Copenhagen Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children, Adolescents and Adults, Copenhagen University Hospital ‐ Amager and Hvidovre Hvidovre Denmark.
    Pandis, Nikolaos
    Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, School of Dental Medicine University of Bern Switzerland.
    Bruckmann, Corinna
    Division of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology University Clinic of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna Vienna Austria.
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Periodontitis prevalence in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease - PPCC: a case–control study2022In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 1262-1274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this questionnaire-based, case-control study was to assess whether self-reported oral health and periodontitis in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) patients differ from that in matched controls without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

    Methods: A survey including questions on general anamnestic information, IBD diagnosis, and oral health was distributed online. Self-perceived overall health of teeth and gums, severe periodontitis, and tooth loss were defined as outcome parameters.

    Results: Analyses were based on answers from 1108 IBD patients and 3429 controls. IBD patients reported significantly worse oral health and more periodontal problems compared to controls. Regression analyses corrected for relevant confounders showed for UC and CD patients significantly increased odds for fair or poor self-perceived overall health of teeth and gums (OR 2.147 and 2.736, respectively) and for severe periodontitis (OR 1.739 and 2.574, respectively) compared to controls; CD patients presented additionally 91% higher odds for having <20 remaining teeth.

    Conclusions: UC and CD patients have significantly increased odds for worse self-perceived oral health and severe periodontitis compared to controls, with CD patients being more severely affected and losing more teeth. It is strongly recommended that IBD patients are kept under close surveillance to prevent periodontitis development and/or mitigate its progression.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Bertl, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ebner, Maria
    Knibbe, Marianne
    Pandis, Nikolaos
    Kuchler, Ulrike
    Ulm, Christian
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    How old is old for implant therapy in terms of early implant losses?2019In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 46, no 12, p. 1282-1293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To assess, retrospectively, whether older age has an impact on implant osseointegration when compared with younger age. Methods: All patients ≥65 years old at implant installation, in an university setting over a time-period of 11.5 years, with complete anamnestic data and follow-up until prosthetic restoration were included and any early implant loss (EIL; i.e., lack of osseointegration prior to or at time-point of prosthetic restoration) was recorded. Further, one implant, from each of the elderly patients was attempted matched to one implant in a younger patient (35 to <55 years old at implant installation) from the same clinic based on: (1) gender, (2) implant region, (3) smoking status, and (4) bone grafting prior to/simultaneously with implant installation. The potential impact of various local and systemic factors on EIL in the entire elderly population, and in the matched elderly and younger patient group were statistically assessed. Results: Four-hundred-forty-four patients ≥65 years old (range 65.1-91.3; 56.8% female) receiving 1517 implants were identified; 10 patients had one EIL each (implant/patient level: 0.66/2.25%). Splitting this patient cohort additionally into 4 age groups [65-69.9 (n=213), 70-74.9 (n=111), 75-79.9 (n=80), ≥80 (n=40)] EIL was on the implant level 0.41, 0.83, 0.34, and 2.26%, respectively, (p=0.102) and on the patient level 1.41, 2.70, 1.25, and 7.50%, respectively, (p=0.104); multilevel analysis showed weak evidence of association of increasing age with higher EIL rate (p = 0.090). Matching was possible in 347 cases, and 5 (1.44%) and 9 (2.59%) EIL in the elderly and younger patients, respectively, were observed (p=0.280). EIL could not be associated with any systemic condition or medication intake. Conclusions: Elderly patients ≥65 years old presented a similarly low EIL rate as younger patients 35 to <55 years old, while patients ≥80 years old may have a slight tendency for a higher EIL rate. Hence, aging does not seem to compromise osseointegration, and if at all, then only slightly and at a later stage of life.

  • 4.
    Bertl, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Division of Oral Surgery, University Clinic of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Pandis, Nikolaos
    Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, School of Dental Medicine University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Stopfer, Nikolaus
    Division of Oral Surgery, University Clinic of Dentistry Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Haririan, Hady
    Department of Periodontology, Medical Faculty Sigmund Freud University Vienna, Austria.
    Bruckmann, Corinna
    Division of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, University Clinic of Dentistry Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Division of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, University Clinic of Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    The impact of a “successfully treated stable periodontitis patient status” on patient‐related outcome parameters during long‐term supportive periodontal care2022In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 101-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To assess the importance of achieving a successfully treated stable periodontitis patient status (PPS) during long-term supportive periodontal care (SPC).

    Methods: This retrospective cohort study included 100 periodontitis patients, who continued for ≥ 7.5 years after active periodontal treatment with SPC and were judged as overall adherent. The effect of various predictors on 3 patient-related outcome parameters was assessed: number of 1) diseased teeth at last SPC, 2) teeth lost due to periodontitis, and 3) teeth lost due to any reason.

    Results: One fifth of the patients were classified as stable after active periodontal treatment. After a mean follow-up of 10.77 years, 24 patients lost 38 teeth due to periodontitis. An unstable PPS and a higher number of diseased teeth per patient at first SPC, and inadequate oral hygiene levels over time significantly increased the risk for a higher number of diseased teeth per patient at last SPC and for more lost teeth due to periodontitis. However, high adherence to SPC appeared to mitigate the negative effect of an unstable PPS, especially regarding tooth loss due to periodontitis. Further, tooth loss due to any reason was about 3-times higher than tooth loss due to periodontitis and was affected by a larger number of predictors.

    Conclusions: Successfully treated patients with a stable PPS maintained a low number of diseased teeth and barely lost teeth during long-term SPC compared to patients not achieving a stable PPS after active periodontal therapy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Bertl, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Suljkanovic, Nedim
    Suljkanovic, Lejla
    Lettner, Stefan
    Esfandeyari, Azadeh
    Moritz, Andreas
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bruckmann, Corinna
    A root canal filling per se does not have a significant negative effect on the marginal periodontium2015In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 520-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate the periodontal status of single-rooted endodontically treated teeth (ET), correcting for patient- and tooth-related factors. Methods: Clinical parameters (BoP,PD,CAL) of 240 ET and 240 contralateral vital teeth (VT), before and after non-surgical periodontal treatment, were extracted retrospectively from the journals of 175 patients. Possible patientrelated (age, gender, smoking status) and tooth-related (interproximal restoration, root canal filling’s extent, post, tooth type) confounders were tested. Results: At baseline, frequency of BoP at an interproximal site at ET versus VT was 70.4% versus 65.0%, respectively. The frequency of teeth with interproximal PD ≥5 mm and CAL ≥5 mm was 47.9% versus 42.9% and 54.6% versus 49.6% at ET and VT, respectively. Interproximal PD and CAL at ET versus VT were 3.86 versus 3.61 mm and 4.11 versus 3.95 mm. After correcting for tooth-related factors, no significant differences were observed between ET and VT. An improper restoration had a significant (p < 0.001) negative effect on BoP [OR 3.49 (95%CI: 1.95–6.27)], PD [36.81% (95%CI: 18.52–57.92)] and CAL [27.01% (95% CI: 12.67–43.18)]. No significant differences between ET and VT were observed regarding clinical outcome of non-surgical periodontal therapy. Conclusions: Presence of a root canal filling per se does not have a significant negative influence on the marginal periodontium, when correcting for the quality of the interproximal restoration.

  • 6.
    Bertl, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Sigmund Freud Univ Vienna, Fac Med, Dept Periodontol, Dent Clin, Vienna, Austria..
    Tsakos, Georgios
    Univ London Univ Coll, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England..
    Pandis, Nikolaos
    Univ Bern, Sch Dent Med, Dept Orthodont & Dentofacial Orthoped, Bern, Switzerland..
    Bogren, Anna
    Umeå Univ, Dept Odontol, Sect Mol Periodontol, Umeå, Sweden..
    Burisch, Johan
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp Amager Hvidovre, Med Div, Gastrounit, Hvidovre, Denmark.;Copenhagen Univ Hosp Amager & Hvidovre, Copenhagen Ctr Inflammatory Bowel Dis Children Ado, Hvidovre, Denmark..
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Med Univ Vienna, Univ Clin Dent, Div Conservat Dent & Periodontol, Vienna, Austria..
    Health-related quality of life aspects of the 'Periodontitis prevalence in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease' (PPCC) cohort2023In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 1601-1620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To assess whether oral health problems affect disease-specific quality of life (QoL) of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, and vice versa, whether IBD affects oral-health-related QoL. Materials and Methods: Individuals reporting IBD and matched controls were surveyed on general anamnestic information, oral-health-related questions and the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP)-5. IBD patients were additionally surveyed on years since diagnosis, disease activity and severity as well as health-related QoL (Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, sIBDQ). OHIP-5 and sIBDQ were defined as primary outcome parameters, and several predictors and confounders were used in adjusted univariable and multivariable regression analyses. Results: Answers from 1108 IBD patients and 3429 controls were analysed. Compared with controls, IBD patients reported significantly more frequently an oral impact on daily life and worse oral-health-related QoL, with Crohn's disease (CD) patients being more severely affected than ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. The diagnosis of UC and CD, having <20 teeth, severe periodontitis and stressful daily-life experience were associated with a higher prevalence of poor oral-health-related QoL. Among IBD patients, an impaired IBD-specific, health-related QoL was significantly associated with the diagnosis of CD and depression, IBD activity and severity, having <20 teeth, presence of oral lesions and stressful daily-life experience, while a longer time since diagnosis was significantly associated with an improved IBDspecific, health-related QoL. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate, for the first time, that oral health problems are associated with an impairment of IBD-specific health-related QoL, and vice versa, IBD is associated with an impaired oral health-related QoL. This emphasizes the potential advantages of including dental professionals in the multi-disciplinary treatment teams of IBD patients.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7. Buhlin, Kåre
    et al.
    Holmer, Jacob
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Hörkkö, Sohvi
    Pockley, Alan Graham
    Johansson, Anders
    Paju, Susanna
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Pussinen, Pirkko J.
    Association of periodontitis with persistent, pro-atherogenic antibody responses2015In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 1006-1014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study antibody responses associated with molecular mimicry in periodontitis. Material & Methods: Fifty-four periodontitis cases (mean age 54.0 years) and 44 controls (53.6 years) were examined, after which cases received periodontal treatment. Established immunoassays were used to analyse levels of antibodies against two pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), heat shock proteins (Hsp), Hsp60, Hsp65, and Hsp70, and epitopes of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) (CuOx-LDL and MDA-LDL) in plasma samples that were collected at baseline and after 3 (n = 48) and 6 (n = 30) months. Results: When age, sex, smoking habit, and the number of teeth were considered in multivariate logistic regressions, Aa and Pg IgG, Hsp65-IgA, CuOx-LDL-IgG and -IgM, and MDA-LDL-IgG antibody levels were associated with periodontitis, whereas Hsp60-IgG2 antibody levels were inversely associated. The Aa antibody levels significantly correlated with the levels of IgA antibodies to Hsp65 and Hsp70, and both OxLDL IgA antibody levels. The levels of antibodies to Pg correlated with IgG antibodies to Hsp60, Hsp70, and both oxLDL antibody epitopes. None of the antibody levels changed significantly after treatment. Conclusions: Periodontitis is associated with persistently high levels of circulating antibodies that are reactive with pathogen-and host-derived antigens.

  • 8. Buhlin, Kåre
    et al.
    Hultin, Margareta
    Norderyd, Ola
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Persson, Lena
    Pockley, Alan Graham
    Rabe, Per
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Risk factors for atherosclerosis in cases with severe periodontitis2009In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 541-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Studies have reported on an association between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and periodontitis. The purpose of this case-control study was to provide an insight into this association by determining the plasma levels of some risk markers for CVD in cases with periodontitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-eight cases with periodontitis, mean age 53.9 (SD 7.9) years, and 48 randomly selected healthy controls, mean age 53.1 (SD 7.9) years, were investigated. Fasting blood plasma was analysed for glucose, lipids, markers systemic inflammation, cytokines and antibodies against heat shock proteins (Hsp). The associations between periodontitis and the various substances analysed in plasma were calculated using a multivariate logistic regression model, which compensated for age, gender, smoking and body mass index. RESULTS: The regression analyses revealed a significant association between periodontitis and high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) [odds ratio (OR) 4.0, confidence interval (CI) 1.4-11.4] and fibrinogen (OR 8.7, CI 2.6-28.4), IL-18 (OR 6.5, CI 2.2-19.5), and decreased levels of IL-4 (OR 0.12, CI 0.0-0.5). The study showed increased levels of antibodies against Hsp65 (OR 2.8, CI 1-7.6) and 70 (OR 2.9, CI 1.1-7.8) and decreased levels of antibodies against Hsp60 (OR 0.3, CI 0.1-0.8). CONCLUSIONS: Periodontitis was associated with increased levels of CRP, glucose, fibrinogen and IL-18, and with decreased levels of IL-4.

  • 9. Cosgarea, Raluca
    et al.
    Juncar, Raluca
    Heumann, Christian
    Tristiu, Roxana
    Lascu, Liana
    Arweiler, Nicole
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Sculean, Anton
    Non-surgical periodontal treatment in conjunction with 3 or 7 days systemic administration of amoxicillin and metronidazole in severe chronic periodontitis patients: A placebo-controlled randomized clinical study2016In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 43, no 9, p. 767-777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of 3 or 7 days systemic administration of amoxicillin (AMX) and metronidazole (MET) or placebo as adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment in severe chronic periodontitis patients. METHODS: One hundred and two patients with severe chronic periodontitis [e.g. ≥1 site with probing pocket depth (PD) ≥ 6 mm per quadrant] were randomly divided into three equally sized groups and treated with either scaling and root planing within 24 h (SRP) + placebo (Group A) or SRP + AMX + MET (both 500 mg × 3 times daily) for 3 days (Group B) or SRP + AMX + MET (both 500 mg × 3 times daily) for 7 days (Group C). PD, clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), full-mouth plaque scores (FMPS) and gingival bleeding index (GBI) were assessed prior to treatment (baseline), and at 3 and 6 months post-treatment. The primary outcome variable was the difference (Δ) in the number of sites with PD ≥ 6 mm. RESULTS: Ninety-one patients completed the study. At both 3 and 6 months, all three treatment protocols resulted in statistically significant improvements compared to baseline for all evaluated clinical parameters (p < 0.001). At 6 months, a statistically significantly greater reduction in the mean number of sites with PD ≥ 6 mm was observed in group B (28.62 ± 15.32 sites) and group C (30.45 ± 15.04 sites) compared to the placebo group (17.10 ± 14.68 sites). Furthermore, both the 3- and the 7-day antibiotic regimen resulted in statistically significantly higher clinical improvements compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The present findings indicate that in patients with severe chronic periodontitis, non-surgical periodontal therapy in conjunction with a 3 or 7 days systemic administration of AMX + MET may lead to significantly greater clinical improvements compared to non-surgical therapy alone.

  • 10. Cosyn, Jan
    et al.
    Cleymaet, Roberto
    Hanselaer, Lore
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Regenerative periodontal therapy of infrabony defects using minimally invasive surgery and a collagen-enriched bovine-derived xenograft: a 1-year prospective study on clinical and aesthetic outcome2012In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 979-986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical and aesthetic outcome of regenerative periodontal therapy (RPT) using minimally invasive surgery and a collagen-enriched bovine-derived xenograft (1); to identify risk factors for failure (clinical attachment level (CAL) gain ≤ 1 mm) and advanced gingival recession (REC) increase (>1 mm) (2). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ninety-five non-smoking patients, with ≤ 25% full-mouth plaque and bleeding presenting ≥ 6 months after initial periodontal therapy with ≥ 1 isolated inter-dental infrabony defect were recruited. Patients were consecutively treated by the same clinician using minimally invasive surgery and a collagen-enriched bovine-derived xenograft. Clinical, radiographic and aesthetic data were collected before surgery and up to 1 year. Multivariate analyses were used to identify risk factors for failure and advanced REC increase. RESULTS: Eighty-four patients (39 men, 45 women; mean age 53) complied and demonstrated mean probing depth (PD) of 7.8 mm, CAL of 10.0 mm and defect depth of 5.2 mm before surgery. At 1 year, postsurgery mean PD reduction was 3.5 mm (range 0.0-8.0), CAL gain was 3.1 mm (range 0.0-7.0) and radiographic defect fill was 53% (range 0-100). Forty-nine percentage showed ≥ 4 mm CAL gain, whereas 15% were considered failures. Mean inter-dental and midfacial REC increase was 0.3 mm (range-2.0-2.0) and 0.5 mm (range-1.5-2.0) respectively. Midfacial REC increase and contour deterioration contributed most to a small, yet significant reduction in the Pink Esthetic Score from 10.06 to 9.42 (p = 0.002). Risk factors for failure included defects with a non-supportive anatomy (OR: ≥ 10.4), plaque (OR: 14.7) and complication(s) (OR: 12.0). Risk factors for advanced midfacial REC increase included defects with a non-supportive anatomy (OR: 58.8) and a thin-scalloped gingival biotype (OR: 76.9). CONCLUSIONS: RPT using minimally invasive surgery and a collagen-enriched bovine-derived xenograft demonstrated favourable clinical outcome after 1 year, even though soft tissue aesthetics could not be fully preserved. Defects with a non-supporting anatomy may be at risk for failure and advanced midfacial recession.

  • 11. Cosyn, Jan
    et al.
    Eghbali, Aryan
    Hermans, Alexander
    Vervaeke, Stijn
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Cleymaet, Roberto
    A 5-year prospective study on single immediate implants in the aesthetic zone2016In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 702-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim There is a paucity of long-term data on soft tissue aesthetics of single immediate implants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the 5-year clinical and aesthetic outcome of this treatment concept. Materials and methods Twenty-two periodontally healthy patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 50) with low risk for aesthetic complications (thick gingival biotype, intact buccal bone wall, both neighbouring teeth present) were consecutively treated with a single immediate implant in the aesthetic zone (15-25). Flapless surgery was performed and the gap between the implant and buccal bone wall was systematically filled with bovine bone particles. Implants were immediately non-functionally loaded with a screw-retained provisional crown. Cases demonstrating major alveolar process changes and/or advanced mid-facial recession (>1mm) at 3months were additionally treated with a connective tissue graft (CTG). Permanent crowns were installed at 6months. The clinical and aesthetic results at 5years were compared to those obtained at 1 year Results Seventeen patients attended the 5-year re-assessment, of whom five had been treated with a CTG for early aesthetic complications. There was one early implant failure and one complication after 1 year (porcelain chipping). Mean marginal bone loss was 0.12mm at 1 year and 0.19mm at 5years (p=0.595) with the moment of implant installation as baseline. Papilla height increased between 1 and 5years (p0.007), whereas mid-facial contour (p=0.005) and alveolar process deficiency (p=0.008) deteriorated. Mean mid-facial recession was on average 0.28mm (SD 0.48) at 1 year and 0.53mm (SD 0.53) at 5years (p=0.072) with the preoperative status as baseline. Three implants demonstrated advanced mid-facial recession (>1mm) at 5years. All three were in a central incisor position and none had been treated with a CTG. Thus, 8/17 implants showed aesthetic complications (five early and three late aesthetic complications). Implants in a lateral incisor position showed stable soft tissue levels. The pink aesthetic score was on average 12.15 at 1 year and 11.18 at 5years (p=0.030 Conclusion Single immediate implants showed high implant survival and limited marginal bone loss in the long term. However, mid-facial recession, mid-facial contour and alveolar process deficiency deteriorated after 1year. With an aesthetic complication rate of 8/17 in well-selected patients who had been treated by experienced clinicians, type I placement may not be recommended for daily practice

  • 12. Cosyn, Jan
    et al.
    Pollaris, Louis
    Van der Linden, Filip
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Minimally Invasive Single Implant Treatment (MISIT) based on ridge preservation and contour augmentation in patients with a high aesthetic risk profile: one-year results2015In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 398-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo evaluate the 1-year outcome of Minimally Invasive Single Implant Treatment (M.I.S.I.T.) based on ridge preservation and contour augmentation in patients with a high aesthetic risk profile. Materials and MethodsPeriodontally healthy non-smoking patients with a failing tooth in the anterior maxilla (15-25) were selected. All were in need of a single implant and demonstrated high risk for aesthetic complications given mid-facial recession at the failing tooth and/or a buccal bone dehiscence and/or a thin-scalloped gingival biotype. Patients without mid-facial recession (NRG) received flapless tooth extraction and ridge preservation using a collagen-enriched bovine-derived xenograft, flapless installation of a bone condensing implant with variable-thread design (4-6months later), a provisional screw-retained crown and connective tissue graft (CTG) inserted in the buccal mucosa (3months later) and a permanent crown (3months later). Patients with mid-facial recession (RG) were treated similarly, yet they received a CTG at the time of ridge preservation. All patients were treated by an experienced periodontist using a microsurgical approach. Primary outcome variables included papillary and mid-facial recession. Clinical parameters, pink (PES) and white aesthetic score (WES) were considered secondary outcome variables. ResultsFifty patients (25 females, 25 males; mean age 39, range 19-81; 42 in NRG and 8 in RG) met the selection criteria and consented to the treatment. Forty-seven could be examined at 12months and all implants survived. Mean bone loss amounted to 0.48mm (range 0.00-1.80) at 12months. Papillary recession was minimal in both groups at 12months (mean0.3mm), as was mid-facial recession in the NRG (mean 0.1mm). Twelve patients in the NRG even demonstrated coronal migration of the mucosal margin following CTG and needed adaptation of the provisional crown to induce soft tissue retraction. Due to CTG at the time of ridge preservation in the RG, mid-facial soft tissue gain amounted to 0.9mm at 12months, hereby eliminating 2/3rd of the initial recession. PES and WES were favourable pointing to 10.9/14 and 8.2/10 respectively. ConclusionThis short-term prospective study offers a proof of principle of M.I.S.I.T. in patients with a high aesthetic risk profile.

  • 13. Cosyn, Jan
    et al.
    Raes, Magalie
    Packet, Mathieu
    Cleymaet, Roberto
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Disparity in embrasure fill and papilla height between tooth- and implant-borne fixed restorations in the anterior maxilla: a cross-sectional study2013In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 728-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The objective of the present study was to compare inter-proximal fill and papilla height between different embrasures. Material & Methods One hundred and fifty non-smoking consecutive patients (mean age 54, range 32–73; 63 males and 87 females) without periodontal disease were selected in a multidisciplinary practice during regular supportive care. All had been treated for multiple tooth loss in the anterior maxilla at least 1 year earlier by means of a fixed restoration on teeth (n = 50) or implants (n = 100) using straightforward procedures (without hard and/or soft tissue augmentation). Embrasure fill was assessed by means of Jemt's papilla index and papilla height was registered following local anaesthesia by means of bone sounding by one clinician. Results Tooth-pontic and tooth-implant embrasures demonstrated comparable inter-proximal fill and papilla height (≥58% Jemt's score 3; mean papilla height ≥4.1 mm). Between missing teeth, embrasure fill and papilla height were lower regardless of the embrasure type. The implant-implant and implant-pontic embrasure demonstrated comparable outcome (≤42% Jemt's score 3; mean papilla height ≤ 3.3 mm; p ≥ 0.416), which was significantly poorer when compared to the pontic-pontic embrasure (82% Jemt's score 3; mean papilla height 3.7 mm; p ≤ 0.019). Overall, papilla index and papilla height demonstrated a weak correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient: 0.198; p = 0.002). Conclusions The re-establishment of a papilla is difficult when there is no tooth involved. In that scenario a short papilla should be expected and implant-borne restorations demonstrate the poorest outcome. Moreover, an implant with a pontic may not perform better than adjacent implants.

  • 14. Cosyn, Jan
    et al.
    Raes, Stefanie
    De Meyer, Stefanie
    Raes, Filiep
    Buy, Ronald
    Coomans, Danny
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    An analysis of the decision-making process for single implant treatment in general practice2012In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 166-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To study the frequency of and factors associated with the decision to perform single implant treatment after tooth extraction by general practitioners in a private, fee-for-service setting. Material and methods One hundred practitioners with a general dental practice in Ghent were randomly selected. Clinicians were asked to fill in a study form for every single extraction they performed during an 8-week period. The form related to the treatment decision and a number of patient- and clinician-related factors. Results Ninety-four general dentists (52 men, 42 women; mean age 49; range 24–68) agreed to participate and extracted 1180 single teeth. After exclusion of third molars and cases where the reason for tooth loss would generally prohibit replacement, 900 cases were identified. In 24% of these patients, there was no treatment decision and in 18% replacement was deemed unnecessary. When replacement was necessary (n = 526), removable partial denture (RPD), fixed partial denture (FPD), single implant treatment and resin-bonded bridge were chosen in 54%, 24%, 21% and 1% of the patients, respectively. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the decision-making process for single implant treatment against RPD and FPD. In relation to RPD, single implant treatment was more likely in highly educated patients with few missing teeth and no bone loss at adjacent teeth. In relation to FPD, single implant treatment was more likely in patients with intact adjacent teeth and when the tooth was extracted by a female dentist. Experience in implant prosthetics was positively associated with single implant treatment in all analyses. Conclusions Single implant treatment is not the most common procedure in daily practice to restore a single tooth gap. Patient's education, oral factors and clinician-related factors may affect the decision-making process, whereas medical factors may not.

  • 15. Cosyn, Jan
    et al.
    Sabzevar, Mehran M.
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Predictors of inter-proximal and midfacial recession following single implant treatment in the anterior maxilla: a multivariate analysis2012In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 895-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose A number of factors have been associated with soft tissue recession following single implant treatment. However, given the cross-sectional design of most of these studies and crude associations based on univariate analyses, such factors may only be considered risk indicators. The objective of the present retrospective cohort study using multivariate analyses was to identify predictors of recession. Material and Methods Patients who had been treated by two periodontists and two prosthodontists in 2006 and 2007 for a single implant in the anterior maxilla were re-examined in 2009 and their records were scrutinized. Subjects treated via flap surgery with and without ridge re-contouring were considered. Outcome variables were inter-proximal and midfacial recession. Explanatory variables included demographic data, the surgical approach and a number of local factors that were evaluated on radiographs taken pre-operatively or at permanent crown installation (baseline). Results Data pertaining to 97/115 (60 females, 37 males; mean age 51, SD 13, range 23–80) patients were available for evaluation. Significant bone loss was observed between baseline and re-examination at the implant surface (0.2–0.3 mm, p < 0.001) and tooth surface (0.3–0.5 mm, p < 0.001). Surgery with ridge re-contouring demonstrated 0.2 mm additional bone loss at the distal tooth surface when compared to surgery without ridge re-contouring (p = 0.034). This could be explained by a disparity in possible papilla-opening procedures (three versus one or two). As a result, regression analyses identified surgery with ridge re-contouring as a predictor of inter-proximal recession (OR ≥ 3.4). Pre-operative bone level at the tooth surface was another predictor of inter-proximal recession (OR ≥ 2.1). Recession of the distal papilla was also affected by a missing contact point (OR = 221.9), the implant-to-tooth distance (OR = 0.3) and the distance of the bone peak to the contact point (OR = 2.9). Midfacial recession was only associated with a buccal shoulder position (OR = 17.2). Conclusions To optimize soft tissue levels around single implants, clinicians should limit papilla-opening procedures and pay utmost attention to a correct implant and contact point positioning.

  • 16. Danz, Jan C.
    et al.
    Bibby, Bo M
    Katsaros, Christos
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Effects of facial tooth movement on the periodontium in rats: a comparison between conventional and low force2016In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bone dehiscences and gingival recession have been associated with orthodontic arch expansion. The aim of this study was to assess and compare periodontal modelling during application of two force levels. Methods: The second and third upper molars were orthodontically moved buccally with conventional or low forces for 60 or 90 days in 32 rats. Ten non-treatedanimals were used as controls. The influence of force level and time on dental, skeletal and periodontal parameters (i.e. height and thickness of gingiva and bone) was assessed on histomicrographs using a mixed linear model Results: Facial tooth position (725m, CI 379-1072m, distal root of the third molar) and maxillary skeletal width (295m, CI 168-421m) differed significantly between force groups. Despite bone apposition at the facial aspects of the moved roots, bone dehiscences were developing and bone thickness was decreasing during facial tooth movement. Development of gingival recession was scarce and in cases with extreme facial tooth movement. No remarkable differences between force levels were found for any of the periodontal parameters Conclusions: Facial tooth movement with conventional or low forces resulted in similar modelling of facial alveolar bone and gingiva

  • 17.
    de Waal, Yvonne C. M.
    et al.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Ctr Dent & Oral Hyg, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Winning, Lewis
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Dublin Dent Univ Hosp, Dublin, Ireland..
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Univ Clin Dent, Med Univ Vienna, Div Conservat Dent & Periodontol, Vienna, Austria..
    Polyzois, Ioannis
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Dublin Dent Univ Hosp, Dublin, Ireland..
    Efficacy of chemical approaches for implant surface decontamination in conjunction with sub-marginal instrumentation, in the non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis: A systematic review2023In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 50, no S26, p. 212-223Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To answer the following PICOS question: In adult patients with peri-implantitis, what is the efficacy of sub-marginal instrumentation combined with chemical surface decontamination in comparison with sub-marginal instrumentation with or without placebo, in terms of changes in probing depth (PD) and/or bleeding on probing, as reported in prospective randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled trials, or prospective cohort studies, with a minimum of 6-month "follow-up".

    Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Scopus, Ovid Medline, and The Cochrane Library of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL) for articles published until March 2022. Data addressing the primary and secondary outcomes were extracted.

    Results: The search gave 2033 results of which 3 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Two studies investigated the use of anti-microbial photodynamic therapy as adjunct to sub-marginal instrumentation and the third study assessed the adjunctive use of a desiccant material. A meta-analysis was not deemed meaningful because of the large heterogeneity among the studies. All three studies showed favourable results in terms of PD reduction for chemical surface decontamination over control approaches, but were inconsistent or showed no differences for the other outcome variables.

    Conclusions: Adjunctive chemical approaches for implant surface decontamination may offer an advantage over sub-marginal instrumentation alone, in terms of improved PD.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18. Dierens, Melissa
    et al.
    de Bruecker, Evelyn
    Vandeweghe, Stefan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Kisch, Jenö
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Cosyn, Jan
    Alterations in soft tissue levels and aesthetics over a 16–22 year period following single implant treatment in periodontally-healthy patients: a retrospective case series2013In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 311-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Long term studies on single implants are scarce and merely focus on clinical response parameters, complications and bone remodelling. The objective of this retrospective case series was to assess alterations in soft tissue levels and aesthetics over a 16–22 year period in periodontally-healthy patients. Material and methods Patients who had received a single turned implant in the anterior maxilla/mandible at the Dental Specialist Clinic in Malmö between 1987 and 1993 were invited for a re-examination on the basis of a number of inclusion criteria. Both neighbouring teeth had to be present at re-examination and baseline clinical photographs (within the first year of function) had to be available for soft tissue evaluation. These photographs were superimposed onto final clinical photographs to assess longitudinal soft tissue alterations. Results Twenty-one patients (nine females; mean age 23, range 16–41) treated with 24 single implants met the criteria for soft tissue evaluation. Peri-implant soft tissue levels (papillae, midfacial level) remained stable over a 16–22 year observation period (p ≥ 0.372). However, neighbouring teeth demonstrated midfacial recession and eruption pointing to a major distortion with the implant crown (> 1 mm) in 5/24 (21%) and 10/24 (42%) of the cases, respectively. Baseline aesthetics was considered poor (mean Pink Esthetic Score 7.42, mean White Esthetic Score 5.43), yet a significant time effect could not be demonstrated (p ≥ 0.552). Implant and tooth bone loss was low (mean 0.6 mm and 0.4 mm, respectively) over a 16–22 year period. Conclusions This limited case series demonstrated stable peri-implant soft tissue levels and aesthetics in the long term following single implant treatment in periodontally-healthy patients. However, midfacial recession and eruption may be expected at neighbouring teeth.

  • 19.
    Erovic Ademovski, Seida
    et al.
    School for Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Carina
    School for Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Persson, G Rutger
    School for Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden; Department of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Renvert, Stefan
    School for Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden; School of Dental Science, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland; Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    The effect of periodontal therapy on intra-oral halitosis: a case series2016In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 445-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on intra-oral halitosis 3 months after therapy.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty-eight adults with intra-oral halitosis were included in a case series. Intra-oral halitosis was evaluated at baseline, and at 3 months after treatment using the organoleptic scores (OLS), Halimeter® , and a gas chromatograph.

    RESULTS: Significant reductions for OLS (p < 0.01), total sum of volatile sulphur compounds (T-VSC) (p < 0.01) and methyl mercaptan (MM) (p < 0.05) values were found after treatment. Hydrogen sulphide (H2 S) levels were not significantly reduced. The numbers of probing pockets 4 mm, 5 mm and 6 mm were significantly reduced as a result of therapy (p < 0.001). Bleeding on probing (BOP) and plaque indices were also significantly reduced (p < 0.001). For the 34 individuals with successful periodontal treatment (BOP<20% and a ≥50% reduction of total pocket depth) reductions in OLS (p < 0.01) and T-VSC scores (p < 0.01) were found. Eleven individuals were considered effectively treated for intra-oral halitosis presenting with a T-VSC value <160 ppb, a H2 S value <112 ppb and a MM value <26 ppb.

    CONCLUSION: Non-surgical periodontal therapy resulted in reduction of OLS, MM and T-VSC values 3 months after therapy. Few individuals were considered as effectively treated for intra-oral halitosis.

  • 20.
    Erovic Ademovski, Seida
    et al.
    School for Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Carina
    School for Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Persson, Gösta Rutger
    School for Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden; Department of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Renvert, Stefan
    School for Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden; School of Dental Science, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland; Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    The long-term effect of a zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate containing mouth rinse on intra-oral halitosis-A randomized clinical trial.2017In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 1010-1019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term effects of a zinc acetate and chlorhexidine diacetate mouth rinse (Zn/CHX) on intra-oral halitosis.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-six adults with intra-oral halitosis were randomized into a 6-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. The presence of intra-oral halitosis was evaluated at baseline, 3 and 6 months after treatment by assessment of organoleptic score (OLS) and by total volatile sulphur compounds (T-VSC), hydrogen sulphide (H2 S) and methyl mercaptan (MM) concentrations in exhaled air.

    RESULTS: A Zn/CHX mouth rinse provided significantly better control of intra-oral halitosis than a placebo mouth rinse. At 3 and 6 months, individuals rinsing with the Zn/CHX rinse presented with reductions of the OLS, T-VSC (p < .01, respectively), H2 S (p < .001), and MM (p < .01) in subjects' exhaled air. At 6 months, 68.2% of individuals using the Zn/CHX rinse experienced a 1 or 2 category improvement in OLS compared with 19.1% of placebo-treated subjects. 91% of subjects in the Zn/CHX group were categorized as being effectively treated for intra-oral halitosis (i.e. H2 S < 112 ppb), compared to 43% in the placebo group.

    CONCLUSION: Zn/CHX mouth rinse provides effective long-term efficacy against intra-oral halitosis, assessed both objectively and subjectively. With regular rinsing, the effect was sustained for 6 months.

  • 21. Giannobile, William V
    et al.
    Berglundh, Tord
    Al-Nawas, Bilal
    Araujo, Mauricio
    Bartold, P Mark
    Bouchard, Philippe
    Chapple, Iain
    Gruber, Reinhard
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Sculean, Anton
    Lang, Niklaus P
    Lyngstadaas, Petter
    Kebschull, Moritz
    Galindo-Moreno, Pablo
    Schwartz, Zvi
    Shapira, Lior
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Reseland, Janne
    Biological factors involved in alveolar bone regeneration: Consensus report of Working Group 1 of the 15(th) European Workshop on Periodontology on Bone Regeneration.2019In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. Suppl 21, no 46, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To describe the biology of alveolar bone regeneration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Four comprehensive reviews were performed on (a) mesenchymal cells and differentiation factors leading to bone formation; (b) the critical interplay between bone resorbing and formative cells; (c) the role of osteoimmunology in the formation and maintenance of alveolar bone; and (d) the self-regenerative capacity following bone injury or tooth extraction were prepared prior to the workshop. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: This summary information adds to the fuller understanding of the alveolar bone regenerative response with implications to reconstructive procedures for patient oral rehabilitation. The group collectively formulated and addressed critical questions based on each of the reviews in this consensus report to advance the field. The report concludes with identified areas of future research.

  • 22.
    Gotfredsen, Klaus
    et al.
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Odontol, Sect Oral Rehabil, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Rimborg, Susie
    Copenhagen Univ Lib, Copenhagen Univ, Fac Lib Nat & Hlth Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Univ Geneva, Univ Clin Dent Med CUMD, Div Regenerat Dent Med & Periodontol, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Efficacy and risks of removable partial prosthesis in periodontitis patients: A systematic review2022In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 49, no 24, p. 167-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this systematic review was to answer the following focused question: "In partially edentulous patients with periodontitis, are removable dental prostheses (RDPs) more efficacious than no prosthetic treatment, treatment to a shortened dental arch (SDA), or tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs)?" Materials and methods A systematic literature search was performed electronically for the period 1966-2020. Two authors independently assessed the studies for eligibility according to the PRISMA guidelines. Risk assessment was performed using RoB 2.0 and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Results Two retrospective studies indicated that RDPs increased the risk of tooth loss compared to FDPs in patients with a history of periodontitis. Prospective studies found that RDPs could be maintained without any significant periodontal destruction on a long-term basis. Owing to the heterogeneity of the data, no meta-analysis could be performed. Several studies indicated that RDP increased plaque accumulation. RDPs had only a limited effect on masticatory efficiency and nutritional status. RDPs may improve oral-health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), but to a lesser extent compared with that of patients treated to an SDA. Conclusions There is no strong evidence that RDPs per se will cause periodontal destruction including tooth loss. RDPs do not inevitably improve masticatory efficiency but improve OHRQoL, although less than for patients treated with FDPs including resin-bonded FDPs.

  • 23. Hallström, Hadar
    et al.
    Persson, G Rutger
    Lindgren, Susann
    Olofsson, Maria
    Renvert, Stefan
    Systemic antibiotics and debridement of peri-implant mucositis. A randomized clinical trial.2012In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 574-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This RCT compared non-surgical treatment of peri-implant mucositis with or without systemic antibiotics.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-eight subjects received non-surgical debridement with or without systemic Azithromax (®) (4 days), and were followed during 6 months. The checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method was used to analyse the microbiological material.

    RESULTS: Five subjects were excluded due to antibiotic medication during follow-up. At baseline,1 and 3 months no group differences were found. Statistical analysis failed to demonstrate differences in probing pocket depths (PPD) values at 6 months (Mean diff PPD: 0.5 mm, SE: ±0.4 mm, 95% CI: -0.2, 1.3, p = 0.16). Mean% implant bleeding decreased between baseline and month 6 from 82.6% to 27.3% in the test, and from 80.0% to 47.5% in the control group (p < 0.02). Throughout the study, no study group differences in bacterial counts were found.

    CONCLUSION: No short-term differences were found between study groups. The clinical improvements observed at 6 months may be attributed to improvements in oral hygiene. The present study does not provide evidence for the use of systemic antibiotics in treatment of peri-implant mucositis.

  • 24.
    Hallström, Hadar
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Persson, G. Rutger
    Lindgren, Susann
    Renvert, Stefan
    Open flap debridement of peri-implantitis with or without adjunctive systemic antibiotics: A randomized clinical trial2017In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 44, no 12, p. 1285-1293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate clinical, radiographic and microbiological outcome over 12months following open flap debridement of peri-implantitis with or without antibiotics. Materials and methods: Peri-implantitis was surgically treated with or without Zithromax((R)) in 19 control and 20 test individuals. Probing pocket depth (PPD), gingival inflammation (BOP), intra-oral radiographs and microbial samples were studied. Per protocol and intent-to-treat analyses were performed. Results: The mean difference (reduction) in PPD values between baseline and month 12 in the test and control groups was 1.7mm (SD1.1, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.3, p<.001) and 1.6mm (SD +/- 1.5, 95% CI: 0.8, 2,4, p<.001), respectively. Data analysis failed to show study group differences for BOP, PPD, radiographic bone level and microbial load. Successful treatment (per protocol: PPD5mm, no BOP, no suppuration and no bone loss 0.5mm) at 12months in test and control groups was 7/15 (46.7%) and 4/16 (25.0%). Bacterial load reduction was similar in study groups with a temporary reduction following treatment. Conclusions: Surgical treatment of peri-implantitis with adjunctive systemic azithromycin did not provide 1-year clinical benefits in comparison with those only receiving open flap debridement.

  • 25.
    Heitz-Mayfield, Lisa J A
    et al.
    School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
    Schätzle, Marc
    School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
    Löe, Harald
    School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
    Bürgin, Walter
    School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
    Anerud, Age
    School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
    Boysen, Hans
    School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
    Lang, Niklaus P
    School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.
    Clinical course of chronic periodontitis: II. Incidence, characteristics and time of occurrence of the initial periodontal lesion2003In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 902-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to assess the initiation and progression of periodontal disease during adult life.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a 26-year longitudinal investigation of the initiation and progression of chronic periodontitis that started in 1969 and included 565 men of Norwegian middle class, 223 who had participated in some, but not all, intermediate examinations presented at the last survey in 1995. Fifty-four individuals were available for examination in all seven surveys.

    RESULTS: Covering the age range from 16 to 60 years, the study showed that at 16 years of age, 5% of the participants had initial loss of periodontal attachment (ILA > or = 2 mm) at one or more sites. Both the subject incidence and the site incidence increased with time, and by 32 years of age, all individuals had one or more sites with loss of attachment. As age progressed, new lesions affected sites, so that as these men approached 60 years of age approximately 50% of all available sites had ILA. An assessment of the intraoral distribution of the first periodontal lesion showed that, regardless of age, molars and bicuspids were most often affected. At and before the age of 40 years, the majority of ILA was found in buccal surfaces in the form of gingival recession. By 50 years, however, a greater proportion of sites presented with attachment loss attributed to pocket formation or a combination of pocket formation and gingival recession. As individuals neared 60 years of age, approximately half of the interproximal areas in posterior teeth had these lesions.

    CONCLUSION: This investigation has shown that, in a well-maintained population who practises oral home care and has regular check-ups, the incidence of incipient periodontal destruction increases with age, the highest rate occurs between 50 and 60 years, and gingival recession is the predominant lesion before 40 years, while periodontal pocketing is the principal mode of destruction between 50 and 60 years of age.

  • 26. Hämmerle, Christoph H F
    et al.
    Giannobile, William V
    Abrahamsson, Ingemar
    Blanco, Juan
    Bosshardt, Dieter
    Dahlin, Christer
    Donos, Nikos
    Ellingsen, Jan Eirik
    Fickl, Stefan
    Gruber, Reinhard
    Goerlach, Goerlach
    Nuñez, Javier
    Meyle, Joerg
    Schwarz, Frank
    Sculean, Anton
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Terheyden, Hendrik
    Vignoletti, Fabio
    Weber, Franz
    Biology of soft tissue wound healing and regeneration: consensus report of group 1 of the 10th European workshop on periodontology2014In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 41, no s15, p. S1-S5, article id 41Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:The scope of this consensus was to review the biological processes of soft tissue wound healing in the oral cavity and to histologically evaluate soft tissue healing in clinical and pre-clinical models. AIMS:To review the current knowledge regarding the biological processes of soft tissue wound healing at teeth, implants and on the edentulous ridge. Furthermore, to review soft tissue wound healing at these sites, when using barrier membranes, growth and differentiation factors and soft tissue substitutes. COLLECTION OF DATA:Searches of the literature with respect to recessions at teeth and soft tissue deficiencies at implants, augmentation of the area of keratinized tissue and soft tissue volume were conducted. The available evidence was collected, categorized and summarized. FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF ORAL SOFT TISSUE WOUND HEALING:Oral mucosal and skin wound healing follow a similar pattern of the four phases of haemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and maturation/matrix remodelling. The soft connective tissue determines the characteristics of the overlaying oral epithelium. Within 7-14 days, epithelial healing of surgical wounds at teeth is completed. Soft tissue healing following surgery at implants requires 6-8 weeks for maturation. The resulting tissue resembles scar tissue. Well-designed pre-clinical studies providing histological data have been reported describing soft tissue wound healing, when using barrier membranes, growth and differentiation factors and soft tissue substitutes. Few controlled clinical studies with low numbers of patients are available for some of the treatments reviewed at teeth. Whereas, histological new attachment has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies resulting from some of the treatments reviewed, human histological data commonly report a lack of new attachment but rather long junctional epithelial attachment and connective tissue adhesion. Regarding soft tissue healing at implants human data are very scarce. CONCLUSIONS:Oral soft tissue healing at teeth, implants and the edentulous ridge follows the same phases as skin wound healing. Histological studies in humans have not reported new attachment formation at teeth for the indications studied. Human histological data of soft tissue wound healing at implants are limited. CLINICAL RECOMMENDATIONS:The use of barriers membranes, growth and differentiation factors and soft tissue substitutes for the treatment of localized gingival/mucosal recessions, insufficient amount of keratinized tissue and insufficient soft tissue volume is at a developing stage.

  • 27.
    Jansson, Henrik
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lindholm, Eero
    Groop, Leif
    Bratthall, Gunilla
    Type 2 diabetes and risk for periodontal disease: a role for dental health awareness2006In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 408-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have found correlations between diabetes and an increased prevalence of periodontitis. OBJECTIVE: To analyse, in a group of subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D), (i) the association between medical characteristics and severe periodontal disease and (ii) dental care habits and knowledge of oral health. METHODS: One hundred and ninety-one subjects with T2D were examined. Based on assessment of marginal bone height in panoramic radiographs, two periodontal subgroups were identified: one periodontally diseased (PD+) and one periodontally healthy (PD-) group. All subjects completed a questionnaire about their medical and oral health. RESULTS: Twenty per cent of the subjects were classified as PD+. This was verified by clinical parameters. PD+ individuals had higher haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (p=0.033) and higher prevalences of cardiovascular complications (p=0.012). They were also less likely to be of Scandinavian origin (p=0.028) and more likely to smoke (p<0.001) than the PD- group. The PD+ group rated their oral health as poor (p<0.0001) and believed that T2D had an influence on their oral status (p<0.0001). CONCLUSION: The best predictor for severe periodontal disease in subjects with T2D is smoking followed by HbA1c levels. T2D subjects should be informed about the increased risk for periodontal disease when suffering from T2D.

  • 28.
    Jönsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ramberg, Per
    Demmer, Ryan T
    Kebschull, Moritz
    Dahlén, Gunnar
    Papapanou, Panos N.
    Gingival tissue transcriptomes in experimental gingivitis.2011In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 7, no 38, p. 599-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: We investigated the sequential gene expression in the gingiva during the induction and resolution of experimental gingivitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty periodontally and systemically healthy non-smoking volunteers participated in a 3-week experimental gingivitis protocol, followed by debridement and 2-week regular plaque control. We recorded clinical indices and harvested gingival tissue samples from four interproximal palatal sites in half of the participants at baseline, Day 7, Day 14 and Day 21 (the "induction phase"), and at Day 21, Day 25, Day 30 and Day 35 in the other half (the "resolution phase"). RNA was extracted, amplified, reversed transcribed, amplified, labelled and hybridized using Affymetrix Human Genome U133Plus2.0 microarrays. Paired t-tests compared gene expression changes between consecutive time points. Gene ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. RESULTS: The median gingival index was 0 at baseline, 2 at Day 21 and 1 at Day 35. Differential gene regulation peaked during the third week of induction and the first 4 days of resolution. Leucocyte transmigration, cell adhesion and antigen processing/presentation were the top differentially regulated pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Transcriptomic studies enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of the reversible inflammatory gingival lesion and provide a detailed account of the dynamic tissue responses during the induction and resolution of experimental gingivitis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 29. Lang, Niklaus P
    et al.
    Zitzman, Nicola U
    Al-Nawas, Bilal
    Benic, Goran I
    Bouchard, Philippe
    Cordaro, Luca
    Goldstein, Moshe
    Gotfredsen, Klaus
    McGrath, Colman
    Pjetursson, Bjarni E
    Sicilia, Alberto
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Holmén, Anders
    Hungerbühler, Marcell
    Vigon, Alberto Ortiz
    Clinical research in implant dentistry: evaluation of implant-supported restorations, aesthetic and patient-reported outcomes2012In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 39, no Suppl 12, p. 133-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The articles discussed in working group 3 dealt with specific aspects of clinical research. In this context, the literature reporting on survival and complication rates of implant-supported or implant-tooth supported restorations in longitudinal studies of at least 5 years were discussed. The second aspect dealt with the evaluation of aesthetic outcomes in clinical studies and the related index systems available. Finally, the third aspect discussed dealt with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). A detailed appraisal of the available methodology was presented.

  • 30.
    Lundgren, T
    et al.
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
    Crossner, C G
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
    Twetman, S
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
    Ullbro, C
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
    Systemic retinoid medication and periodontal health in patients with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome1996In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 23, no 3 Pt 1, p. 176-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Periodontal health in relation to systemic retinoid medication was evaluated retrospectively in patients with Papillon-Lefèvre Syndrome (PLS). The material consisted of 18 children/young adults ranging from 8 to 28 years of age, all with a confirmed diagnosis of PLS. 9 participants, comprising a medication group, had been on long-term (range 1.5-9 years) retinoid medication for their cutaneous lesions. The remaining 9 served as controls. Regardless of whether or not retinoid medication was received, every patient experienced an early and devastating periodontitis, with atypical edematous and erythematous gingiva, suppuration from deep gingival pockets and premature loss of teeth. No correlation could be found between the severity of skin involvement and the severity of periodontal involvement. An improvement with age could be seen for the cutaneous lesions but not for the periodontal condition. Systemic medication with retinoids had a favorable therapeutic effect on cutaneous lesions, and no severe complication/side effect could be seen after several years of continuous use. However, from the results of this study it can be concluded that, at least in a situation with poor compliance of daily oral home-care, no positive effect on the periodontal health in patients with PLS could be seen by the retinoid medication.

  • 31.
    Lundgren, T
    et al.
    Loma Linda University, California, USA.
    Renvert, S
    Kristianstad University.
    Periodontal treatment of patients with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome: a 3-year follow-up.2004In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 933-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Conventional mechanical periodontal treatment of Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS) has often been reported to fail. This study describes the outcome of a non-surgical periodontal therapy including antimicrobial treatment of nine patients diagnosed with PLS. The patients originate from a total of 15 children and adolescents with PLS for which clinical characteristics are presented.

    METHODS: Clinical examination including conventional periodontal measurements. Initial treatment including oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing and systemic amoxicillin-metronidazole therapy for 6 weeks. After that the patients were enrolled in a 3-month recall maintenance program. In addition to this mechanical supportive maintenance treatment, tetracycline was prescribed and used continuously for 1.5 years.

    RESULTS/CONCLUSION: On five patients who were showing acceptable standard of oral hygiene and also compliance with the antibiotic medication, development of periodontitis on erupting teeth was prevented and disease activity on the previously periodontally involved teeth controlled during a 3-year period. Poor results of treatment were observed for three patients, all siblings. These patients failed to comply with the medication and also failed to improve their oral hygiene.

  • 32.
    Lundgren, T
    et al.
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Public Dental Health Service, Luleá, Sweden.
    Renvert, S
    Kristianstad University; Lund University.
    Papapanou, P N
    Göteborg University.
    Dahlén, G
    Göteborg University.
    Subgingival microbial profile of Papillon-Lefèvre patients assessed by DNA-probes1998In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 624-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of 18 selected bacterial species was assessed by means of "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridisation in a group of 12 Saudi-Arabian adolescents with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. A total of 36 tooth sites were investigated. The patients exhibited severe periodontal disease with deep pockets. All 12 patients harboured the putative bacterial pathogens P. intermedia, F. nucleatum, P. micros and S. intermedius while T. denticola, B. forsythus, P. nigrescens, E. corrodens, S. noxia and C. rectus were recovered from 11 patients. P. gingivalis was recovered from 9 patients and 18 sites while corresponding figures for A. actinomycetemcomitans were 8 and 19, respectively. A number of the investigated species (B. forsythus, T. denticola, P. intermedia, C rectus) reached high levels (> or =10(6) cells) in more than 1/2 of the patients. On the other hand, bacteria such as A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were infrequently encountered at high levels in these subgingival samples. In conclusion, the analysis failed to demonstrate a PLS-specific profile of the subgingival infection, since the bacterial composition of the sampled sites closely resembled that characterising deep pockets in adult periodontitis patients.

  • 33.
    Lundgren, T
    et al.
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
    Twetman, S
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, I
    University of Umeå.
    Crossner, C G
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
    Birkhed, D
    Göteborg University.
    Saliva composition in children and young adults with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome1996In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 1068-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the salivary secretion rate and composition in a group of 16 children and young adults (6-27 years) with Papillon-Lefèvre Syndrome (PLS), and to compare the findings with a group (n = 16) of healthy controls. Unstimulated and stimulated whole saliva was collected at least 2 h after meals and the secretion rate determined. The stimulated saliva was assessed for buffer capacity, total protein, peroxidase and hexosamine, while the unstimulated samples were evaluated for total protein, lysozyme, thiocyanate, lactoferrin and salivary IgA. Both the unstimulated (p < 0.01) and stimulated (p < 0.05) saliva secretion rates were significantly lower among the PLS patients compared with the controls. Furthermore salivary buffer capacity was significantly (p < 0.01) lower in the PLS patients. The total protein content in saliva was comparatively high in the study group, while the concentrations of immunoglobulins and non-immunoglobulins were within normal ranges. When calculating the output of the assessed antimicrobial factors, the mean peroxidase level in stimulated whole saliva was found to be significantly (p < 0.01) lower in the PLS patients than in the healthy controls. In conclusion, the present study indicates an impaired water secretion and a somewhat altered saliva gland function in children and young adults with PLS.

  • 34. Lundmark, Anna
    et al.
    Johannsen, Gunnar
    Eriksson, Kaja
    Kats, Anna
    Jansson, Leif
    Tervahartiala, Taina
    Rathnayake, Nilminie
    Åkerman, Sigvard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Sorsa, Timo
    Yucel-Lindberg, Tulay
    Mucin 4 and matrix metalloproteinase 7 as novel salivary biomarkers for periodontitis2017In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 247-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by irreversible destruction of tooth-supporting tissue including alveolar bone. We recently reported mucin 4 ( MUC4) and matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) as highly associated with periodontitis in gingival tissue biopsies. The aim of this study was to further investigate the levels of MUC4 and MMP7 in saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples of patients with periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Saliva and GCF samples were collected from periodontitis patients and healthy controls. The levels of MUC4, MMP7, and total protein concentrations were analysed using ELISA or Bradford assay. Results: MUC4 levels were significantly lower in saliva and GCF from periodontitis patients relative to healthy controls. MMP7 levels were significantly higher in saliva and GCF from periodontitis patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that MUC4 was significantly associated with periodontitis after adjusting for age and smoking habits and, moreover, that the combination of MUC4 and MMP7 accurately discriminated periodontitis from healthy controls. Conclusions: MUC4 and MMP7 may be utilized as possible novel biomarkers for periodontitis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 35. Madianos, Phoebus
    et al.
    Papaioannou, William
    Herrera, David
    Sanz, Mariano
    Baeumer, Amelie
    Bogren, Anna
    Bouchard, Philippe
    Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria
    Demirel, Korkud
    Gaspersic, Rok
    Giurgiu, Marina
    Graziani, Filippo
    Jepsen, Karin
    Jepsen, Soeren
    OBrien, Tiernan
    Polyzois, Ioannis
    Preshaw, Philip M
    Rakic, Mia
    Reners, Michele
    Rincic, Nives
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Sutcu, Serdar
    Verner, Christian
    Carlos Llodra, Juan
    EFP Delphi study on the trends in Periodontology and Periodontics in Europe for the year 20252016In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 472-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to assess the potential trends in Periodontology and Periodontics in Europe that might be anticipated by the year 2025, using the Delphi method. Material and Methods: The expert opinion of 120 experts was sought through the use of an open-ended questionnaire, developed by an advisory group, containing 40 questions concerning the various trends in periodontology Results: The experts (113 responders) expect a stabilization of the prevalence of periodontitis, both for the chronic as well as the aggressive cases, but an increase in implant-related diseases up to the year 2025. Concurrently, the importance of implants is seen to be increasing. They foresee an increased demand for postgraduate periodontology and implantology training. This is mirrored in an increase in publications for implant dentistry and increase in demand and need for training. Concerning the patients, better-informed individuals seeking more routine checkups are expected Conclusion: A continued need for specialized periodontists, but also well trained dental practitioners is foreseen for next decade in Europe. Apart from periodontology they will be increasingly exposed to and trained in implant dentistry

  • 36. Miremadi, S. Reza
    et al.
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Steyaert, Harold
    Princen, Katrijn
    Cosyn, Jan
    A randomized controlled trial comparing surgical and non-surgical periodontal therapy: a 3-year clinical and cost-effectiveness analysis2015In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 748-755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo compare immediate surgery to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of advanced periodontitis focusing on the prevalence of residual pockets after treatment and cost-effectiveness (1); to elucidate the adjunctive effects of azithromycin in a second-treatment phase (2) up to 36months. Materials and MethodsThirty-nine patients (18 males, 21 females; mean age: 54.6) received oral hygiene instructions and were randomly allocated to surgery (n=19) or SRP (n=20). Patients with residual pockets (6mm) at 6months received re-debridement of these sites and systemic azithromycin. Clinical measurements were performed at 12, 24 and 36months whereby residual pockets underwent re-debridement. Patients were evaluated in terms of clinical response parameters and cost-effectiveness. Chair-time was used to assess the financial impact of treatment. ResultsOnly six patients in the surgery group required additional treatment at 6months, whereas 14 patients in the SRP underwent this therapy. Both treatment arms were equally effective in terms of clinical outcome demonstrating <2% residual pockets at 36months. Surgery imposed an extra 746 Euro on the patient up to 6months compared to SRP. At 36months, 69 Euro of this amount could be offset due to the lower need for re-treatment during maintenance phase. ConclusionsSurgery was ultimately associated with a significantly lower need for re-treatment during supportive care, however, at significantly higher costs over the 3years.

  • 37. Miremadi, Seyed Reza
    et al.
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Steyaert, Harold
    Princen, Katrijn
    Sabzevar, Mehran M.
    Cosyn, Jan
    A randomized controlled trial on immediate surgery versus root planing in patients with advanced periodontal disease: a cost-effectiveness analysis2014In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 164-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo compare immediate surgery to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of advanced periodontal disease focusing on the prevalence of residual sites and cost-effectiveness (1); to evaluate the adjunctive effects of azithromycin in a second treatment phase (2). Materials and MethodsThirty-nine patients (18 males, 21 females; mean age: 54.6) received oral hygiene instructions and were randomly allocated to surgery (n=19) or SRP (n=20). Patients with residual pockets (6mm) at 6months received re-debridement of these sites and systemic azithromycin. Treatment groups were followed up to 12months and evaluated in terms of clinical response parameters and cost-effectiveness. Chair-time was used to assess the financial impact of treatment. ResultsBoth treatment arms were equally effective in terms of clinical outcome demonstrating less than 1% residual pockets at 12months. Surgery imposed an extra 746 Euro on the patient up to 6months when compared to SRP. At 12months, 46 Euro of this amount could be offset as a result of a reduced need for supportive care. Only 6 patients in the surgery group needed systemic antibiotics, whereas 14 patients in the SRP needed such additional treatment. ConclusionsAlthough 700 Euro could be saved on average by performing SRP instead of surgery, the latter significantly reduced the need for supportive care and systemic antibiotics.

  • 38. Miron, Richard J.
    et al.
    Sculean, Anton
    Cochran, David L
    Froum, Stuart
    Zucchelli, Giovanni
    Nemcovsky, Carlos
    Donos, Nikos
    Lyngstadaas, Staale Petter
    Deschner, James
    Dard, Michel
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Zhang, Yufeng
    Trombelli, Leonardo
    Kasaj, Adrian
    Shirakata, Yoshinori
    Cortellini, Pierpaolo
    Tonetti, Maurizio
    Rasperini, Giulio
    Jepsen, Søren
    Bosshardt, Dieter D
    Twenty years of enamel matrix derivative: the past, the present and the future2016In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 668-683Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background On June 5th, 2015 at Europerio 8, a group of leading experts were gathered to discuss what has now been 20years of documented evidence supporting the clinical use of enamel matrix derivative (EMD). Original experiments led by Lars Hammarstrom demonstrated that enamel matrix proteins could serve as key regenerative proteins capable of promoting periodontal regeneration including new cementum, with functionally oriented inserting new periodontal ligament fibres, and new alveolar bone formation. This pioneering work and vision by Lars Hammarstrom has paved the way to an enormous amount of publications related to its biological basis and clinical use. Twenty years later, it is clear that all these studies have greatly contributed to our understanding of how biologics can act as mediators for periodontal regeneration and have provided additional clinical means to support tissue regeneration of the periodontium. Aims This review article aims to: (1) provide the biological background necessary to understand the rational for the use of EMD for periodontal regeneration, (2) present animal and human histological evidence of periodontal regeneration following EMD application, (3) provide clinically relevant indications for the use of EMD and (4) discuss future avenues of research including key early findings leading to the development of Osteogain, a new carrier system for EMD specifically developed with better protein adsorption to bone grafting materials

  • 39.
    Nebel, Daniel
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jonsson, Daniel
    Bratthall, Gunilla
    Nilsson, Bengt-Olof
    Estrogen affects gene expression in LPS stimulated PDL-cells2009In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 36, no suppl 9, p. 61-61, article id 82Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The periodontal ligament cells (PDL cells) play a key role in the formation of the periodontal ligament but these cells have other functions as well. The PDL cells express estrogen receptors but the functional importance is not known. Estrogen modulates inflammation and our hypothesis is that estrogen protects the periodontium via an anti-inflammatory effect on PDL cells. Aim: To identify genes regulated by estrogen in LPS-treated human PDL cells by whole genome arrays. Materials and methods: PDL cells were obtained from human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. The cells were divided into two groups. One group was pre-treated with 17β-estradiol (E2, 100 nM) for 2 h and then with Escherichia coli LPS (500ng/ml) for 24 h. The other group was treated with LPS only. Total RNA was extracted and purified by RNeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen®, USA). A whole genome microarray was performed (Affymetrix®, USA) comparing gene expression in the two groups. The cut-off limit was set to a twofold change. Results and Conclusion: Estrogen caused an up-regulation of 38 genes, while 28 genes were down-regulated. Estrogen regulated genes associated with cell-metabolism and cell-signalling but also genes associated with early the inflammatory response. The functional significance of these findings is now determined by e.g. measuring protein levels with ELISA. We conclude that estrogen regulates gene expression in human PDL cells exposed to LPS.

  • 40.
    Nibali, L
    et al.
    King's College London, London, UK.
    Shemie, M
    King's College London, London, UK.
    Li, G
    King's College London, London, UK.
    Ting, R
    King's College London, London, UK.
    Asimakopoulou, K
    King's College London, London, UK.
    Barbagallo, G
    University of Catania, Italy.
    Lee, R
    School of Dentistry, Herston, Australia.
    Eickholz, P
    University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.
    Kocher, T
    University of Greifswald, Germany.
    Walter, C
    University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Aimetti, M
    University of Torino, Italy.
    Rüdiger, S
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Periodontal Furcation Lesions: A Survey of Diagnosis and Management by General Dental Practitioners.2021In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 48, no 11, p. 1441-1448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to explore general dental practitioners' (GDP) attitude to periodontal furcation involvement (FI).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: An online survey focused on diagnosis and management of periodontal FI was circulated to general dental practitioners in 7 different countries.

    RESULTS: A total of 400 responses were collected. Nearly a fifth of participants reported rarely or never taking 6-point pocket charts. 65.8% of participants had access to a Nabers probe in their practice. When shown clinical pictures and radiographs of FI-involved molars, the majority of participants correctly diagnosed it. Although 47.1% of participants were very/extremely confident in detecting FI, only 8.9% felt very-extremely confident at treating it. Differences in responses were detected according to country and year of qualification, with a trend towards less interest in periodontal diagnosis and treatment in younger generations. Lack of knowledge of management/referral pathways (reported by 22.8%) and lack of correct equipment were considered the biggest barriers to FI management. Most participants (80.9%) were interested in learning more about FI, ideally face-to-face, followed by online tutorials.

    CONCLUSIONS: Plans should be put in place to improve general dentists' knowledge and ability to manage FI, as this can have a significant public health impact.

  • 41. Nibali, Luigi
    et al.
    Akcali, Aliye
    Rüdiger, Stefan G
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The importance of supportive periodontal therapy for molars treated with furcation tunnelling2019In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 46, no 12, p. 1228-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Degree III furcation involvement (FI) represents a risk of molar tooth loss. A limited number of studies have assessed the survival of molars with degree III FI treated with tunnelling procedures. AIMS: The aim of the present study was to assess periodontal disease progression and tooth loss in a cohort of patients with degree III FI treated with tunnelling by two periodontists in a private practice setting in the UK and in a hospital setting in Sweden. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted on 102 consecutive surgically-created tunnelled molars in 62 periodontitis patients and followed up at least 5 years later (average 7 years and 9 months follow-up). RESULTS: Overall tooth loss for tunnelled molars was 29.4%. Multivariate analysis revealed statistically significant associations with tooth loss for 'irregular supportive periodontal therapy (SPT)' (p=0.039) and age (p=0.037). Tooth loss occurred only in the Swedish sample, not undergoing regular SPT. CONCLUSION: A high rate of tooth loss was observed following tunnelling surgery, mainly in patients not undergoing regular supportive therapy. Clinical studies should be carried out to compare tunnelling with other treatment options for advanced furcation involvement in patients on SPT. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 42. Nicopoulou-Karayianni, Kety
    et al.
    Tzoutzoukos, Panagiotis
    Mitsea, Anastasia
    Karayiannis, Athanasios
    Tsiklakis, Kostas
    Jacobs, Reinhilde
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Van der Stelt, Paul
    Allen, Philip
    Graham, Jim
    Horner, Keith
    Devlin, Hugh
    Pavitt, Susan
    Yuan, Jingsong
    Tooth loss and osteoporosis: the OSTEODENT Study2009In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 190-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To determine the cross-sectional association of the osteoporotic status of patients with the number of their teeth, with and without taking into account age and/or smoking. MATERIAL & METHODS: At four centres, the study recruited 665 females aged 45-70 years and the number of teeth was counted for 651 subjects. Bone density was measured at the total hip, femoral neck and lumbar spine. RESULTS: The mean number of teeth in the osteoporotic subjects was 3.3 fewer than normal subjects and 2.1 fewer if those with no teeth were excluded. The association between osteoporosis and having 0, three clusters were identified corresponding to different degrees of tooth loss. The overall effect of osteoporosis was as follows: -1.8 teeth before and after adjusting for smoking, -1.2 teeth after adjusting for age, and -1.1 teeth after adjusting for both age and smoking. CONCLUSIONS: We have established a significant association between osteoporosis and tooth loss after adjusting the effect for age and smoking.

  • 43. Nilsson, Helena
    et al.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Renvert, Stefan
    Longitudinal evaluation of periodontitis and development of cognitive decline among older adults.2018In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 1142-1149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: to determine whether having periodontitis is associated with cognitive decline among older adults. Material and Methods: A prospective population study of older adults, Swedish National Study on Ageing and Care, (SNAC) provided repeated registrations of cognitive functions. Cognitive decline was defined as ≥ 3-points deterioration from a predetermined level at baseline, using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Between 2001 and 2003, 715 individuals had a medical as well as a clinical and radiographic dental examination. The individuals were re-examined after 6 years. Periodontitis was defined as ≥ 4mm bone loss at ≥ 30 % of tooth sites. Social variables were captured from questionnaires. Results: The multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant association between prevalence of periodontitis and cognitive decline after adjustments of confounding factors of importance. Conclusions: A history of periodontitis may be of importance for cognitive functions among older adults.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 44. Nilsson, Helena
    et al.
    Sanmartin Berglund, Johan
    Renvert, Stefan
    Longitudinal evaluation of periodontitis and tooth loss among older adults2019In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 1041-1049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To evaluate pattern of change in periodontal variables and tooth loss in a twelve-year follow-up study of older adults living in Sweden.

    METHODS: In a prospective population study of older adults, a clinical examination and radiographic dental examination were performed at baseline (2001-2003) and after 12 years (2013-2015). In 375 individuals, the number and proportion of sites with a distance ≥4 mm and ≥5 mm from cemento-enamel junction to the bone level, the number and proportion of teeth with pockets ≥5 mm and number of teeth lost were calculated. Dental caries was registered. Periodontitis was defined as having ≥2 sites with ≥5 mm distance from cemento-enamel junction to the marginal bone level and ≥1 tooth with pockets ≥5 mm.

    RESULTS: A diagnosis of periodontitis was evident in 39% of the individuals, and 23% of the individuals lost ≥3 teeth over the study period. The proportion of sites with ≥4 mm and ≥5 mm bone loss increased with age, while the proportion of teeth with pockets remained stable. Periodontitis was the strongest predictor for losing ≥3 teeth, OR 2.9 (p < .001) in the final model.

    CONCLUSIONS: Periodontitis is a risk factor for future tooth loss among older adults.

  • 45.
    Ottosson, Filip
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Section for Clinical Mass Spectrometry, Danish Center for Neonatal Screening, Department of Congenital Disorders, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hultgren, Lina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Public Dental Service of Skåne, Lund, Sweden.
    Fernandez, Celine
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Engström, Gunnar
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kennbäck, Cecilia
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Persson, Margaretha
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Demmer, Ryan T
    School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, NY, USA.
    Melander, Olle
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Daniel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Public Dental Service of Skåne, Lund, Sweden.
    The inverse association between a fish consumption biomarker with gingival inflammation and periodontitis: a population-based study2022In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 353-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The metabolite 3-Carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionic acid (CMPF) is a fatty fish-intake biomarker. We investigated the association between plasma levels of CMPF in relation to gingival inflammation and periodontitis case definition, as well as extent and severity variables.

    METHODS: The Malmö Offspring Study (MOS) is a population-based study, and the Malmö Offspring Dental Study (MODS) is its dental arm, including periodontal charting. Plasma CMPF was measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and studied in relation to periodontal diagnosis and parameters using multivariable linear or logistic regression modelling adjusting for age, sex, education, BMI, fasting glucose and smoking.

    RESULTS: Metabolite data were available for 922 MODS participants. Higher CMPF levels were associated with less gingival inflammation (beta -2.12, p=0.002), and lower odds of severe periodontitis (OR 0.74, 95% CI=0.56-0.98). Higher CMPF levels were also associated with more teeth (beta 0.19, p=0.001), lower number of periodontal pockets (>4 mm) (beta -1.07, p=0.007) and lower odds of having two or more >6 mm periodontal pockets (OR 0.80, 95% CI=0.65-0.98) in fully adjusted models.

    CONCLUSION: CMPF, a validated biomarker of fatty fish consumption, is associated with less periodontal inflammation and periodontitis. Residual confounding cannot be ruled out and future studies are warranted. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46.
    Parvini, P
    et al.
    Department of Oral Surgery and Implantology, Carolinum, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Buser, D
    Buser Consulting Services, Gümligen, Switzerland.
    Pippenger, B E
    Department of Periodontology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland Department of Preclinical & Translational Research, Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland.
    Imber, J C
    Department of Periodontology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bellón, B
    Department of Preclinical & Translational Research, Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Jarry, C
    Department of Global Medical Education, Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland Department of Implantology, Faculdade São Leopoldo Mandic, Campinas, Brazil.
    Schwarz, F
    Department of Oral Surgery and Implantology, Carolinum, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Influence of loading and grafting on hard- and soft tissue healing at immediately placed implants: An experimental study in minipigs2023In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 232-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To histologically evaluate the influence of i) loading and ii) grafting on osseointegration and peri-implant soft tissue healing at immediately placed, self- cutting progressive tissue- level implants (TLX) in a minipig model.

    MATERIAL & METHODS: TLX implants (n=56) were immediately placed following the extraction of the mandibular first and second premolars, bilaterally, in a total of n=14 minipigs. In each animal, the implant sites were allocated to the following four groups: 1. unloaded with simultaneous grafting using a bovine bone mineral; 2. unloaded without grafting; 3. loaded with simultaneous grafting; 4. loaded without grafting. Histomorphometrical assessments at 4 and 12 weeks (n=7 animals each) included primary (i.e. bone-to-implant contact - BIC) and secondary outcome measures (e.g. first bone-to-implant contact - fBIC, junctional epithelium length- JE, connective tissue contact length - CTC, biological width - BW = JE + CTC).

    RESULTS: At 4 weeks, mean BIC values ranged from 74.5 ± 11.6% in group 2 to 83.8 ± 13.3% in group 1, and, at 12 weeks, from 75.5% ± 7.9% in group 2 to 79.9 ± 8.6% in group 1, respectively. Multivariate linear mixed regression did not reveal any associations between BIC and implant loading or grafting at 4 and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, significantly higher fBIC values were noted in group 2 when compared with group 1. All groups showed comparable JE, CTC and BW values.

    CONCLUSIONS: Implant loading and grafting had no major effects on osseointegration and peri-implant soft tissue healing at TLX implants.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 47. Persson, GR
    et al.
    Attström, Rolf
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lang, NP
    Page, RC
    Perceived risk of deteriorating periodontal conditions2003In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 30, no 11, p. 982-989Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Interpretation of risk for periodontitis is critical for treatment planning. How periodontists assess risk for periodontitis is unclear. PURPOSE: To study (1) what factors periodontists use when assessing the risks for worsening periodontal conditions anticipating that no treatment would be provided, and (2) if risk assessment is consistent and independent of specialty background training. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical history, clinical dental data, full-mouth intra-oral radiographs, and slide pictures were obtained from each of 51 subjects, and the information was provided to 23 examiners. RESULTS: The mean age of the study subjects was 51.5 years (SD +/- 17.7, range 23-81), with 28 women included. In 10 of the subjects, only gingivitis was identified, while 22 subjects had advanced chronic periodontitis. Risk scores assigned for 2 and 4 years differed significantly between European- and US-trained periodontists (p < 0.001) and between graduate students in training and periodontists from either the US or Europe (p < 0.01) (Wilcoxon n-pair test), with European periodontists scoring the lowest risks. Risk scores were correlated between groups (p < 0.01 with rho range 0.82-0.89) (Spearman’s rank correlation). The best-fit model (r2 = 0.86) to assess perceived risk for worsening periodontal conditions based on data from all examiners combined included the following variables: (1) overall horizontal alveolar bone loss (p < 0.000), (2) age-adjusted proportional radiographic bone height score for the worst site (p < 0.000), and (3) proportion of pocket probing depths > or = 6.0 mm. CONCLUSIONS: Differences exist on the scale of risk values based on specialty training. Consistency in scoring patterns exists. The examiners based their assigned risk scores almost exclusively on measures of existing disease severity, including radiographic bone loss and numbers of periodontal pockets > or = 6.0 mm, and excluding most known risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, and poor oral hygiene.

  • 48. Rathnayake, Nilminie
    et al.
    Buhlin, Kåre
    Kjellström, Barbro
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Löwbeer, Christian
    Norhammar, Anna
    Rydén, Lars
    Sorsa, Timo
    Tervahartiala, Taina
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Saliva and plasma levels of cardiac-related biomarkers in post-myocardial infarction patients2017In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 692-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo relate cardiac biomarkers, such as cystatin C and growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) in saliva to myocardial infarction (MI) and to periodontal status, and to investigate the relation between salivary and plasma cardiac biomarkers. Materials and MethodsTwo hundred patients with MI admitted to coronary care units and 200 matched controls without MI were included. Dental examination and collection of blood and saliva samples was performed 6-10weeks after the MI for patients and in close proximity thereafter for controls. Analysing methods: ARCHITECT i4000SR, Immulite 2000 XPi or ELISA. ResultsThe mean age was 628years and 84% were male. Total probing pocket depth, fibrinogen, white blood cell counts and HbA1c were higher in patients than controls. GDF-15 levels correlated with most of the included clinical variables in both study groups. No correlation was found between plasma and saliva levels of cystatin C or GDF-15. ConclusionSalivary cystatin C and GDF-15 could not differentiate between MI patients and controls.

  • 49. Rathnayake, Nilminie
    et al.
    Åkerman, Sigvard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lundegren, Nina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jansson, Henrik
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Tryselius, Ylva
    Sorsa, Timo
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Salivary biomarkers of oral health: a cross-sectional study2013In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 140-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Saliva is a useful diagnostic fluid for oral-related diseases. Monitoring salivary biomarkers for oral and systemic diseases could become an important complement to clinical examinations in epidemiological surveys. Recent findings indicate that it is possible to detect biomarkers for oral diseases within saliva samples. The aim of this study was to investigate if known salivary biomarkers could be used for epidemiological studies for detection of periodontitis. Materials and Methods A randomly selected sample of adults (20–89 years) living in Southern Sweden were invited to participate. Four hundred and fifty-one individuals were examined clinically using standard examination procedures. Stimulated saliva samples were collected and analysed for concentrations of IL-1β, -6, -8, lysozyme, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-8 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 using ELISA, immunofluorometric assay or Luminex assays. Results Patients with severe periodontitis presented with elevated salivary concentrations of IL-1β (p < 0.001) and MMP-8 (p < 0.001). In addition, the MMP-8/TIMP-1 ratio was significantly higher in the severe periodontitis group (p < 0.001). Smokers compared with non-smokers showed slightly lower concentrations of IL–8 (p < 0.05) and MMP-8 (p = 0.052). Conclusion This investigation shows that IL-1β, MMP-8 and the ratio of MMP-8/TIMP-1 could be used as markers of periodontal disease in larger patient populations.

  • 50. Riben-Grundstrom, Caroline
    et al.
    Norderyd, Ola
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Andre, Ulrika
    Renvert, Stefan
    Treatment of peri-implant mucositis using a glycine powder air-polishing or ultrasonic device: a randomized clinical trial2015In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 462-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo evaluate the clinical treatment effects of a glycine powder air-polishing or ultrasonic device on peri-implant mucositis. Materials and methodsThirty-seven patients with one implant diagnosed with peri-implant mucositis (probing depth 4mm (0.2N) and bleeding on probing (BOP) (primary outcome)) were randomly assigned to treatment with either glycine powder air-polishing (GPAP) or ultrasonic (US) debridement. Treatment was performed at baseline and at 3 and 6months. Professional supra gingival cleaning was performed at 9 and 12months. Oral hygiene instructions were reinforced at each visit. ResultsAt 12months there was a statistically significant reduction in mean plaque score, bleeding on probing and number of periodontal pockets 4mm within the treatment groups compared to baseline. The percentages of diseased sites were significantly reduced for both groups. ConclusionsTreatment with a glycine powder air-polishing or an ultrasonic device is effective in non-surgical treatment of peri-implant mucositis.

12 1 - 50 of 63
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf